21 June 2006

 

Dear Councillor,

In pursuance of the provisions of the Local Government Act, 1993 and the Regulations thereunder, notice is hereby given that a POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING of Penrith City Council is to be held in the Passadena Room, Civic Centre, 601 High Street, Penrith on Monday 26 June 2006 at 7:00PM.

Attention is directed to the statement accompanying this notice of the business proposed to be transacted at the meeting.

Yours Faithfully

 

 

Alan Travers

General Manager

 

BUSINESS

 

1.           APOLOGIES

 

2.           LEAVE OF ABSENCE

Leave of absence has been granted to:

Councillor Jackie Greenow - 26 June 2006.

Councillor Susan Page - 5 June 2006 to 26 June 2006 inclusive.

Councillor Steve Simat - 19 June 2006 to 8 July 2006 inclusive.

 

3.           CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES

Policy Review Committee Meeting - 22 May 2006.

 

4.           DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

Pecuniary Interest (The Act requires Councillors who declare a pecuniary interest in an item to leave the meeting during discussion of that item)

Non-Pecuniary Interest

 

5.           ADDRESSING THE MEETING

 

6.           MAYORAL MINUTES

 

7.           NOTICES OF MOTION

 

8.           ADOPTION OF REPORTS AND RECOMMENDATION OF COMMITTEES

 

9.           MASTER PROGRAM REPORTS

 

10.         URGENT REPORTS (to be dealt with in the master program to which the item relates)

 

11.         QUESTIONS WITHOUT NOTICE

 

12.         COMMITTEE OF THE WHOLE


POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING

 

Monday 26 June 2006

 

table of contents

 

 

 

 

 

 

meeting calendar

 

 

confirmation of minutes

 

 

master program reports

 


MEETING CALENDAR

 

June 2006 - December 2006

 

 

TIME

JUNE

JULY

AUG

SEPT

OCT

NOV

DEC

 

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

 

Ordinary Meetings

7.00 pm

 

3

7

4ü

9

6

4

 

 

17

21#+

18

25^

23

20 #

11

 

Policy Review Committee

7.00 pm

26

24

28

11@

16

13

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

#  Meetings at which the Management Plan quarterly reviews are presented.

v Meeting at which the Draft Management Plan is adopted for exhibition

 

#+  General Manager’s presentation – half year and end of year review

*   Meeting at which the Management Plan for 2006/2007 is adopted

 

@  Strategic Program progress reports (only business)

ü  Meeting at which the 2005/2006 Annual Statements are presented

 

 

^   Election of Mayor/Deputy Mayor (only business)

 

·         Council has two Ordinary Meetings per month where practicable.

·         Extraordinary Meetings are held as required.

·         Policy Review Meetings are held monthly where practicable.

·         Members of the public are invited to observe meetings (Ordinary & Policy Review) of the Council.

Should you wish to address Council, please contact the Executive Officer, Glenn McCarthy on 47327649.

 

 


UNCONFIRMED MINUTES

 OF THE POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING OF PENRITH CITY COUNCIL HELD IN THE PASSADENA ROOM, PENRITH

ON MONDAY 22 MAY 2006 AT 7:08PM

PRESENT

His Worship the Mayor Councillor John Thain, Councillors Kaylene Allison, David Bradbury, Kevin Crameri OAM (arrived 7:10PM), Greg Davies, Mark Davies, Ross Fowler, Jackie Greenow, Karen McKeown, Garry Rumble, Pat Sheehy AM, and Steve Simat.

 

APOLOGIES

PRC 15  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Steve Simat seconded Councillor Jackie Greenow that apologies be received and accepted from Councillors Jim Aitken OAM, Lexie Cettolin and Susan Page.

STATEMENT OF RECOGNITION

His Worship the Mayor, Councillor John Thain read a statement of recognition of Penrith City’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cultural Heritage.

WELCOME TO GUESTS

His Worship the Mayor, Councillor John Thain welcomed members of the Deerubbin Local Aboriginal Land Council, Mr Kevin Cavanagh (CEO), Mrs Maise Cavanagh (Secretary), Mr Don Dodds (Treasurer) and Mr Robert Lester.

 

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES - Policy Review Committee Meeting - 20 March 2006

PRC 16  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Ross Fowler seconded Councillor Greg Davies that the minutes of the Policy Review Committee Meeting of 20 March 2006 be confirmed.

 

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

Councillor Ross Fowler declared a pecuniary interest in Item 7, ADI Site - Draft Dunheved Precinct Plan & Draft Planning Agreement as he is auditor or accountant for a number of landowners, and a director of businesses, that are directly or indirectly affected by the proposals discussed in the report.  Prior to the consideration of Item 7, Councillor Fowler left the meeting and and took no part in the debate or voting on that item.

ORDER OF BUSINESS

PRC 17  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Pat Sheehy seconded Councillor Steve Simat that Items 6, 8 and 13 be dealt with before the other items in the business paper.

 

Councillor Kevin Crameri arrived at the meeting the time being 7:10PM.

 

MASTER PROGRAM REPORTS

 

The City AS A SOCIAL PLACE

 

6        Rezoning Application to amend Employment Zone - Waterside Estate, corner of Cranebrook and Andrews Roads, Cranebrook                                                                          4107/28

Council’s Planning Manager Mr Roger Nethercote introduced the report.

Mr Mark Attiwill, Regional Manager – Residential Communities NSW, from Stocklands Pty Ltd gave a short presentation on Stocklands proposals for the rezoning.

PRC 18  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Steve Simat seconded Councillor Greg Davies

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Rezoning Application to amend Employment Zone - Waterside Estate, corner of Cranebrook and Andrews Roads, Cranebrook be received.

2.     Council advise Stockland of the key issues identified in the report that need to be addressed in any rezoning application.

THE CITY AS AN ECONOMY

8        Six Monthly Performance Report from the Penrith Valley Economic Development Corporation

Council’s Director – City Strategy, Mr Alan Stoneham introduced Ms Jane Holdsworth, CEO of the Penrith Valley Economic Development Corporation who gave a short presentation and showed a DVD on the construction of the new Penrith Valley Visitors’ Information Centre.

Councillor Garry Rumble congratulated Ms Holdsworth and called for acclaimation from the meeting on the achievements of the Corporation.

PRC 19  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Garry Rumble seconded Councillor Mark Davies that the information contained in the report on the Six Monthly Performance Report from the Penrith Valley Economic Development Corporation be received.

LEADERSHIP AND ORGANISATION

13      Workforce Planning and Workplace

The General Manager, Mr Alan Travers introduced the report and said that Council has made very good progress in this area.

Council’s Director – City Strategy, Mr Alan Stoneham spoke to the report and said that Council’s next step is to engage some external expertise to assist in the production of a strategic worforce and workplace plan.

PRC 20  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Ross Fowler

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Workforce Planning and Workplace be received

2.     The information contained in the report on the Service Specifications Program be received

3.     The specification for Workforce Development be adopted.

The City IN ITS BROADER CONTEXT

 

1        Penrith Valley Cultural Precinct                                                                            2981/13

PRC 21  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Ross Fowler seconded Councillor Greg Davies that the information contained in the report on Penrith Valley Cultural Precinct be received.

 

2        City Centres' Vitality and Viability Review - Interim Precinct Guidelines                     

PRC 22  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Ross Fowler seconded Councillor Greg Davies

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on City Centres' Vitality and Viability Review - Interim Precinct Guidelines be received.

2.     The Interim Development Guidelines for the High Street West precinct and the former Council Chambers precinct be adopted, to be used in the assessment and control of new development within those precincts.

The City as a Social Place

4        Integration of the City's Principal Cultural Facilities                                                       

PRC 23  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Ross Fowler seconded Councillor Karen McKeown that the information contained in the report on Integration of the City's Principal Cultural Facilities be received

 

5        Castlereagh Cemetery and Crematorium Working Party                                     1008/2

PRC 24  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Ross Fowler seconded Councillor Karen McKeown

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Castlereagh Cemetery and Crematorium Working Party be received

2.     Council endorse the program of activities outlined in the report.

 

 

3        Aboriginal Protocol for Penrith City Council                                                  1105/12 Pt3

PRC 25  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Karen McKeown

That:

1.       The information contained in the report on the Aboriginal Protocol for Penrith City Council be received

2.       Council reconfirm its current Aboriginal Protocol for Civic Receptions, Citizenship ceremonies, NAIDOC Week civic occasions, and Ordinary Council meetings as outlined in this report

3.       Council formally adopt the Policy on the Statement of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Recognition as shown in Attachment 2 to this report on Aboriginal Protocol for Penrith City Council

4.       The Ordinary Meeting remain standing while the Statement of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Recognition is read

5.       A further report be brought to Council following consultation with members of the local indigenous community, outlining the options relating to the dual naming of various locations in the city.

 

ITEM DEFERRED PENDING CONFIDENTIAL DISCUSSION

PRC 26  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor David Bradbury seconded Councillor Greg Davies that Item 7 ADI Site - Draft Dunheved Precinct Plan & Draft Planning Agreement be deferred until after a discussion of the associated legal issues in closed session later in the meeting.

 

DECLARATION OF INTEREST

Councillor Kevin Crameri declared a non-pecuniary interest in Item 7 ADI Site - Draft Dunheved Precinct Plan & Draft Planning Agreement as he owns land in Llandilo in the vicinity of the area discussed in the report and he reserved his right to speak and vote on the item.

Leadership and Organisation

10      Service Specification Program                                                                                   36/35

PRC 27  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Karen McKeown

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on the Service Specification Program be received

2.     The specification for Financial Services be adopted.

 

11      Implementation of Best Practice OHS & Injury Management Systems           6011/101

PRC 28  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Karen McKeown

That:

1.   The information contained in the report on Implementation of Best Practice OHS & Injury Management Systems be received

2.   Council’s new OHSIM system be modified and improved over the next 18 months to the same extent as the systems implemented by self-insurers

3.   Council engage consultants to assist in bridging the gap between current OHSIM systems and the self insurance model

4.   A review be conducted in 18 months to compare the benefits gained from improved systems (measured through lower cost premiums) and the additional costs of converting to a full self-insurer

5.   Subject to the outcome of the cost benefit analysis, Council implement the claims systems as specified by Work Cover within 3 months following that analysis

6.   Council endorse the program to improve OHS and Injury management and allocate a provisional budget of $100,000 for external services from the insurance reserve as indicated in the report

7.   Council work with Westpool and its member Councils to develop a model for pooling of workers compensation amongst its members

8.   Council lobby the State Government to effect changes in legislation so as to enable licencing of joint workers compensation schemes such as Westpool, United Independent Pools and similar organisations.

 

12      Investment Policy                                                                                                                 

PRC 29  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Karen McKeown

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Investment Policy be received

2.     Council adopt the proposed changes to the Investment Policy.

 

9        Mayoral Charity Ball                                                                                                         

PRC 30  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Pat Sheehy seconded Councillor Greg Davies

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Mayoral Charity Ball be received

2.     Council conduct a Mayoral Charity Ball on Friday 25 August 2006

3.     The name of the Ball be the ‘2006 Penrith Rotary Mayoral Charity Ball’

4.     Investigations into the establishment of a Penrith City Council Mayoral Charity Ball fund continue and if appropriate the fund be created

5.     The the beneficiary charity for the proceeds of the mayoral ball be determined by the Mayor of the day.

His Worship the Mayor, Councillor John Thain, called for a motion for the Policy Review Committee meeting to move into confidential session, the time being 8:30 PM.

Councillor Ross Fowler left the meeting the time being 8:30PM and did not return.

confidential business

PRC 31  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor David Bradbury seconded Councillor Steve Simat that the press and public be excluded from the meeting while the Policy Review Committee discuss the following matter:

Legal Matter - ADI Site

as the issues to be raised refer to advice concerning litigation, or advice that would otherwise be privileged from production in legal proceedings on the ground of legal professional privilege and discussion of the matter in open meeting would be, on balance, contrary to the public interest.

RESUMPTION OF BUSINESS IN OPEN COMMITTEE

The meeting moved out of confidential session at 8:53PM and the General Manager reported that after excluding the press and public from the meeting, the Policy Review Committee met in confidential session from 8:30PM to 8:53PM to consider a legal matter involving the ADI site.  The General Manager reported that while in confidential session, the Committee made the following resolution:

PRC 32  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor David Bradbury seconded Councillor Steve Simat that a further report be provided to all Councillors regarding the legal issues discussed during the confidential session of the Policy Review Committee.

THE CITY AS A SOCIAL PLACE

7        ADI Site - Draft Dunheved Precinct Plan & Draft Planning Agreement     4130/26 Pt 5

Councillor Greg Davies left the meeting the time being 9:08PM and did not return.

Councillor Karen McKeown left the meeting the time being 9:25PM.

Councillor Karen McKeown returned to the meeting the time being 9:27PM.

PRC 33  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor David Bradbury seconded Councillor Steve Simat

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on ADI Site - Draft Dunheved Precinct Plan & Draft Planning Agreement be received.

2.     The proposed works schedules included in the Attachments to this report be included in the draft Planning Agreement.

3.     Council publicly exhibit the draft Planning Agreement in accordance with the provisions of the Environmental Planning & Assessment Act, 1979 and Regulations and authorise the Legal Officer and Environmental Planning Manager to finalise the content of the draft Planning Agreement prior to the formal public exhibition process.

4.     Further consideration of the draft Dunheved Precinct Plan be deferred until the further report requested in the confidential session of tonight’s Policy Review Committee is submitted

5.     Delfin Lend Lease be advised of Council’s decision.

Councillor Kevin Crameri requested that his name be recorded as having voted against the motion.

 

There being no further business the Chairperson declared the meeting closed the time being 9:33PM.

