11 August 2006

 

Dear Councillor,

In pursuance of the provisions of the Local Government Act, 1993 and the Regulations thereunder, notice is hereby given that an ORDINARY MEETING of Penrith City Council is to be held in the Council Chambers, Civic Centre, 601 High Street, Penrith on Monday 7 August 2006 at 7:00PM.

Attention is directed to the statement accompanying this notice of the business proposed to be transacted at the meeting.

Yours Faithfully

 

 

Alan Travers

General Manager

 

BUSINESS

 

1.           APOLOGIES

 

2.           LEAVE OF ABSENCE

Leave of absence has been granted to:

Councillor Greg Davies - 6 August 2006 to 3 September 2006 inclusive.

Councillor Pat Sheehy - 14 July 2006 to 9 August 2006 inclusive.

 

3.           CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES

Ordinary Meeting - 17 July 2006.

 

4.           DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

Pecuniary Interest (The Act requires Councillors who declare a pecuniary interest in an item to leave the meeting during discussion of that item)

Non-Pecuniary Interest

 

5.           ADDRESSING THE MEETING

 

6.           MAYORAL MINUTES

2006 Western Sydney Region Trainee of the Year Awards.

Council Highly Commended in the RH Dougherty Communication Awards.

St Marys Band Club 50th Anniversary.

 

7.           NOTICES OF MOTION

 

8.           ADOPTION OF REPORTS AND RECOMMENDATION OF COMMITTEES

Policy Review Committee Meeting - 24 July 2006.

Penrith Valley Community Safety Partnership Meeting - 29 June 2006.

 

9.           MASTER PROGRAM REPORTS

 

10.         URGENT REPORTS (to be dealt with in the master program to which the item relates)

 

11.         QUESTIONS WITHOUT NOTICE

 

12.         COMMITTEE OF THE WHOLE


ORDINARY MEETING

 

Monday 7 August 2006

 

table of contents

 

 

 

 

 

seating arrangements

 

 

meeting calendar

 

 

confirmation of minutes

 

 

report and recommendations of committees

 

 

master program reports

 


 

 

 

 

PRAYER

 

 

 

“Sovereign God, tonight as we gather together as a Council we affirm that you are the giver and sustainer of life.  We come together as representatives of our community to make decisions that will benefit this city and the people within it. 

 

We come not in a spirit of competition, not as adversaries, but as colleagues.  Help us to treat each other with respect, with dignity, with interest and with honesty.  Help us not just to hear the words we say, but also to hear each others hearts.  We seek to be wise in all that we say and do.

 

As we meet, our concern is for this city.  Grant us wisdom, courage and strength.

 

Lord, help us.  We pray this in the name of Jesus Christ our Lord.  Amen.”

 

 

 

 

 


Statement of Recognition of Penrith City’s

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander
Cultural Heritage

 

 

Council values the unique status of Aboriginal people as the original owners and custodians of lands and waters, including the land and waters of Penrith City.

 

Council values the unique status of Torres Strait Islander people as the original owners and custodians of the Torres Strait Islands and surrounding waters.

 

We work together for a united Australia and City that respects this land of ours, that values the diversity of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural heritage, and provides justice and equity for all.

 

 

 

 

 



MEETING CALENDAR

 

February 2006 - December 2006

 

 

TIME

FEB

MAR

APRIL

MAY

JUNE

JULY

AUG

SEPT

OCT

NOV

DEC

 

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

 

Ordinary Meetings

7.00 pm

6

6

3

1v

5

3

7

4ü

9

6

4

 

20 #+

 

 

15 #

19*

17

21#+

18

25^

23

20 #

11

 

Policy Review Committee

7.00 pm

27

20@

 

22

26

24

14

11@

16

13

 

 

 

#  Meetings at which the Management Plan quarterly reviews are presented.

v Meeting at which the Draft Management Plan is adopted for exhibition

 

#+  General Manager’s presentation – half year and end of year review

*   Meeting at which the Management Plan for 2006/2007 is adopted

 

@  Strategic Program progress reports (only business)

ü  Meeting at which the 2005/2006 Annual Statements are presented

 

 

^   Election of Mayor/Deputy Mayor (only business)

 

·         Council has two Ordinary Meetings per month where practicable.

·         Extraordinary Meetings are held as required.

·         Policy Review Meetings are held monthly where practicable.

·         Members of the public are invited to observe meetings (Ordinary & Policy Review) of the Council.

Should you wish to address Council, please contact the Executive Officer, Glenn McCarthy on 47327649.

