20 July 2006

 

Dear Councillor,

In pursuance of the provisions of the Local Government Act, 1993 and the Regulations thereunder, notice is hereby given that a POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING of Penrith City Council is to be held in the Passadena Room, Civic Centre, 601 High Street, Penrith on Monday 24 July 2006 at 7:00PM.

Attention is directed to the statement accompanying this notice of the business proposed to be transacted at the meeting.

Yours Faithfully

 

 

Alan Travers

General Manager

 

BUSINESS

 

1.           APOLOGIES

 

2.           LEAVE OF ABSENCE

Leave of absence has been granted to:

Councillor Pat Sheehy - 14 July 2006 to 9 August 2006 inclusive.

 

3.           CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES

Policy Review Committee Meeting - 26 June 2006.

 

4.           DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

Pecuniary Interest (The Act requires Councillors who declare a pecuniary interest in an item to leave the meeting during discussion of that item)

Non-Pecuniary Interest

 

5.           ADDRESSING THE MEETING

 

6.           MAYORAL MINUTES

 

7.           NOTICES OF MOTION

 

8.           ADOPTION OF REPORTS AND RECOMMENDATION OF COMMITTEES

 

9.           MASTER PROGRAM REPORTS

 

10.         URGENT REPORTS (to be dealt with in the master program to which the item relates)

 

11.         QUESTIONS WITHOUT NOTICE

 

12.         COMMITTEE OF THE WHOLE


POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING

 

Monday 24 July 2006

 

table of contents

 

 

 

 

 

 

meeting calendar

 

 

confirmation of minutes

 

 

master program reports

 


MEETING CALENDAR

 

February 2006 - December 2006

 

 

TIME

FEB

MAR

APRIL

MAY

JUNE

JULY

AUG

SEPT

OCT

NOV

DEC

 

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

 

Ordinary Meetings

7.00 pm

6

6

3

1v

5

3

7

4ü

9

6

4

 

20 #+

 

 

15 #

19*

17

21#+

18

25^

23

20 #

11

 

Policy Review Committee

7.00 pm

27

20@

 

22

26

24

14

11@

16

13

 

 

 

#  Meetings at which the Management Plan quarterly reviews are presented.

v Meeting at which the Draft Management Plan is adopted for exhibition

 

#+  General Manager’s presentation – half year and end of year review

*   Meeting at which the Management Plan for 2006/2007 is adopted

 

@  Strategic Program progress reports (only business)

ü  Meeting at which the 2005/2006 Annual Statements are presented

 

 

^   Election of Mayor/Deputy Mayor (only business)

 

·         Council has two Ordinary Meetings per month where practicable.

·         Extraordinary Meetings are held as required.

·         Policy Review Meetings are held monthly where practicable.

·         Members of the public are invited to observe meetings (Ordinary & Policy Review) of the Council.

Should you wish to address Council, please contact the Executive Officer, Glenn McCarthy on 47327649.

 

 


UNCONFIRMED MINUTES

 OF THE POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING OF PENRITH CITY COUNCIL HELD IN THE PASSADENA ROOM, PENRITH

ON MONDAY 26 JUNE 2006 AT 7:00PM

PRESENT

His Worship the Mayor Councillor John Thain, Councillors Jim Aitken OAM, Kaylene Allison, Kevin Crameri OAM, Greg Davies, Mark Davies, Ross Fowler, Garry Rumble, Steve Simat (arrived 7:09PM) and Pat Sheehy AM.

 

APOLOGIES

34  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Pat Sheehy seconded Councillor Ross Fowler that apologies be received and accepted for Councillors Karen McKeown Lexie Cettolin and David Bradbury.

 

LEAVE OF ABSENCE

Leave of Absence was previously granted to Councillor Jackie Greenow for 26 June 2006.

Leave of Absence was previously granted to Councillor Susan Page for the period 5 June 2006 to 26 June 2006 inclusive.

It was noted that Councillor Steve Simat who was previously granted Leave of Absence for the period 19 June to 8 July 2006 inclusive, had returned and arrived at the meeting. the time being 7:09PM.

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES - Policy Review Committee Meeting - 22 May 2006

35  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Pat Sheehy seconded Councillor Garry Rumble that the minutes of the Policy Review Committee Meeting of 22 May 2006 be confirmed.

 

His Worship the Mayor, Councillor John Thain, welcomed to the meeting Ms Bronwynn Nosworthy from the Internal Audit Bureau who is conducting a review of Council’s operations as part of the Department of Local Government’s “Promoting Better Practice” program.

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

 There were no declarations of interest.

 

MASTER PROGRAM REPORTS

 

The City in its Broader Context

Council’s Planning Manager, Mr Roger Nethercote, introduced the Executive Director of the Western Sydney Regional Organisation of Councils (WSROC), Mr Alex Gooding who gave a short presentation on programs and activities undertaken by WSROC’s in delivering its 2004-08 strategic plan.

Councillor Steve Simat arrived at the meeting the time being 7:09PM.

1        WSROC Strategic Program Activities                                                                              

PRC 36  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Ross Fowler seconded Councillor Garry Rumble that the information contained in the report on WSROC Strategic Program Activities be received.

 

The City as a Social Place

3               City of Penrith Regional Indoor Aquatic and Recreation Centre Ltd – Ripples

The Chairman of Penrith Regional Indoor Aquatic and Recreation Centre Ltd, Councillor Ross Fowler introduced the report and said that Ripples’ business model was very good and had won awards.  He said that a number of other facilities had used a similar model, which was one of the challenges Ripples now faced.

Councillor Fowler introduced the General Manager of Ripples, Mr Geoff Yates.

Mr Yates outlined the challenges and issues that Ripples needed to address, as outlined in the report.

His Worship the Mayor, Councillor John Thain left the meeting the time being 7:21PM.

His Worship the Mayor, Councillor John Thain returned to the meeting the time being 7:22PM.

PRC 37  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Pat Sheehy seconded Councillor Kaylene Allison

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on City of Penrith Regional Indoor Aquatic and Recreation Centre Ltd - Ripples be received

2.     Council endorse officers’ actions in advancing $290,000, such sum to be treated as a subsidy and the appropriate budget allocation be made as part of the June 2006 year end review

3.     Council agree to provide Ripples with an operating subsidy of $220,000 for the 2006-07 financial year

4.     In view of the Ripples Board’s request for a 2006/7 subsidy of $250,000, a progress report on Ripples financial performance be submitted to Council in conjunction with Council’s December 2006 quarterly financial review

5.     The Service Specification for Ripples as outlined in this report be adopted.

The City In Its Environment

6        Landscape Character Strategy

Council’s Design and Technical Advice Manager, Mr Craig Ross, introduced the report and consultant, Mr Brett Newbold of Brett Newbold Urban Planning Ltd to answer questions about the Landscape Character Strategy.

Councillor Kevin Crameri asked for clarification of the phrase “on an opportunistic basis” on page 39 of the business paper.

Mr Newbold said that the strategy would be applied as opportunities presented themselves in the normal course of events.

Councillor Mark Davies left the meeting the time being 7:43PM

Councillor Mark Davies returned to the meeting the time being 7:43PM

PRC 38  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Steve Simat seconded Councillor Pat Sheehy

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on the Landscape Character Strategy be received.

2.     The Landscape Character Strategy and supporting Background Papers be endorsed.

3.     The prioritised list of key sites and actions be the subject of a further report to Council.

8               Penrith City Heritage Study

Council’s Planning Policy Unit Coordinator, Mr Terry Agar, introduced heritage consultant, Mr Paul Davies, who gave a short presentation on the Penrith Heritage Study.

PRC 39  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Kevin Crameri seconded Councillor Jim Aitken that the information contained in the report on Penrith City Heritage Study be received.

 

The City in its Broader Context

 

2        The Development of a National Centre for Universal Design at the University of Western Sydney                                                                                                                                 

PRC 40  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Pat Sheehy seconded Councillor Garry Rumble

That:

1.   The information contained in the report on The Development of a National Centre for Universal Design at the University of Western Sydney be received.

2.   Council write to the Vice Chancellor of the University of Western Sydney formally indicating its commitment to the proposal, including contributing to the Research Project and development of a Business Plan.

 

The City as a Social Place

4        Erskine Park Employment Area - Naming of the Estate and Renaming of Lenore Lane        

PRC 41  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Steve Simat

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Erskine Park Employment Area - Naming of the Estate and Renaming of Lenore Lane be received

2.     Council endorse ‘Lenore Drive’ as the new name for Lenore Lane and formally advertise the proposed road name in accordance with the requirements of the Roads (General) Regulation 2000.

3.     A further report on the naming of the Erskine Park Employment Area be brought to Council after further consultation with landowners on possible names for the site.

 

The City In Its Environment

 

5        Implementation of the Mulgoa/Wallacia Sewerage Scheme                                            

PRC 42  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Ross Fowler seconded Councillor Pat Sheehy

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Implementation of the Mulgoa/Wallacia Sewerage Scheme be received

2.     Council pay for the cost of solids removal from existing septic tanks for premises in the nominated catchment that connect to the Mulgoa/Wallacia Sewerage Scheme within twelve months from the time that the sewer becomes available for connection

3.     A further report be brought to Council detailing the options for assisting residents to connect to the scheme, in circumstances where the cost of connection may result in financial hardship.

Councillor Greg Davies left the meeting the time being 8:45PM. and did not return.

7        Status of the City's Major Planning Policy Program                                                        

PRC 43  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Ross Fowler seconded Councillor Pat Sheehy that the information contained in the report on Status of the City's Major Planning Policy Program be received.

 

Leadership and Organisation

9   Service Specification Program

Councillor Jim Aitken left the meeting the time being 8:49PM.

Councillor Jim Aitken returned to the meeting the time being 8:50PM.

PRC 44  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Kevin Crameri seconded Councillor Ross Fowler

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on the Service Specification Program be received

2.     The specification for the Library Services be adopted

3.     The specification for the Regulatory Control service be adopted.

 

10      Proposed Suburb Boundary Re-alignment - Luddenham, Badgerys Creek and Kemps Creek.                                                                                                                                             

PRC 45  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Steve Simat seconded Councillor Mark Davies

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Proposed Suburb Boundary Re-alignment - Luddenham, Badgerys Creek and Kemps Creek be received

2.     A submission be made to the Geographical Names Board seeking the re-alignment of the boundary between the suburbs of Luddenham, Badgerys Creek and Kemps Creek as depicted on the attached plan.

There being no further business the Chairperson declared the meeting closed the time being 8:52PM.

 

    



 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

The City in its Broader Context

 

1        Results of the Survey of the Agricultural Business Sector in Penrith                                        1

 

2        Proposed Membership of the Hawkesbury Harvest Network                                              13

 

3        St Marys Town Centre Strategy                                                                                         17

 

4        Penrith City Centre Strategy                                                                                               25

 

5        Penrith Regional Cities Taskforce                                                                                        37

 

The City as a Social Place

 

6        Disability Access Committee 2004-06 Highlights                                                                 43

 

7        ADI Site, St Marys - Request by Delfin Lend Lease for Declaration of Remaining Precincts on the ADI Site as Release Areas                                                                                                         46

 

The City as an Economy

 

8        Penrith City Centre Association and St Mary's Town Centre Association Business Plans for 2006-07                                                                                                                                             61

 

9        Penrith Valley Economic Development Corporation Business Plan 2006-07                        65

 

The City Supported by Infrastructure

 

10      Agreed Stormwater Drainage Capacity Standards                                                               73

 

Leadership and Organisation

 

11      Service Specification Program                                                                                            79

 

12      Proposed Policy on Grant Applications by Staff                                                                  86

 

 


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


The City in its Broader Context

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

1        Results of the Survey of the Agricultural Business Sector in Penrith                                        1

 

2        Proposed Membership of the Hawkesbury Harvest Network                                              13

 

3        St Marys Town Centre Strategy                                                                                         17

 

4        Penrith City Centre Strategy                                                                                               25

 

5        Penrith Regional Cities Taskforce                                                                                        37

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting

24 July 2006

The City in its Broader Context

 

 

The City in its Broader Context

 

 

1

Results of the Survey of the Agricultural Business Sector in Penrith   

 

Compiled by:                Julianne Christie, Economic Development Analyst

Authorised by:             Bijai Kumar, Local Economic Development Program Manager 

Strategic Program Term Achievement: Council’s adopted strategy is being implemented as the basis for future rural land use decisions.

Critical Action: Facilitate economic development opportunities that promote leading practice rural land use and sustainable, commercially viable agriculture activities and are consistent with the Rural Lands Strategy.

     

Purpose:

To inform Council of the results of the agricultural business survey in Penrith and the proposal to seek Commonwealth support to introduce a range of business programs in the sector.

 

Background

Issue six in the City in its Broader Context master program relates to Sustainable Rural Lands and requires the implementation of Council’s adopted strategy as the basis for future rural land use decisions. One critical action that underscores this issue is “Facilitate economic development opportunities that promote leading practice land use and sustainable, commercially viable agricultural activities and are consistent with the Rural Lands Strategy.”

A UWS summer research student, Ms Tracy Burton, was hired in November 2005 to conduct a five week study on Penrith’s agri-businesses and provide Council with an overview describing the characteristics and contributions of the sector to the local economy, and to assess the impediments to growing commercial agri-businesses.

Agricultural Business survey

In 2001 over 9,000 people were employed in the Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing industry in the Sydney Metropolitan Area, and while a large proportion were directly employed within agriculture itself, as many as 5,000 more were employed in related industries such as transport and food processing. 

As at financial year ended 2002, the value of the agricultural industry within Penrith LGA was in the order of $71m, and constituted almost 2% of Penrith’s gross regional product. The industry also provided employment for close to 700 full time equivalent people.

In December 2005 Council conducted a survey of agricultural businesses in Penrith. Of the 300 surveys sent out some 48 responses were received representing a response rate of 16%. A further 19 responses were received after the closing date raising the response rate to 22%.

The survey was designed to identify the barriers and impediments that agricultural businesses may encounter with particular focus on economic viability, social identity and environmental sustainability.  Identification of business types was also relevant in determining employment opportunities and any employment related issues. The destination of agricultural produce and methods of transport to ascertain the current transport modes was also explored, as was ways to ensure future sustainability of agriculture in the Penrith LGA.  The survey responses will allow Council to develop additional valuable programs to meet the vision of the Rural Lands Strategy.

The major findings of this research include the following:

·    A large number of agricultural business owners are from a non-English speaking background (NESB) and this needs to be addressed in terms of future communications with industry participants in light of any negative and positive impacts on economic, social and environmental contributions from the sector;

·    The main agricultural business activity based on the respondents from the survey is Grazing (16%); the category of “Other” included Beekeeping, Pigs, Hobby agriculture etc and was the second highest type of business (13%), followed by Nurseries and Horses (each with 12%).

·    Most of the produce is transported by truck (61%) and delivered to the Sydney Metropolitan Area (41%).

·    The agricultural industry is largely stable with 89% of businesses having been established for more than five years.

·    The largest age group of business operators is 45+ years and opportunities exist to increase the representation of other age groups by encouraging younger generations into the agricultural industry.

·    Survey respondents were interested in business growth opportunities and most respondents would like to expand regionally.

·    Most survey respondents were apprehensive regarding opportunities within Tourism, Farm Stays and Agricultural Tourism, yet, (58%) were concerned for the future of agricultural business. 

·    Only 19% of respondents were interested in an agricultural awards night.

·    Only 15% of respondents have received assistance or information from the Penrith Economic Development Corporation (PVEDC).

·    Word of mouth is the largest advertising or marketing strategy selected in agricultural businesses with 22 survey respondents out of 48 using this method. 

·    Overall 58% of respondents rated Council services as adequate or higher.

The key survey recommendations included the following:

·    An opportunity exists for succession planning to provide assistance to our farmers creating additional wealth and sustainable agricultural business.

·    Explore funding options for consultants to work in close liaison with willing business owners to develop business plans/investment proposals.

·    Undertake workshops for agricultural networking, business planning, access to working capital and time management and to discuss the benefits of these initiatives.

·    An information pack and sustainability kit could be provided to agricultural business owners that showed an interest in attending a workshop or discussion on agricultural sustainability.

·    Address the language barrier between council and land owners from NESB

·    Establish ways to consolidate and reduce the number of trucks used to transport produce to reduce emissions into the environment and to reduce overall transport costs, thereby increasing local profit margins.

·    Increasing younger agricultural business owner participation in the industry by the use of incentives and positive marketing strategies to ensure the sustainability of agriculture.

·    Increase the awareness of positive effects of tourism within agriculture and implement other business and marketing strategies that aim to promote the agricultural industry.

·    Encourage agricultural business network establishment and promote membership.

·    Continue to build Council’s reputation as taking positive initiatives to benefit the community.

·    Hold a public forum to discuss agricultural issues of concern.

·    Possibility to extend the Farmers Market should be explored to allow for a bigger business base to attract a more diverse market.

The Greater Western Sydney Economic Development Board [GWSEDB] also conducted a Agriculture Industry Roundtable meeting in Penrith in March 2006 jointly with the NSW Department of Primary Industry. The aim of the meeting was to examine the key issues affecting growth and identify programs that would deliver genuine on the ground outcomes for agricultural businesses. Discussion topics included implications of the Metro Strategy; maintaining viable agricultural businesses; supply chain relationships; impacts of national and international competition; and issues associated with environmental and conservation, skills shortages and the role of government in urban agriculture. The meeting was attended by farmers, business organisations, Councils, state and federal government agencies and UWS representatives.