    


 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

The City in its Broader Context

 

1        WSROC Strategic Program Activities                                                                                   1

 

2        The Development of a National Centre for Universal Design at the University of Western Sydney       4

 

The City as a Social Place

 

3        City of Penrith Regional Indoor Aquatic and Recreation Centre Ltd - Ripples                      11

 

4        Erskine Park Employment Area - Naming of the Estate and Renaming of Lenore Lane         22

 

The City In Its Environment

 

5        Implementation of the Mulgoa/Wallacia Sewerage Scheme                                                  28

 

6        Landscape Character Strategy                                                                                            33

 

7        Status of the City's Major Planning Policy Program                                                             39

 

8        Penrith City Heritage Study                                                                                                 46

 

Leadership and Organisation

 

9        Service Specification Program 36/35                                                                                  51

 

10      Proposed Suburb Boundary Re-alignment - Luddenham, Badgerys Creek and Kemps Creek.           60

 

 


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


The City in its Broader Context

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

1        WSROC Strategic Program Activities                                                                                   1

 

2        The Development of a National Centre for Universal Design at the University of Western Sydney       4

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting

26 June 2006

The City in its Broader Context

 

 

The City in its Broader Context

 

 

1

WSROC Strategic Program Activities   

 

Compiled by:                Roger Nethercote, Environmental Planning Manager

Authorised by:             Roger Nethercote, Environmental Planning Manager 

Strategic Program Term Achievement: Joint responses and initiatives are regularly developed with neighbouring Councils and regional organisations around metropolitan and regional issues.

Critical Action: Participate with WSROC and other regional groups on regional issues of importance to the City.

 

Presenters:                   Alex Gooding - WSROC's Executive Director -       

Purpose:

To inform Councillors on the activities being undertaken by WSROC in delivering its 2004-08 Strategic Plan.  A presentation will be provided by WSROC's Executive Director, Alex Gooding. The report recommends that the information be received.

 

Background

WSROC – the Western Sydney Regional Organisation of Councils Ltd – is one of Australia’s oldest and most respected local government lobbying organisations and a key advocate for Western Sydney.  Every four years, immediately after the local government elections, WSROC calls on each of its member Councils to nominate two Councillors as representatives, or Directors, to the WSROC Board.

 

WSROC was formed in 1973 as a research, advocacy and lobbying organisation representing the councils and communities of this region.  Member councils are:  Auburn, Bankstown, Baulkham Hills, Blacktown, Blue Mountains, Fairfield, Hawkesbury, Holroyd, Liverpool, Parramatta and Penrith.

 

Penrith Council is the primary voice for our local area – but it is only one of over 40 councils in Sydney, and nearly 150 across the State, trying to deal with State and Federal Governments.

 

Neighbouring Councils in Western Sydney share many of the same concerns regarding urban planning, environmental, economic and social issues.  By joining with these councils through WSROC, Council and the region have a stronger and much more influential voice in the corridors of power.

 

WSROC also provides a stable framework as well as professional expertise and administrative support for member councils to initiate regional projects, pooling resources, managing issues that require a larger than local focus (eg, environment, transport) and achieving significant economies of scale.

 

WSROC is a company limited by guarantee managed by a Board of Directors.  Each member council has two Directors on this Board which meets six times annually.  Council’s current Board Directors are Councillors Susan Page and Jim Aitken.  The Board sets general policy and makes key decisions for the organisation.  The Board is supported by an Executive Management Committee (EMC) which meets regularly between formal Board meetings.  The organisation is resourced by a regional secretariat with professional and support staff.

 

WSROC’s Mission

 

WSROC’s mission is ‘to secure – through research, lobbying and the fostering of cooperation between Councils – a sustainable lifestyle for the people of Western Sydney and the provision of infrastructure such that no one should have to leave the region to have access to the sorts of amenities, services and opportunities others in urban Australia take for granted.’

 

2004-08 Strategic Plan

 

WSROC has produced a Strategic Plan which identifies relevant strategic goals and short-term actions and key projects which form WSROC’s Work Program and focus of activities.  A copy of the 2004-2008 Strategic Plan Progress Report is attached for further information.  That report outlines a series of advocacy and project highlights achieved during 2004-05, key WSROC submissions and reports and key project achievements to date.

 

A primary focus in the Strategic Plan relates to the implementation of the critical actions contained in the FutureWest Regional Planning and Management Framework launched in April 2005. 

 

Some of the key advocacy highlights achieved in 2004-05 are outlined below.  WSROC has:

 

·       Played a key role in the campaign by local government for a more strategic role in metropolitan planning.  As a result the Metropolitan Strategy will now be implemented in conjunction with subregional groupings of Councils.

·       Lobbied for the early construction of the M7 Westlink which finally came to fruition in 2004/05.

·       Continued advocacy for better public transport for Western Sydney including bus corridors.  The Government has started to implement the bus corridor system and has announced plans for a ‘super-railway’.

·       Lobbied for equalisation of fares between public buses and private buses, including the introduction of a full range of weekly tickets and other volume discount tickets.

·       Prepared submissions to the NSW Governments review of the planning system and associated legislation which resulted in a range of changes.

·       Continued advocacy in response to the Federal Government’s policies on higher education funding.  The University of Western Sydney received some compensation in the form of capital works and an increase in Federally-funded student places.

·       Lobbied for a moratorium and consultation on the restructure of the Australia Council for the Arts which proposed axing the community Cultural Development Board.  The Australia Council is undertaking a scoping study of arts within communities with WSROC input into the process.

·       Developed policies on housing affordability.  As a result of community advocacy involving WSROC, the State Government has established the Centre for Affordable Housing.

·       Undertaken a delegation to Canberra to meet with a range of Federal Ministers, Shadow Ministers and MPs on a range of regional issues.  After the State Government reshuffle WSROC commenced a round of meetings to continue dialogue with State Government Ministers and key Shadow Ministers.

 

Conclusion

 

Council has for some time established strong links with WSROC and remains a key supporter of its mission to advocate on behalf of Western Sydney. 

 

Council’s strategic program continues to recognise the importance of developing joint responses and initiatives with regional partners such as WSROC around metropolitan and regional issues of significance to our City.  Council has been a strong participant in many of the initiatives outlined in WSROC’s Strategic Program and continues to work collaboratively with member Councils to ensure a strong voice on behalf of Western Sydney is heard in Government at all levels.

 

The positive progress WSROC is making with its strategic initiatives is particularly noteworthy given the limited resources available to it and the significant array of new State Government legislation emerging over the last 12 to 18 months which has required detailed policy responses.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the information contained in the report on WSROC Strategic Program Activities be received.

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.  

WSROC 2004-2008 Strategic Plan February 2006 Progress Report

42 Pages

Attachment

 


Policy Review Committee Meeting

26 June 2006

The City in its Broader Context

 

 

The City in its Broader Context

 

 

2

The Development of a National Centre for Universal Design at the University of Western Sydney   

 

Compiled by:                Paul Page, City Marketing Supervisor; Grant Collins, Recreation and Cultural Facilities Planner

Authorised by:             Geoff Shuttleworth, Economic Development and City Marketing Manager; Ruth Goldsmith, Local Planning Manager 

Strategic Program Term Achievement: A decision has been secured from relevant groups to develop a nominated institution or event that has the status to cause Penrith Valley to be widely recognised locally, throughout the State, nationally and throughout the world.

Critical Action: Identify and work with partners to develop and implement a strategy to secure the selected institution or event.

     

Purpose:

To advise Council about recent initiatives regarding the proposal to develop a National Centre for Universal Design at the University of Western Sydney (UWS) and its role in relation to Critical Action 1.1A.  The report recommends that the information be received

 

Background

Universal Design has been defined as:

“The design of products and environments to be useable by all people, to the greatest extent possible, without adaptation or specialised design.  Universal Design is a design concept that recognises, respects, values and attempts to accommodate the broadest possible spectrum of human ability in the design of all products, environments and information systems”

(Centre for Universal Design, North Carolina State University 1997)

 

The intent of Universal Design is to plan safer, more comfortable, useable and sustainable products and environments that cater more effectively for all people, including those with diverse abilities and those whose abilities change over time.

 

Over the past six months, the opportunity to develop a National Centre for Universal Design as a potential project in partnership with the University of Western Sydney (UWS), has emerged.  There is strong interest and support for the concept within the University and it presents an opportunity for the City of Penrith to take initiative and lead the way in this field.

 

The potential for a Centre for Universal Design was researched as part of the Innovative Recreation Facilities and National Centre on Accessibility study conducted in May 2003.  That information was incorporated into the adopted PLANS Strategies, with a recommendation to ‘investigate the potential development of a Centre of Excellence in Universal Design, in partnership with others’.  The Centre for Universal Design would provide a national base to coordinate research, design, training and information collection and dissemination.

 

Further research into Universal Design and the potential for a Centre of Excellence was conducted in January 2005 with the assistance of a UWS student, who prepared a Research Paper.  The findings supported the need for a more co-ordinated approach, in Australia, in developing and promoting the philosophy, aims and practical application of Universal Design.

 

This proposal presents a superb opportunity for Penrith Valley to stand out, internationally, in a field that will become increasingly central to the way we live.  Such a centre could greatly enhance the image of Penrith Valley and the University and would contribute to delivering an institution with the status to be widely recognised locally, throughout the state, nationally and throughout the world.

Project Aim

The aim of the project is to develop an effective strategic alliance between Penrith City Council and the University of Western Sydney, and to work collaboratively in promoting the philosophy and practical application of Universal Design by establishing an internationally recognised Centre of Excellence in Universal Design within the University structure.

Activities of Proposed Centre for Universal Design

A National Centre for Universal Design could offer a range of services to the community, similar to the model demonstrated by the Centre for Universal Design at North Carolina State University in the USA.  It provides the following services:

1.   Research

The Centre would conduct applied research studies on human factors and user needs, useability of accessible and universally designed products and environments, and the impact of universal design.  The Centre’s aims could include advancing knowledge of universal design principles, identifying user needs, conducting design and market research, and evaluating universal design solutions.

2.   Design

The Centre would investigate universal solutions to user problems encountered in the built environment, and provide design development services to create universally useable homes, building components, spaces and products.  The Centre’s aims could include providing concept development for model plans and products, conducting architectural and product evaluations, conducting plan reviews, and providing design and marketing assistance to business and industry.

3.   Training

The Centre would provide courses, workshops and presentations for students, advocates, builders, designers, engineers, service providers and government agencies.  The Centre’s aims could include developing post-secondary curricula, providing advanced graduate training, offering seminars and workshops, and conducting skill-based training programs.

4.   Outreach

The Centre would collect, develop and disseminate information on all aspects of accessibility and universal design.  The Centre’s aims could include collecting and distributing resource material on Universal Design from around the world, developing original materials and publications, maintaining a library and comprehensive Web site, and providing information presentations.

The First Steps

Council staff met with key UWS staff (from the Schools of Engineering, Industrial Design and Construction, Property and Planning, and the University Administration) to initiate the potential partnership in December 2005.  Those discussions indicated that:

1.   There was general ‘in principle’ support for the proposal from the University representatives;

2.   The proposal supported the direction of the courses presented, particularly in the Schools of Industrial Design and Construction, Property and Planning;

3.   The newly proposed UWS Centre for Urban Research could provide a suitable base for fostering Universal Design;

4.   The actual scope of the proposed Centre, and how it would fit into existing University structures and programs would need to be further investigated.

 

The Head of the Centre for Urban Research has also indicated support for the proposal.

 

An early outcome from this meeting has been a partnership with lecturers responsible for the fourth year Industrial Design course, in which students are required to undertake a major design project and develop a prototype.  A high standard of documentation, design and construction is expected, and the year culminates in a gallery display of the students’ work.

 

This year, the theme of the course is Universal Design and is focussed on Local Government infrastructure in the form of park furniture, bus shelters and play equipment.  Council has contributed to this project by providing a comprehensive presentation on Universal Design, and participating in discussions of potential projects.  The students recently presented their project proposals, which include such items as innovative park seating, a dual person accessible park swing, a new type of accessible water bubbler in the shape of a water reed, a device to allow users to calculate their body mass index as part of a public fitness circuit, and a graffiti wall with a digital camera that can upload images to the web.

 

Arrangements have been made for the students to receive mentoring from relevant design professionals within Council’s staff, as well as responses from people who may use the items, as the designs progress.

Other Initiatives

In December 2005, the National Association of Consultants in Access Australia conference was held in Perth.  It incorporated the theme ‘Universal Design – Where is Australia Heading?’ and reflects the emerging interest, in Australia, about Universal Design.

 

The Chairman of the Australian Building Code Board 1428 Standards Committee has also indicated his support for this project, indicated that he was unaware of any similar initiative in Australia, and confirmed this as a unique opportunity for the City of Penrith.

 

Council’s Disability Access Committee has also endorsed the principles of Universal Design, and expressed its support for the joint initiative with the University of Western Sydney.

Next Steps

Funding of $25,000 to progress this project has been included in Council’s draft Management Plan for 2006/2007.  The University has several funding schemes through which there may be opportunities for matching funds.  Discussions with the UWS Research Development Manager regarding the funding programs have commenced.  It is envisaged that the research project would be developed in collaboration with UWS and that it would determine the viability, longer-term benefits and opportunities for developing the Centre within the university structure, how other partners could become involved and how other sources of funding, such as GROW or CRC grants, could be accessed.

Conclusion

The interest and support received from within areas of the University is most encouraging.  Embarking on this project reinforces the strong partnership Council has already established with the University.

 

The concept of a National Centre for Universal Design is an exciting one.  It is clear that future directions in the design and provision of public infrastructure will require increasing recognition of Universal Design principles.  The presence of a Centre of Universal Design, along with other local initiatives incorporating these guiding principles (eg accessible adventure and recreation opportunities), provides a great opportunity to develop a unique point of difference between Penrith Valley and other places throughout the world.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.   The information contained in the report on The Development of a National Centre for Universal Design at the University of Western Sydney be received.

2.   Council write to the Vice Chancellor of the University of Western Sydney formally indicating its commitment to the proposal, including contributing to the Research Project and development of a Business Plan. 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


 

 

 

 

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The City as a Social Place

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

3        City of Penrith Regional Indoor Aquatic and Recreation Centre Ltd - Ripples                      11

 

4        Erskine Park Employment Area - Naming of the Estate and Renaming of Lenore Lane         22

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting

26 June 2006

The City as a Social Place

 

 

The City as a Social Place

 

 

3

City of Penrith Regional Indoor Aquatic and Recreation Centre Ltd - Ripples   

 

Compiled by:                Gary Dean, Facilities Operations Manager; Eric Shen, Service Specification Officer

Authorised by:             Steve Hackett, Director - City Services 

Strategic Program Term Achievement: The City’s recreation and leisure facilities and services meet its needs and are optimally used.