 

 


CONFIRMED MINUTES

 OF THE ORDINARY MEETING OF PENRITH CITY COUNCIL HELD IN THE

COUNCIL CHAMBERS

ON MONDAY 17 JULY 2006 AT 7:02PM

NATIONAL ANTHEM

The meeting opened with the National Anthem.

STATEMENT OF RECOGNITION

His Worship the Mayor, Councillor John Thain read a statement of recognition of Penrith City’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cultural Heritage.

PRAYER

The Council Prayer was read by the Rev Neil Checkley.

PRESENT

His Worship the Mayor Councillor John Thain, Councillors Jim Aitken OAM, Kaylene Allison, David Bradbury (arrived at 7:23 pm), Lexie Cettolin, Kevin Crameri OAM, Greg Davies, Mark Davies, Ross Fowler, Jackie Greenow, Karen McKeown, Susan Page, Garry Rumble and Steve Simat (arrived at 7:20 pm).

 

APOLOGIES

951  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Jackie Greenow seconded Councillor Jim Aitken that apologies be accepted for Councillors Bradbury and Simat.

 

LEAVE OF ABSENCE

Leave of Absence was previously granted to Councillor Pat Sheehy for the period 14 July 2006 to 9 August 2006 inclusive.

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES - Ordinary Meeting - 3 July 2006

952  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Ross Fowler seconded Councillor Greg Davies that the minutes of the Ordinary Meeting of 3 July 2006 be confirmed.

 

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

There were no declarations of interest.

 

Reports of Committees

 

1        Report and Recommendations of the Local Traffic Committee Meeting held on 3 July 2006

953  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Ross Fowler that the recommendations contained in the Report and Recommendations of the Local Traffic Committee Meeting held on 3 July 2006 be adopted.

 

 

2        Report and Recommendations of Disability Access Committee Meeting held on 7 June 2006                                                                                                                                             

954  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Ross Fowler that the recommendations contained in the Report and Recommendations of the Disability Access Committee Meeting held on 7 June 2006 be adopted.

 

 

MASTER PROGRAM REPORTS

 

The City in its Broader Context

 

1        NSW State Infrastructure Strategy                                                                                   

955  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Ross Fowler

That the information contained in the report on NSW State Infrastructure Strategy be received.

 

The City as a Social Place

 

2        Disability Access Committee - Appointment of Community Representatives                

956  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Garry Rumble

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Disability Access Committee  - Appointment of Community Representatives be received.

2.     The following people be appointed as community representatives on the Disability Access Committee for a period of two years from this date:

                                      Mr. David Currie

                                      Ms. Maeve Dunnett

                                      Mrs. Jill Huber

                                      Mrs. Tricia Hitchen

                                      Ms. Alison Herbert

                                      Ms. Carole Grayson

 

3        Assistance Towards Amateur Sportspersons and Representatives in the fields of Art, Music, Culture - Overseas and Interstate Travel                                                                         

957  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Garry Rumble that the information contained in the report on Assistance Towards Amateur Sportspersons and Representatives in the fields of Art, Music, Culture - Overseas and Interstate Travel be received.

 

 

4        Construction of Samuel Marsden Baseball Amenities Building                                      

958  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Garry Rumble

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Construction of Samuel Marsden Baseball Amenities Building be received.

2.     Council accepts the tender of Westco Building Consultants Pty Ltd in the amount of $244,942.

3.     Additional funding of $104,526 be allocated, from the Open Space – Existing Residential s94 plan, for the construction of the Samuel Marsden Baseball Amenities Building.

 

5        Naming of a Park in North St Marys                                                                                

959  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Garry Rumble

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Naming of a Park in North St Marys be received.

2.     Council endorse the naming of the park on the corner of Sycamore Street and Maple Road, North St Marys to “Robin Wiles Park” and make application to the Geographical Names Board for the official gazetting.

3.     Following gazettal, an official naming ceremony be held at the park.

 

6        Update of activities undertaken by the Development Assessment Department - Third and Fourth Quarters 2005/2006                                                                                                

960  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Garry Rumble that the information contained in the report on Update of activities undertaken by the Development Assessment Department - Third and Fourth Quarters 2005/2006 be received.

 

7        NSW Health Strategic Document "Fit for the Future"                                                    

961  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Garry Rumble

That:

1.   The information contained in the report on NSW Health Strategic Document "Fit for the Future" be received.

2.   The information contained in the draft submission on the “Fit for Future” future directions document by NSW Health be endorsed and submitted to the Department.