The meeting reaffirmed most of the survey findings and concluded that the Sydney Basin farmers were in a dire strait and their ongoing financial viability and sustainability would be severely impeded unless:

·    Government attitude to farming changes and appropriate planning controls are introduced to secure their future commercial viability and sustainability

·    The monopoly being exercised by companies like Coles and Woolworths who control the supply chain through predatory pricing is broken to give farmers some control over their profit margins. There was unanimous support from the meeting for this issue to be addressed as high priority by government.

The GWSED Board will be presented with the key issues discussed at the meeting with priority issues identified for action by the three levels of government and industry organisations representing farmers.

Succession Planning for Agricultural Development Excellence (SPADE)- a funding proposal to the Commonwealth

In November 2005 the Commonwealth government announced its Small Business Entrepreneurship Funding Program, which is about fostering greater entrepreneurship in small businesses to help them grow and achieve their full potential. The Program consists of a Business Skills Development Program that is further split into Training and Mentoring and Incubators with a theme focusing on young entrepreneurs. The second element of the funding programs deals with Succession Planning and its theme is business continuity.

SPADE is a proposal for funding a business continuity program for sustainable urban agricultural businesses in Penrith and if successful it will be delivered in partnership with such organisations as the NSW Department of Primary Industries and NSW Farmers Association.  A total of $280,000 is being sought from the Commonwealth under the succession planning part of the funding program. If the funding proposal is successful part of the funds will be applied in developing a best practice model for replication in other industry sectors in Penrith. The project has received the support of the local federal member the Hon Jackie Kelly, the NSW Department of Primary Industries and the NSW Farmers Association.

 

Council was advised in early June that its application, comprehensive though it was, had not been successful in securing Commonwealth funding support. A list of successful applicants is provided with the report, and includes some $1.25 million awarded to Ernst and Young to deliver a succession planning program for small business across Australia.

 

Council has also written to the Penrith Valley Economic Development Corporation requesting that consideration be given to extending its business services to the agricultural community in Penrith. The letter was tabled at the Board meeting of the PVEDC in April where it was agreed that the matter would be more appropriately addressed in the upcoming review of its strategic program. Council is yet to be advised of the final outcome of its request.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Results of the Survey of the Agricultural Business Sector in Penrith be received

2.     Representations be made to the State Government through the Greater Western Sydney Economic Development Board to examine and address the issue of predatory pricing by major buyers of agricultural produce in the Sydney basin.

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1. View

Building Entrepreneurship in Small Business - Round 1- Successful Projects

8 Pages

Appendix

 


Policy Review Committee Meeting

24 July 2006

Appendix 1 - Building Entrepreneurship in Small Business - Round 1- Successful Projects

 

 

 









Policy Review Committee Meeting

24 July 2006

The City in its Broader Context

 

 

The City in its Broader Context

 

 

2

Proposed Membership of the Hawkesbury Harvest Network

 

Compiled by:                Wayne Mitchell, Environmental Health Manager

Authorised by:             Wayne Mitchell, Environmental Health Manager 

Strategic Program Term Achievement: A network is advancing best practice commercial rural land use.

Critical Action: Promote leading practice rural land use and sustainable, commercially viable agriculture activities that are consistent with the Rural Lands Strategy through partnerships and networks.

 

Presenters:                   David Mason - Hawkesbury Harvest - Proposed Membership of the Hawkesbury Harvest Network    

Purpose:

To provide Council with a presentation and information about the Hawkesbury Harvest Network.  The report recommends that Council become a member of Hawkesbury Harvest.  Representatives of Hawkesbury Harvest will be providing a Powerpoint Presentation.

 

Background

Hawkesbury Harvest is a community organisation that is setting Sydney apart from other Cities of Australia and the world.  It is demonstrating to the world the benefits local agriculture contributes to the quality of all life within the environs associated with metropolitan areas.

 

Hawkesbury Harvest is an organisation that facilitates the economic and social wellbeing of its members in an environmentally responsible manner.  It does not aim to maximise profit for the organisation itself.  Rather it aims to implement mechanisms that will generate funds and income to at least meet the operational and development.

 

The geographic context for the Hawkesbury Harvest is that part of the Hawkesbury Nepean Catchment in the northwest sector of the Sydney Basin and it encompasses a great deal of what is considered the Sydney Region.

 

The farm gate value of agriculture production in this region is estimated at more than $1 billion per annum.  This represents at least 12% of NSW total agricultural production grown on approximately 1% of the states agricultural land.  The value of vegetables produced in Sydney as they pass through the farm gate is estimated at $250 million per annum.  Of all the fresh leafy vegetables consumed in Sydney up to 90% are grown in the Sydney Region.  Over 11,000 people are employed full-time on Sydney farms.  The northwest sector accounts for more than 50% of this economic activity.

 

The Hawkesbury Harvest has some history with the early years of the Penrith Food Project.  Farm visits under that program led to the development of the Hawkesbury Food Program in 1997.  Hawkesbury Harvest was incorporated in 2000 following public meetings to consider ways to advance the role of sustainable agriculture in the Hawkesbury.  Hawkesbury Harvest was born with a focus essentially on the economic viability of metropolitan agriculture and associated small business.  This included businesses that were complementary to agriculture and which provided mutual leverage.

Hawkesbury Harvest Business Plan

Hawkesbury Harvest has two strategic potentials: 

 

·    Business/Industry Development in Agribusiness

·    Community engagement of agriculture in the Region.

 

Innovation in agribusiness is fostered by Hawkesbury harvest activities and aims to realise the potential of biotechnologies, intensive production, on-farm microclimate management, and regional production and marketing co-operative efforts.  Community engagement with the agriculture of the region is fostered by making that culture accessible to the community through the Farm Gate Trail, farmers markets, open farms, special events, produce outlets and provedoring services.  These two strategic potentials in industry development and community building will bring important learning and social capital to the region in areas of standards, marketing and economic benefit.

 

Hawkesbury Harvest is a process that facilitates engagement with and thus ownership of the outputs and outcomes of that process by its stakeholders.

 

Hawkesbury Harvest has successfully developed the following:

 

·    Farm Gate Trail – The current map has 42 destinations across the region and is the foundation production of the Hawkesbury Harvest.  It has provided small farmers and other associated businesses with a new and increasing income stream.

 

·    Open Farm Days – Hawkesbury Harvest assists by promoting events that are organised by individual members.  Penrith Valley Oranges commenced its 2002 season by holding an open farm day, which attracted 6,000 visitors over the weekend.

 

·    Hawkesbury Harvest Farmers and Gourmet Food Market (Castle Hill) – This market has grown from 30 stalls and 6,000 customers at its initial market to more than 50 stalls and up to 10,000 members.  It is regarded as one of the top three Farmers Markets in Sydney.  This market provides the farmers and those who value-added with another marketing opportunity.  It also meets the needs of the increasing number of consumers who want to deal face to face with the people who grow or make the food they eat.  Hawkesbury Harvest intends to develop similar markets at other locations in the region when opportunities arise.

 

·    A detailed website – the website can be viewed at www.hawkesubryharvest.com.au.  It is a good resource for members and provides significant information on events and products available.

 

It aims to develop the following as a matter of priority:

 

·    Industry Development (including regional branding)

·    Special events

·    Education

Partners

Hawkesbury Harvest is working with the NSW Government to implement the “Strategic Plan for Sustainable Agriculture – Sydney Region”.  It is also working with an increasing number of Councils to assist in the implementation of the recommendations arising from their rural lands studies.  Hawkesbury, Baulkham Hills and Hornsby Councils are all now members of Hawkesbury Harvest.

 

One of the greatest challenges facing Sydney is how it will retain the many social, economic and environmental benefits sustainable agriculture offers in the context of the huge population increases being planned for.  Strong regional partnership will be essential in facing this challenge.  Other project partners in Hawkesbury Harvest include the Department of Transport and Regional Services, Department of Primary Industries, the Greater Western Sydney Economic Development Board, GROW, NSW Department of State and Regional Development and Tourism Hawkesbury Incorporated.

Comment by Economic Development and City Marketing Manager

Quality food and wine have the potential to attract more visitors to and media interest in Penrith Valley.  We have worked with Hawkesbury Harvest over the past three years to develop this market by advertising in the Hawkesbury Harvest map brochure and on their web site.  A segment on Penrith Valley food and wine assets shown on the “Great Outdoors” last year demonstrated the level of consumer interest in this area as it generated a great deal of interest and lead to the production of a dedicated food and wine brochure. 

 

Membership of Hawkesbury Harvest would give us the opportunity to further expand this niche market in partnership with individual farms and quality food businesses in Penrith Valley. 

 

It would also provide an opportunity to work more closely with the Hawkesbury City area in marketing the broader Penrith Valley / Hawkesbury / Blue Mountains Region. 

 

On the basis of assurances from Hawkesbury Harvest that it will actively recruit businesses in Penrith Valley to the program, funding support from the City Marketing budget for membership of Hawkesbury Harvest can be provided. 

Budget

The Hawkesbury Harvest has a business plan, which has a goal to be self-funding through revenue from current activities such as membership fees, Farm Gate Trail maps, web presence, Farmers and Gourmet Food Markets, Open Farm Days and special events.

 

Council’s contribution to join the Hawkesbury Harvest is $20,000.  This is primarily to establish new members and businesses in the Penrith area and for the reprinting of the updated Farmgate Trail maps.

 

This funding can be made available from existing budgets for Sustainable Agriculture under the Enhanced Environmental Program and from the City Marketing budget.

Conclusion

Membership of the Hawkesbury Harvest has the potential to provide significant assistance to rural landholders and rural business in the City.  The objective of the Hawkesbury Harvest has a strong synergy with Council’s goal under the Strategic Plan “to achieve sustainable, productive use of rural lands and preservation of the City’s rural qualities is secured” and Council’s Rural Lands Strategy.  The Hawkesbury Harvest provides a regional focus to the protection and sustainability of agriculture in the Sydney Metropolitan area and has developed a strong business plan and support base.

 

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Proposed Membership of the Hawkesbury Harvest Network be received

2.     Council join the Hawkesbury Harvest and make a financial contribution of $20,000 from existing budgets as outlined in the report.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Policy Review Committee Meeting

24 July 2006

The City in its Broader Context

 

 

The City in its Broader Context

 

 

3

St Marys Town Centre Strategy   

 

Compiled by:                Mark Andrews, Strategic & Management Planning Coordinator; Nuala Cavanagh, Senior Environmental Planner

Authorised by:             Ruth Goldsmith, Acting Director - City Strategy 

Strategic Program Term Achievement: St Marys offers a range of district level retail and service businesses to its surrounding localities.

Critical Action: The City Centres Review strategies for the St Marys Town Centre are developed, prioritised and being implemented.

     

Purpose:

To present to Council the outcomes of the public exhibition of the draft St Marys Town Centre Strategy.  The report recommends that Council adopt the revised Strategy.

 

Background

Over the past two years, Council has received a series of reports and briefings outlining the progress of the City Centres’ Review.  The public exhibition of the St Marys Town Centre Strategy has been completed, and the Strategy, amended to reflect the issues raised in the submissions, is presented for Council’s consideration.

 

The exhibition of the St Marys Town Centre Strategy was generally well received, with a number of submissions raising issues for further consideration.  The Strategy and actions have been amended to ensure they are contemporary, and also to reflect the issues raised during the exhibition.  These matters are detailed later in this report.  In the revised Strategy, an amended Activity Precinct Map, and a Public Domain Map, will be included.

 

The St Marys Town Centre Strategy, as endorsed for exhibition on 12 December 2005, identified the following key challenges:

Maintaining commercial viability – St Marys Town Centre is currently vulnerable to market competition from other surrounding growth centres.  Currently, the St Marys trade area overlaps with that of Mount Druitt, and the potential new centres at Werrington and ADI.  St Marys therefore needs to redefine itself as a unique centre as it does not currently present the characteristics of the defined three main types of retail centre in Australia today – a ‘destination/regional centre’, a ‘convenience centre’ and a ‘big-box retail centre’.

The need for diversity – St Marys Town Centre cannot afford to retain its current dominance by retail activities and needs to promote diversity.  A wide range of uses that offer people a variety of reasons to visit is characteristic of a healthy centre.  This provides not only a spin off for the other uses but also activates the town throughout the day and night.  The inclusion of residential, cultural and entertainment activities make the centre a living place.

Achieving a balance of activities – The Town Centre must achieve a balance of daytime and night-time activities to ensure its viability.  Promotion of entertainment, cultural and residential uses will attract visitors during the night provided that these can be provided in a “safe environment”, whilst daytime activity will continue with retail and commercial services.

Encouraging compactness and development intensity – St Marys is not spread over a large area, and encouraging carefully designed higher development density in the centre will promote pedestrian activity so that people are encouraged to walk out of the offices at lunchtime and interact.  The wide footpaths are utilised for outdoor cafés, florists, newsstands etc, which are common tools to create a sense of place.  An intensity of development is needed to provide critical mass to justify public transport investment and generate street level activity.

Creating functional linkages – There needs to be a path of integrated open space, an armature of parks, cycle and pedestrian networks and distinctive streetscape treatments.  Development of this network will encourage physical activity and social interaction thereby improving the overall health of residents and visitors.  Consideration needs to be given to a whole town plan that looks not simply at the defined Town Centre boundary but a broader boundary that encompasses the nearby WELL Precinct, ADI, North St Marys and surrounding residential areas.

Encouraging the growth of cultural activities – To be a truly vibrant Town Centre, St Marys must nurture and expand its cultural resource base.  This involves establishing cultural enterprise incubators, promoting the arts and music of the region, supporting local amateur groups and providing for an integrated range of community facilities.

Building a positive identity – St Marys needs to build on its strengths and focus on its competitive advantages, particularly the smaller scale of its centre.  Focusing on building a positive identify will foster business confidence and community support for the long-term strategy and vision.  The public announcement of the vision and the resulting strategy is a marketing tool in itself.

Encouraging positive social interaction – A liveable city focuses on all its citizens,  with a strong emphasis on caring for those less powerful and self determined than others such as children, youth and elderly people.  Creating a fabric of meeting places that encourages and invites positive social interaction will contribute to enliven the city, improve the health (including the physical, mental and social well being) of residents and visitors, and make the Centre a safer and more attractive and inclusive place to be.

 

These key challenges have guided responses to the issues raised in the exhibition of the St Marys Town Centre Strategy.

Public Exhibition

Council endorsed the public exhibition of the draft St Marys Town Centre Strategy at its meeting of 12 December 2005.  That Council report, together with the draft Strategies, were made available on the Our City Centres website in late December 2005.  In addition to a number of workshops held with the Metropolitan Strategy planning team during the City Centres’ Review process, the Department of Planning was also invited to make a formal submission on the draft Strategies.  All landowners within the City’s two key Centres were notified during January and early February about the draft Strategies, advised how to access the draft Strategies and supporting information, and invited to make a submission.  Key stakeholders were also notified, and invited to make submissions.

 

A special briefing, hosted by the Mayor, was held on 17 February 2006 for the Penrith City Centre Association, St Marys Town Centre Management Inc, Penrith Valley Chamber of Commerce, Penrith Valley Economic Development Corporation, and the Penrith City and District Business Advisory Committee.  The briefing attracted 32 business representatives.

 

The City Centre draft Strategies were formally advertised and exhibited at Council’s offices and libraries in Penrith and St Marys from 3 March 2006 to 31 March 2006.  Arising from the notification and exhibition of the draft St Marys Town Centre Strategy, there have been numerous discussions with key stakeholders, including:

§  St Marys Town Centre Management Inc

§  St Marys Band Club

§  Mirvac (owners of the St Marys Shopping Village)

§  Woolworths (regarding a new discount department store in St Marys)

§  St Marys Station Plaza owners

§  Individual landowners and business operators.

 

As a result of the exhibition, Council received 34 submissions from residents, landowner / developers and government authorities.  There were 12 submissions that specifically addressed the St Marys Town Centre Strategy, and a further 6 submissions that provided general comments in relation to both draft Strategies.

 

Considerable efforts were made to ensure that key stakeholders in both Centres were contacted, and their views obtained.  Over the past 5 months, Council staff have held numerous meetings with landowners and / or their representatives to discuss the implications of the proposed Strategies on their land, and potential development proposals.

 

The ‘authorities and agencies’ (Section 62) consultation process undertaken for the Penrith Local Plan has provided feedback, in addition to those submissions received during the exhibition process.  The comments relevant to St Marys Town Centre, from the Department of Education and Training, are outlined below.  Council’s officers’ comments regarding the issues raised in submissions are italicised.

1.   The Department of Education and Training requests that school sites be zoned similar to surrounding land.

The Department has been asked to clarify its intentions for sites within the St Marys Town Centre, however a range of educational opportunities should be retained in the Centre.

 

The submissions made to the exhibition of the draft Strategy were generally supportive, with comments provided around a number of key issues.  A detailed summary of submissions is provided as an attachment to this report.  The issues raised in submissions were broadly discussed at the Councillor Briefing on 31 May 2006, and are outlined below.  Council’s officer’s comments regarding the issues raised in submissions are italicised.