Critical Action: Ensure facilities and services reflect the City’s diverse current and future recreation and leisure needs.

 

Presenters:                     - Representatives from Ripples -       

Purpose:

To advise Council of a request from the Board of the City of Penrith Regional Indoor Aquatic and Recreation Centre Ltd for financial assistance from Council in order to meet the Company's budget shortfall.  The report also addresses Ripples Service Specification. 

A presentation by Ripples representatives will be made to the Council to support this request for financial assistance.

The report recommends that Council support the Board's request for a subsidy and that the Service Specification be adopted.

 

Introduction

Following the redevelopment of the St Marys Swim Centre in 1994, the City of Penrith Regional Indoor Aquatic and Recreation Centre Limited commenced operations with the official opening of the new indoor aquatic centre (Ripples).  The newly redeveloped (and expanded) Centre necessitated a new and enlarged management and staffing structure.

 

This new Company is a controlled entity of Council, operating independently of Council’s administration.  Each year, since the formation of this new Company, Council has received a report and presentation from Company representatives following the Annual General Meetings, those reports highlighted yearly achievements and the Company’s focus for the next year.  Those presentations also addressed the financial issues for the Company. 

 

As part of the ‘set-up’ arrangements of these controlled entities, Council accepts the responsibility for underwriting the activities of these ‘independent’ Companies.

 

In 2001 a new Hydrotherapy Treatment Centre was officially opened, which is situated on land opposite Ripples.  This new Centre was jointly funded from the State Government, Council and a loan to the Ripples Company.  This new Centre was then brought under the control of the Ripples Company both from an asset and management point of view.

 

Late last year the Company advised Council of the present (difficult) financial situation at the Hydrotherapy Centre and requested Council to ‘take over’ the Centre asset (but not the operation) and the present loan.  Council subsequently agreed to that request.

 

Current Situation

 

The following submission has recently been received from the Chairman of Ripples Board:

 

“At the Board of Directors Meeting held on Tuesday 20th June 2006, the Board made the following resolutions:

 

1.   The draft Budget 2006/2007 Ver. 4 was adopted.

 

2.   That the Fees & Charges be increased by 7.5% as per the adopted schedule.

 

3.   That Council be requested to provide a subsidy of $250,000 to fund the projected deficit for the 2006/2007 financial year.

 

4.   That the General Manager’s report to Council dated 6th June 2006 was endorsed.

 

Ripples therefore formally requests that Council provide a subsidy of $250,000 to fund the Company’s operations for the 2006/2007 financial year. If further information is required please contact the Company Secretary or General Manager.”

 

The following is a copy of the General Manager’s report dated 6 June 2006:

 

RIPPLES ST MARYS LEISURE CENTRE

FINANCIAL REPORT & OVERVIEW

 

Ripples St Marys Leisure Centre commenced operations on the 10th September 1994 providing the area with a first class aquatic and recreation facility. Over the first few years it became apparent that to improve service delivery to our customers, the premises required some modifications to make best use of space.

 

Subsequently Ripples:

 

·    Extended the gym twice to increase floor space

·    Built a new dedicated child minding room over an unused courtyard

·    Enclosed a walkway to the outdoor pools to provide additional office space and display window.

·    Installed a beach volleyball court

 

These improvements to the facilities, along with others, were all funded directly by Ripples.

 

In November 2001, the Ripples Hydrotherapy Centre was opened and Ripples also undertook to operate this community-based facility within its main business activities.

 

Currently, Ripples is facing issues stemming from declining patronage over the past 3 years. This has led to a decline in our income base and even though costs have been kept close to budget, the decline in income has resulted in loss situations. The purpose of this report is to provide historical background leading up to the current financial situation.

 

Operating Results

The graph following illustrates the annual financial results for Ripples since inception. There were 3 main issues that had an effect on our results from 2002 onwards:

 

·    The costs associated with operating the Hydrotherapy Centre

 

·    The introduction of GST. Ripples being a previously tax-exempt company was now required to pay GST. At the time we were not allowed to simply add the full 10% GST component onto our income. This therefore meant that we had to absorb some of the GST into our profits.

 

Insurance. The cost of Public Liability insurance rose dramatically and had to be absorbed into our operations.


Centre Annual Results Since Commencement

(Not Including Depreciation)

 

 


The following graph shows the results for the Main Centre only (after removing the Hydrotherapy Centre costs.)

 

As can be seen, Ripples Main Centre has been operating in deficit for the past 3 years. Add to this the costs of the Hydrotherapy Centre and the resultant losses become greater.

 

Ripples has been operating from its own reserves (except for a call on Council for $100,000 in 2004). The continued operating losses have depleted these reserves to the point where we need to call on Council to support the ongoing operations of Ripples.

 

Patronage

 

As highlighted earlier, Ripples has suffered a drop in patronage, especially in casual pool use and more importantly Learn to Swim. This is shown in the graphs following:

 

 

 

2002-2003            624,610            Target       650,000

2003-2004            600,911                               650,000             

2004-2005            551,524                               600,000    

2005-May 2006   487,162                               600,000

 

 

2002-2003             231,234           Target       230,000             

2003-2004             207,273                              230,000

2004-2005             165,603                              200,000

2005-May 2006    150,540                                      200,000    

 

*Note: No LTS held on Easter Public Holidays this year due to Staff Penalty Rates. 

 

Factors Affecting Drop in LTS Patronage

 

External

 

·   Tightening of Household Expenditure leading to Cuts in Spending

·   Rising Fuel Costs & Interest Rates

·   Lessons seen as a luxury not a necessity

·   Both Parents now working – less time available for recreation

·   Weather – Swim in Summer, Footy in Winter

 

Internal

 

·   Staff Turnover

·   Water Temperature if Plant malfunctions or fails at any time

 

 

Jan 2003-2004           69,327       Target         85,000

2004-2005               136,897                           150,000    

2005-May 2006      119,307                            150.000

 

Factors Affecting Drop in Pool Patronage

 

·   Competition from other recreation activities

·   Swimming not “attractive” or “exciting”

·   Youth less active – prefer computers

·   Centre does not have attractions – wave pool, slides etc.

 

The General Manager has contacted other Centre Managers in the local area and discussed the issues of falling patronage. All have confirmed that Learn to Swim attendances have dropped dramatically and that this has adversely affected their income and end of year results. We as a Centre will need to work more effectively and be very aggressive in our marketing initiatives in the next financial year, especially in increasing patronage overall.

 

2006/2007 Budget

 

The General Manager, Board of Directors and Council Officers have undertaken a review of the 2006/2007 Budget. Following a review of income and expenditure a price rise of 7.5% will be implemented from 1/7/06. The net cash outcome of the budget is a deficit of $221,921. Approximately $95,000 of this figure is an increase in staff wages due to the introduction of weekend penalty rates. The following section briefly outlines initiatives we are initiating to improve on this bottom line result.

 

Marketing Initiatives

 

To bring additional income into the Company we propose to:            

 

·   Use the economic situation to our advantage – Swimming is a low cost alternative for recreation and fun.

·   Intensify efforts to increase LTS enrolments – more emphasis on water survival and swifter progression so that parents can see results (value for money) (already initiated)

·   Converting Corporate members to Direct Debit memberships – staff incentives to encourage proactivity. This will increase cash flow with members  committed for a specific period rather than ad hoc Month-by-Month income from Corporate memberships. (Already initiated)

·   Increase the pool based activities – better inflatables, planned activities (water fun days – the Beach @ Ripples)

·   Refocus to promote winter swimming – “Ripples – its hot ALL year round”

·   Realign the business to customer needs – Work towards International Customer Service Standard accreditation. (Planning stage)

 

Request for Council Assistance

 

As a result of the current situation and the projection of a loss in the next financial year, we will require the assistance of Council to provide subsidy funding for our operations. The amount that will be required is:

 

Funding to Year End 30/6/06            $290,000

Funding for next year loss                  $250,000 - With a review mid point during the financial year.

 

Conclusion

 

Ripples Leisure and Hydrotherapy Centres provide the community with important facilities to undertake recreation, rehabilitation and fitness activities. Ripples is an important part of the Penrith LGA and provides an enormous social benefit to the community. We pride ourselves on the service we provide and this has been recognized this year with the Centre winning awards in the Community Business Awards and The Small Business Awards.

 

Over the 12 years of operations Ripples reputation has been at the forefront of the industry, leading the way in service provision, standards and training. We therefore look to Council to support us during this period.”

 

Financial Services Manager’s comments

 

For the past three years Ripples has operated at a deficit. Even when the operation of the Hydrotherapy Centre is removed the Centre has operated at a deficit. To date Ripples have absorbed these accumulated debts without recourse to Council.  Included in these deficits is a debt to Council of $245,123, some of which dates back to 2003, for items such as water rates and insurance premiums and as reported to the Ordinary Meeting 3 April 2006, one year’s loan repayments for the hydrotherapy centre remain outstanding ($133,000).  The current year’s operation has seen this trend continue to worsen. Ripples’ General Manager has listed some of the influences leading to this result and identified a number of initiatives, which it is hoped, will help to improve the performance for 2006-07.

 

The Ripples Board has established a sub committee to review the budget proposed for 2006-07. This sub committee met with Ripples General Manager and Council’s Financial Accountant - Entities to closely review the assumptions and parameters used for this budget. Ripples is now proposing to increase prices by 7.5% effective 1 July 2006.

 

Advances totalling $290,000 have recently been made to Ripples in order for them to meet their commitments following representations from Ripples General Manager and Board Members.  On the presentation of its Annual Report to Council each year, Council resolves to underwrite the operations of Ripples for the next twelve months.  At this stage the $290,000 has been treated as an advance however, Ripples is requesting that this be a direct subsidy for its 2005-06 operations and is also requesting $250,000 for 2006-07. This is the first time they have requested a direct subsidy in their twelve years of operation.  If the $290,000 already advanced is to be treated as a subsidy then general revenue funds will need to be allocated in the June year end review.  It is unlikely that Ripples will be in a financial position to repay this amount or in fact, the other amount currently owing to Council.

 

As indicated by Ripples’ General Manager the attendances, particularly in the ‘Wet’ areas, for 2005-06 have been significantly down on original estimates resulting in reduced revenue to the Centre. These reduced revenue and increased wage costs have necessitated the request for a direct subsidy. The funding for 2005-06 has not been included in Council’s 2005-06 budget to date and will need to be considered in the June year-end review of the Management Plan.

 

The report on the 2006-07 Management Plan to the 19 June 2006 Ordinary meeting foreshadowed a likely request for a subsidy in 2006-07 of approximately $220,000 by Ripples.  A provision for that purpose was made to reserve, $220,000, pending the outcome of tonight’s meeting.  Since that date the subsidy request has been received for $250,000, including a contingency amount of $28,000.  If the marketing initiatives are successful then the projected deficit budget may be reduced.  There may also be opportunities for operational savings at Ripples in 2006-07 if the Water Savings Fund grant application (reported to the Ordinary meeting 19 June 2006) is successful.  Council’s adopted 2006-07 Management Plan has a small surplus of $33,500.  If Council supports the full subsidy request from Ripples then the 2006-07 budget surplus would be reduced to $3,500.

 

It is clear that, despite the best efforts of Ripples Board and management, it will not be possible for Ripples to continue its operations without direct financial support from Council. By way of comparison the Draft Management Plan for 2006-07 provides a deficit budget of $197,941 (excluding depreciation and debt servicing) for Penrith Swimming Centre.

Draft Service Specification for Ripples

Introduction

It was considered appropriate that the Service Specification be included as part of this report on Ripples Services.  The aim of each specification is to accurately document the existing levels of service and activities that the service provides in terms of quantity, quality and cost. 

Once adopted by Council the specification will be used as the basis for testing service performance and for service review, including any changes to services levels, adjustments to resourcing or for changes in priority within the existing service.

The specification has been approved by the Board of Ripples on 21 February 2006.

Summary of Key Information

 

Summary of the Ripples Services Specification

1. Service Description

The aim of the Company is to provide a regional facility operating to provide the widest possible choice of activities to all age groups.

Ripples – St. Marys Leisure Centre Service provides recreational, leisure, hydrotherapy and sporting opportunities for the Penrith LGA. Within our service, clients have the opportunity to access both wet and dry fitness and recreation areas, holiday club, birthday parties, and rehabilitation for post operative care, injury management and workers compensation.

2. Service Objectives and Scope of Service

As per Memorandum of Association of City of Penrith Regional Indoor Aquatic & Recreation Centre Limited the service provider must: -

Ø Foster, accommodate and provide the broadest range of leisure, sporting, recreational, fitness, educational and entertainment activities

Ø Provide equitable access and service to all persons regardless of their age, ethnicity, religion, gender, level of skill or specific interest without unreasonably discouraging those who wish to achieve individual excellence in their chosen pursuits

Ø Achieve optimal use of the centre by the provision of the highest quality activities and support services consistent with appropriate standards and resources.

These objectives are achieved through:

·     Provide recreation opportunities for the community of Penrith LGA and beyond

·     Meet contemporary council and community expectations in the provision of services.

·     Administer and operate an indoor sporting and leisure facility as per occupation agreement and Articles of Association.

·     Ensure safe, suitable and presentable facilities at all times

·     Manage and operate efficiently a public swimming pool facility and associated services

·     Facilitate the needs of local sporting bodies, educational facilities and various associations

Provide services and programs consistent with operations for such a facility·           Maintain an excess of revenue over operating and maintenance cost

·     Hydrotherapy operate efficiently and in partnerships with health services and facilities

Partnerships with education centres and sports associations

3. Link to Management Plan

Issue

Term Achievements

Critical Actions

Issue 9:

Recreation and Leisure

The City’s recreation and leisure facilities and services meet its needs and are optimally used.

Facilitate joint use of the City’s recreation and leisure facilities, including co-location of programs.