 

 

 

 The City In Its Environment

 

10      Grant Application - Environmental Trust                                                                          

962  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Kevin Crameri seconded Councillor Susan Page

That:

1.      The information contained in the report on Grant Application - Environmental Trust be received.

   2.       Council endorse the application for the 2006 Environmental Trust grant.

 

8        Shopping Trolleys                                                                                                               

963  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Jim Aitken seconded Councillor Garry Rumble

          That:

1.      The information contained in the report on Shopping Trolleys be received.

                                      2.       A further report be presented to Council, outlining alternative solutions to address the problem of shopping trolleys being abandoned in public areas.

 

9        Domestic Waste Contract Tenders                                                                                   

964  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Jackie Greenow that this matter be deferred for determination after consideration in Committee of the Whole for the discussion of a related matter that concerns commercial information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed, prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied it and discussion of the matter in open meeting would be, on balance, contrary to the public interest.

 

The City Supported by Infrastructure

 

11      Federal Government 2007/2008 "Auslink Black Spot Programme"                                 

965  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Kevin Crameri seconded Councillor Lexie Cettolin

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Federal Government 2007/2008 "Auslink Black Spot Programme"  be received.

2.     Council’s Asset Manager submit the above listed projects in Table A to the NSW Black Spot Consultative Panel of the Roads and Traffic Authority for consideration for funding under the Federal Government 2007/2008 “Auslink Black Spot Programme”.

3.     The Federal Members for Lindsay and Chifley be requested to strongly support the projects submitted by Council.

4.     The Roads and Traffic Authority be advised and requested to investigate traffic safety at locations indicated in the above Table B, under the  Authority’s control and management.

5.     Council seeks clarification as to the extent of proposed works scheduled for the intersections of Richmond Road with Llandilo and St Marys Roads and the upgrading of Richmond Road.

 

12      Local Government Road Safety Program - Roads and Traffic Authority Grant Funding 2006-2007                                                                                                                                     

966  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Karen McKeown

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Local Government Road Safety Program - Roads and Traffic Authority Grant Funding 2006-2007 be received.

2.     Council accept the grants from the Roads and Traffic Authority as outlined in the report.

 

Leadership and Organisation

 

13      Pecuniary Interest Returns                                                                                                

967  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Karen McKeown seconded Councillor Jackie Greenow that the information contained in the report on Pecuniary Interest Returns be received.

 

14      City Operations Directorate Report to end of June 2006                                                

968  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Karen McKeown seconded Councillor Jackie Greenow that the information contained in the report on City Operations Directorate Report to end of June 2006 be received.

 

15      Summary of Investments and Banking for the period 31 May 2006 to 30 June 2006    

969  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Karen McKeown seconded Councillor Jackie Greenow

That:

1.   The information contained in the report on Summary of Investments and Banking for the period 31 May 2006 to 30 June 2006 be received.

2.   The Certificate of the Responsible Accounting Officer and Summaries of Investments and Performance for the period 31 May 2006 to 30 June 2006 be noted and accepted.

3.   The graphical investment analysis as at 30 June 2006 be noted.

4.   The Agency Collection Fees information be noted.

 

16      EcoProcura 2006 Practical Solutions for Sustainable Procurement Conference            

970  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Karen McKeown seconded Councillor Jackie Greenow

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on EcoProcura 2006 Practical Solutions for Sustainable Procurement Conference be received.

2.     The Financial Services Manager attend EcoProcura 2006 in Barcelona, Spain, 20-22 September 2006.

 

17      Urban Sustainability Program Grants                                                                               

971  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Karen McKeown seconded Councillor Jackie Greenow

That:

1.      The information contained in the report on Urban Sustainability Program Grants be received.

 

2.      Council endorse the projects proposed for application to the Urban Sustainability Program and authorise management to proceed with the necessary negotiations with other councils and community partners.

 

3.      An allocation of up to $15,000 be made from the Grant Funded Projects Reserve for necessary expenses to commit towards Council’s preparation of and contribution to these projects.

 

 

QUESTIONS WITHOUT NOTICE

 

QWN 1      Traffic Study - North St Marys/Oxley Park                                                            

Councillor Jackie Greenow requested a memo reply as to the progress of the Traffic Study for North St Marys/Oxley Park.

 

QWN 2      Publication - 'Conversations in the West'                                                                

Councillor Jackie Greenow presented the Mayor with a copy of the publication ‘Conversations in the West’ (A dialogue with Muslim communities in Outer Western Sydney).

 

QWN 3      Path Paving Program                                                                                                

Councillor Greg Davies requested a report to Council on the progress of the Path Paving Program, the report to include progress, how it works, timeframe for completion, how much has been finished, compared to the original audited program.

 

QWN 4      Alcohol Free Zones                                                                                                   

Councillor Mark Davies requested a report to Council, detailing how open space, parks and ovals in Glenmore Park can be designated as Alcohol Free Zones.