Major Issues - Submissions

1.       Built Form and Economic Feasibility

Comments were provided, in 6 of the 12 submissions, about the proposed building height controls in the Town Centre.  Five of the submissions argued that redevelopment consistent with the draft Strategy would not be economically feasible, and suggested that the 2 storey height limits along the Queen Street frontage would inhibit the viability of redevelopment.

 

Several landowners suggested increasing building heights along the Queen Street frontage to 5-9 storeys.  It was argued that the narrow lot frontages and strata title ownership of land in Queen Street limited redevelopment options.  The St Marys Town Centre Management Inc recommended that a financial feasibility study should be undertaken, to establish the economic viability of redevelopment in St Marys.

 

Conversely, there were also comments that building heights should be limited in St Marys, and that the proposed 12 storey buildings were inappropriate and out of proportion.

 

Prior to the development of the St Marys City Centre Strategy a report was commissioned by Council to investigate and analyse the economic issues that influence the functioning of St Marys and Penrith, and to look at ways of promoting growth within the centres.  The report noted that the location of St Marys, between Mt Druitt and Penrith, would limit its potential for growth, but that trading and activity may improve with enhanced connections between the supermarkets and Queen Street, and improved accessibility of car parking to Queen Street.

 

At present the majority of Queen Street is zoned 3(a) under the Penrith Planning Scheme.  Dwelling houses are currently prohibited within this zone, unless ancillary to shops or commercial premises.  Shops and commercial premises are permitted without consent in the zone.  There are currently no height, setback or floor space ratio restrictions applicable to land within the 3(a) zone.  There has been limited development in St Marys, despite the current lack of planning controls.

 

The historic layout on which St Marys has developed and, to a large extent retains, is a strong and traditional urban form which has endured and continues to provide a variety of retailing and commercial opportunities for business.  It also provides a focal point for the community and remains a public place.  The Centre has good accessibility and public transport services, and the potential for increased residential development, which should assist in its continuing growth.

 

The St Marys Town Centre Strategy proposes maintaining 2 storey building heights along Queen Street, with higher buildings (4-5 storeys on the eastern side of Queen Street, and 4-6 storeys on the western side) set back from the street.  The draft Strategy also proposed 12 storey buildings at the northern end of St Marys, along the Railway line.

 

The intent of the proposed building heights is to retain the existing streetscape and human scale along Queen Street, and encourage mixed-use developments set back from the street frontage.  This would maintain the street’s amenity as it is open, sunny and landscaped with wide pedestrian footpaths, creating opportunities for street dining and trading which contribute to the vibrancy and vitality of the Town Centre.

 

There will be opportunities for landowners to consolidate lots and work cooperatively to deliver precinct plans.  As a major landowner, Council also has the capacity to contribute to the revitalisation of St Marys Town Centre, and assist by improving the public domain and establishing better links between car parking areas and Queen Street.

 

Whilst it is important to ensure that planning controls allow for viability, quality development and good urban design outcomes are also essential elements of revitalisation.  The revised Activity Precinct map acknowledges and reinforces existing patterns of use in the Town Centre, encouraging a series of legible precincts that define the retail and commercial centre, whilst promoting residential activities set back from, and above, the main shopping strip.

Recommended Actions – Built Form and Economic Feasibility

1.   Use the Strategy’s Activity Precinct map, and the directions of the current urban design analysis processes, to further inform detailed precinct plans.

2.   Undertake further economic analysis when a built form for St Marys has been developed and endorsed.

3.   Continue discussions with stakeholders regarding the viability of the proposed built form.

2.       Key Sites

(a)      St Marys Shopping Village

The St Marys Shopping Village owners, Mirvac, provided a submission that was generally supportive of the draft Town Centre Strategy, and outlined plans for potential future expansion.  Mirvac provided preliminary designs proposing additional retail floor space, community facilities, and decked car parking on the eastern side of the existing shopping centre.  The submission also queried the parking survey undertaken by SKM, in Stage 1 of the City Centres Review, and suggested that the issue of proximity of car parking and demand should be further investigated.

 

The Strategy highlights the redevelopment potential for both of the shopping centres in St Marys, and specifically encourages any proposals to focus on improving connections with Queen Street.  The current proposal includes the establishment of a new Town Square across existing parklands, to better link the shopping centre and Queen Street.

Recommended Actions – St Marys Shopping Village

4.   Apply the following principles in the preparation of planning controls for this precinct –

§  Deliver enhanced pedestrian connections to Queen Street, and landscaped public areas

§  Locate structures and buildings to ensure that the healthy growth of shade trees is not affected

§  Reduce pedestrian / vehicular conflict by relocating and centralising car parking

§  Improve public domain, including the redevelopment of Lang Park, Kokoda Park and Coachman’s Park to provide connected, landscaped areas, pathways and Town Park / Square between Queen Street and the Shopping Village, and pathways through to the Great Western Highway.

(b)      North-eastern end of Queen St / Station Plaza

A submission was received from JBA Urban Planning Consultants on behalf of the owners of the Station Plaza.  The submission strongly supported the Strategy, particularly improving pedestrian connections to the Town Centre, and the encouragement of strong partnerships between the public and private sector.  Caution was urged in relation to the scale and location of weekend markets, as there could be impacts on general retail trade.  Mixed-use development was supported, as were improvements to parking accessibility.

 

JPS Planning made a submission on behalf of a group of owners of 16-32 Queen Street.  The submission suggests 9-storey development for this precinct, rather than the proposed 2 storeys fronting Queen St, and the proposed 6 storeys fronting Station St.  The submission also objects to the proposed 12 storeys on the adjacent land fronting Station St.

 

As noted above, the Strategy highlights the redevelopment potential for both of the shopping centres in St Marys, and specifically encourages any proposals to focus on improving connections with Queen Street.  The potential redevelopment of the St Marys Station Plaza shopping centre could re-orient the building towards Queen Street, and allow for an improved urban design response, with active street frontages to revitalise the northern end of the St Marys Town Centre.

 

In separate discussions with the owners’ representatives for 16-32 Queen Street, Council officers indicated that the shallower depth of the blocks restricted any potential for a higher built form at the rear of these properties.  A precinct plan, that included all properties from the Station Plaza shopping centre through to Queen Street, was suggested as a response that could provide better development opportunities, with appropriate building heights, improved connectivity, and enhanced amenity and public domain.  A precinct plan over this area could also incorporate consideration of re-alignment of the existing laneway.

Recommended Action – North-eastern end of Queen St / Station Plaza

5.   Progress the detailed urban design analysis and planning for this precinct, and continue discussions about their future plans with all landowners.

 

(c)      St Marys Band Club

The Band Club’s submission generally supports the Strategy, and seeks a ‘mixed-use’ designation rather than ‘enterprise’.  The Band Club advised that it has also acquired the adjacent former Bowling Club site, which currently has a 6(a) open space zoning (which is not usual for a privately owned site).  The Band Club proposes to redevelop its land to provide a range of commercial, residential and retail uses, and seeks to ensure that its plans are not restricted by inappropriate designations.

 

The Metropolitan Strategy and the standard LEP template are now available to inform the City Centres’ Strategies, and a mixed-use designation is considered appropriate for all of the St Marys Town Centre.  The revised Activity Precinct map includes the St Marys Band Club in the Highway Entry (Mixed Use) precinct, which will have a broad range of uses.

Recommended Action – St Marys Band Club

6.   Progress the detailed urban design analysis and planning for this precinct, and continue discussions about their future plans with all landowners.

 

(d)      Glossop Street Precinct

The Department’s submission advises that it is ready to proceed with a planning process to identify the future redevelopment potential of the precinct.

 

This residential area, between Gidley Street and Glossop Street, supports a significant local population immediately adjacent to the Town Centre.  The precinct is identified in the Memorandum of Understanding between Council and the Department of Housing (signed in 2005).  Council officers have recently discussed the proposal with representatives of the Department.

Recommended Action – Glossop Street Precinct

7.   Progress the detailed urban design analysis and planning for this precinct, and continue discussions with all landowners.

4.       Site Specific Submissions

Two submissions expressed concern at the impact of the draft Strategy on potential future land uses.  One submission relates to a privately owned, existing residence at 39 Gidley St, and the other relates to privately owned land at 62-64 Carinya Ave.

 

The Activity Precinct map was intended to present a general concept of future activities in the Town Centre.  The Activity Precinct map, as exhibited, identified these sites as ‘ground level car parks’.  Most of the land identified for car parking is in Council ownership.

 

The Gidley Street property is identified in the adopted Section 94 Plan, for acquisition as a carpark.  However, the Strategy has now been revised to propose mixed use precincts throughout the St Marys Town Centre.  Detailed urban design analysis and precinct planning (including the identification of future car parking areas) will be progressed in the preparation of land use zones and draft planning controls.

 

The identification of the Carinya Street property as a carpark in the Strategy was an oversight, and the subject land is currently zoned to permit residential uses.  The Strategy has now been revised to propose mixed use precincts throughout the St Marys Town Centre.  Detailed urban design analysis and precinct planning (including the identification of future car parking areas) will be progressed in the preparation of land use zones and draft planning controls.  Notwithstanding the revisions made to the Activity Precinct map, the potential for this property to be developed in isolation is not considered to be a good strategic outcome for St Marys.  Several meetings have been held with the owner to discuss his concerns and possible solutions.  A proposal to acquire the site has been put to the owner, and will be the subject of a separate report to Council.

Recommended Action – Site Specific Submissions

8.   Progress the detailed urban design analysis and planning for these precincts, and continue discussions with relevant landowners.

Conclusion

The majority of submissions provided comments on the draft Activity Precinct and Built Form maps.  Generally, the Activity Precincts acknowledge and reinforce existing patterns of use in the Town Centre.  The intention is to establish a series of legible precincts that define the retail and commercial centre whilst promoting integrated mixed uses.

 

The draft Strategy has been revised to incorporate comments, and ensure its references are contemporary.  Actions have also been reviewed to ensure consistency, and remove repetition.

 

The Activity Precinct map has been revised to propose mixed use precincts throughout the St Marys Town Centre.  Detailed urban design analysis and precinct planning will be progressed in the preparation of land use zones and draft planning controls.  A Public Domain map, to guide and inform public improvements, has also been developed.  This map emphasises pedestrian connectivity between Queen Street and the shopping centres, and suggests appropriate locations for a new Town Square and community space.

 

The public exhibition process, and the numerous meetings with key stakeholders, have provided valuable contributions and policy directions for the draft Strategy.  Currently, key actions relating to the future of the St Marys Town Centre include –

§  Continuing to work with major landowners so that redevelopment of the shopping centres and other key sites improves connectivity with Queen St, and provides a catalyst for improvements to the public domain,

§  Developing appropriate planning controls including built form and design, a public domain plan, a Section 94 contributions plan, an accessibility plan and implementation plan,

§  Review the parking restrictions and directional signage in the Town Centre to improve the efficiency of the current parking system, in consultation with the St Marys Town Centre Management Inc.

 

The revised St Marys Town Centre Strategy is presented for Council’s consideration, and recommended for Council’s adoption.  Discussions with stakeholders and key organisations, and work on plans for implementation, will continue.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on St Marys Town Centre Strategy be received

2.     Council adopt the revised St Marys Town Centre Strategy (attached to this report)

3.     Council endorse the recommended actions outlined in this report

4.     Responses, as outlined in this report, be provided to persons who made submissions on the draft Strategy

5.     The St Marys Town Centre Strategy, including the Activity Precinct and Public Domain maps, be used to inform further planning, funding and implementation processes.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.  

Summary of Strategy Submissions

8 Pages

Attachment

2.  

St Marys Town Centre Strategy

54 Pages

Attachment

 


Policy Review Committee Meeting

24 July 2006

The City in its Broader Context

 

 

The City in its Broader Context

 

 

4

Penrith City Centre Strategy   

 

Compiled by:                Mark Andrews, Strategic & Management Planning Coordinator; Nuala Cavanagh, Senior Environmental Planner

Authorised by:             Ruth Goldsmith, Acting Director - City Strategy 

Strategic Program Term Achievement: Penrith City Centre provides a comprehensive range of economic and human and lifestyle services to Outer Western Sydney and Central Western New South Wales.

Critical Action: The City Centres Review strategies for the Penrith City Centre are developed, prioritised and being implemented.

     

Purpose:

To present to Council the outcomes of the public exhibition of the draft Penrith City Centre Strategy.  The report recommends that Council adopt the revised Strategy.

 

Background

Over the past two years, Council has received a series of reports and briefings outlining the progress of the City Centres’ Review.  The public exhibition of the Penrith City Centre Strategy has been completed, and the Strategy, amended to reflect the issues raised in the submissions, is presented for Council’s consideration.

 

Concurrently with Council’s City Centres’ Review process, the State Government has been developing a policy to manage urban growth over the next 25 years.  The Metropolitan Strategy nominates Penrith as a ‘Regional City’ along with Liverpool, Wollongong, Gosford, Parramatta and Newcastle.  A separate report on this matter is presented in tonight’s Business Paper.

 

The implications of being a ‘Regional City’ are still emerging, however it appears that Penrith will be expected to provide, for the Region, a significant increase in jobs and housing within the City Centre.  To assist in achieving its goals for housing and job targets, the State Government has established a ‘Regional Cities Taskforce’ that will assist Council in the development of local planning controls.

 

The Penrith City Centre Strategy provides clear policy directions, informed by extensive research and community participation, which will guide the planning work to be undertaken by the Regional Cities Taskforce (in partnership with Council).  The Penrith City Centre Strategy has been amended to reference the involvement of the Regional Cities Taskforce.

 

The exhibition of the Penrith City Centre Strategy was generally well received, with a number of submissions raising issues for further consideration.  The Strategy and actions have been amended to ensure they are contemporary, and also to reflect the issues raised during the exhibition.  These matters are detailed later in this report.  In the revised Strategy, an amended Activity Precinct Map, and a Public Domain Map, will be included.

 

The Penrith City Centre Strategy, as endorsed for exhibition on 12 December 2005, identified the following key challenges:

The need for diversity – Penrith CBD cannot afford to be dominated by retail activities.  A healthy city contains a wide mix of uses that offer people a variety of reasons to visit the centre.  This provides not only a spin off for the other uses, but also activates the city throughout the day and night.  The inclusion of residential, cultural and entertainment activities make the city a living place.  Meeting housing and employment targets set by the State government for the Metropolitan Strategy will require an intensification of development in some locations.  Core commercial and retail areas will be established centrally around the railway station to improve the central form of the city, whilst allowing for a greater mix and diversity of land uses, with particular emphasis on encouraging increased levels of housing within the city, adjacent to these core areas and within walkable distances from the centre.

Achieving a balance of activities – Penrith CBD runs the risk of being a tale of two cities, with Penrith Plaza being the dominant retail town activity, and the commercial precinct with High Street being a historical fragment of the old rural town.  Activities must be balanced.  There is a need not only to open Penrith Plaza to the main street but also to complement its dominant retail uses with other uses such as offices, restaurants and city housing.  In addition, adequate concentrations of commercial office space around a central core need to be provided in order that Penrith can respond to the demands required as a Regional City as defined by the Metropolitan Strategy.

Encouraging compactness and development intensity – At present, the Penrith CBD is spread along a very long spine, roughly the same distance as Circular Quay to Central in Sydney’s CBD.  A compact centre promotes pedestrian activity so that people are encouraged to walk out of the offices at lunchtime and interact.  Cafes help to provide meeting places and opportunities for creative minds and people to interact.  Footpath widening and the creation of side walk cafes, florists, newsstands etc are common tools to create sense of place.  An intensity of development is needed to provide critical mass to justify public transport investment and generate street level activity.

Creating functional linkages – There needs to be a path of integrated open space, armature of parks, cycle and pedestrian networks and distinctive streetscape treatments.  Development of this network will encourage physical activity and social interaction, thereby improving the overall health of residents and visitors.  Consideration needs to be given to a whole city plan that looks not simply at the defined CBD boundary but a broader boundary that encompasses the Nepean River, Penrith Panthers Entertainment Precinct, Mulgoa Road Bulky Goods Precinct and Penrith Stadium.

Encouraging the growth of cultural activities – To be a truly great City Centre, Penrith must nurture and expand its cultural resource base.  This involves establishing cultural enterprise incubators, promoting the arts and music of the region, supporting local amateur groups and providing for stronger connections with Nepean River and Penrith’s history.

Building a positive identity – Penrith needs to build on its strengths and focus on its competitive advantages, particularly its relationship to the Nepean River and the Blue Mountains.  Focusing on building a positive identify will foster business confidence and community support for the long term strategy and vision.  The public announcement of the vision and the resulting strategy is a marketing tool in itself.  Allowing for the growth of the city as required by the Metropolitan Strategy, whilst maintaining the connections to the natural environment including the river and farmlands within the LGA, will be a challenge.  Maintaining the identity of Penrith as identified within the community consultations is imperative to ensuring community ownership and acceptance of the City Centre Strategy and subsequent plans implementing the Strategy.

Encouraging positive social interaction – A liveable city focuses on its citizens, including those that are not visibly and directly shaping or contributing to the economic or cultural environment, such as children, youth and elderly people, who are no longer active in the workforce.  Creating a fabric of meeting places that encourages and invites positive social interaction will contribute to enliven the city, improve the health (including the physical, mental and social well being) of residents and visitors, and make the Centre a safer and more attractive place to be.