4. Service Levels

·      Gymnasium - Mon to Fri: 5:30am – 9pm
Saturday 6:30am - 6:30pm; Sunday 7am – 7pm

·      Aerobics – 57 sessions per week

·      Aqua Aerobics – 14 sessions per week

·      Pool access 7 days per week, learn to swim and squad

·      Hydrotherapy – Monday to Saturday

·      Crèche Monday to Saturday, Holiday club, birthday parties

·      Café – 7 days per week

5. Key Performance Indicators (KPIs)

Indicator

04-05 Actuals

05-06 Target

Patronage Membership

1401

2000

Patronage Attendances

551524

600000

Gym Income

$904,757

$987,050

Café Income

$287,630

$343,090

Aquatics Income

$1,253,194

$1,377,947

Children’s Programs Income

$26,126

$28,200

Pool Shop Income

$70,557

$76,700

Hydrotherapy Income

$176,859

$207,520

6.       Service Funding

The annual budget for Ripples is $ 3,039,061 for 2005-06.  This amount includes all operating costs.  This amount does not include capital costs unless otherwise noted.

 

 

2005-06 Budget

2005-06 YTD end May

Expenses

 

 

Gym Operations

$     489,217

$     413,595

Café Operations

$    302,800

$     260,532

Aquatics Operations

$ 1,099,918

$  1,171,815

Children’s Programs

$      81,042

$       70,296

Pool Shop Operations

$     30,700

$       49,426

Administration Costs

$    793,984

$     683,337

Hydrotherapy Operations

$    241,400

$     222,073

Expense Total

$ 3,039,061

$2,871,075

Income

 

 

Income from Gym

$    987,050

$     842,526

Income from Café

$    343,090

$     253,475

Income from Aquatics

$ 1,377,947

$  1,184,550

Income from Children’s Programs

$      28,200

$       25,346

Income from Pool Shop

$      76,700

$       59,225

Interest received, administration income

$      14,450

$       28,598

Income from Hydrotherapy

$    207,520

$      176,729

Total Income

$  3,034,957

$  2,570,450

Net Cost of Ripples Service

$        4,104

$     300,625

 

This service is to be provided within this funding.  No additional funds will be provided unless authorised by a resolution of the Board.

 

Any amount unspent as at year ended 30th June 2006 may be returned to general operating funds at the discretion of Council’s General Manager as per Occupancy Agreement.

7.       Service Summary Chart

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on City of Penrith Regional Indoor Aquatic and Recreation Centre Ltd - Ripples be received

2.     Council endorse officers’ actions in advancing $290,000, such sum to be treated as a subsidy and the appropriate budget allocation be made as part of the June 2006 year end review

3.     Council agree to provide Ripples with an operating subsidy of $220,000 for the 2006-07 financial year

4.     In view of the Ripples Board’s request for a 2006/7 subsidy of $250,000, a progress report on Ripples financial performance be submitted to Council in conjunction with Council’s December 2006 quarterly financial review

5.     The Service Specification for Ripples as outlined in this report be adopted

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Policy Review Committee Meeting

26 June 2006

The City as a Social Place

 

 

The City as a Social Place

 

 

4

Erskine Park Employment Area - Naming of the Estate and Renaming of Lenore Lane   

 

Compiled by:                Tony Crichton, Senior Environmental Planner

Authorised by:             Roger Nethercote, Environmental Planning Manager 

Strategic Program Term Achievement: Timely delivery of services to new release areas is being secured.

Critical Action: Prepare and implement services and infrastructure delivery plans for each new release area that ensures that the early establishment of services and facilities match community needs.

     

Purpose:

To advise Council of  proposals to re-name the Erskine Park Employment Area as "The Erskine Park Business Estate" and to  re-name Lenore Lane as "Lenore Drive."

The report recommends that Council formally endorse the proposed new estate name and road name and publicly advertise the proposals in accordance with the requirements of the Roads (General) Regulation 2000.

 

Background

Council has been proactive in working with service authorities and developers to ensure the provision of a zone substation, provision of water supply and sewage services, provision of telecommunications services and installation of a high pressure gas pipeline.

 

The Lenore Lane upgrade, which provides the principal access into the central and eastern parts of the estate is nearing completion.

 

The Erskine Park Employment Area  (EPEA) is now developing rapidly.  Currently, there are six developments established and operational, including TNT, Pickfords, Stramit, Packcentre, Hasbro and Coilsteel.  Construction is well advanced for two other developments, namely Bluescope and Chep Pallets.  Four other developments have also been approved.

 

Council is aware of the continued submissions we have made seeking a commitment for the proposed Erskine Park / M7 link road to the State Government, particularly the Department of Planning and RTA.  On 9 June 2006 the State Government gazetted the proposal for the development of a road network as a major project under Part 3A of the Environmental Planning & Assessment Act for the Erskine Park estate.  The road network will connect employment areas in Fairfield, Blacktown and Penrith LGA’s with the M7 and M4 motorways and Mamre Road, known as the Erskine Park Link Road Network in the Western Sydney Employment Hub. 

 

This announcement will now commence a formal process for the development of the concept for the Link Road network and subsequent decisions by the Minister for Planning for its establishment.  We are currently awaiting formal advice from the Department of Planning on the process which will now move forward to determine the Link Road concept and its ultimate alignment.

 

Lenore Lane Construction

 

Construction of Lenore Lane has now been substantially completed and the remaining works include completion of roadworks on Erskine Park Road and completion of landscape works along Lenore Lane.  The official opening of this road is scheduled for July 2006.

 

Given the advancement of these works and the visual character of Lenore Lane changing dramatically with four lanes as a result, it is appropriate to select a new name for Lenore Lane.  The name ‘Lenore’ borrows from the name of the dairy farm operated in the locality by Andrew Thompson (1852-1918) who also operated the St Marys Tannery.  Given this historical association it is considered appropriate to retain ‘Lenore’ in the road name.

 

The Blackwell family, who has been a long-term property and business owner in the area, has provided strong support for the choice of  Lenore Drive as the new road name.  The use of the term ‘Drive’ is more befitting the new construction format and is an appropriate new name for what will be a major future arterial link road. 

 

Naming of the Estate

 

Erskine Park Employment Area is the original planning name given to the estate some 16 or more years ago when Council first decided to develop the estate as an employment area for the City.  Given that individual landowners are using new terms to badge their individual properties, a new name for the estate needs to be chosen.  It is now timely to introduce a new name for the estate which is widely recognised by the State Government, development and business community and which promotes the area as a place for business.

 

It is intended that there will be several entry signs designed and established at the main entries to the estate at key intersections.  Consideration is being currently given to the ‘badging’ of the estate with the design of an entry sign at the intersection of Erskine Park Road and Lenore Lane. 

 

In consideration of an appropriate new estate name, Erskine Park Business Estate’ has emerged as a suitable name for the identification and marketing of the estate.  The name retains the geographic connection to the locality which is now well established as a business and industrial address.  The reference to ‘business’ estate picks up on the theme that Erskine Park is a place which is open for business development – a place for new job creating enterprise.

 

We have written to the Erskine Park landowners in April 2006 seeking their views on this matter, however little interest was expressed at the time.  Several landowners have however contacted us independently expressing their support for the new name and in particular urging the retention of ‘Erskine Park’ within the new name.

 

Conclusion

 

Development of EPEA is now moving ahead rapidly and support infrastructure is well established.  In the interests of ensuring that there is a cohesive approach taken in the naming and marketing of the estate, a new name which reflects the emerging business enterprise activity is required.  Accordingly, Council’s endorsement of Erskine Park Business Estate’ is sought as the most appropriate future name for the estate.

 

The upgrading of Lenore Lane has seen its character alter dramatically and will form part of the new link road network connecting the estate through the industrial lands in Blacktown to the M7.  Lenore Drive’ is considered a more befitting name for the road, whilst retaining its historical association with the locality.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Erskine Park Employment Area - Naming of the Estate and Renaming of Lenore Lane be received

2.     Council endorse ‘Erskine Park Business Estate’ as the new name for the employment area

3.     Council endorse ‘Lenore Drive’ as the new name for Lenore Lane and formally advertise the proposed road name in accordance with the requirements of the Roads (General) Regulation 2000.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1. View

Map of Lenore Lane

1 Page

Appendix

 


Policy Review Committee Meeting

26 June 2006

Appendix 1 - Map of Lenore Lane

 

 

 

 


The City In Its Environment

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

5        Implementation of the Mulgoa/Wallacia Sewerage Scheme                                                  28

 

6        Landscape Character Strategy                                                                                            33

 

7        Status of the City's Major Planning Policy Program                                                             39

 

8        Penrith City Heritage Study                                                                                                 46

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting

26 June 2006

The City in its Environment

 

 

The City in its Environment

 

 

5

Implementation of the Mulgoa/Wallacia Sewerage Scheme

 

Compiled by:                Graham Pares, Acting Coordinator Health and Environment Unit

Authorised by:             Wayne Mitchell, Environmental Health Manager 

Strategic Program Term Achievement: The health of the river system is being improved through the implementation of a comprehensive catchment management strategy.

Critical Action: Effectively manage sewerage impacts including the sewering of the rural villages.

     

Purpose:

To provide an update on the progress of the Mulgoa/Wallacia Sewerage Scheme and to provide further detail on the options developed to ensure the early uptake of connections to the Scheme.

 

Background

Funding for the Mulgoa/Wallacia Sewerage Scheme was announced in September 2004 under the State Government’s Priority Sewerage Program.  This area was given high priority under this program because of its proximity to the Nepean River and the significant environmental health and social benefits to be achieved by the reduction in potential for untreated effluent entering waterways or being disposed of in unsuitable land areas.

 

The estimated Scheme costs of $65 million represent a significant investment in improving the quality of the environment and reflected the committed effort of Council in lobbying for the inclusion of this area in the Priority Sewerage Program.

 

Works for the Scheme commenced in January 2005 and a previous report was provided to Council in November 2005 outlining the details of the Scheme and the works completed at that time.  That report also detailed potential initiatives that Council could consider, including the provision of financial assistance for residents, to encourage early connection to the Scheme.

 

A review of the connection process identified that costs would be incurred by residents in respect of:

 

·    Connection from the existing drainage system to the new connection point.  This cost will vary depending on the distance and factors such as the presence of rock

·    Repair of existing drainage.  This is compulsory before a property is connected and all systems must be pressure tested for leaks

·    Decommissioning of existing tanks.  All tanks must have the sludge removed and can then be destroyed and backfilled or converted to a rainwater tank

·    Sydney Water inspection and application fees

 

Whilst it is acknowledged that the total costs will vary for individual properties, information provided by Sydney Water indicates that average costs are expected to range between $2,000 and $4,000.

Scheme Progress

Sydney Water have confirmed that the Scheme has continued to progress ahead of schedule and is now expected to come on line by July 2006, six months earlier than the previously estimated commencement date of December 2006.  Representatives of the Sydney Water Priority Sewerage Program team made a presentation to Councillors on the 6th March outlining the progress of the Scheme and a tour of the sewerage treatment plant was held on Wednesday, 31 May 2006.

Options to Encourage Early Connection

As outlined previously, the Mulgoa/Wallacia and Silverdale Scheme was selected because of the identified environmental health and social benefits obtainable with its implementation.  However, these benefits will not be realised until all properties within the Scheme catchment are connected and Sydney Water have expressed their desire to see Council active in encouraging connections by residents.

 

Plans to facilitate the early connection to the sewerage scheme for single dwellings include:

 

1.   Formal requirement for all identified properties to connect to the Scheme.

 

This will be facilitated through the use of Notices and Orders served appropriately under the Local Government Act.  It is proposed that inspections of the relevant properties would commence in July/August to discuss the proposed Order with property owners.  Flexible time frames will be negotiated with individual owners prior to service of the Order, with a proposed period of twelve months unless mitigating circumstances exist.

 

2.   Withdrawal of the current subsidy for sullage collections services after the sewerage scheme has been available to a property for twelve months (July 2007).

 

Council currently provides a subsidy of approximately $1,700 per annum for each property that requires a pump-out service.  This subsidy is funded by a special rate variation.  The withdrawal of the subsidy will make the move to connect to the sewerage scheme a cost effective alternative to pump-out of the existing systems.

 

3.   Consideration of an interest free loan or subsidy for pensioners to assist with connection costs.

 

Investigations have found that within the nominated catchment for the Scheme area approximately 58 premises owned by pensioners (excluding Regal Oaks Retirement Village) could be eligible for assistance.  Assistance of this type would complement existing assistance program that Sydney Water has for disadvantaged customers.  Under the Sydney Water policy part, or all, of the costs of connection to the sewer can be paid for disadvantaged customers in the greatest socio-economic need.  Further details of these options are provided later in the report.

 

Information on connection options will be made available to all residents within the catchment area in several ways:

 

·    By written letter sent directly to the property owner.

·    Through Council’s Environmental Health Officers who will attend all properties within the Catchment prior to the service of any Order or Notice

·    Through Council’s Environmental Health Officers who will attend the Open Days and other information events hosted by Sydney Water in conjunction with the opening of the Scheme

·    Through information provided on Council’s website and customer contact through general phone enquiries.

·    Sydney Water Help Line

Options to Provide Financial Assistance

A number of options have been considered for potential assistance.  The following options are recommended to Council for consideration:

 

1.   An interest free loan is offered to pensioners with an upper limit of $3,000.  This would be based on the provision of detailed quotations.  Application procedures would also need to be developed, but an important criteria would be the requirement for regular direct debit repayments of the loan.  It is estimated that the startup costs for this option could be as high as $174,000 if all pensioners undertook the maximum loan.

 

Advantages

·    This would provide a high level of assistance that should ensure that all pensioners are able to quickly connect to the scheme.

 

Disadvantages

·    There is some risk as the loan cannot be secured as a debt against the property.

·    There will be a significant amount of administrative work involved, depending on the level of take-up.

 

2.   Financial assistance in the form of a $1,700 one-off payment be made to all pensioners to assist with connection costs.  This is equivalent to one year of the current sullage subsidy.  The total cost of this option is estimated at $98,600.

 

Advantages

·    This would provide a significant level of assistance to enable all pensioners to quickly connect to the scheme.