 

QWN 5      Communications Box - Opposite 20 Monarch Circle, Glenmore Park                  

Councillor Mark Davies requested a memo reply concerning requesting the relevant telecommunications service provider to erect a fence around the communications box opposite 20 Monarch Circle, Glenmore Park. 

 

Councillor Steve Simat arrived, the time being 7:20 pm.

 

QWN 6      Playground - Brookfield Avenue, Werrington Downs                                             

Councillor Kevin Crameri requested a memo reply regarding the possibility of a fence being built around the new playground on Brookfield Avenue, Werrington Downs.

 

QWN 7      Groundwater Investigations in Penrith City Area                                                   

Councillor Garry Rumble requested that a Councillor Briefing be held with the Sydney Catchment Authority regarding groundwater investigations in the Penrith City Area.

 

QWN 8      Antisocial Behaviour on Council Land at Lot 8 Coallee Place,  South Penrith     

Councillor Garry Rumble requested a memo reply to South Ward Councillors regarding his request for a cyclone mesh fence to be erected adjacent Lot 7 Coallee Place, South Penrith, in accordance with Council’s previous investigations, and that $1,300 from South Ward voted works be allocated to this purpose.

 

972  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Garry Rumble seconded Councillor Jim Aitken that the matter be brought forward and dealt with as a matter of urgency.

 

His Worship the Mayor, Councillor John Thain, ruled that the matter was urgent and should be dealt with at the meeting.

 

973  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Garry Rumble seconded Councillor Jim Aitken that $1,300 from South Ward voted works be allocated to the erection of a cyclone mesh fence adjacent Lot 7 Coallee Place, South Penrith.

 

QWN 9      Provision of Traffic Calming Devices - Leicester Way, St Clair                            

Councillor Steve Simat requested that this matter be referred to the Local Traffic Committee recommending the installation of speed humps or other appropriate traffic calming devices to slow traffic on in Leicester Way, St Clair. 

 

QWN 10    Replacement of Play Equipment in Downes Park, Wallacia                                  

Councillor Karen McKeown requested that $5,000 from South Ward voted works be allocated to replace play equipment in Downes Park, Wallacia, as well as providing for a bench and additional trees for shading.

 

974  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Karen McKeown seconded Councillor Jim Aitken that the matter be brought forward and dealt with as a matter of urgency.

 

His Worship the Mayor, Councillor John Thain, ruled that the matter was urgent and should be dealt with at the meeting.

 

975  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Karen McKeown seconded Councillor Jim Aitken that $5,000 from South Ward voted works be allocated to replace play equipment in Downes Park, Wallacia, as well as providing for a bench and additional trees for shading.

 

Councillor David Bradbury arrived, the time being 7:23 pm.

 

QWN 11    Fencing Sportsgrounds at Emu Plains                                                                      

Councillor Jim Aitken requested a memo reply in response to concerns of local residents with regard to the fencing of Darcy Smith Oval at Emu Plains to the detriment of soccer clubs. 

 

QWN 12    Employment Opportunities at Penrith Council for People with Disabilities           

Councillor Jim Aitken requested a memo reply in response to a letter he attached from a resident regarding employment issues for people with disabilities. 

 

QWN 13    Illegal Dumping                                                                                                         

Councillor David Bradbury requested a memo reply concerning illegal dumping at the Old Garden Centre in O’Connell Street, Claremont Meadows.

 

QWN 14    Road Closure - Gipps Street, Werrington                                                               

Councillor David Bradbury requested a memo reply concerning the closing of Gipps Street near the old tip site at Werrington and seeking an explanation of the road closing process.

 

QWN 15    Public Toilet Facilities                                                                                               

Councillor David Bradbury requested a report to Council concerning the provision of toilet facilities in the Penrith area and in particular accessibility options for parents with young children.

 

Committee of the Whole

 

976  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Jackie Greenow seconded Councillor Greg Davies the meeting adjourn to the Committee of the Whole to deal with the following matters, the time being 7:33 pm.

 

1        Presence of the Public

 

CW1 RESOLVED on the motion of Councillor Jackie Greenow seconded Councillor Greg Davies that the press and public be excluded from Committee of the Whole to deal with the following matters:

 

Leadership and Organisation

 

2        Industrial Relations Matters                                                                                             

 

This item has been referred to Committee of the Whole as the report refers to advice concerning litigation, or advice that would otherwise be privileged from production in legal proceedings on the ground of legal professional privilege and discussion of the matter in open meeting would be, on balance, contrary to the public interest.