 

These key challenges have guided responses to the issues raised in the exhibition of the Penrith City Centre Strategy.

Public Exhibition

Council endorsed the public exhibition of the draft Penrith City Centre Strategy at its meeting of 12 December 2005.  That Council report, together with the draft Strategies, were made available on the Our City Centres website in late December 2005.  In addition to a number of workshops held with the Metropolitan Strategy planning team during the City Centres’ Review process, the Department of Planning was also invited to make a formal submission on the draft Strategies.  All landowners within the City’s two key Centres were notified during January and early February about the draft Strategies, advised how to access the draft Strategies and supporting information, and invited to make a submission.

 

A special briefing, hosted by the Mayor, was held on 17 February 2006 for the Penrith City Centre Association, St Marys Town Centre Management Inc, Penrith Valley Chamber of Commerce, Penrith Valley Economic Development Corporation, and the Penrith City and District Business Advisory Committee.  The briefing attracted 32 business representatives.

 

The City Centre draft Strategies were formally advertised and exhibited at Council’s offices and libraries in Penrith and St Marys from 3 March 2006 to 31 March 2006.  Arising from the notification and exhibition of the draft Strategies, there have also been discussions with key stakeholders including:

§  Westfield, regarding the potential expansion of Penrith Plaza

§  TAFE, regarding the future of its Henry Street site

§  Parkview, regarding the future of the former Panasonic site

§  Centro Property Group, regarding the potential expansion of Centro Nepean

§  Western Sydney Area Health Service, regarding the masterplan for Nepean Hospital

§  Individual landowners and business operators.

 

As a result of the exhibition, Council received 34 submissions from residents, landowner / developers and government authorities.  The submissions were generally supportive of the draft Strategy, with concerns raised around a number of key issues.  The issues raised in submissions were broadly discussed at the Councillor Briefing on 31 May 2006.  A detailed summary of submissions is provided as an attachment to this report.

 

There were 16 submissions that specifically addressed the Penrith City Centre Strategy, and a further 6 submissions that provided general comments in relation to both draft Strategies.  Considerable efforts were made to ensure that key stakeholders in both Centres were contacted, and their views obtained.  Over the past 5 months, Council staff have held numerous meetings with landowners and / or their representatives to discuss the implications of the proposed Strategies on their land, and potential development proposals.  The positions of these key stakeholders will be discussed below.

 

While the submissions were being assessed, and discussions with landowners continued, Interim Design Guidelines for the former Council Chambers Precinct and the High St west precinct were also adopted (22 May 2006).  This process also involved discussions and negotiations with landowners.  The interim guidelines will be incorporated in the Penrith Local Plan at the appropriate stage.

 

The ‘authorities and agencies’ (Section 62) consultation process undertaken for the Penrith Local Plan has provided feedback, in addition to those submissions received during the exhibition process.  A summary of the comments provided through the Section 62 consultations are outlined below.  Council’s officers’ comments regarding the issues raised in submissions are italicised.

 

1.   The Federal Member for Lindsay strongly promoted the redevelopment of the North Penrith Urban Area, north of the Railway line, for employment and business park type uses.

No submission to the draft Strategies was received from the landowner.  Council has encouraged a mix of residential and light industry land uses on the site, which is a position supported by the local business community.  Redevelopment of the land for commercial / office use in the short term would potentially fragment and weaken the City Centre.  While the site is peripheral to the City Centre, and not formally part of the Review, the draft Penrith City Centre Strategy has suggested that complementary employment and residential activities should be established on the site.

Further planning for the North Penrith site is dependent on the outcome of the sale of the land (foreshadowed by the Department of Defence).

2.   Agility advises that the Primary Gas Receiving Station, a major asset of AGLGN, is located adjacent to the Sydney Water Station within Woodriff Gardens.  Agility requested notification of any proposals for rezoning or development adjacent to the site.

This advice is noted, and is particularly relevant for potential roadworks or redevelopment proposals within this locality.

3.   The Department of Education and Training requests that school sites be zoned similar to surrounding land.

The Department has been asked to clarify its intentions for sites within the Penrith City Centre, however a range of educational opportunities should be retained in the Centre.

4.   Railcorp outlined its long-term plans for the quadruplication of the Main Western Rail Line within the LGA, with one option being to construct a new fourth platform on the southern side of the existing Platform 3.  This will require the relocation of the bus interchange, and the resumption of sections of the commuter car park along the northern side of Belmore Street.

This proposal would result in the loss of land identified within the Strategy as a public square, the relocation of the bus-rail interchange, and possible redesign of the Jane St / Belmore St bypass.  Most importantly, it significantly affects the sense of arrival and sense of place at this key entry point within the City.

Further discussions with RailCorp and the DoP Regional Cities Taskforce will be pursued.

 

As noted above, the submissions made in response to the public exhibition of the draft Strategy were generally supportive, with comments provided around a number of key issues.  The issues raised in submissions were broadly discussed at the Councillor Briefing on 31 May 2006, and are outlined below.

1.       Traffic and Car Parking

Five out of 16 submissions identified concerns with the availability of car parking within the City Centre.  The Penrith City Centre Association (PCCA) provided several comments, and suggested design responses.  The PCCA also raised concern about the provision of commuter car parking, and interactions with the long stay needs of City Centre workers.  The Association encouraged Council to lobby State Government for the provision of commuter car parking.

 

A survey of car parking needs was undertaken by Iris Research Consultants in October / November 2005, coinciding with the opening of the Plaza extensions.  This survey confirmed the concerns raised by the PCCA that the majority of individual and business respondents believed there was inadequate car parking in the City Centre, and they were unwilling to pay for parking.  The most popular response to suggestions to improve parking was to build a multi-storey or underground parking facility.  Other suggestions included improved traffic management and public transport.

 

Step 7 of the Strategy – ‘Managing Parking and Improving Access’ identifies that decisions about car parking and traffic management are among the most important in making the City Centre a quality place.  The Strategy indicates that Penrith is well serviced by car parking facilities however, there may be a disparity between the Centre’s short, medium and long term parking needs, and the current traffic management system.  Large areas of surface-level car parking also breaks up the urban form, and reduces the opportunity for an integrated city form that is pleasant to walk around.

 

The Strategy recommends the provision of a hierarchy of parking, including short stay parking along streets, and the construction of multi storey level car parks in peripheral locations in conjunction with the promotion of public transport, and a cycle network.

 

Council has pursued State Rail and the Department of Transport regarding the construction of commuter car parking, with limited response.  The provision of a decked commuter carpark is planned in the redevelopment of the North Penrith Urban Area.

 

At present, many people find it difficult to access all day parking within the Centre, in close proximity to their destination.  The PCCA proposes that the location of time restrictions should be reviewed, so that the short-term spaces are located within close proximity to High Street, and longer timed spaces are located at greater distance from High St.  The PCCA also suggests that medium stay (3 hour) car parking spaces are in short supply, which makes it more difficult for High Street traders, as Westfield customers have ready access to 3-hour spaces.

 

A draft Parking Strategy has been developed for Penrith by consultants Glazebrook and Associates.  The draft Strategy projects the Centre’s future parking demand, and indicates that additional car parking spaces will be required within the Centre, even with more effective travel demand management.  The draft Parking Strategy outlines a new Parking and Access Policy, which includes recommendations to:

§  establish an access fund that receives contributions from developers and Council towards the provision of improved access facilities (including improved pedestrian environment, cycleways and shuttle bus services) that will, in time reduce the dependence of users of the centre on a large supply of car parking within the Centre,

§  review on-site car parking requirements, and

§  review the existing supply of car parking within the City Centre.

 

The Penrith City Centre Strategy promotes these policy directions, aiming to encourage a shift away from dependence on cars, and strategically locating parking facilities to balance the demands on land within the City Centre between active uses (such as office, retail, housing and recreation space) and inactive uses (car parking).  Step 7 of the Strategy ‘Managing Parking and Improving Access’ also includes an action to prepare an Accessibility Action Plan to identify appropriate short, medium and long term actions to improve access to the City Centre based on travel demand management principles.

Recommended Actions – Traffic and Car Parking

1.   Review current parking restrictions and, in consultation with the Penrith City Centre Association, make changes to improve the efficiency of the current parking system and the provision of temporary long stay parking areas;

2.   Prepare a detailed business case and implementation plan for the redevelopment of key Council sites, particularly where decked car parking can be provided, with the assistance of Landcom (in its Metropolitan Strategy implementation role); and

3.   Use the draft Parking Strategy to inform the work of the DoP Regional Cities Taskforce, and present it to Council for consideration when it has been finalised.

2.       Public Domain

The Penrith City Centre Association suggests, as a priority, improvements to signage, public seating, public lighting, pavement treatment (including shared pedestrian bicycle paths along key streets) and landscaping.  There were a number of other submissions reinforcing the importance of Penrith retaining its landscape character, reflective of its rural and river setting.  There was concern that focal points and entries within the City would become ‘over developed’ with tower blocks.

 

Step 4 of the Penrith City Centre Strategy identifies a range of actions to improve the public domain, focussing on enhancing the walkability of the city.  In particular, the Strategy seeks the establishment of a new City Park and an open space plan.  A Public Domain map, identifying landscaped town entries at the Castlereagh Rd / GWH entry, has been included in the Strategy.  The Strategy will inform the Department of Planning’s Regional Cities Taskforce, which intends to prepare a Public Domain Plan as part of its plans for the Penrith City Centre.

 

Step 10 ‘Providing the right planning, development and implementation framework’ of the Penrith City Centre Strategy also recommends a staging plan for public work improvements.

Recommended Actions – Public Domain

4.   Prepare a Public Domain Plan, in conjunction with the Department of Planning Regional Cities Taskforce.

5.   Identify a priority program of staged improvements, in consultation with the Penrith City Centre Association and other key stakeholder groups.

3.       Built Form

Comments were made regarding the impact that high-density development would have on the City Centre’s ‘gateway’ locations.  These comments reflected the attitudes expressed in the Community Visioning Process Report (January 2005), which identified a strong connection with the surrounding natural environment, and a desire to maintain or enhance those links to open space and the City’s landscape features.  There were also issues with the likely impacts of taller built forms on the western edge of the City Centre, at the Mulgoa Rd / Great Western Highway intersection.

 

There were also, however, a number of comments regarding height limits within the City Centre (particularly around Henry Street) and concerns about the proposed retail / commercial ‘core’, with landowners seeking opportunities for mixed-use (including residential) development.

 

The Penrith City Centre Strategy aims to encourage a built form that creates focal points, permitting taller buildings (at a similar scale to that established by the Australian Tax Office building) within the retail / commercial core, and lower scale built forms in surrounding precincts.  The Strategy generally aims for a ‘human scale’ of development, which is generally accepted to be 2 – 3 storeys in height at the street elevation, with an overall building height of 5 – 6 storeys (set back from the street).  This approach has been adopted in the Interim Design Guidelines for the High Street West precinct.

 

Permitting higher built forms on the western edge of the city is likely to cut off connectivity within the surrounding natural environment, obstruct views to scenic features and create a sense of an enclosed City.  These outcomes would not deliver the agreed values established in the Visioning workshops.

 

The City Centre is located within a river valley, and is therefore visible from a number of higher points adjoining the City, and from further away.  Allowing the highest and most dense forms of development in the centre of the City, adjacent to the most accessible locations, is considered appropriate and would result in a clear and legible built form for Penrith.

 

It is considered essential to provide for a retail / commercial core in the City Centre, to consolidate Penrith’s position as a Regional City.  The building heights in this precinct define the edge of the Centre.  The revised Activity Precinct map acknowledges and reinforces existing patterns of use in the City Centre, encouraging a series of legible precincts that define the retail and commercial centre, whilst promoting mixed use in appropriately integrated locations.

 

The Department’s Regional Cities Taskforce will be preparing a DCP and LEP for the City Centre, and the Penrith City Centre Strategy, including the revised Activity Precinct Map, and the urban design analysis work undertaken to date, will inform this work.

Recommended Action – Built Form

6.   Use the Strategy, including the Activity Precinct Map, and the directions of the current urban design analysis processes, to inform the work of the DoP Regional Cities Taskforce.

4.      Key Sites

(a)     Westfield

The Westfield submission identifies that further expansion of the Plaza is likely.  The manner in which Westfield redevelops will have significant consequences for the functioning of the City Centre, with development towards High Street enhancing important pedestrian linkages.  The submission highlights the potential to close or ‘pedestrianise’ Henry Street (between High Street and Riley or Station Street) to allow further expansion of the shopping centre to the southeast.  An alternative proposal, to increase the heights of the existing shopping centre, was also mooted.

 

The proposal to expand the shopping centre in a south easterly direction has the potential to improve the walkability of the city, and enhance connections between precincts within the Centre.  The alternative Westfield option (to expand by increasing the heights and FSR of the existing centre) is not considered to benefit the City Centre to the same extent, as it would increase the ‘internalisation’ of the Plaza, and reduce connectivity between important City Centre precincts.

Recommended Actions – Westfield Penrith Plaza

7.   Encourage the future expansion of Westfield Penrith Plaza to the south-east, and require direct pedestrian connectivity with High Street.

8.   Apply the following principles in the preparation of planning controls for this precinct (with the DoP Regional Cities Taskforce) –

§  Ensure new development improves pedestrian links between Westfield Penrith Plaza and High Street, and generally maintain current building heights and FSR controls to encourage that expansion towards High Street

§  Create a public square, that links to the new City Park, with high quality landscaping and street furniture and wide footpaths.

 

(b)     Centro Nepean

Centro has indicated, in a brief submission, that it prefers to remain as a single level sub-regional shopping centre.  Although the submission acknowledged that a decked car park may be needed in future, Centro indicated that it does not support this plan, nor the proposed 3 – 5 storey residential opportunities along the eastern edge of the site.

 

The site is a key activity node, well within the 2km radius of the Penrith City Centre.  The key principles for this precinct involve improving pedestrian connectivity with the City Centre, and also with the entertainment precinct around Penrith Panthers, the Stadium and the Showground.  It is important that the future potential of this site is reflected in greater development density and yields, and is encouraged to expand towards the north.

Recommended Action – Centro Nepean

9.   Progress the detailed urban design analysis and planning for this precinct (from Derby Street to Jamison Road) with the DoP Regional Cities Taskforce, and continue discussions about their future plans with all landowners.

 

(c)     Parkview (164 Station Street)

Parkview’s submission seeks the inclusion of the former Panasonic site in the City Centre.  The submission includes a draft masterplan for the 7.85ha site that proposes a mix of residential apartments, commercial office space, retail, leisure and recreational opportunities.  The design includes a series of 4 – 6 storey apartment blocks around a central park, and a number of taller residential towers (up to 20 storeys).

 

The submission argues that the proposal is based on the site’s proximity to surrounding services and facilities, including the City Centre and transport.  It argues that the use of the site for well-designed high-density residential development is in keeping with Penrith’s Regional City status.

 

Given the potential for the site to contribute to increased residential densities within walking distance of services and facilities, including the site in the City Centre is appropriate.  The owners have been informed of this ‘in-principle’ consideration, and also strongly advised to reconsider the appropriateness of the proposed 20 storey buildings in Penrith’s ‘river valley’ context.  As previously noted, buildings of 3 – 6 stories are considered appropriate for Penrith, particularly in its role as a unique and individual Regional City, which will allow for the relatively high residential densities whilst maintaining human scale.

 

It is therefore of concern that Parkview is currently proceeding with the preparation of a rezoning request and a masterplan that continues to propose 3 towers of up to 20 storeys.  The formal rezoning request had not been received at the time of writing this report.

 

The site has been included in the Activity Precinct Map as the ‘Parkview (Residential)’ precinct.  Commercial and retail uses in the precinct should be managed so that they service the residential activities, and to complement the core retail / commercial precincts in the Centre.  Generally, active ground floor uses would be encouraged on the site.

Recommended Action – Parkview

10. Progress the detailed urban design analysis and planning for this precinct (from Derby Street to Jamison Road) with the DoP Regional Cities Taskforce, and continue discussions about their future plans with all landowners.

 

(d)     614-632 High Street and 83-85 Union Road (former Penrith Mitsubishi site)

This prominent 1.27ha site is opposite the Joan Sutherland Performing Arts Centre.  The owners have expressed an interest in redeveloping the site as a mixed-use office / retail / residential building, and have objected to the proposed 3 – 5 storey height limit.  The submission argues that height restrictions are inappropriate in the context of Penrith’s role as a Regional City, and encourages Council to promote more intense development forms within the City Centre.

 

Acknowledgement of Penrith’s Regional City status should not mean that the Centre’s built form has to conform to the urban design of other Regional Cities.  The current planning processes provide an opportunity for Council and the City’s communities to enhance the special character of Penrith, maintaining its links with the surrounding natural areas and its unique location and views.  This should be seen as a valuable ‘point of difference’, which builds on our commitment to sustainability, rather than a factor that could limit future development.  Economic analysis supports this approach, arguing that sustainable and high quality growth encourages further investment.

Penrith also has an extensive footprint, with scope for significant increases in commercial development and residential uses without significantly increased building heights.  Council will be working with the DoP’s Regional Cities Taskforce to prepare LEP and DCP controls to reflect these principles, and facilitate the development of Penrith as a Regional City over the next 25 years.