·    No on going administration costs or debt recovery costs.

 

3.   Council cover the costs of solids removal for the existing septic tanks of all residential premises in the catchment area.  The costs for these pump-outs are being negotiated with Council’s contractor, but are expected to be in the order of $360 per premises. This pump-out is required before Sydney Water will approve connection to the sewer.  It is estimated that the total costs of this option would be $146,880 if provided to the 408 premises identified in the catchment.

 

Advantages

·    This opportunity would help to expedite the connections by all residents in the villages. 

·    It represents less than 4 months of the normal yearly subsidy and ensures that many subsidies are concluded before the end of the 12-month connection period.

 

It is suggested that one or two of these options be selected following discussion at tonight’s meeting.  The final form of the assistance package will then need to be publicly notified for a period of 28 days in accordance with section 356 f the Local Government Act.

Financial Services Manager Comment

The two main reasons for the special rate variation in 2004-05 which subsidises the sullage pumpout were to provide the subsidy to contribute to redressing an inequity of access to services (sewerage) and also to assist in limiting the amount of potential environmental damage caused by illegal pumpouts by providing a cost effective service.  The rate variation is paid by each ratepayer across the city and is provided to all residents on sullage pumpout. 

 

In order to reduce the dependence on the subsidy it is proposed that the subsidy be withdrawn for all residents covered by the Mulgoa/Wallacia Sewerage Scheme from July 2007 (twelve months after the system is available for connection.)  It is anticipated that owners will find it more financially viable to connect to the sewer than bear the full cost of the pump-out service. Also as a result the identified environmental health and social benefits associated with the scheme will be realised.

 

In order to encourage residents who may not financially be in a position a number of options have been put forward to encourage early connection and are discussed earlier in this report.  They include: an interest free loan or financial assistance be made available to pensioners in Mulgoa/Wallacia, a grant to pensioners equivalent to one years subsidy and the payment of the costs associated with solids pump-out for all residents in the Mulgoa/Wallacia area. 

 

Section 356 of the Local Government Act 1993 prescribes the requirements when Councils provide financial assistance to others (including charitable, community and sporting organisations and private individuals).  It provides that Council may grant financial assistance of the nature suggested if 28 days public notice of the proposed resolution for financial assistance is given.

 

The sullage reserve is estimated to have a closing balance of $259,000 at the end of June 2007.  These funds would be sufficient for Option 2 and Option 3 (estimated total $245,500).  If Council chose to apply Option 1 and all eligible pensioners take up this option in conjunction with Option 3 then there would be a shortfall of approximately $62,000.  The procedure for the assistance program will be finalised during the exhibition period if Council chooses to pursue that option.

Conclusion

The completion of the Mulgoa/Wallacia Sewerage Scheme in July 2006 will provide significant benefits for the communities in these villages.  For the environmental and social benefits to be fully realised it is important that residents connect to the scheme at the earliest possible time.  The outlined plan to facilitate these early connections, including options to provide either a subsidy or financial assistance for pensioners, is recommended as a balanced approach to realising the full benefits of the sewerage scheme.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the information contained in the report on Implementation of the Mulgoa/Wallacia Sewerage Scheme be received.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Policy Review Committee Meeting

26 June 2006

The City in its Environment

 

 

The City in its Environment

 

 

6

Landscape Character Strategy   

 

Compiled by:                Karin Schicht, Landscape Architecture Supervisor

Authorised by:             Craig Ross, Design and Technical Advice Manager 

Strategic Program Term Achievement: Key agencies, institutions, landholders and the community are cooperatively engaged in enhancing the visual amenity of the City.

Critical Action: Engage key agencies, landholders and the community in the implementation of Council’s Landscape Strategy and in promoting clean environments.

     

Purpose:

To seek endorsement of the draft Landscape Character Strategy following exhibition and consultation. Council's Landscape Architecture supervisor, Ms Karin Schicht and Mr Brett Newbold of Brett Newbold Urban Planning will be available to answer questions, if required.

The report recommends the Landscape Character Strategy by endorsed.

 

Background

The Landscape Character Strategy has been developed by Council as a means to protect and enhance the visual amenity or ‘look’ of the City.  This reflects Council’s vision for harmonious urban and rural qualities and environmental protection and enhancement.

 

The Landscape Character Strategy will be a tool to guide Council in its administration and activities that affect landscape character across the entire Local Government Area, such as strategic planning tasks, development assessment, capital works projects, and maintenance programs.  It also has application to places that are not owned by Council (significant private landholdings, Government authority lands) in which Council can provide guidance and encouragement in those landowners’ administration and activities.

 

The Strategy comprises:

 

·    Landscape Character Strategy:  statements and maps (forwarded to Councillors under separate cover)

·    Background Papers including the Framework, which support the Strategy (forwarded to Councillors under separate cover)

·    Prioritised list of projects and actions (to be prepared in 2006-07).

 

Current Situation

 

In June 2004, Council engaged consultant Brett Newbold Urban Planning, to develop the scope and approach to implementation of the Landscape Character Strategy.  This resulted in the preparation of a 'Framework' document (now packaged as the ‘Background Papers’ that support the Strategy).  The Framework was based upon consultation within Council staff and the study of many existing documents, data and maps, which determined the various existing landscape settings and features that define Penrith City’s identity.  It has since been updated to document the results of more recent consultation.

 

Planning, design and quality of the built form play a significant role in the interpretation of the character and the visual amenity of a place, however due to limited resources available, this was excluded from the scope, with the focus remaining on open spaces and vegetation.

 

In February 2006, the same consultant was engaged to progress the Framework to the next level of detail, the Strategy itself, by developing draft statements of ‘desired character’ and these fall into four broad categories, ranging from a broad contextual perspective to district and local places – they roughly represent patterns of landuse:

 

·    Iconic places, which are places or elements of character that the community acknowledges as fundamental to Penrith City's environmental identity;

·    The primary visual backdrops, which specifically emphasises the 'visibility' of backdrops to major roads and transportation corridors that have a primary influence upon residents' and visitors perceptions of the City;

·    Rural places, which are distinct rural areas that have broadly similar characteristics and are influenced by landuse and development history; and

·    Urban places, which are distinct urban areas that have broadly similar characteristics and are influenced by landuse and development history.

 

Maps were prepared to accompany the statements, which determine the extent of each character type.

 

There were limits applied to the level of detail of visual assessment and extent of public consultation.  As a result, a simple manual method of visual assessment was used, based on overlaying various analysis maps.  Public consultation was limited to public exhibition of the draft statements.

 

The consultation phase of the Strategy involved obtaining feedback on three levels:

 

·    Internal review: of the draft Strategy by key staff, key managers and key Directors, from 24 April to 23 May 2006.

·    Forum: with key landowners, agencies, authorities and external organisations.  This was held on 2 May 2006.  The Strategy Forum was to ensure the directions and intentions of the Strategy could be applied to landscapes, or key places, that are not Council-owned.  Participants were informed of the Strategy’s statements; had an opportunity to table directions and stances from their organisations; participated in the exchange of ideas and agreed upon the principles; and were engaged in the co-ordinated process of enhancing the Look of the City.

·    Public exhibition: the draft Strategy was exhibited to the wider community from 8‑26 May 2006.

 

Issues that emerged from the consultation phase were neither contentious nor required significant change to the document, and generally sought expansion and clarification of scope, issues and presentation material.  These have either been embedded in the final draft document or will be dealt with as future actions.  The key issues/outcomes raised are described below:

Forum

·    Conflicts may arise against policies of external agencies, requiring examination at a detailed level

·    Opportunity for PCC to review its own policies eg. percentage of land clearing on pastoral properties

·    Address wider context, including adjoining Councils

·    What are the icons that the community value?  May emerge during Public exhibition phase

·    Planners, specialised in rural issues, are required for dealing with rural issues and developments

·    Very limited response to pursuing further Forums

·    Limited response as to how to penetrate external organisations to communicate the Strategy

·    Challenge of consistency of maintenance / presentation between Council and non-Council properties

·    Community education required of value of trees, natural areas particularly in rural areas

·    Strategy will speed up assessment time and streamline integrated development referrals under the Rivers and Foreshores Improvement Act

·    The Department of Natural Resources outlined the three riparian categories and recommended the full length of watercourses, in developed areas, be mapped

·    Site-specific solutions required for revegetation in flood prone areas to accommodate flood behaviour

·    Potential for salinity will have an impact on visual amenity (traditional residential areas, density of new development)

·    Low public understanding of flooding.  Major impacts on flood events where developments fill to raise levels.  Floodplains are also iconic places in their own right for conservation and enhancement.

·    Agriculture – Changes over time in response to markets eg. paddocks to greenhouse structures.  Farm gate sales are important. 

·    Minerals – Expansion required on design of extraction to limit visual intrusion on the landscape

 

Council Staff feedback

·    Refinement of definitions and maps required

·    Include local shopping strips within 'Primary Community Centres'

·    General formatting and wording suggestions, preamble, introduce maps and conclusions

·    BAEP staff capability to assess small DAs against character

·    Macro scale context

·    General additional comments to supplement text

·    Include definition to cover Aboriginal cultural heritage and integrate into Statements

·    Rural villages – are these characterised by avenues of street trees?  Include limitations on signage, colour schemes etc.

·    Include text relating to clearly defined interface between rural and urban

·    State existing and desired character as statements

·    Policy statements (based upon existing legal documents) are not included

·    Various Urban Residential areas require more specific descriptions to differentiate between the different character types

·    Area south of EPEA may be Future Urban but awaiting PCC position

·    Understorey of native vegetation is as important as canopies

·    Accommodate text to cover high community expectations in new subdivision's maintenance regimes vs. PCC capabilities

·    Does not address character of the built form

 

Public exhibition

·    Maintenance of business and bulk residential areas (repainting of premises) would improve aesthetics

·    Critical of current image of Penrith.  "searing open scrubland, horrid industrial areas with hand-painted scrawlish signs, mission brown and canary yellow mass-housing, broken glass and graffiti."

·    Attempts at landscaping are disappointing (mulch, grass and gum trees)

·    Strategy reads as maintain status quo.  Not a useful document.  Only suggests more tree plantings

·    PCC should be more vigilant in terms of restrictions of use in rural areas, including tree clearing.

·    Garden Suburbs (Iconic) need to promote locally native vegetation corridors

·    Against all areas developing into multi-housing.  Keep some areas as traditional character

 

The Landscape Character Strategy has been updated, where appropriate, to address issues raised.  Some issues will be addressed in future stages. 

 

Whilst the Strategy is a new document, it is pointed out that it embodies many existing processes and practices and can immediately be applied to many of Council's activities, such as:

·    Preparation of Section 94 Plans

·    Better inform current maintenance activities eg graffiti control and tree management

·    Preparation and assessment of Project Evaluation Bids

·    Assessment of Development Applications

·    City beautification programs

·    Design projects and site analysis

 

Application of the Strategy can be appreciated at three levels, each founded upon the core character statements:

 

1.   Strategic – whereby the Strategy is promoted to external stakeholders, agencies, landowners.  There is a need for dialogue with senior representatives of government agencies, initiated by the Strategic Directorate, leading to agreed procedures and protocols re: major project planning / planning refinement and implementation / management.  This would establish a systematic approach to ensure appropriate communication between Council and the major agencies, whose activities can impact scenic quality;

2.   Land use and development control - whereby it informs Council's key planning instruments with additional levels of detail plus technical and legal parameters that can ultimately mandate specific environmental outcomes.  This will be accommodated in Council’s GIS with new layers;

3.   Land management and civic improvements – whereby sites and actions are identified, developed with a more detailed approach to scenic, visual and character issues and finally implemented.  Until those detailed specific sites and actions are addressed, the basic principles as set out in the Strategy are applied.

 

It is intended that the Landscape Character Statements will be used to inform the preparation of the Local Plan and accompanying City-wide DCP, particularly the development of existing and future character statements as well as guiding development control. 

 

The new LEP template provides opportunity for Council to develop local planning provisions.  The policy direction as to whether these character statements and provisions should sit within the LEP or DCP, will be clearer as the Local Plan team advances drafting of the first chapter of the new Local Plan and clarifies the implementation of the Standard LEP template with the Department of Planning.

 

With the foundation character principles in the Strategy established, more practical guidance for improvements to the ‘Look of the City’ will emerge when key sites and actions are identified, developed and implemented on a priority basis.  Each site or action will be scoped to determine the extent of detail and resources required, as agreed with the appropriate responsible Manager, to address desired landscape character, visual and scenic values and maintenance and management.  Further, more targeted community consultation may also be required.

 

For maximum flexibility, any site or action identified as having a potential significant impact on the Look of the City will be ranked in a weighted points-scoring system to determine its priority for action or implementation in line with the Strategy.  Assessment would be against a set of criteria.  Identification of sites and actions and the assignment of points will be through discussions with relevant Managers or other internal stakeholders.  Whilst the assessment methodology is still under development, the criteria could include:

 

·    Whether the site is a large land holding

·    Identification of recent pressure or changes in its landscape context

·    Potential direct or indirect impacts by future development or change

·    Existing or future pressures resulting in the need to protect/conserve existing character

·    High profile/high visual exposure to the public

·    Located within ‘Primary Visual Backdrop’ areas – refer to map in Strategy

·    Adjacent/close proximity to a visually valuable feature or asset

·    Places that attract significant numbers of people

·    Have citywide implications on landscape character

·    Have iconic status in terms of ‘Scenic and Natural Areas’ and ‘Community Centres of Excellence’ – refer to maps in Strategy.

As capital costs may be associated with some sites and actions, they will require further consideration for implementation and may be ranked again due to costs.  If development of sites or actions causes a change to agreed maintenance or management practices, the relevant service specifications should be altered to reflect that change.  At times it may be necessary to review the priority ranking, for example the level of exposure may change.

 

The implementation of sites and actions relating to Council owned land would be the responsibility of the relevant Managers in Council.  Typical key sites and actions may include:

 

·    Review of existing strategies in the context of the Landscape Character Strategy

·    Preparation of street tree management plans and masterplans for roads in Primary Scenic backdrop areas

·    Preparation/review of a Signage Strategy for the City

·    Development of a policy for tree replacement.