The precinct generally is an important element in one of the Centre’s gateways, with views along High Street to the escarpment.  Maintaining these wide vistas is one way of maintaining that ‘connectedness’ with the surrounding natural areas.  This site can contribute to the vitality of the area with mixed uses that comprise predominantly residential development, and ancillary commercial, retail and possibly cultural uses (galleries, studios etc).

Recommended Actions – High Street / Union Road (City West precinct)

11. Apply the following principles in the preparation of planning controls for this precinct (with the DoP Regional Cities Taskforce) –

§  Promote mixed use development, including residential, ancillary retail and commercial, and encouraging cultural activities such as galleries and studios

§  Provide strong landscaped elements at the western entry to the City Centre

§  Prepare planning controls for the precinct that acknowledge and respond to the views to the escarpment.

12. Continue discussions about their future plans with all landowners.

(e)     Riverlink

Following Council’s endorsement at its Ordinary Meeting of 15 May 2006, Landcom (on Council’s behalf) has engaged consultants to prepare a broad Structure Plan for the area bounded by Mulgoa Road, the Railway line, Nepean River and Jamison Road.  A further report to Council on the ‘Riverlink’ project is being prepared.

Additional pedestrian / cycleway River crossings were suggested in several submissions, with the PCCA proposing a pedestrian / bicycle crossing north of the Rowing Club.  The Great River Walk masterplan incorporates a crossing along the southern side of Victoria Bridge.

In progressing the planning for the Riverlink precinct, and City Centre, improved pedestrian connectivity, and community and cultural uses, between the City Centre and the River will be encouraged.

5.      Community Organisations

Several submissions expressed similar views regarding the importance of providing accommodation for community organisations within the City Centre, to ensure the communities’ continuing access to services.  The submissions requested ongoing support from Council and other government organisations in the continuing provision of services within a central location.

The draft Social Services and Community Organisations Accommodation Needs Study report, prepared by Elton Consulting, seeks to address the key challenges in the Penrith City Centre, including –

·        The majority of services and organisations cannot afford to pay commercial rents for accommodation.

·        There is a shortage of affordable accommodation, particularly ground floor, well-located and in good condition.

·        Many clients of social services and community organisations are public transport reliant and the City Centre accommodation provides an accessible location for service providers.

·        Many agencies and organisations indicated that some clients utilise services that are linked, eg health, social security, the courts and other social support services.

·        Community organisations and social services contribute to employment in the City Centre and, together with clients, contribute to activity and vitality.

·        As the City grows a number of services are outgrowing their current accommodation.

·        Parking constraints, particularly for volunteers and clients with a disability as well as for staff is impacting on service access and efficiency.

·        Some accommodation currently utilised by community organisations and social services is in poor condition, with problems varying from air conditioning and airflow, to plumbing and security, thus contributing in some cases to under utilisation.

·        A broad range of population target groups access services provided by community organisations and social services located in the City Centre.

·        A need for additional meeting and exhibition space has been identified.

Council has existing arrangements with a number of organisations, such as the Warehouse Youth Health Centre, which is built on Council land and with whom Council has a long-term lease.  Other facilities include the Community Connections, which has in part been modified and refurbished using Section 94 and Commonwealth funds, and Senior Citizens Centres.  Many other organisations and services are housed in Council buildings on short-term leases, or similar short-term arrangements.

The Study recognises that purpose-built accommodation cannot be provided for all the organisations, services and groups that want it.  Within the context of the limited resources available to Council, priorities will need to be set.  The Study also emphasises that the Federal and State Governments, which provide funds for many of the organisations to deliver a service to the residents of the City, have a responsibility to also contribute to the accommodation requirements of these organisations.

The Elton Study provides Council with guidelines regarding how it might prioritise the allocation of future purpose-built accommodation.  The timeframe for possible future redevelopment of Council buildings / sites, which currently provide accommodation for community organisations and social services, is not yet determined.  In some cases it may be many years before redevelopment is feasible.

Further assessment of the Elton Study is required to establish some indicative costs, and  identify opportunities for funding from State and Federal agencies, as well as other funding mechanisms.  The directions Council may decide to pursue on the matters covered by the Elton Study will need to be consistent with the broader City Centres Strategy.

Recommended Action – Community Organisations

13. Following assessment by Council officers, a report on the draft Social Services and Community Organisations Accommodation Needs Study, prepared by Elton Consulting, be presented to Council for its consideration.

Conclusion

The public exhibition process, and the numerous meetings with key stakeholders, have provided valuable contributions and policy directions for the draft Strategy.  Currently, key actions relating to the future of the Penrith City Centre include –

§  Continuing to negotiate appropriate outcomes for proposed redevelopment sites, including Westfield Penrith Plaza, Centro Nepean, Parkview and other key sites

§  Finalising a Plan to provide and manage car parking and improved public transport

§  Funding and delivering an improved public domain, art and cultural programs, and community facilities

§  Working with the Regional Cities Taskforce to implement the next stages of detailed planning and implementation.

The revised Penrith City Centre Strategy is presented for Council’s consideration, and recommended for Council’s adoption.  Discussions with stakeholders and key organisations, and work on plans for implementation, will continue.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on the Penrith City Centre Strategy be received

2.     Council adopt the revised Penrith City Centre Strategy (attached to this report)

3.     Council endorse the recommended actions outlined in this report

4.     Responses, as outlined in this report, be provided to persons who made submissions on the draft Strategy

5.     The Penrith City Centre Strategy, including the Activity Precinct and Public Domain maps, be used to inform the planning to be undertaken with the State Government’s Regional Cities Taskforce.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.  

Summary of Strategy Submissions

8 Pages

Attachment

2.  

Penrith City Centre Strategy

51 Pages

Attachment

 


Policy Review Committee Meeting

24 July 2006

The City in its Broader Context

 

 

The City in its Broader Context

 

 

5

Penrith Regional Cities Taskforce

 

Compiled by:                Mark Andrews, Strategic & Management Planning Coordinator

Authorised by:             Ruth Goldsmith, Acting Director - City Strategy 

Strategic Program Term Achievement: Penrith City Centre provides a comprehensive range of economic and human and lifestyle services to Outer Western Sydney and Central Western New South Wales.

Critical Action: The City Centres Review strategies for the Penrith City Centre are developed, prioritised and being implemented.

 

Presenters:                   Professor Chris Johnson - Department of Planning - Regional Cities Taskforce    

Purpose:

To inform Council of the proposed Taskforce arrangements.  Professor Chris Johnson, Executive Director - Cities and Centres, Department of Planning, will make a brief presentation.

The report recommends that the information contained in the report be received, and the proposed Taskforce arrangements be endorsed.

 

Background

The NSW Government’s Metropolitan Strategy, released in December 2005, identifies Penrith as a Regional River City.  Penrith is one of the six regional cities, along with Parramatta, Liverpool, Gosford, Wollongong and Newcastle, nominated to provide improved access to jobs and lifestyle opportunities.  The Strategy proposed a Stronger Centres Initiative, aimed at clustering a range of jobs, services and housing around public transport nodes that serve population catchments.

 

At its Ordinary Meeting of 15 May 2006, Council was informed that the Premier’s Economic and Financial Statement released on 23 February 2006 included an initiative for a Taskforce to prepare new City Centre Plans for the six regional cities by December 2006.

 

The Minister for Planning wrote to Council, seeking to work cooperatively to develop the Plan, which would include a series of consistent supporting documents.  The Minister also said that he would ensure that there is a ‘whole of Government’ input into the planning process, and that real outcomes flow from the new city plans.

Taskforce Arrangements

The Director General of the Department of Planning convened a meeting with the six Regional City Mayors and General Managers on Friday 12 May 2006.  Arising from that meeting, and following information-gathering visits to the councils, the Director General of the Department has advised that –

·      The order for undertaking the plans is Wollongong, Gosford, Parramatta, Liverpool, Penrith and Newcastle

·      The plan for Wollongong will be the ‘test case’ for the documents, and is to be launched at the end of July, with the other cities following approximately monthly after this

·      A joint taskforce is to be established for each city between the Government and the city council

·      A reference panel of stakeholders and industry should be established for each city

·      Draft documents will be developed jointly, including a Vision Document, a Local Environmental Plan (LEP) based on the Template, a Development Control Plan (DCP), and a Public Domain Plan incorporating a Contributions Plan

·      Meetings and presentations to Councillors will be as required by Councils

·      It will be necessary for Council to have a resolution to prepare an LEP, and to forward this to the Department in accordance with Section 54 of the Act

·      When the draft LEP is complete, it will be necessary for Council to make a resolution that this is ready for public exhibition under Section 65, and to forward a request for exhibition to the Department

·      As the preparation of the planning documents is a joint exercise, the Department’s approval for both the preparation and the public exhibition will be given promptly

·      It is intended that the documents to be exhibited are a joint Government / Council proposal

·      During exhibition there should be a number of public forums to explain the plans

·      As a result of submissions during exhibition the documents may be amended prior to submission to the Minister for approval.

 

The LEP process for the City of Penrith has already been initiated, with Council resolving on 10 October 2005 to prepare the new Local Environmental Plan in accordance with Section 54 of the Act.  The Department of Planning was advised of this resolution, and has since endorsed Council’s approach, whilst also informing Council that it has not been issued any delegations for the process.  Council’s Penrith City Centre Strategy will provide the basis for the Vision and other documents.

 

The Metropolitan Strategy’s Centres typology for a Regional City Centre indicates a 2-kilometre radius around the Centre.  This includes the areas from Andrews Road to the north, Jamison Rd to the south, the Nepean River to the west and Parker St / Northern Rd to the east.  Although it is a broader area than that considered directly by the City Centres’ Review, the future of the key peripheral areas also informed the development of the Strategy.  The Taskforce process will thus provide an opportunity to draw together the outcomes identified for the Penrith City Centre and its surrounding key precincts.

 

Council is expected to bring its resources to the work of the Taskforce.  Council’s membership of the Taskforce will comprise the General Manager, Director~City Strategy and Local Planning Manager.  A Senior Environmental Planner will lead the day-to-day work program, supported by specialist Council staff providing input and advice as required.  The Department has set an optimistic timeframe, and will be expected to also bring sufficient and timely resources to the exercise.

 

Professor Chris Johnson, Executive Director – Cities and Centres, Department of Planning, will present the details of the Taskforce and, over the coming months, will be available to provide progress reports on the development of the Penrith City Centre Plan.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Penrith Regional Cities Taskforce be received

2.     The proposed Regional Cities Taskforce arrangements be endorsed.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


 

 

 

 

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The City as a Social Place

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

6        Disability Access Committee 2004-06 Highlights                                                                 43

 

7        ADI Site, St Marys - Request by Delfin Lend Lease for Declaration of Remaining Precincts on the ADI Site as Release Areas                                                                                                         46

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting

24 July 2006

The City as a Social Place

 

 

The City as a Social Place

 

 

6

Disability Access Committee 2004-06 Highlights   

 

Compiled by:                Athena Kandris, Community Development Officer - Aged and Disability; Ben Felten, Disability Access Officer; Joe Ibbitson, Community Programs Coordinator

Authorised by:             Erich Weller, Community Development Manager 

Strategic Program Term Achievement: Access has increased for communities that face barriers to using social services and facilities.

Critical Action: Coordinate and implement strategies across all areas of Council’s responsibility to improve access for people with a disability.

 

Presenters:                   David Currie - Disability Access Committee - 2004-04 Highlights    

Purpose:

To highlight some of the key successes in relation to the work of Council's Disability Access Committee over the past two years.

The report recommends that the information be received.

Mr David Currie,  a community representative on Council's Disability Access Committee will make a brief presentation on this matter.

 

Background

 

The current two-year term of the community representatives appointed to Council’s Disability Access Committee was completed in June 2006. This presents an important opportunity to reflect on the work of the Committee and to highlight some of the key achievements during this two-year period.

Disability Access Committee

 

The terms of reference of the Disability Access Committee identify ‘an accessible environment’ and ‘the highest possible standard of access’ as the primary vision and aim of the Committee. The objectives make reference to policies, procedures and legislative requirements; links to people in the community with a disability; and consulting, educating and informing the broader community.

 

During the 2004/2006 term a particular emphasis has been to refocus the work of the committee at a strategic level.  The Committee has also been involved in the development of Council’s Disability Action Plan and consequently monitoring the progress of implementation of the Plan.

 

 

 

2004-06 Highlights

 

The following list highlights some of the successful projects and activities which have been undertaken over the 2004-06 period with the support, advice and assistance of the Disability Access Committee. The list has been grouped according to type of activity noting, however, that projects may fit under a number of groupings. Also the list is not meant to be exhaustive but rather to provide an indication of achievement.

1.       Disability Action Plan and Disability Access Improvement Program

·    Tactile Ground Surface Indicators in both Penrith and St Marys CBDs

·    Accessible toilets in the Australia Arms Hotel and Rural Fire Brigade facilities

·    Handrails at various Council facilities

·    Signage currently being installed at the Civic Centre

·    Technical training on AS 1428 and Building Codes of Australia for Council staff

·    Councillor training in disability awareness

·    Adaptive and Assistive Technology in Penrith and St Marys libraries.

2.       Advice on Plans, Strategies and Development Applications

·    A new protocol on providing input to significant public access DAs

·    Great River Walk

·    The Red Cow Hotel

·    Joan Sutherland Performing Arts Centre

·    Lewers Regional Gallery

·    Penrith Stadium

·    BLOC Night Club

·    Outdoor Eating and Trading Policy

·    Tench Reserve.

3.       Support for Events and New Initiatives

·    Nepean Disability Expo

·    Council Open Days

·    International Day for People with a Disability

·    Launch of Access Maps

·    Carers Award.

4.       Access Maps

·    St Marys Town Centre Access Map

·    Penrith City Centre Access Map.

5.       Presentations

·    New Urban Release Areas

·    Universal Design Principles and Draft Open Space Action Plan

·    City Centres Review

·    Alternate Formats.

 

Conclusion

 

The completion of the two-year term of the community representatives offers an opportunity to reflect on some of the achievements of the Committee between 2004-06. The list of highlights identifies the important work that the Committee has undertaken over the previous two years and point to the continuing success of the Committee in promoting and achieving enhanced outcomes in the accessibility of infrastructure and services in the Penrith Local Government Area.

 

 

 RECOMMENDATION

That the information contained in the report on the Disability Action Committee achievements be received.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Policy Review Committee Meeting

24 July 2006

The City as a Social Place

 

 

The City as a Social Place

 

 

7

ADI Site, St Marys - Request by Delfin Lend Lease for Declaration of Remaining Precincts on the ADI Site as Release Areas   

 

Compiled by:                Tony Crichton, Senior Environmental Planner

Authorised by:             Roger Nethercote, Environmental Planning Manager 

Strategic Program Term Achievement: Timely delivery of services to new release areas is being secured.

Critical Action: Prepare and implement services and infrastructure delivery plans for each new release area that ensures that the early establishment of services and facilities match community needs.

     

Purpose:

To inform Councillors of the receipt from the Minister for Planning of a formal request by Delfin Lend Lease (DLL) seeking the declaration of the remaining precincts on the ADI site as release areas.  The Department of Planning (DoP) has invited Council to make a submission on the request.

The report recommends that Council support in principle the request by DLL, however seek the Department's support to introduce specific mechanisms to require the developer to demonstrate a staged delivery of infrastructure and other services for the development.

 

Background

In June 2003 the Minister for Western Sydney, the Hon Diane Beamer MP, declared the Eastern Precinct (Blacktown) and the Dunheved North and Dunheved South Precincts (Penrith and Blacktown)as the first release areas for the former ADI Site.  This enabled urban and employment development to proceed in those precincts.

The Eastern Precinct Plan was approved by Blacktown City Council in March 2004.   Development has since commenced on that precinct. Blacktown Council approved the Dunheved North Precinct Plan in June 2006.  Council considered a report regarding the Dunheved South Precinct Plan at its Policy Review Committee Meeting on 22 May 2006.  Discussions are advancing with DLL (DLL) to finalise the draft Planning Agreement for exhibition.

DLL has now formally requested that the Minister for Planning declare the remaining precincts as Release Areas as soon as possible.  This includes the Western and Central Precincts within Penrith LGA and the Ropes Creek Precinct within Blacktown LGA.  A map of the release area precincts is appended to this report, along with a copy of the letter from DLL to the Minister. 

 

Statutory Planning Framework

 

The three key documents guiding the development of the site are:

 

·         Sydney Regional Environmental Plan No 30 – St Marys (SREP 30);

·         St Marys Environmental Planning Strategy 2000 (EPS); and

·         St Marys Development Agreement.

 

SREP 30

 

SREP 30 provides the statutory planning framework for the development and planning of the site.  The provisions of  Clause 7.2(a) of SREP 30 permit the Minister for Planning to declare a precinct as a release area provided the following matters have been considered:

 

(a)     The views of Council and relevant public authorities;

(b)     The degree to which the requirements of any development agreement that relates to any previous release areas have been met;

(c)     The degree to which development in any previous release has achieved the performance objectives in Part 5 of this plan. 

 

EPS

 

The EPS identifies performance objectives and corresponding strategies to achieve the performance objectives.  The strategies provide details of specific actions to be undertaken by government, the developer and the community.

 

St Marys Development Agreement

 

The St Marys Development Agreement provides a description of facilities and services to be provided by the developer and Government to meet the performance objectives, the timing of the development or facilities and services and the responsibilities for service and facility provision.

 

In general, the principal purpose of the staged release area declaration process is to ensure that there is adequate performance on the part of the developers in achieving the objectives and requirements of the adopted plans. In this regard, the Minister must consider the degree to which previous precincts have achieved the performance objectives contained in SREP 30 and also the requirements of the St Marys Development Agreement.

 

Formal Request to the Minister

 

On 10 March 2006 DLL made a formal request to the Minister for Planning seeking the declaration of the remaining Precincts on the ADI Site as Release Areas.  The DoP wrote to Council on 18 May 2006 advising Council of the request by DLL.  The Minister has the discretion to consult with any public authorities, including Council, in considering whether to declare further Release Areas. 

 

The DoP has therefore written to Council seeking clarification that Council is satisfied with progress of the requirements of any separate agreements which have been established with the Joint Venture under Part 3 of the St Marys Development Agreement.  DLL advised that a draft Agreement was lodged with Council on 31 March 2006 and is currently under negotiation.

 

The DLL letter to the Minister for Planning highlights potential benefits of declaring the remaining precincts as Release Areas as listed below:

·         Delivery of 3,000 local jobs;

·         Facilitate early handover of the Regional Park;

·         Address long lead time to provide development continuity;

·         Commitment to recycled water;

·         Fast track delivery of key infrastructure; and

·         Provide delivery certainty to NSW Government.

 

In support of their request, DLL has provided a copy of a monitoring report (3 volumes) to the Minister.  A copy of the St Marys Monitoring Report Summary Document is included in the attachments. 

 

Assessment of Request for Declaration of Remaining Precincts as Release Areas

 

The declaration of release areas Precincts is the first step in the delivery of urban development on the ADI site in Penrith.  It is understood the fundamental purpose of the precinct declaration process was to enable the staged roll-out of the planning for the site commensurate with the delivery of critical infrastructure, services and job creation.  In this regard, the principle was established that the developer’s performance needed to be judged against the requirements of the statutory plans and the Development Agreement, prior to new release precincts being declared as release areas.

 

While there are no general objections to the declaration of the remaining precincts, there remains the need to ensure that Council will have opportunities to pursue required infrastructure and services at the planning stage for each precinct.  In this regard, Council needs to be assured that the appropriate level of infrastructure is provided commensurate with each phase of development through the adoption of Precinct Plans and with negotiated planning agreements. 

 

SREP 30 lists performance objectives that are required to be met by precinct development.  These are summarised as follows:

 

·         Ecologically sustainable development

·         Air quality

·         Conservation

·         Heritage

·         Community services

·         Open space and recreation

·         Water cycle

·         Soils

·         Transport

·         Urban form

·         Employment and business development

·         Housing

·         Energy efficiency

·         Waste Management.

 

DLL has provided a status report on the achievements to date in these areas which is included in the attachments.  This summary demonstrates that substantial progress has been made by DLL on most of the core performance objectives listed under SREP 30 and the Environmental Planning Strategy.

 

Significant scope exists for these matters to be largely dealt with through the requirements outlined in the St Marys Development Agreement between DLL and the State Government and in subsequent Precinct Plans which will be developed and submitted to Council for adoption, together with the related Planning Agreements outlining key infrastructure delivery.

 

In our view, the most critical elements that will need to be effectively monitored for delivery are those outlined below:

 

1.       Demonstrated performance on delivery of employment. 

 

A key performance objective of SREP 30 requires “the total number of jobs generated by development on land to which this plan applies (including jobs generated on the surrounding land) is to approximate the number of workers who will be resident on the land to which this plan applies after the development has been carried out. 

 

An Economic Development Strategy (EDS) was prepared for DLL and endorsed by the DoP on 22 March 2005.  The Strategy identifies actions and initiatives to be implemented to meet the employment and business development performance objectives set out in the statutory plans relating to the site. 

 

In addition to identifying direct employment initiatives which improves the level of employment self-containment within the area, the EDS also proposes a range of capacity building initiatives which will provide opportunities for education and training, serving to build a platform for long-term skill development and knowledge generation within the new and established communities.  The Strategy incorporates an action plan based on three broad categories, being direct employment focus, capacity building and integrated planning.

 

The EDS analyses the various potential uses for the site that would generate employment associated with demand emanating from beyond the resident population, or activities selling to external markets.  These target uses include the employment land areas and the service oriented uses which are to be located in the urban areas, Regional Park and Regional Open Space areas.

 

Employment-generating uses which have been targeted include manufacturing, wholesale trade, environmental and agri-business, construction and fabrication.  In the Urban and Open Space areas the employment-generating uses targeted include retailing, health facilities, leisure and recreation, offices, education and hospitality.

 

The Strategy targets the delivery of 5,300 ongoing jobs both on and off the ADI Site over the life of the development.  Of these, 2,473 jobs were projected to be established on the site, and 2,827 established off site in both Penrith and Blacktown LGAs.  A total of approximately 3,460 jobs are intended to be located within the Penrith LGA, both on and off the site.   

 

An EDS Committee is required to be established by DoP under the provisions of the Environmental Planning Strategy and the St Marys Development Agreement.  The EDS Committee has an advisory role and membership comprises representatives from DoP, Penrith and Blacktown Councils, DLL, Premier’s Department and the Department of State & Regional Development.  The Committee is chaired by DoP.  The primary function of the EDS Committee is to consider the EDS and subsequent reviews undertaken by the Joint Venture as required by the St Marys Development Agreement and to advise the Joint Venture on what measures might be taken to overcome any shortfall in employment based on targets identified in the EDS not being identified.

 

The St Marys Development Agreement proposes a 3 year cycle for reviews by the EDS Committee of employment generation.  Council has previously argued in its submissions to DoP over time that this meeting schedule was too infrequent to be able to effectively advise on measures to be undertaken to correct any lag in employment creation if required. 

 

It has been subsequently argued by Council at EDS Meetings that these meetings should be held on at least an annual basis in order to better track progress in the implementation of the strategy.   At the last EDS Committee meeting held on 22 March 2005 it was confirmed that the Committee would meet on a 6 monthly basis.  Given the importance of ensuring that an effective monitoring program for employment creation is in place, it is recommended Council pursue this matter with DoP and request the EDS Committee meetings to be put back on a regular 6 monthly cycle.

 

SREP 30 and the EPS do not provide specific, detailed mechanisms for determining a satisfactory level of job creation at various stages of the development, other than at completion.  Whilst the EDS provides an annualised job growth summary, the expected job growth in the identified sectors is not clearly aligned with the proposed precincts yet to be planned and released.  If all of the precincts are now to be released for further detailed planning, it would be of assistance to have a fuller appreciation of the expected roll-out of jobs relevant to each precinct implementation. 

 

In order to properly demonstrate a satisfactory staged performance regarding provision of jobs to meet future employment targets, it is suggested that the DoP also give consideration to requiring an annual audit process to be instigated which would enable joint monitoring of job creation by the Department, DLL and Council.  This approach is incorporated in the recommendation.   

 

2.       Critical Infrastructure Delivery

 

Table 1 and Table 2 of the submitted St Marys Monitoring Report (summary version) demonstrate that the initial obligations have been met by DLL.  These include payments, road works design, completion of the Sims Varley Technical Traffic Study in 2004 and submission of the draft St Marys Development Traffic Management Study 2005 (draft TMS 2005) to DoP. 

 

However, significant infrastructure delivery matters still remain to be resolved.  The draft TMS 2005 was submitted to the Department in October 2005, however is yet to be finalised as final decisions on apportionment and location of works in various release areas are yet to be made by the RTA.  The timely, staged delivery of critical infrastructure, especially transport infrastructure, is critical to ensure that desirable public transport participation levels are achieved and maintained, and private car usage is minimised. 

 

Negotiations have been undertaken with Sydney Water regarding the provision of recycled water for the Eastern Precinct (Ropes Crossing), however this is yet to be completed for the North Dunheved and South Dunheved Precincts.  The provision of recycled water and broadband telecommunication infrastructure are critical infrastructure elements that should be accelerated by DLL, particularly if the remaining precincts are declared as release areas.

 

A more defined process is required to ensure that satisfactory early staged delivery of services can be achieved for public transport and road works, broadband infrastructure, recycled water and for Regional Park and Regional Open Space infrastructure. 

 

3.      Draft Planning Agreement

 

Council has also been asked to comment on whether we are satisfied with the progress against Part 3 of the St Marys Development Agreement (the Deed).

 

Council received a draft Planning Agreement from DLL in May 2006.  We are currently finalising a final draft version of this document with both Council and DLL lawyers.  Public exhibition of the draft Planning Agreement will proceed shortly, when this process is completed.  We are unable at this stage to provide any substantial commentary to the Department until that assessment is complete. 

 

4.      Regional Park

 

A St Marys Regional Park Community Reference Group was established in July 2004 by the Department of Environment and Conservation (DEC) to assist it with the development of a Plan of Management for the ADI Regional Park.  The Committee was comprised of representatives of Blacktown and Penrith Councils, DLL, specialist expertise from Universities of Western Sydney and Wollongong, RSPCA, and community representatives including ADI RAG, the Aboriginal community, wildlife education and Hawkesbury/Nepean Catchment Foundation.  The Committee met on a number of occasions up to mid 2005. 

 

Under the terms of the St Marys Development Agreement, DLL has indicated it has now paid $200K contribution to DEC for the development of the Plan of Management and the operations of the Advisory Group.  DEC has advised that the Plan of Management is currently being finalised and will be placed on public exhibition prior to the end of December 2006. 

 

DLL are obligated to pay a contribution to DEC of $6.9M for capital improvement works for the Regional Park.  The St Marys Development Agreement indicates this contribution to be paid over 10 stages, the last payment being provided approximately 4 years after the completion of the first subdivision works in the Central Precinct.  This assumes the Central Precinct is the last Precinct to be developed on the site.  We have previously raised concern to both DEC and DoP over the lengthy timeframes involved for financial contributions to be made to assist in the development of the Regional Park.

 

DLL have indicated that the proposal to declare the remaining Precincts as Release Areas provides the opportunity to fast-track the staged implementation of the transfer of the Regional Park, commencing in December 2006.  There is however, no detail on the degree of acceleration of the Regional Park transfer or the new timeframe for delivery. 

 

The principle of achieving a quicker hand over of the Regional Park is supported and would be of notable public benefit.  It is therefore recommended that Council urge DEC to fast track finalisation of the Plan of Management process for the Regional Park and to make funds available for the establishment and opening of the Regional Park at the earliest possible opportunity. 

 

5.       Regional Open Space

 

DLL has made commitments to the Federal Government to deliver a Central Park recreation facility on the ADI Site.  In a letter to Council dated 6 May 2004, DLL advised that a potential Central Park solution has been prepared including an expenditure commitment of $6M primarily for roads, carparking and Regional Open Space commitments to be delivered over a 4½ year period from January 2006. 

 

The site location indicated for the Central Park was the nominated Regional Open Space land adjacent the eastern edge of the Central Precinct in Penrith LGA.  The planning phase for this facility is yet to be initiated by DLL.

 

Council’s recently completed PLANS Study and related draft Open Space Strategy and Section 94 Developer Contributions Plan has highlighted the need for several major district level recreation and sporting facilities in the City.  The ADI Site represents an opportunity for the development of one of these district level facilities. 

 

We would urge that the DoP be proactive in monitoring the progress of establishment of the Central Park facility on site and we also urge that a timetable be established as soon as possible for its design and delivery.

 

Conclusion

 

The declaration of the remaining precincts as release areas commences the detailed planning and delivery process of the proposed urban development on the ADI site. 

 

A comparison of the required performance objectives in SREP 30 with the development achievements listed under the St Marys Monitoring Report indicates that DLL has been able to demonstrate successful implementation of the Development Agreement obligations and achievement of the performance objectives in the SREP 30 to date.

 

DLL has advanced a number of substantial benefits in pursuing the concurrent declaration of the remaining Precincts as release areas and these are supported in principle.  However, a number of aspects, particularly relating to the delivery of critical infrastructure and jobs, require further clarification and advancement by DoP and other Government agencies to underpin a decision by the Minister to release the remaining Precincts.  These are included in the recommendations.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on ADI Site, St Marys - Request by Delfin Lend Lease for Declaration of Remaining Precincts on the ADI Site as Release Areas be received

2.     Council advise the Department of Planning that it has no objections in principle to the Minister for Planning declaring the remaining precincts on the ADI site as Release Areas subject to:

       (a)   The establishment of an annual audit process which demonstrates that specific employment targets for the ADI Site are being met on a staged basis;

       (b)   The Department of Planning ensuring that the Employment Development Strategy Committee meet on a six-monthly basis to review progress on the implementation of the Employment Development Strategy;

       (c)   The formulation of an employment delivery program on a Precinct specific basis which identifies expected job growth in the nominated sectors over the life of the development; 

       (d)   The establishment of a clear process for ensuring the staged, early delivery of transport and service infrastructure for all Precincts on the ADI site;

       (e)   The urgent completion of the draft Plan of Management for the Regional Park for public exhibition and a fast-tracking of infrastructure works to allow the opening of the Regional Park at the earliest practical opportunity;

       (f)    The progression of the planning and implementation of the proposed Central Park facility to be located in the Regional Open Space on the ADI Site.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1. View

Letter from Delfin Lend Lease to Minister for Planning

3 Pages

Appendix

2. View

ADI Precinct Plan

1 Page

Appendix

3.  

St Marys Monitoring Report Summary Document

18 Pages

Attachment

 


Policy Review Committee Meeting

24 July 2006

Appendix 1 - Letter from Delfin Lend Lease to Minister for Planning

 

 

 




Policy Review Committee Meeting

24 July 2006

Appendix 2 - ADI Precinct Plan

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


The City as an Economy

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

8        Penrith City Centre Association and St Mary's Town Centre Association Business Plans for 2006-07                                                                                                                                             61

 

9        Penrith Valley Economic Development Corporation Business Plan 2006-07                        65

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting

24 July 2006

The City as an Economy

 

 

The City as an Economy

 

 

8

Penrith City Centre Association and St Mary's Town Centre Association Business Plans for 2006-07    

 

Compiled by:                Bijai Kumar, Local Economic Development Program Manager

Authorised by:             Bijai Kumar, Local Economic Development Program Manager 

Strategic Program Term Achievement: Council is working with the Centre Associations to identify and cultivate market and development opportunities.

Critical Action: Identify and develop a demand driven commercial opportunity that appeals to the broader regional and metropolitan marketplace in partnership with the Centre Associations.

     

Purpose:

To inform Council of the Business Plans for the City and Town Centre Associations and to seek endorsement for funding the activities of the Associations for the 2006-07 financial year.

The report recommends that funding for the Associations be approved.

 

Background

The Penrith City Centre Association [PCCA] and the St Marys Town Centre Association [SMTCA] are funded through sub-category rates levied on businesses in the Penrith CBD and St Marys. Historically both Associations have performed a vital role in supporting and growing the retail activity of businesses in Penrith and St Marys and making representations to Council on a range of issues to improve the physical look of the centres and to help create safer, accessible and attractive places that enhance shopping and recreational experiences of both local residents and visitors to the City. This is expected to be an ongoing core business activity of the Associations and a significant proportion of the budgets will be expended in promotion and marketing programs associated with retail trade. The Associations business plans and budgets reflect this trend.

 

Council’s new Strategic Plan 2005-09 has introduced a new element in how Council proposes to interact with the Associations which expands the scope of the activities and roles of the two Associations and accentuates the value of partnering between Council and the Associations. Several issues in the Strategic Plan relate to economic development and employment generation which require Council to work in partnership with the Associations to attract investment, both commercial and residential and a range of business and metropolitan services into the city and town centres. There has been ongoing dialogue and consultations with the Associations on this new direction and the Associations have been both positive and supportive.

 

The business plans of both Associations recognise the value of this more dynamic partnership and the leadership being provided by Council and have incorporated the relevant issues and actions proposed in Council’s Management Plan into their own programs. Council will be working closely with the Associations’ executives to progress a number of investment related programs and findings of the city and town centre review in the 2006-07 financial year.

Copies of the business plans and the last audited accounts of both Associations are provided in the Appendix. The auditors have not raised any matter of concern in their reports.

2006-07 Business and Marketing Plans of the Associations

§ Penrith City Centre Association

The PCCA is driven by a vision to “create a vibrant city centre experience encompassing its natural environmental aspects while taking account of its changing demographics and by offering :

§ diverse and unique strip shopping and a central mass of key components that also offer lifestyle, leisure and entertainment; and

§ creating an attractive, safe and lively destination which also offers shop top living in the Penrith CBD

sustained by engaging, motivating and enthusing all city centre stakeholders.”

 

The Association values its partnership with Council. It is keen to work with Council to achieve a range of common outcomes as set out in Council’s strategic plan. The long term vision and a number of initiatives are directed at increasing the vitality of the city centre and its businesses and to broaden its base a functioning, accessible and attractive regional city.

 

The Strategies the PCCA will use to drive this vision include the following:

·    implementing a sustained partnership program to make improvements in the city centre

·    create opportunities to improve the economic viability of businesses in the centre

·    developing plans to improve streetscape

·    offering a range of promotions to broaden the interests of shoppers and to attract more shoppers

·    offering business development programs to improve turnover, visual presentation and customer service

·    improving the tenancy mix

·    promoting the city regionally

·    working in close partnership with Council to implement strategies outlined in its Strategic Plan and the 2006-07 management plan.