 

Any Council generated site or action may trigger another action with external stakeholders such as property owners outside the road corridor under investigation, whose properties are located within the visual catchment of that road.  Action on those properties may be pursued on an opportunistic basis, eg, by applying conditions of consent to a Development Application or negotiations with Government agencies or landowners.  As these opportunities arise, there may be continued lobbying of government agencies on a particular issue or site, as the 'look' of a place can be largely influenced by an agency eg. through its maintenance practices.

 

Once the Strategy is endorsed, the following ‘next steps’ will take place, dependent upon available resources:

 

1.   Updated and corrected maps are included as layers in GIS.

(Note: maps shown in the final draft Strategy are those from the public exhibition and have not yet been updated.  All maps will be refined in accordance with consultation feedback received and quality control checks prior to their conversion to the GIS format)

2.   Source and include additional photos to further convey the intent of the Character Statements

3.   Statements are incorporated into Local Plan or city-wide DCP

4.   Establish the prioritised list of key sites and actions

5.   Refine actions/statements for key sites on a priority basis and progress implementation

6.   Monitor and report on implementation

7.   Review the Strategy every five years

8.   Ongoing lobbying and dialogue with adjoining Councils and various external stakeholders in progressing the principles and identifying potential partnership projects.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on the Landscape Character Strategy be received.

2.     The Landscape Character Strategy and supporting Background Papers be endorsed.

3.     The prioritised list of key sites and actions be the subject of a further report to Council.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Policy Review Committee Meeting

26 June 2006

The City in its Environment

 

 

The City in its Environment

 

 

7

Status of the City's Major Planning Policy Program   

 

Compiled by:                Josephine Bavatu, Environmental Planner

Authorised by:             Ruth Goldsmith, Local Planning Manager 

Strategic Program Term Achievement: Council’s planning policies, land use, regulatory controls and asset management practices enhance the visual amenity of the City.

Critical Action: Develop and implement compliance and regulatory programs to protect the visual amenity of the City.

     

Purpose:

To advise Council of our major planning policy projects, emerging strategies, and the key policy projects that are separate to our Release Areas Program.  The report recommends that information on the status of the City's major policy program and key policy projects be received.

 

Background

Council, in its considerations for the strategic direction of the City, has emphasised the need to ensure Penrith remains a place with a distinct character and identity.  Setting limits to the extent of urban growth, and arresting its impact on an already stressed and depleted environment are recognised as issues which must be resolved in partnership with Government and the development industry.

 

There is a strong need for articulated strategies to manage issues such as biodiversity conservation, heritage protection and management and recreation planning.  Pursuing quality urban outcomes for both the new release areas and the redeveloping older neighbourhoods across the City is a substantial area of endeavour.  The principles for managing these significant issues remain the focus for our planning response.

 

Council last considered a report on the status of the City’s major planning policy program and key policy projects at its Policy Review Committee of 6 December 2004. The current status, and future directions, for each of the major policy projects is outlined below.

1.   Biodiversity Conservation

Conserving biodiversity is important on both ethical and practical levels.  Biodiversity provides cultural, economic, educational, scientific and social benefits to Penrith City.  Without it, ecosystems fail, the resources fuelling economic growth disappear, and landscapes are lost.

 

The City of Penrith contains significant biodiversity, with more than 500 species of plants, and at least 132 native species of fish, amphibians, reptiles and mammals.  The City is home to more than 17% of the remnant Cumberland Plain Woodland of Western Sydney, and contains 13 distinct vegetation communities, all but one of which is listed as an Endangered Ecological Community under the Threatened Species Conservation Act (1995).  The protection and conservation of biological diversity, biodiversity is part of the process of achieving a sustainable future for the City.

 

Council has developed a plan of action to protect biodiversity in the City, and manage threats to its survival.  The ‘Penrith Biodiversity Strategy’ was adopted by Council at its Policy Review Committee meeting of 17 May 2004.

 

The overall goal of the Strategy is ‘to protect the native biodiversity of the Penrith Local Government Area and maintain ecological processes and systems’.  This goal is supported by key principles to guide its implementation –

·    Biodiversity is best conserved in situ (i.e. in its natural environment)

·    Collective responsibility and co-operation of all governments, business and the community is essential to conserve biodiversity

·    Protecting biodiversity requires management of threatening processes by identifying, preventing and mitigating the causes of biodiversity loss

·    Allocation and use of resources should be efficient, equitable and transparent

·    Lack of full knowledge should not be an excuse for postponing action to conserve biodiversity

·    Central to the biodiversity conservation is the establishment of a comprehensive, representative and adequate and system of ecologically viable reserves integrated with agricultural and other resource production systems, and

·    The traditional association of Aboriginal people with components of biodiversity should be recognised.

 

The Strategy proposes a range of actions to protect native vegetation on private land, manage vegetation on public land, encourage sustainable business practices to ensure the City’s biodiversity survives for future generations, and build awareness, understanding and knowledge of biodiversity issues in the City’s communities. 

 

Implementation of the Strategy has involved undertaking on-the-ground surveys of Council’s natural areas, which provided the basis for more detailed and directed Plans of Management in these areas.  Concurrently, Council’s existing GIS and mapping system has been enhanced, to develop a biodiversity database that will assist in monitoring long-term changes.  The database, together with improved mapping capacity, provides a basis for assessing proposals for vegetation removal, and ensuring the long-term conservation and management of the City’s biodiversity assets.  The biodiversity database is essential in providing Council with a clearer picture of the cumulative loss (and in some cases gains) in biodiversity habitat over time.

 

The key directions of the Biodiversity Strategy have been included in the 2005 – 2009 Strategic Program.  This recognises the responsibilities across Council for programs such as supporting bushcare groups, managing proposals for land use activities that require vegetation removal, and advocating for improved management of natural areas by State and Federal Government.

2.   City Centres’ Review

Council is currently finalising the Vitality and Viability Review of the Penrith City Centre and St Marys Town Centre, which will set the direction and framework to enhance Penrith City Centre as the principal retail, commercial, cultural and social centre of the City and the region.

 

The Review was intended to stimulate debate about the framework, direction and future planning of the Centres, and aims to develop a framework and provide future direction for the role and operation of Penrith City Centre and St Marys Town Centre as vital, viable and sustainable centres.  It has been undertaken in two stages, with the first stage (2003-2005) involving a review of the principal systems that bear upon the operation, development and growth of the Centres, including land use systems, economic systems, and social systems. The first stage also included extensive community participation and visioning process.

 

The technical studies have provided an analysis of the Centres’ existing systems, and have identified elements that constrain current activities.  Together with feedback from the consultations, they provided a solid foundation for the second stage of the Review, which involved more focused investigations to guide the future planning directions and the development of a strategic framework for the Centres.

 

Over the past 18 months, Councillors have received a number of reports and briefings on the City Centres’ Review, focussing on elements including urban design and form, economic viability, accessibility, cultural planning, community consultation and visioning for each Centre.  The initial Review studies have been completed, consultations undertaken, visions developed, draft planning controls prepared, precinct planning advanced, and a 3D model constructed.

 

These studies, investigations and consultations underpin the development of the draft Penrith City Centre Strategy and the St Marys Town Centre Strategy, exhibited until March this year.  The exhibition material included maps showing proposed activity precincts and built form for each Centre.  The City’s Centres can accommodate, in the future, increases in commercial, retail, entertainment and civic activities, as well as growth in residential apartments and dwellings.

 

The exhibition process has resulted in discussions being held with landowners / proponents in both Centres about the future of a number of key sites.  This in itself is encouraging for the future.  Submissions on the draft Strategies are being assessed and will be reported to Council at its Policy Review Committee meeting in July.

 

Draft planning controls for the Centres are being prepared, and Council has recently agreed to interim guidelines for the former Council Chambers precinct and a precinct in High St, Penrith.

 

The Metropolitan Strategy identifies Penrith as a Regional City and the State Government has formed a Taskforce in collaboration with Councils to prepare new Regional City Centre Plans by December this year.

 

Council, the City’s business communities, community and cultural groups, workers, residents and visitors all have a role in contributing to the outcomes of the City Centres’ Review, and in ensuring the long-term vitality and viability of the Centres.

 

Delivering the Strategies for Penrith and St Marys will take many years, and it is important to recognise that decisions made now, and over the next 10 years, will be critical in achieving the vision for the Centres.  This requires commitment to delivering agreed public works and programs to encourage the Centre’s amenity and vitality, and also the strategic management of land use activities and sites that present key investment opportunities for the City.

3.   Employment Lands Review

The Employment Lands Study was prepared in 2002 – 2004 by Leyshon Consulting.  The Study involved an employment demand analysis, and an examination of the supply of employment land in the City.

 

Stage 1 of the Employment Lands Study, considered the demand for employment land and was reported to Council in March 2003.  The analysis identified that unemployment for Penrith residents had fallen over the last 10 years, with strong growth in the managerial / professional and retail sectors.  Job figures also indicate that Council’s focus on ensuring that employment is provided as part of most new release areas is providing positive results.  These trends are likely to continue into the future, although growth in employment will slow as growth in population slows.  It is expected that the majority of jobs growth will require the provision of commercial, retail or community facility type space, with the balance requiring industrial or semi industrial space.

 

Stage 2 of the Study considered the supply of employment land, and was reported to Council in March 2004 and completed in July 2004.  The Study also broadly looked at the current and emerging trends in employment provision, forecasting of future employment opportunities, and the adequacy of zoned land to meet demand for commercial, industrial and retail uses over the next 15 to 20 years.  The analysis indicated that although there is sufficient commercial and retail land to meet immediate needs, the City would experience a shortfall in employment lands by (at the earliest) 2014.  Since the completion of the Study, however, the Metropolitan Strategy has identified Strategic Employment Precincts that would address the employment needs for Sydney’s growth over the next 25 years, including the identification of additional employment lands for Penrith after 2014.

 

The draft Employment Planning Discussion Paper, prepared by NewPlan Consulting, has been developed in response to the Employment Lands Study.  The Discussion Paper covers strategic employment land issues, Penrith’s employment lands issues and needs, the planning opportunities and constraints in relation to those needs, and then outlines the recommended Strategy actions.

 

The Discussion Paper has been used to inform the draft Employment Planning Strategy for the City of Penrith.  Together with the Discussion Paper, the draft Strategy will identify the current employment situation (particularly regarding employment lands supply) in Penrith, and provide strategic direction for the future planning and management of employment lands.  Council at its Ordinary Meeting of 19 June 2006 endorsed the draft Employment Planning Strategy and Employment Planning Discussion Paper for public exhibition.

4.   Heritage Review

The Penrith Heritage LEP was based on a Heritage Study carried out in 1986-1987, and was gazetted in 1991.  In recent years, the City’s communities have identified new places that they believe should be listed and protected as heritage items.  In working with the current Heritage Local Environmental Plan (LEP), some statutory limitations and omissions have also been identified.  To improve the protection and management of places of heritage significance to the community, a review of the previous Heritage Study and Heritage LEP has been undertaken.  The review will assist Council in conserving existing heritage items, and protecting newly identified heritage places.  Council’s consultants, Paul Davies Architect, commenced investigations in March 2004.

 

At its Policy Review meeting of 21 June 2004, Council considered and adopted the Heritage Study Community Consultation Program, which seeks to obtain community input into the Penrith Heritage Study process.  A Heritage Study Reference Group, composed of a diverse range of representatives with specialised skills and people within the City, has also been established to assist the consultant in undertaking the Heritage Study, and reflect the diversity of interests that will be affected by its outcomes.

 

Community meetings were held in Penrith on 17 August 2004 and St Marys on 18 August 2004.  The Heritage Study Reference Group met on 2 November 2004.  The Heritage Study process is now nearing completion, with a Thematic History finalised, Suburb ‘stories’ developed, a draft Inventory nearing finalisation, and potential incentives identified.

 

A presentation on the new Thematic History has been arranged for this Policy and Review Meeting (a separate report is presented in tonight’s Business Paper).  A Councillor Workshop is also proposed, on 10 July 2006, to discuss the findings of the Study.  The Workshop provides an opportunity for further consideration of the Thematic History for the City, and a detailed examination of the items and places proposed for inclusion in the Heritage Inventory.  It is also proposed to present the Suburb ‘stories’, which provide a context for existing and new heritage items.

 

An extensive public consultation process, and the preparation of new planning controls, will follow Council’s consideration and endorsement of the Heritage Inventory.  It is proposed to exhibit any proposed changes to heritage items by amending Council’s existing Heritage LEP.  This LEP will subsequently be incorporated as a ‘chapter’ in the Penrith Local Plan.

5.   Integrated Local Plan

In recent years the State Government has been gradually implementing reforms to the planning system, in recognition of the need to simplify both the process of making local environmental plans, and the application of those plans and other planning instruments to development.  This process was initiated by the release of the State Government’s planFIRST White Paper in 2001 which recommended that all councils be compelled to prepare a single, integrated local plan, containing all the statutory and non-statutory planning provisions relevant for a local government area.

 

In September 2004 the State Government released a Discussion Paper providing a broad overview of the Department’s intended approach to an integrated Citywide Local Environmental Plan (LEP).  This was followed by the release of a draft Standard Template for LEPs, for comment, on 22 September 2005.  Council made submissions to both of these documents, with the submission to the draft Standard Template raising concerns regarding the degree of standardisation and mandatory provisions included in the LEP, and the capacity for the Template to allow for the articulation of local conditions, and appropriately reflect local strategic planning.

 

On 31 March 2006, the NSW Government gazetted the Standard Instrument (Local Environmental Plans) Order 2006.  All councils are now required to prepare a single LEP Template for their local government area, which conforms to the Standard Template, within the next five years.  Penrith Council has been advised that it is a ‘two year’ Council, with an identified completion date of 31 March 2008.  Over the past six months, however, a number of Department of Planning processes, relevant to the preparation of the City’s new Local Plan, have been delayed, including the Sub Regional Planning Framework, the development of requirements for new Local Plan maps, the proposed six-month Penrith City Centre planning exercise, and the proposed preparation of a Rural Lands Policy.  In recognising the impact of these delays, the Department has indicated that it may consider an extension, if necessary, to Council’s two-year timeframe.