 

The key focus areas for the PCCA in 2006-07 include the following:

 

·    The introduction of weekly Sunday markets in the city centre

·    Development of new and continuation of already established business programs

·    Façade enhancements and interior refurbishments

·    Filling of vacancies arising through clustering of like businesses and creating emporium style shops in larger vacant premises

·    Regular promotions to market the city

·    Beautification of the CBD

·    Encouraging CBD landowners to participate in Council forums, for example to provide input in the development of a city centres investment prospectus.

 

The Association proposes to expend its 2006-07 budget of $268,708 in the following key areas:

 

·    Administration                                                                       $153,000

·    Marketing                                                                    $  70,708

·    Business Development                                                 $  15,000

·    Physical Environment [Improvements]                                    $  30,000

 

The PCCA lists its key achievements for the last financial year as follows:

 

·    lodging of  new constitution to the Department of Fair Trading

·    undertaking a range of marketing and promotion programs covering major events such as Queens Baton Relay, monthly sales days, special occasion promotion and advertising

·    business development including business owner network meetings, mystery shopper programs, and use of refurbishment consultants

·    participating in and promoting the City centre review exercise

·    improvement to the physical environment such as building façade program, presentation to Council of concept drawings.

 

The Association has also been instrumental in promoting the Gosford model cleaning and public domain maintenance program and for arranging a visit by Councillors to Gosford and Entrance to view the cleaning operation. As a result of assessment work undertaken by Council staff, an enhanced cleaning program has been adopted by Council for the city and town centres to be funded from the special rate initiative commencing 2006-07.

 

The report provided by the Association also offers a brief assessment of the current retail trading environment and the challenges some small retailers confront in growing their businesses. The Association has also offered suggestions on how improvements in the public domain through streetscape enhancements could impact positively on retail trade in the city centre. These suggestions are being pursued with Council.

 

The PCCA’s day to day affairs and marketing and business development programs are managed by the City Centre Manager, Ms Gladys Reed and a part time assistant while a twelve member committee representing landowner and business interests provide broad strategic direction and oversees the implementation of the business plan. Council’s Local Economic Development Program Manager is Council’s liaison with the PCCA.

 

§ St Marys Town Centre Association

 

The Association’s key objective is to work together with Council, landowners, businesses and the community at large to “improve the physical, economic and social environment of our commercial district.”

 

Over the past twelve months the Association has continued to employ a town centre manager who has worked closely with the retailers and landowners to identify and address the issues that concern them specially in the context of the town centre review. A number of capital works programs and physical improvements to the streetscape and public amenities have been identified by the Association with regular feedback provided to Council.

 

The Association has also undertaken some twelve promotional activities some of which include Christmas street decorations; kool kidz Christmas show; easter bunny promotion; and voucher promotion and holiday giveaway. All promotional programs have received excellent support form the retailers in the town centre attracting shoppers from the local and district catchment.

 

The Association is proposing to conduct with support from Council a workshop to assess the impacts of several developments around St Marys and to have a more proactive involvement in economic development matters being promoted by Council. Details of where the Association sees its involvement in Council’s strategic program is provided in the business plan.

 

The Association’s budget of $221,585 comprises $201,585 in rate contributions and $20,000 contributed by retailers in the town centre. For the 2006-07 financial year the key areas of expenditure include:

 

Management services/Administration                                        $86,000

Promotion and Marketing                                                                  $80,000

Queen St Enhancement                                                                     $20,000

Tree Lighting Program                                                                       $20,000

Workshop and Seminars                                                          $ 10,000

General Maintenance                                                                         $  5,585

 

The Town Centre Manger is Mr Peter Jackson Calway and the Association committee consists of ten business people and landowners. Council’s Local Economic Development Program Manager is Council’s liaison with the Association.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Penrith City Centre Association and St Mary's Town Centre Association Business Plans for 2006-07 financial year be received.

2.     Funding for the Penrith City Centre Association in the amount of $268,708 for the 2006-07 financial year be endorsed to be paid on a quarterly basis

3.     Funding for the St Marys Town Centre Association in the amount of $201,585 for the 2006-07 financial year be endorsed to be paid on a quarterly basis

4.     The Associations submit in February 2007 six monthly performance reports for review by Council’s Director City Strategy.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.  

Penrith City Centre Association Business Plan 06-07

11 Pages

Attachment

2.  

Penrith City Centre Association Financial statements

13 Pages

Attachment

3.  

St Marys City Centre Association Business  Plan

13 Pages

Attachment

4.  

St Marys City Centre Association Financial Statements

10 Pages

Attachment

 


Policy Review Committee Meeting

24 July 2006

The City as an Economy

 

 

The City as an Economy

 

 

9

Penrith Valley Economic Development Corporation Business Plan 2006-07   

 

Compiled by:                Bijai Kumar, Local Economic Development Program Manager

Authorised by:             Ruth Goldsmith, Acting Director - City Strategy 

Strategic Program Term Achievement: The City’s business community, learning institutions and training institutions are working in an integrated way to strengthen and develop the City’s local economic base.

Critical Action: Support PVEDC in the development of the City's enterprises and self-supporting business networks

     

Purpose:

To inform Council on the proposed activities of the Corporation and seek endorsement for its Business Plan for the 2006-07 financial year.

The report recommends that funding in the amount of $260,623 for the Corporation be endorsed.

 

Background

Penrith City's first Economic Development Committee was formed in March 1990 as a Committee of the Council.  It was established to address the issues of employment generation and economic growth in the Penrith Valley.  This initiative became the genesis for the evolution and development of the Economic Development and Employment Committee (EDEC) which became the principal vehicle for the engagement of Council with its industry partners, in creating the institutional framework for expanding and implementing the City's economic development agenda.

 

At its meeting on 11 December 2001, Council agreed that EDEC had reached a level of maturity that supported its restructure as an independent incorporated body.  To achieve this objective, the Penrith business community requested Council to consider a general rate rise in its 2002-2003 Management Plan.  Subsequently, annual funding for an independent EDEC (for a ten year period) was authorised by Council, providing that EDEC demonstrated effective use of the funds for local economic development.

 

The Penrith Valley Economic Development Corporation [PVEDC] was incorporated in January 2003, and has been running its operations from Council premises in Allen Arcade.  The Corporation's board consists of eleven members, with ‘as of right’ membership from Council, UWS, Western Sydney TAFE, Penrith Valley Business Enterprise Centre and Sydney West Area Health Service (accounting for six members).  The remaining five members represent local industry.  The Board’s chair is Mr Steve Welsh, Director, IMS Installations Pty Ltd.  Council representatives on the Board are Councillor Ross Fowler and Alan Stoneham, Council’s Director City Strategy.

 

The Corporation’s activities have been guided by a strategic plan, and a series of business plans which have been presented to Council at the beginning of each financial year.  A number of task groups comprising business people, representatives of learning institutions, local business organisations, government agencies and Council staff have supported the activities of the Corporation.  The Penrith Education and Training Providers network (PEATS), which was established by Council to promote skills development in the City, has merged with the Corporation’s IT, Education and Training task group to avoid duplication and expand its membership base.

 

The Corporation has eighteen members in total, of which twelve are represented on the Board.

2005-2008 Strategic Plan

Given Council’s extensive economic development agenda, and the inevitability of overlapping activities, the PVEDC Board had requested clarification from Council on the respective roles of the two organisations.  This response was provided last year, wherein it was emphasised that “understanding the dynamics of how the existing businesses operate, representing and servicing their needs and fostering their growth is a key challenge which confronts us and this we see is the responsibility of the Corporation.”

 

The Board was further advised that “Council sees itself operating at the level of local economy, industry and the City’s labour market, while the Corporation is best placed to direct its resources and capabilities at the level of the ‘enterprise’ strengthening business capability, technology diffusion, exports, skills development, home based businesses etc. with the broad objective of assisting existing businesses to the next stage of their development.”

 

In several meetings with the Corporation, it was emphasised that the City’s broad economic program was underpinned by a clear objective of generating jobs for local residents.  These jobs would arise both from new investment locating from other areas into the City, as well as those arising from growth and expansion of existing businesses.

 

Council’s role in investment attraction, planning for new employment lands and creating the right conditions for investment has been clearly articulated in its Strategic Program and did not need to be replicated.  The Corporation, on the other hand, has a vital role to play in generating jobs within existing businesses, with a particular focus on the potential in the small business sector.  The Corporation was also asked to consider the roles and functions of other business organisations in the City, and to clearly communicate with its constituency on the programs and services it would deliver.

 

The Corporation was also advised of the opportunities for accessing government funding for a range of business and skills development related programs and grants.  The former Economic Development and Employment Committee (EDEC) had, within Council, secured significant government grants.

 

This clear separation of responsibilities was recognised by the Board, and became the basis for reassessing its role, and focussing its energy and resources in creating a more dynamic business community in the City.  The Board undertook to revisit its strategic program, and acquired the services of a consultant to workshop its strategic direction and role as a business development agency, amongst several others in the City.

 

The revised strategic program has now been endorsed by the Board.  A copy of this program, together with the Corporation’s Business Plan for 2006-07, and the last audited accounts, has been provided to Councillors under separate cover and is available to the public on request.

 

The Corporation’s strategic program is driven by a mission to “attract, retain, and facilitate the growth of business investment in the Penrith Valley”.  It has refined its vision, key success factors and strategic initiatives to meet the challenges ahead.  The Corporation’s vision rests on the following five platforms:

·    promoting the business profile of the region

·    promoting and marketing activities for business growth

·    facilitating cooperative activity which stimulates business growth

·    promoting small business, and

·    promoting employment.

 

The Corporation has further identified that the three factors critical to its success are:

·    strong alliances

·    high performing task groups, and

·    clear communication.

 

The Corporation expects that, by the end of the current Strategic Plan, it “will be highly respected and valued for enhancing the status of Penrith Valley as a place to do business.”  It hopes to achieve this position by:

·    promoting and marketing the business and investment profile of the Penrith Valley

·    supporting the growth of business in the region, and

·    facilitating cooperative activity among the region’s businesses and institutions.

2006-07 Business Plan

Key Achievements 2005-06

 

The Corporation has listed the following key achievements for its various task groups for the last financial year:

 

Business Growth and Marketing

·    continued operation of the Western Sydney Innovation Advisory Centre funded by the Department of State and Regional Development as an outsourced service.  The Centre assists the development of business ideas and concepts into commercial propositions

·    facilitated the growth of the Penrith Valley Home Based Business Network which became independent in October 2005

·    four Chief Executive Officer’s dinners and Federal budget breakfast organised

·    the PVEDC website received 47,574 visits, an increase of 43% over the last financial year.

 

International Business

·    2005 Penrith Valley Export and Business Survey was conducted focusing on businesses in the city’s key industrial areas and its findings promoted

·    Austrade provided with a list of potential exporters and current exporters identified in the survey for follow-up.

 

Tourism, Creative and Cultural

·    the new Visitors Information Centre built with sponsorship support from 67 businesses and local tourism operators and valued at some $600,000 was opened

·    facilitated the world’s biggest kayak cake to support the 2005 ICF Canoe Slalom world championships.

 

Information Technology, Education and Training

·    continuation of a partnership with Telstra Country-wide and TAFE to provide free e-commerce workshops to 400 local businesses

·    participation by Nepean High School students in a PVEDC customer service program

·    facilitated the Smart City Transport project a unique initiative for a dedicated local transport information website

·    continued support of the Cranebrook IT Centre project

·    development of a specific IT project to bring business on-line.

 

Further details on specific achievements are provided in the Corporation’s report.

 

2006-07 Action Plan

 

In 2006-07 the Corporation has planned to undertake the following programs under three broad strategic areas:

 

Promoting and marketing the business and investment profile of Penrith Valley

·    promote the existence and capabilities of the PVEDC

·    market and promote the business investment profile of Penrith Valley

·    promote the business strength and capabilities of the region in its role as a business centre.

 

Supporting the growth of businesses in the region

·    identify growth opportunities specific to large businesses

·    identify growth opportunities specific to small business

·    maintain collaborative relationships with city partners to optimise business growth

·    support Council’s program of industry clusters

·    facilitate, promote and support an interactive business environment that is conducive to business growth

·    identify and promote smart business

·    pro-actively market the benefits of exporting and importing and provide and facilitate good advice on all aspects of international trade

·    support business growth through innovation.

 

Facilitate cooperative activity amongst the region’s businesses and institutions

·    seek to expand the role of higher education and increase co-operation and involvement of learning institutions in skills development to support the business community.

 

Further details on tasks to be undertaken, and key performance indicators, are provided in the Corporation’s 2006-07 Action Plans.

 

2006-07 Budget

 

The Corporation’s budget for the 2006-07 financial year is $454,300 and will be expended in the following areas:

 

Staff and Administration costs

$301,555

Projects and Marketing

$  77,100

Catering for functions and events

$  49,560

Computers and Network set up

$  11,840

Website development ISP

$  10,800

Accommodation fit out

$    3,445

Total

$454,300

 

The Corporation’s key revenue sources include the following:

 

Council

$260,623

Membership

$    4,000

Interest income

$    3,098

Function income

$  53,800

Other income

$  12,000

GST collected

$  33,042

Total

$366,563

 

The Corporation’s accounts also show that it has $61,309 in its bank account, which increases the total funds at its disposal to $424,872.

 

The Corporation has asked for additional funding of $85,000, above the value of the special Citywide rate initiative, which has realised $260,623 for the Corporation in the 2006-07 financial year.  In meetings held between the Corporation and senior Council staff, the Corporation was advised that Council would only consider a request for increased funding if it were supported by a detailed case and justification.  Any such request from the Corporation would be considered along with other funding priorities identified by Council, and there was no guarantee that any particular submission would be endorsed.

 

The Corporation was also advised that it should explore creative funding solutions, including funding from external sources (the Commonwealth Government supports a wide array of business development programs) as well as leveraging its role as the central agency for enterprise development in the City.

 

As Council has already set its budget for the 2006–07 year, additional funding is not available at this time.  The Corporation will be asked to provide more detail, regarding the $85,000 additional funding, for Council’s consideration in future budgets.  This request will be considered along with other funding priorities.  The Corporation will also be advised that it should base its 2006 -07 budget on Council’s current funding commitment.

 

A copy of the last audited accounts is provided in the Corporations’ report.  The auditors have not raised any matter of concern in their report.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on the Penrith Valley Economic Development Corporation Business Plan 2006-07 be received

2.     Funding for the Penrith Valley Economic Development Corporation for the 2006-07 financial year, in the amount of $260,623, to be paid in two equal instalments in August 2006 and January 2007, be endorsed

3.     A six monthly performance report on the activities of the Penrith Valley Economic Development Corporation be presented to Council in February 2007

4.     The Penrith Valley Economic Development Corporation be requested to submit further information and justification for the $85,000 additional funding, for Council’s consideration in future budgets.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report 


The City Supported by Infrastructure

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

10      Agreed Stormwater Drainage Capacity Standards                                                               73

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting

24 July 2006

The City Supported by Infrastructure

 

 

The City Supported by Infrastructure

 

 

10

Agreed Stormwater Drainage Capacity Standards   

 

Compiled by:                Maruf Hossain, Engineering Stormwater Supervisor

Authorised by:             Craig Ross, Design and Technical Advice Manager 

Strategic Program Term Achievement: An asset management strategy is in operation for civil infrastructure that optimises its use and maintains it to agreed standards fit for its contemporary purpose.

Critical Action: New drainage infrastructure is designed and constructed to meet agreed capacity standards.

     

Purpose:

To obtain Council's concurrence of revised drainage capacity standards for the city.  The report recommends that revised standards be adopted.

 

Background

Studies are currently in progress to determine the overland flow flooding impacts in catchments across the LGA.  These studies, when completed, will identify flood impacts primarily associated with local catchment effects.  Council’s current flood policy typically relates to mainstream flooding of major creeks and rivers.  The investigations, higher up in the catchments, are in line with the State Government’s Floodplain Development Manual.

 

Consultants are currently analysing the sub-catchments to determine a priority for more detailed catchment investigations.

 

Whilst the studies are primarily associated with flood impacts, the hydraulic and hydrological models have been structured to enable their use for more detailed investigation of Council’s drainage systems.

 

At the moment, Council’s Asset Management System holds details of the drainage network - size, location and condition.  There is no indication as to whether a system satisfies any particular capacity standard.

 

The catchment analysis developed for the Overland Flow Study will enable Council’s drainage systems to be benchmarked against the relevant capacity standards for land use categories.  Any drainage system identified in this process as being deficient will be prioritised and added to Council’s Drainage Upgrade Program.  A further report will be submitted to Council on this matter at a later date.

 

Council’s current standards have been in place for some time and may not align with industry standards.  Given that the catchment analysis is a very large task, it was considered prudent to review the current standards prior to the analysis being undertaken.  This has been identified as a task in the 2005-06 Management Plan.

 

 

Current Situation

 

Comparative data has been obtained from neighbouring LGAs such as Blacktown, Liverpool and Campbelltown.

 

In addition, stormwater drainage capacity standards for Gold Coast City Council in Queensland and City of Dandenong in Victoria have been reviewed for a better understanding of practices in similar Local Government Areas in other states.  A comparison of stormwater drainage capacity standards is shown on Attachment A.