 

The task of preparing a new Local Environmental Plan for the whole LGA is complex and, given the magnitude of the task, Council has consistently endorsed an approach whereby the Plan is developed in stages.  This will allow incorporation of Strategies as they are completed, and ensure that resources are directed most effectively.  The Department of Planning agreed in-principle to this approach, provided that the initial stage sets the framework for the entire Plan, so that compliance with the Template can be demonstrated.  A comprehensive and sequenced approach for the preparation of the Plan has been developed, and a software package installed which will enable electronic delivery of not just the Local Plan, but a comprehensive Development Control Plan as well.

 

Council, at its meeting of 10 October 2005, resolved to prepare a draft LEP and draft Development Control Plan (DCP) for the City of Penrith.  In accordance with Section 54 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 (the Act) Council notified the Department of Planning of its intention to prepare a single and integrated draft LEP, and an accompanying DCP, for the City.  Council’s notification has been considered by the Department’s LEP Review Panel who has advised that ‘Written Authorisation’ to exercise any functions under delegation has not been issued in respect of this draft LEP.  This means that Council can continue to prepare the draft LEP, but will need to seek the Department’s authorisation to publicly exhibit the draft LEP at the appropriate time.  The Department has determined that there is no need for an environmental study to be prepared in relation to the draft LEP.

 

Section 34A consultations with the Department of Environment and Conservation and Section 62 consultations with relevant statutory authorities and organisations, as required under the Act, on the draft Penrith Local Plan, have been completed.  Comments on matters to be considered in the comprehensive DCP for the City were also sought.

 

The integrated Penrith Local Plan will implement all of the strategic planning which has been undertaken in recent years, as well as that which is currently underway, or due to be commenced within the next 12 months.  The completed work includes the adopted Rural Lands Strategy and the Biodiversity Strategy, as well as the Heritage Study, the Employment Strategy, and the City Centres’ Vitality and Viability Review, which are currently underway.  Additionally, the Residential Strategy Review, which will include developing contemporary responses for managing redevelopment in our older established residential neighbourhoods, and the Integrated Land Use and Transport Study, will commence in the next 12 months and will be incorporated into a later stage of the Local Plan.

 

Another key element of the planning reforms is that ultimately only one Development Control Plan (DCP) will be able to apply to a particular site.  The intention of this component of the reforms is to reduce the number of DCPs, making it easier for planning authorities, business, and the community to determine the planning controls that apply to a site.

 

Council initially commenced this process by combining all existing and adopted DCPs into one DCP for the City.  Draft Development Control Plan 2006 (DCP 2006) was publicly exhibited from 7 March 2006 to 7 April 2006. 

 

Council has also sought the Department of Planning’s endorsement of the procedural LEP amendments required to make DCP 2006 have effect.  The LEP procedural amendments relate to four LEPs, which contain clauses that specifically reference an existing adopted DCP within the City.  It is intended that the outcomes of the public exhibition of Draft DCP 2006 will be reported to Council, following agreement from the Department with regard to the LEP procedural amendments.

 

The next stage, in relation to a comprehensive DCP for the City, will be an extensive review of all DCPs, Codes and Policies applicable to Penrith.  This review will occur in conjunction with the preparation of the integrated Local Plan, enabling the development of the complete suite of planning controls for each area.  The new DCP ‘chapters’ will be exhibited concurrently with the ‘chapters’ of the Local Plan.  This approach provides a consistent review which is intended to give the community greater certainty regarding the new planning controls that will apply in their areas.

6.   People’s Lifestyle Aspirations and Needs Study – ‘PLANS for our future’

The ‘PLANS for our Future’ project commenced in July 2002 with the appointment of Urbis and Stratcorp Consulting.  The project included strategic research, City wide demographic and socio economic analysis, existing facilities and services audit, recreation and cultural needs assessment, established residential areas infrastructure, facilities and services needs assessment, and City wide community consultation.

 

The PLANS Study formed the basis for the development of the Recreation and Cultural Facilities Strategy, the Established Residential Areas Infrastructure, Facilities and Services Strategy, a Section 94 Strategy and Section 94 Plan Framework.  Council endorsed the final PLANS Strategies (Recreation and Cultural Facilities, and Established Residential Areas Infrastructure, Facilities and Services) on 15 March 2004.

 

One of the key priorities from the Recreation and Cultural Facilities Strategy is to develop an Open Space Action Plan.  Development of the Open Space Action Plan involved categorising and mapping the City’s open space assets, conducting site visits and detailed investigations to establish priorities, and identifying opportunities for open space rationalisation.

 

Council, on 5 December 2005, endorsed the public exhibition of the draft Open Space Action Plan and draft Open Space Development Contributions Plan, from Monday 16 January to Monday 27 February 2006.  The draft Open Space Action Plan incorporates the strategic directions from the PLANS Report, and provides an outline of the open space network within each of the City’s 12 ‘cluster’ areas.  The draft Open Space Development Contributions Plan outlines the provision of, and improvements to, active and passive recreation facilities and infrastructure within the City to 2020, based on the PLANS recommendations.

 

On 20 June 2005, Council resolved to allocate $80,000 per ward from the Open Space Development Contributions Plan for the construction of pathways within some of Council’s District Parks.  The development of new pathways in South Creek Park, Tench Reserve and Werrington Creek Park were proposed, and works have commenced.

 

A key focus for the remainder of 2006, following completion of the Open Space Action Plan, is the development of a Pathways and Cycleways Network that will aim to provide improved linkages for the Citywide ‘destinational’ and ‘recreational’ pathways system.  The work being done on the Open Space Action Plan is providing information that contributes to improved open space standards, including the adoption of Universal Design standards to improve access within the City's pathway network.

 

The establishment of a National Centre of Excellence in Universal Design, in partnership with the University of Western Sydney, is also being pursued as recommended in PLANS.  A separate report is included in tonight’s Business Paper on this matter.

 

A number of Strategy recommendations have been recognised in Council’s 2005 - 2009 Strategic Program, and others are being delivered through Council’s existing services.  This reflects responsibilities across Council for programs such as supporting community groups, continuing to effectively managing Council’s facilities and services, and encouraging new recreation and leisure activities, services and facilities that meet the needs of the City’s existing and future communities.

Summary

We are actively advancing our approaches for achieving more sustainable outcomes for the City.  Those elements will be paramount in the way we look at the future growth of the City, and intrinsic to our planning responses to both new and existing urban areas.

 

The range of planning policy projects to be advanced is extensive, and our resourcing is at full capacity.  At relevant stages in the planning for these projects, there will need to be more detailed discussions, which we will facilitate through regular reports to Council’s Policy Review Committee and project-specific Councillor Workshops.

 

The development of contemporary strategies for biodiversity, employment lands, heritage, recreation and cultural facilities, the older established neighbourhoods, and the City Centres, will guide the development of the new Citywide Integrated Local Plan, and Council’s future policy responses and actions.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the information contained in the report on Status of the City's Major Planning Policy Program be received.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Policy Review Committee Meeting

26 June 2006

The City in its Environment

 

 

The City in its Environment

 

 

8

Penrith City Heritage Study

 

Compiled by:                Terry Agar, Planning Policy Unit Co-ordinator

Authorised by:             Ruth Goldsmith, Local Planning Manager 

Strategic Program Term Achievement: The City’s heritage is being protected and conserved.

Critical Action: Undertake heritage protection and conservation and pursue the effective management of the City’s cultural heritage.

 

Presenters:                   Paul Davies, Heritage Consultant - Paul Davies Pty Ltd, Architects and Heritage Consultants  - Heritage Study    

Purpose:

To advise Council on the status of the Heritage Study (including a proposed workshop to review the Heritage Inventory items and places), to present the Thematic History, and to provide information on the potential for future incentives.  The report recommends that the information be received.

 

Background

The Penrith Heritage LEP was based on a Heritage Study carried out in 1986-1987, and was gazetted in 1991.  In recent years, the City’s communities have identified new places that they believe should be listed and protected as heritage items.  In working with the current Heritage Local Environmental Plan (LEP), some statutory limitations and omissions have also been identified.

To improve the protection and management of places of heritage significance to the community, a review of the previous Heritage Study and Heritage LEP has been undertaken.  The review will assist Council in conserving existing heritage items, and protecting newly identified heritage places.  Council’s consultants, Paul Davies Architect, commenced investigations in March 2004.

At its Policy Review meeting of 21 June 2004, Council considered and adopted the Heritage Study Community Consultation Program, which seeks to obtain community input into the Penrith Heritage Study process.  A Heritage Study Reference Group, composed of a diverse range of representatives with specialised skills and people within the City, has also been established to assist the consultant in undertaking the Heritage Study, and reflect the diversity of interests that will be affected by its outcomes.  The Heritage Study Reference Group includes representatives from the Nepean District Historical Archaeological Group, University of Western Sydney, Penrith Valley Chamber of Commerce, Penrith City Centre Association, St Marys Town Centre Management, St Marys Historical Society, Nepean District Historical Society, and Council’s Local Studies Librarian.

Community meetings were held in Penrith on 17 August 2004 and St Marys on 18 August 2004.  The Heritage Study Reference Group met on 2 November 2004.  The Heritage Study process is now nearing completion, with a Thematic History prepared, Suburb ‘stories’ developed, a draft Inventory prepared, and potential incentives identified.

An extensive public consultation process, and the preparation of new planning controls, will follow Council’s consideration and endorsement of the Heritage Inventory.  It is proposed to exhibit any proposed changes to heritage items by amending Council’s existing Heritage LEP.  This LEP will subsequently be incorporated as a ‘chapter’ in the Penrith Local Plan.

The purpose of the presentation by the consultant Paul Davies is to inform Council of the findings of the Thematic History, and a range of possible incentives for consideration.  A copy of the Thematic History will be provided, under separate cover, to all Councillors.

A Councillor Briefing Session is planned for 10 July 2006.  This workshop will provide an opportunity to present in detail the items and places proposed for inclusion in the Heritage Inventory.  It is also proposed to present the Suburb ‘stories’, which provide a context for existing and new heritage items.

Conclusion

The presentation by the Heritage Study consultant, Paul Davies, will provide insight into the findings of the Thematic History for the City, and summarise the process that has been undertaken.  It will also provide a background and context for the workshop on 10 July 2006, where the proposed Heritage Inventory and Suburb stories may be discussed in detail.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the information contained in the report on Penrith City Heritage Study be received.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


Leadership and Organisation

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

9        Service Specification Program 36/35                                                                                  51

 

10      Proposed Suburb Boundary Re-alignment - Luddenham, Badgerys Creek and Kemps Creek.           60

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting

26 June 2006

Leadership and Organisation

 

 

Leadership and Organisation

 

 

9

Service Specification Program   

36/35

Compiled by:                Eric Shen, Service Specification Officer

Authorised by:             Ross Kingsley, Corporate Development Manager 

Strategic Program Term Achievement: Services and programs that Council provides are determined based on equity, customer requirements, community benefits and best value.

Critical Action: All services are provided to adopted service levels.

     

Purpose:

To provide Council with the draft Service Specifications for the following Services for its consideration - Library Services and Regulatory Control Services. The report recommends that these service specifications be adopted. 

Given the size of these documents, copies have been provided separately to Councillors. Additional copies of any of these documents can be obtained on request.

 

Background

Council established the Service Specification Program in 2002-03 in order to:

1.   Comprehensively analyse and document all services and the present level of service provided (stage 1 of the Program)

2.   Enable Council in a fully informed manner to review and where appropriate adjust service levels to better meet the needs of the community and align to Council’s strategy (stage 2).

Documentation of Council’s 75 external and internal services is a major exercise with significant benefits to the efficient and effective management of the organisation. The program has seen the formal adoption to date of 39 Service Specifications with an additional 2 specifications presented tonight for Council’s consideration. A separate report to tonight’s meeting includes the presentation to Council of the specification for Ripples. A large body of specifications is approaching completion and will be progressively reported to Council in coming months.

Stage 2 of the program, Review and Adjustment of Service Levels, has already been undertaken by Council in selected key areas.  Important decisions have been taken by Council flowing from these reviews, which have been reflected in the 2005-06 and 2006-07 Management Plans.  A more comprehensive review of service levels has commenced and further information on this will be brought to Council during the year.


Assessment of Draft Service Specifications

The draft Service Specifications presented tonight for Council’s consideration are:

·    Library Services (Information Manager)

·    Regulatory Control Services (Waste and Community Protection Manager)

 

Prior to their reporting to Council, all draft specifications undergo a rigorous process of validation and assessment, leading to approval by the Corporate Management Team. The aim is to ensure that each specification accurately communicates the existing levels of service and activities that the service provides in terms of quantity, quality and cost to Council.  Once adopted by Council the specification will be used as the basis for testing service performance and for service review, including any changes to services levels, calls for additional resourcing or for changes in priority setting within an existing service.

As previously determined by Council, all completed draft service specifications are reported to its Policy Review Committee for consideration and adoption. Where additional information or further consideration is required, resulting in a specification not being adopted at that meeting, the relevant specification would be referred to the Services Review Working Party. This working party would be scheduled to meet every quarter or as required. Recommendations from the Services Review Working Party would then be reported to the next Ordinary or Policy Review Committee meeting for adoption.

Summary of Key Information

Service Specifications are very detailed documents. By policy, full documentation is provided under separate cover to all Councillors and is available to the public on request. To assist in Council’s consideration of the draft specifications submitted tonight, executive summaries of the two service specification are provided in the appendices to this report.

These summaries contain :-

·          Service Description

·          Service Objectives

·          Scope of Service

·          Key Statistics

·          Key Performance Indicators

·          Service Funding

·          Service Summary Chart

 

 


Appendix 1 – Executive Summary of Library Services for 2005-06

 

Summary of the Library Services Specification

1. Service Description

 

The Library Service provides informational, educational and recreational facilities, resources, products and services for residents of Penrith and visitors to Penrith.

 

2. Service Objectives

 

·      Manage library resources efficiently and effectively.