 

The table below outlines the recommended minimum capacity standards for urban and rural drainage systems and indicates the current standards.  Upgrading of existing drainage networks and drainage design for new developments shall be carried out in accordance with the recommended capacity standards.

Minor Systems: Underground Piped Drainage

 

Land Use

Current Average Recurrence Interval (ARI)

Proposed Average Recurrence Interval (ARI)

Rural Residential

Urban Residential

Commercial, Central Business and Shopping Centres

Industrial

5 year

5 year

20 year

20 year

5 year

5 year

20 year

20 year

Road Culverts:

 

Local / Collector Roads

Sub-arterial/Regional Roads

Arterial Roads

Access to Emergency Facilities

 

 

 

10 year

20 year

100 year

Not defined

 

 

10 year

20 year

100 year

100 year

NOTE:  Some sections of the Penrith CBD have 100 year underground systems.

 

Major Systems: Overland Flow Paths for All Land Use

The major systems are to be designed to convey major flows up to the 100 year ARI storm event when the capacity of the minor system is exceeded.  In case of restricted overland flow path, minor systems (underground pipe systems) shall be upgraded to accommodate up to the 100 year ARI flows.

 

Pit Blockage Factor

In design of minor systems, sufficient pits must be provided, with acceptable blockage factors used in the calculations in accordance with the table below, to ensure that pipes run fully charged to the design limit of the system in the design storm event.  Determination of overland flow rates shall also account for pit blockage factors.  Council’s current standards do not have a pit blockage factor.

 

 

Condition

Inlet Type

Percentage of Theoretical Capacity Allowed

Sag

Side entry

80%

Sag

Grated

50%

Sag

Combination

Side inlet capacity only, Grate assumed completely blocked

Sag

Letterbox

50%

Continuous Grade

Side entry

80%

Continuous Grade

Grated

50%

Continuous Grade

Combination

90%

 

Pipe Friction Losses

In selecting roughness factors, due consideration must be given to ongoing increase in roughness with age of the pipe system.  A higher roughness value compared to that of a new system shall be considered in the design analysis and will be determined on merit basis.

Water Sensitive Urban Design (WSUD): For All Land Use

Principles of water sensitive urban design shall be incorporated to minimise impacts of developments on the total water cycle by reducing the stormwater discharge rate and protecting stormwater quality.  On-site stormwater detention (OSD) shall be provided in accordance with Council’s policy for the relevant catchments and the requirements of Council’s Development Services Department.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Agreed Stormwater Drainage Capacity Standards be received.

2.     The design parameters as outlined be adopted by Council for all future drainage design.

3.     A further report be submitted to Council addressing any inadequacies in the existing drainage system.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1. View

Table showing Council Drainage Standards

1 Page

Appendix

 


Policy Review Committee Meeting

24 July 2006

Appendix 1 - Table showing Council Drainage Standards

 

 

 

Comparison of Stormwater Drainage Capacity Standards

 

NSW Councils

Queensland

Victoria

Land Use

Blacktown CC

Campbelltown CC

Liverpool CC

Penrith CC

Goldcoast CC

Dandenong

A. Minor System

Urban Residential (6Ha or less)

5 year ARI

5 year ARI

5 year ARI

5 year ARI

2 year ARI

5 year ARI
(<20 lots/ha)

Urban Residential (>6Ha)

10 year ARI

5 year ARI

5 year ARI

5 year ARI

10 year ARI

10 year ARI
(>20 lots/ha)

Rural Residential

5 year ARI

5 year ARI

5 year ARI

5 year ARI

2 year ARI

Not defined

Commercial / Industrial

20 year ARI

10 year ARI

10 year ARI (CBD 20 year)

20 year ARI

10 year ARI

20 year ARI

Arterial Road Crossings

100 year ARI

100 year ARI

100 year ARI

100 year ARI

50 year ARI

Not defined

Major Road Crossings

20 year ARI

20 year ARI

100 year ARI

20 year ARI

50 year ARI

Not defined

Local / Collector Road crossings

5 year ARI

5 year ARI

Not defined

10 year ARI

10 year ARI

Not defined

Access to emergency facilities

100 year ARI

100 year ARI

Not defined

Not defined

Not defined

Not defined

B. Major System

100 year ARI

100 year ARI

Not defined

100 year ARI

100 year ARI

100 year ARI

 


Leadership and Organisation

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

11      Service Specification Program                                                                                            79

 

12      Proposed Policy on Grant Applications by Staff                                                                  86

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting

24 July 2006

Leadership and Organisation

 

 

Leadership and Organisation

 

 

11

Service Specification Program   

 

Compiled by:                Eric Shen, Service Specification Officer

Authorised by:             Ross Kingsley, Corporate Development Manager 

Strategic Program Term Achievement: Services and programs that Council provides are determined based on equity, customer requirements, community benefits and best value.

Critical Action: All services are provided to adopted service levels.

     

Purpose:

To provide Council with the draft Service Specifications for the following Services for its consideration - Waste Management Service and Printing Service. The report recommends that these service specifications be adopted.

Given the size of these documents, copies have been provided separately to Councillors. Additional copies of any of these documents can be obtained on request.

 

Background

Council established the Service Specification Program in 2002-03 in order to:

1.   Comprehensively analyse and document all services and the present level of service provided (stage 1 of the Program)

2.   Enable Council in a fully informed manner to review and where appropriate adjust service levels to better meet the needs of the community and align to Council’s strategy (stage 2).

Documentation of Council’s 75 external and internal services is a major exercise with significant benefits to the efficient and effective management of the organisation. The program has seen the formal adoption to date of 42 Service Specifications with an additional 2 specifications presented tonight for Council’s consideration. A large body of specifications is approaching completion and will be progressively reported to Council in coming months.

Stage 2 of the program, Review and Adjustment of Service Levels, has already been undertaken by Council in selected key areas.  Important decisions have been taken by Council flowing from these reviews, which have been reflected in the 2005-06 and 2006-07 Management Plans.  A more comprehensive review of service levels has commenced and further information on this will be brought to Council during the year.

Assessment of Draft Service Specifications

The draft Service Specifications presented tonight for Council’s consideration are:

·    Waste Management Services (Waste and Community Protection Manager)

·    Printing Services (Information Manager).

Prior to their reporting to Council, all draft specifications undergo a rigorous process of validation and assessment, leading to approval by the Corporate Management Team. The aim is to ensure that each specification accurately communicates the existing levels of service and activities that the service provides in terms of quantity, quality and cost to Council.  Once adopted by Council the specification will be used as the basis for testing service performance and for service review, including any changes to services levels, calls for additional resourcing or for changes in priority setting within an existing service.

As previously determined by Council, all completed draft service specifications are reported to its Policy Review Committee for consideration and adoption. Where additional information or further consideration is required, resulting in a specification not being adopted at that meeting, the relevant specification would be referred to the Services Review Working Party. This working party would be scheduled to meet every quarter or as required. Recommendations from the Services Review Working Party would then be reported to the next Ordinary or Policy Review Committee meeting for adoption.

Summary of Key Information

Service Specifications are very detailed documents. By policy, full documentation is provided under separate cover to all Councillors and is available to the public on request. To assist in Council’s consideration of the draft specifications submitted tonight, executive summaries of the two service specification are provided in the appendices to this report.

These summaries contain :-

·    Service Description

·    Service Objectives

·    Scope of Service

·    Key Statistics

·    Key Performance Indicators

·    Service Funding

·    Service Summary Chart.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on the Service Specification Program be received

2.     The specification for the Waste Management Services be adopted

3.     The specification for the Printing Services be adopted.

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1. View

Appendix 1 - Executive Summary of Waste Management Service

3 Pages

Appendix

2. View

Appendix 2 - Executive Summary of Printing Service

2 Pages

Appendix

 


Policy Review Committee Meeting

24 July 2006

Appendix 1 - Appendix 1 - Executive Summary of Waste Management Service

 

2.2

 

Appendix 1 – Executive Summary of Waste Management Services

 

Summary of the Waste Management Service Specification

1. Service Description

 

Waste Services contributes significantly to the community through sustainable resource management, community education, and management of waste collection services. The services include:

 

Domestic Waste Services:

§ Residential Garbage Service

§ Residential Recycling Service

§ Residential Clean-Up Service

 

Non-Domestic Waste Services:

§ Street Litter Bin Waste Collection Service

§ Bulk Bin Waste Collection Service from designated Council facilities

§ Effluent Collection Service from residential and commercial premises

 

Waste education and promotion to the Community and to the organisation

2. Link to Strategic Program

 

Issue 17 - Sustainable Resource Management

The City conducts itself as a leading environmental practitioner through prudent consumption of resources and reduced resource disposal.

 

Term Achievement 17.2

Waste to landfill and indiscriminate dumping are significantly reduced and resource recovery is optimised.

 

Critical Actions

§ CA17.2A - Develop and progressively implement a waste strategy that complements the State Government’s Waste Avoidance and Resource Recovery Strategy

§ CA17.2B - Develop and implement service systems to complement waste reduction strategies and satisfy community needs.

 

3. Service Objectives

 

To achieve the organisational goals, the Waste Management Service will:

·      Maintain the scope and quality of services to a level satisfactory to the Council.

·      Ensure services delivered:

o  are cost effective

o  satisfy the reasonable expectations of customers

o  complement the State Government’s waste avoidance and resource recovery strategies

o  increase recycling in the Penrith LGA

o  are performed in a safe, environmentally responsible manner

o  meet all applicable statutory requirements

o  meet performance criteria (as per contract)

 

4. Scope of Work

 

§ Manage the contracts which provide:

o  Residential garbage and recycling services for 12,400 premises

o  Repair or replace 5,460 bins per annum

o  Removal of effluent for approx 400 premises = 17,290 services per annum 

o  Bulk bin collections for 44 locations weekly

 

Contracts cover the following services (actuals for 2005-06) :-

·    For residential garbage collection service:

o 3,170,000 collections per annum

o 58,284 tonnes of waste

·    For residential clean-up and orphan waste collection services

o 21,256 collections per annum

o 2,500 tonnes of waste

·    For residential recycling collection service

o 1,540,000 collections per annum

o 14,500 tonnes collected

·    For street litter bin waste collection service

o 462 street litter bins

o 205,130 collections per annum

o 365 tonnes of waste

·    For effluent collection services

o Approx 400 residences with 51 Megalitres collected

o 44 weekly commercial premises pump-outs with 4.4 Megalitres collected

·    For bulk bin waste collection service

o 48 locations (bins sizes and collection frequencies are variable)

 

§ Develop and deliver approximately educational programs to 70 schools and community groups annually

§ Respond to customer enquiries and development needs including 300 site inspections annually

 

5. Key Performance Indicators (KPIs)

Indicator

2006-07 Target

% of residents satisfied with Domestic Garbage Collection

(93% in 2003 city-wide survey, 94% in 2005)

94%
(2007 survey target)

% of residents satisfied with Recycling Services

(91% in 2003 city-wide survey, 89% in 2005)

89%
(2007 survey target)

% of residents satisfied with the Clean-up Service

(76% in 2003 city-wide survey, 82% in 2005)

82%
(2007 survey target)

Waste to landfill per capita

(322kg in 2003-04, 339kg in 2004-05 as per DLG Comparative data)

< 325kg

Recyclables collected per capita

(76kg in 2003-04, 80kg in 2004-05 as per DLG Comparative data)

> 60kg

% of Domestic Waste diverted from landfill as Recyclables

(20% in 2004-05)

> 15 %

% of Domestic waste taken to landfill

(80% in 2004-05)

< 85 %

 


6. Service Funding

Service / Sub-Service

2005-2006 Budget

Contract Management

$      195,305

Administration

$      198,501

Waste Education & Promotion

$      216,200

Subtotal

$      610,006

Provisional Sums

 

Contractor Services (includes tipping fees)

$  13,398,253

Legals

$         26,500

Principal repayment and interest on loans

$       380,172

Bins purchase and delivery

$         22,303

Receipting/Counter/Collection Costs

$         96,786

Pensioner Rebate

$       229,500

Water and sewerage rates

$       100,018

Cost of Service (excludes capital costs)

$  14,863,537

Income from Domestic Waste

($  14,145,445)

Income from Non-Domestic Waste

($       365,936)

Net cost of waste management service

$      352,156

 

 

Domestic Waste

Non-Domestic Waste

Total

Cost of Service

$  13,607,566

$   1,255,971

$ 14,863,537

Income

($14,145,445)

($ 365,936)

($14,511,381)

Net Surplus / (Loss)

$537,879

($890,035)

($352,156)

 

Surpluses from the Domestic Waste goes to Waste Reserve and Non-Domestic Waste services are transferred to the General Reserve.  This Reserve provides funding for infrastructure improvements related to waste management, monitoring of the Gipps Street tip and enhancements to services developed from new contracts.

 

7.      Service Summary Chart

 


Policy Review Committee Meeting

24 July 2006

Appendix 2 - Appendix 2 - Executive Summary of Printing Service

 

 

 

Appendix 2 – Executive Summary of Printing Services

 

Summary of the Printing Services Specification

1. Service Description

 

The Printing Service includes copying, laminating & binding, & paper supply to all areas of Council. It also incorporates the management of maintenance and lease of copiers within Council and expenditure on print services external to Council.

 

2. Link to Strategic Program

 

This service does not map to any issue or term achievement of Council. It is an infrastructure support service to the delivery of other services by the organisation.

 

3. Service Objectives

 

·     Manage the coordination of the production of documents including copying, document enhancement, laminating, and binding, to ensure delivery of the projects, within time, budget and quality parameters

 

·     Ensure relevant required paper supplies are maintained and available for the organisation at all times.

 

·     Manage the maintenance and technical support of Council Copiers.

 

5. Workload Indicators for 2005-06

 

Print Room Copying

·      310 requisitions for work per annum

·      1,274,559 copies made per annum

Print Room Binding & Finishing

·      348 requisitions per annum

·      1,142 documents laminated per annum

Print Room Paper Supply

·      185 requisitions for paper per annum

·      9,240 reams of paper ordered from suppliers per annum

·      38.5 reams of paper used by Council per day

Copying (other)

·      15 local copiers in the organisation (this does not include copiers in the library, Council controlled entities or children’s centres)

·      1.8 million black and white prints and copies

·      415,000 colour prints and copies

·      22,000 pages scanned each year (this does not include the records management system)

·      41,000 faxes sent each year

·      External print expenditure $224,816

 

 


6.      SCHEDULE OF SPECIFICATION COSTING (Lump Sum)

Ref

Activity

Lump Sum

Price per annum

1

Copying by Print Room

 

1.1

Receive & prioritise requisition

$      24,771

1.2

Program digital printer

$      23,245

1.3

Proof document & run

$      37,190

2

Binding & Finishing

 

2.1

Establish process

$        8,599

2.2

Undertake requested finishing

$      27,751

2.3

Task completion

$        4,915

3

Paper Supply

 

3.1

Order & maintain paper supply

$        4,793

3.2

Distribute paper & maintain records

$        4,793

 

$      136,057

Anticipated Income

($  117,833)

Sub Total Costs Print Room

$     18,224

4

Copy (other)

 

4.1

Local Copier / Printer - rental

$ 63,048

Local Copier / Printer - Printing cost (b/w @ $0.009) (approx 1,792,524 b/w prints per annum)*

$  16,132

Local Copier / Printer - Printing cost (colour @ $0.15) (approx 414,753 colour prints per annum)*

$  62,213

Local printer (small fleet) – print cost (b/w @ $0.048) Approx 85,000 pages / month

Note : no rental or colour print charges involved

$  48,960

Paper consumed (6,840 reams @ $6/ream)

$  41,040

4.2

External Service*

$ 224,816

Net Cost of Copy (other)

$ 456,209

Net Cost of the Print Service

$ 474,433

 

7.      Service Summary Chart


Policy Review Committee Meeting

24 July 2006

Leadership and Organisation

 

 

Leadership and Organisation

 

 

12

Proposed Policy on Grant Applications by Staff   

 

Compiled by:                Ray Richardson, Grants Support Officer

Authorised by:             Vicki O’Kelly, Financial Services Manager 

Strategic Program Term Achievement: Council has reviewed its own role and operations and has adopted contemporary practices to best discharge its charter.

Critical Action: Review current structures and procedures supporting Council and Councillors responsibilities.

     

Purpose:

To gain Council endorsement for a policy that authorises staff to submit grant applications in particular circumstances without prior Council approval.
The report recommends that the proposed draft policy, as shown in the appendix of the report,  be adopted.

 

Background

Managers and Co-ordinators currently have delegated authority to “sign grant submissions approved by Council”, but in some circumstances, there is no opportunity for Council to formally endorse an application for a grant prior to the deadline for applications.  A policy for dealing with those circumstances will enable the organisation to maximise opportunities for increasing Council’s grant revenue.

Grant programs offering amounts of money less than $20,000 and not requiring a contribution from Council are often advised at short notice, particularly when notification of the availability of the program requires a Ministerial decision. Notification may be received through newsletter, advertisement in the media, or by a letter sent directly to the General Manager or a Manager. Depending on Council’s meeting schedule, it may not be possible to get to formal Council approval before the deadline for submission of grant applications expires.

An example is recent notification of a grant of $2,000 offered to every Council to support an anti-racism or community harmony project. Penrith City Council did not receive the initial notification. The Department of Community Services contacted Council directly after the closing date, but required a response by the next day.

Proposed Policy

Under the proposed policy on grant a