·      Provide print and electronic resources that meet the information, recreation and education needs of the community at an appropriate level of quality and quantity.

·      Maximise access to these resources by the community through appropriate physical and electronic infrastructure.

·      Maximise the use of these resources by the community through quality customer information and research services.

·      Maximise community awareness of library services and resources through appropriate promotional and communication methods.

 

3. Link to Management Plan

Issue

Term Achievements

Critical Actions

 

Issue 8 : Cultural development.

The City of Penrith is the cultural hub of Western Sydney

 

TA 8.1 - The city is widely recognized as a centre of cultural diversity, excellence and access..

Deliver quality library services responding to the community’s need for information, learning and leisure

4. Scope of Service

 

The library service is provided from five fixed locations (Penrith, St. Marys, St. Clair, South Penrith and Emu Plains), two mobile services and website services

·      Resource collections in five physical locations

·      Circulation

·      Reference and enquiries

·      Electronic services

·      Programs and events

 

5. Key Performance Indicators (KPIs)

Key Performance Indicators

Target for 2005-06

Number of loans per annum

650,000

Number of library members

65,000

Number of hours of electronic services usage per annum

70,000

Number of visitors to Penrith City Libraries

650,000

Number of volunteers

50

Satisfaction ratings for the provision of library services
(with medium to high satisfaction)

Result from survey

92% in 2003

86% in 2005

 


Other Indicators

 

Circulation, Visitors and New Members for 2004-05

 

Penrith

St Marys

St. Clair

South
Penrith

Emu
Plains

Total

Circulation

483,170
(69%)

133,598
(19%)

43,841
(6%)

30,437
(4%)

12,092
(2%)

703,138

Visitors

476,161
(70%)

124,054
(18%)

33,194
(5%)

40,643
(6%)

3,884
(0.5%)

677,955

New Members

5,622
(69%)

1,548
(19%)

665
(8%)

294
(4%)

81
(1%)

8,129

 

Visitor numbers by Operating Hours in 2004-05

 

Operational Cost Per Customer Visit in 2004-05

 

Facts related to Library Services For 2004-05

·      Collection value - $18,115,000 (Andrew Nock & Associates valuation, 2005)

·      Collection size – 348,418 items

o  Books and media – 280,000 items

o  Toys – 5,500 items

o  Photographs – 59,000 items

·      New books/media acquired – 37,000

·      66 public use PCs– internet, freenet, WP, OPACs

·      137 equipment items

o  this includes photocopiers printing 563,740 copies 2005

6.      Service Funding

The budget for the Library Service is $4,365,717 in 2005-06.  This amount includes all operating costs.  This amount does not include capital costs unless otherwise noted.

 

Expenditure

 

Operational Expenditure

(includes 43 FTE staff representing $2.49 million or 56% of operational budget)

$ 3,500,802

 

Projects:

 

 

 

IM002

Library book and other resource purchases

$ 635,500

 

 

IM003

Library Community Computer Facilities

$   23,000

 

 

IM016

Toy Library Operations

$ 107,818

 

 

IM017

Library Special Projects (Grant - State Library)

$   23,931

 

 

IM018

History of Penrith (Volume 2)

$     2,805

 

 

IM019

Library market research project (Grant - State Library)

$   31,085

 

 

IM020

Library Special Projects-Building (Grant - State Library)

 $   16,250

 

 

IM021

Library Special Projects-Promotion (Grant - State Library)

$   24,526

$    864,915

 

 

 

 

 

Total Expenditure

 

$ 4,365,717

Income

 

Operating Income

 

 $     323,950

 

Library Per Capita Subsidy (NSW State Library)

 

$     331,639

 

Grant Income (State Library)

 

$       91,702

 

Section 94 library book and other resources funding

 

$     125,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Income

 

$     872,291

 

 

 

Net Cost

 

 

($ 3,493,426)

 

This service is to be provided within this funding.  No additional funds will be provided unless authorised by a resolution of Council.

 

Any amount unspent as at year ended 30th June 2006 will be returned to Council’s General Funds, except for any approved carry forwards (revotes) or grants with special conditions attached.


7.       Service Summary Chart

 

 

Library Services

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1. Management & Administration

 

 

2. Resources

 

 

3. Access

 

1.1 Planning

1.2 Research and analysis

1.3 Evaluation and reporting

1.4 Financial management & administration

1.5 Human resource management & administration

1.6 Policy & procedures

1.7 Networking

1.8 Office administration

 

2.1 Selection & purchasing

2.2 Receiving & accessioning

2.3 Cataloguing

2.4 Indexing

2.5 Physical processing

2.6 Quality assurance

2.7 Binding, repairs & conservation

2.8 Resource creation & maintenance

2.9 Serials and electronic resources

2.10 Donations

 

3.1 Building provision and maintenance

3.2 Room hire

3.3 Equipment provision, maintenance & support

3.4 Computerized Library Management System design, development & maintenance

3.5 Library Intranet provision & maintenance

3.6 Library IT systems provision & maintenance

3.7 Monitor system

3.8 Council Website provision and maintenance

 

 

 

 

 

 

4. Usage

 

5. Promotion

 

 

 

4.1 Customers & membership

4.2 Shelf tidy

4.3 Circulation

4.4 Reserves

4.5 Overdues

4.6 Deliveries

4.7 Reference and Enquires

4.8 Specialist information /Enquiries

4.9 Inter Library Loans

 

 

5.1 Promotional programs

5.2 Promotional events

5.3 Displays

5.4 Publicity, PR & Advertising

 

 

 


Appendix 2 – Executive Summary of Regulatory Control Services
for 2005-06

 

Summary of the Regulatory Control Services Specification

1. Service Description

 

The Regulatory Control Service provides regulation of on-street and Council parking areas, protection of public lands, community property/facilities, and enforcement of regulatory compliance issues through patrols, education and issuing of infringement notices by Rangers.

 

2. Service Objectives

 

To meet the organisational outcomes the Regulatory Control Service will: 

 

Ø Enhance opportunities for parking through diligent review and management of Council’s parking program for Council Car parks, Schools and On-Street Parking Areas

Ø Ensure a safe environment for residents and visitors through recognition and removal of unauthorised or illegal activities

Ø Improve traffic and pedestrian safety

Ø Provide sustainable enhancement of safety and parking facilities by putting fine revenue in to reserves

 

3. Link to Management Plan

Issues

Term Achievements

Critical Actions

Issue 25:

Local Road Network

TA 25.2 - A parking management plan addressing the provision and utilisation of improved parking within the centres and other key locations

Develop and implement the recommendations of a Parking Management Plan for the City Centres and other key locations.

Issue 19:

Look of the City

TA 19.1 - Council’s planning policies, land use, regulatory controls and asset management practices enhance the visual amenity of the City.

Conduct regulatory and compliance programs, focussing on prominent City locations and illegal signage.

Issue 28:

Emergency Management

TA 28.1 - Plans are developed and implemented in partnership with emergency service agencies to provide emergency services and facilities to the City.

Provide support during local emergencies as requested by emergency services.

4. Scope of Service

 

Patrol Control - Council Car Parks

·      80 Council car park patrols each week.

·      Patrol covers 27 car parks

·      Average of 80 infringement notices per week

 

Patrol Control – On-street

·      Patrol 3 designated areas – minimum of 80 person hours of patrol per week

·      Patrols scheduled from 8am to 5pm Monday to Saturday

·      Average of 130 infringement notices per week.

 

Patrol Control – Schools

·      10 schools patrolled per week covering 76 schools focussing on education and cautions

·      Patrols occur from 8am to 9.30am and from 2pm to 3.30pm on school days

·      Average of 20 infringement notices per week

 

Customer Service

·      3,600 enquiries responded to per annum

 

Court Appearance

·      30 Court appearances per annum

·      Average of 19.5 hours per case to prepare evidence and reports, meetings with prosecutor and appearance in court

 

5. Key Performance Indicators (KPIs)

Key Performance Indicators

Target

Average number of hours of regulation of Councils 27 car parks 

80 hours per week

Number of hours of regulation of on street parking 

80 hours per week

Average number of patrols of on-street parking and pedestrian crossings adjacent to schools 

10 patrols per week

Days in which 90% abandoned motor vehicles removed from notification

within 14 days

Hours in which 95% of responses to request for assistance are provided

within 48 hours

Patrol designated areas of the City to monitor compliance

45 patrols per ranger per month

6.      Service Funding

The annual budget for the Regulatory Control Service is $ 858,240 in 2005-06.  This amount includes all operating costs.  This amount does not include capital costs unless otherwise noted.

 

Service/Sub-Service

2005-2006 Allocation

Traffic and Parking Regulation / Enforcement

$395,776

Regulatory control in public areas

$285,674

Provisional Sum : IPB (Infringement Processing Bureau) & other payments

$ 193,000

Total Allocation for 2005-2006

$ 874,450

Income from traffic and parking enforcement

($629,694)

Income from regulatory control

($15,000)

Net Cost of the Regulatory Control Service

$ 229,756

This service is to be provided within this funding.  No additional funds will be provided unless authorised by a resolution of Council.

 

Any amount unspent as at year ended 30th June 2006 from the Traffic and Parking function will be returned to the traffic and parking reserve, except for any approved carry forwards (revotes) or grants with special conditions attached.

 

Any amount unspent as at year ended 30th June 2006 from the general regulatory area will be returned to Council’s General Funds, except for any approved carry forwards (revotes) or grants with special conditions attached.

 

7.       Service Summary Chart

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on the Service Specification Program be received

2.     The specification for the Library Services be adopted

3.     The specification for the Regulatory Control service be adopted

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Policy Review Committee Meeting

26 June 2006

Leadership and Organisation

 

 

Leadership and Organisation

 

 

10

Proposed Suburb Boundary Re-alignment - Luddenham, Badgerys Creek and Kemps Creek.   

 

Compiled by:                Glenn McCarthy, Executive Officer

Authorised by:             Glenn McCarthy, Executive Officer 

Strategic Program Term Achievement: Council has reviewed its own role and operations and has adopted contemporary practices to best discharge its charter.

Critical Action: Review current structures and procedures supporting Council and Councillors' responsibilities.

  

Previous Items:            Proposed Suburb Boundary Changes - Luddenham, Badgerys Creek and Kemps Creek - Policy Review Committee - 23 May 2005  

Purpose:

To provide Council with details of the community consultation undertaken in relation to the proposed re-alignment of the suburb boundaries between the suburbs of Luddenham, Badgerys Creek and Kemps Creek. The report recommends that a submission be made to the Geographical Names Board to change the alignment of the suburb boundaries as outlined in the report.

 

Background

Under the provisions of the Geographical Names Act 1966, the Geographical Names Board (GNB) has the power and the function to approve suburb and locality names and boundaries. The boundaries of all suburbs within the City of Penrith were approved by the GNB and notified in the NSW Government Gazette on 10 October 1997.

Current Situation

The rural residential and golf course development known as “Twin Creeks” is in four (4) stages with Stage 1 being wholly within the suburb of Luddenham and the subsequent stages being wholly within the suburb of Badgerys Creek. In these circumstances it is prudent to take action to avoid the situation where a single residential area falls into two or more suburbs so that postal/delivery and emergency/enforcement service providers are not hampered.

When this matter was last reported to the Policy Review Committee, the Committee requested that a public consultation process be implemented to ascertain the view of the owners of properties affected by the proposed changes, particularly those on Luddenham Road, Luddenham. Further discussions have since been held with representatives of the developer, Twin Creeks Properties Pty Ltd as the owner of the land holdings that would be most affected by the proposed suburb boundary re-alignment. These discussions were delayed due in part to a change in staff at Twin Creeks Properties Pty Ltd.

Council has received two responses to the 156 letters sent to the owners of properties in Luddenham Road, Luddenham and Mamre Road, Kemps Creek. In addition to direct mail, advertisements were placed in the Penrith Press advising that submissions on the proposed suburb boundary re-alignment would be received until 21 March 2006.

Submissions

One submission received from Phillip Thompson and Associates, Solicitors, acting for the owners of 642 Luddenham Road, Luddenham (Lot 11 DP594600), suggests a minor change to the proposed suburb boundary re-alignment to the south of that lot. The reason for this is that the access handle to Lot 11 is currently separated from the rest of the lot by the current suburb boundary. The suggested change is supported as it results in the whole of Lot 11 being incorporated into the one suburb.

The other submission was received from Twin Creeks Properties Pty Ltd advising of their support of the proposed re-alignment of the suburb boundary so that the Twin Creeks rural residential golf course development is within one suburb (Luddenham) rather than divided into two suburbs, as is presently the case.

Conclusion

It is suggested that the boundary between the suburbs of Luddenham and Badgerys Creek be re-aligned to follow the southern boundary of Lot 11 DP 594600 (642 Luddenham Road, Luddenham) and the southern boundary of the Twin Creeks development as depicted in the attached plan – Attachment 1.

The opportunity is also being taken to align the rear (western) boundaries of 805-859 Mamre Road, Kemps Creek.

Any changes to the existing suburb boundaries or new suburb name must be submitted to the GNB for their approval. Council does not have the power to formally adopt suburb boundaries or names itself. The GNB will publicly exhibit the draft boundary adjustments for a month, providing a further opportunity for public comment.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Proposed Suburb Boundary Re-alignment - Luddenham, Badgerys Creek and Kemps Creek. be received

2.     A submission be made to the Geographical Names Board seeking the re-alignment of the boundary between the suburbs of Luddenham, Badgerys Creek and Kemps Creek as depicted on the attached plan.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1. View

Proposed Re-alignment of Suburb Boundaries

1 Page

Appendix

 


Policy Review Committee Meeting

26 June 2006

Appendix 1 - Proposed Re-alignment of Suburb Boundaries

 

 

 

 


 

ATTACHMENTS   

 

 

Date of Meeting:          Monday 26 June 2006

Master Program:          The City in its Broader Context

Issue:                            Regional Growth

Report Title:                WSROC Strategic Program Activities

Attachments:                WSROC 2004-2008 Strategic Plan February 2006 Progress Report



Policy Review Committee Meeting

26 June 2006

Attachment 1 - WSROC 2004-2008 Strategic Plan February 2006 Progress Report