 

The City in its Environment

 

3        Commercial Matter - Domestic Waste Contract Tenders

          This item has been referred to Committee of the Whole it concerns the discussion of  information that would, if disclosed, confer a commercial advantage on a person with whom the council is conducting (or proposes to conduct) business and discussion of the matter in open meeting would be, on balance, contrary to the public interest.

 

The meeting resumed at 7:59 pm and the General Manager reported that the Committee of the Whole met at 7:33 pm on 17 July 2006, the following being present

 

His Worship the Mayor Councillor John Thain, Councillors Jim Aitken OAM, Kaylene Allison, David Bradbury, Lexie Cettolin, Kevin Crameri OAM, Greg Davies, Mark Davies, Ross Fowler, Jackie Greenow, Karen McKeown, Susan Page, Garry Rumble and Steve Simat

 

and the Committee of the Whole excluded the press and public from the meeting for the reasons set out in CW1 and that the Committee of the Whole submitted the following recommendations to Council.

 

CONFIDENTIAL BUSINESS

 

2        Industrial Relations Matters                                                                                             

CW2  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Ross Fowler that the information contained in the report on Industrial Relations Matters be received.

 

3        Commercial Matter - Domestic Waste Contract Tenders

 

CW3  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Ross Fowler that the information be received.

 

ADOPTION OF Committee of the Whole

 

977 RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Jackie Greenow that the recommendations contained in the Committee of the Whole and shown as CW2 and CW3 be adopted.

 

 

THE CITY IN ITS ENVIRONMENT

 

9        Domestic Waste Contract Tenders

 

978  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Ross Fowler

 

That:

 

                                      1.       The information contained in the report on Domestic Waste Contract Tenders be received.

 

                                      2.       A further report be presented to Council, providing details of clauses relating to Industrial Relations, that will be included in Waste Tender documents, prior to the advertising of tenders for Waste Collection and Disposal Contracts.

         

There being no further business the Chairperson declared the meeting closed, the time being 8:01 pm.

 

 

 


PENRITH CITY COUNCIL

 

Procedure for Addressing Meetings

 

Anyone can request permission to address a meeting, providing that the number of speakers is limited to three in support of any proposal and three against.

 

Any request about an issue or matter on the Agenda for the meeting can be lodged with the General Manager or Public Officer up until 12 noon on the day of the meeting.

 

Prior to the meeting the person who has requested permission to address the meeting will need to provide the Public Officer with a written statement of the points to be covered during the address in sufficient detail so as to inform the Councillors of the substance of the address and a written copy of any questions to be asked of the Council in order that responses to those questions can be provided in due course.

 

In addition, prior to addressing the meeting a person addressing Council or Committee will be informed that they do not enjoy any privilege and that permission to speak may be withdrawn should they make inappropriate comments.

 

It should be noted that speakers at meetings of the Council or Committee do not have absolute privilege (parliamentary privilege).  A speaker who makes any potentially offensive or defamatory remarks about any other person may render themselves open to legal action.

 

Prior to addressing the meeting the person will be required to sign the following statement:

 

“I (name) understand that the meeting I intend to address on (date) is a public meeting.  I also understand that should I say or present any material that is inappropriate, I may be subject to legal action.  I also acknowledge that I have been informed to obtain my own legal advice about the appropriateness of the material that I intend to present at the above mentioned meeting”.

 

Should a person fail to sign the above statement then permission to address either the Council or Committee will not be granted.

 

The Public Officer or Minute Clerk will speak to those people who have requested permission to address the meeting, prior to the meeting at 6.45pm.

 

It is up to the Council or Committee to decide if the request to address the meeting will be granted.

 

Where permission is to be granted the Council or Committee, at the appropriate time, will suspend only so much of the Standing Orders to allow the address to occur.

 

The Chairperson will then call the person up to the lectern or speaking area.

 

The person addressing the meeting needs to clearly indicate:

 

· Their name;

 

· Organisation or group they are representing (if applicable);

 

· Details of the issue to be addressed and the item number of the report in the   Business Paper;

 

· Whether they are opposing or supporting the issue or matter (if applicable)     and the action they would like the meeting to take;

 

·           The interest of the speaker (e.g. affected person, neighbour, applicant,        applicants spokesperson, interested citizen etc).

 

Each person then has five minutes to make their address.  Those addressing Council will be required to speak to the written statement they have submitted.  Permission to address Council is not to be taken as an opportunity to refute or otherwise the points made by previous speakers on the same issue. 

 

The Council or Committee can extend this time if they consider if appropriate, however, everyone needs to work on the basis that the address will be for five minutes only.

 

Councillors may have questions about the address so people are asked to remain at the lectern or in the speaking area until the Chairperson has thanked them.

 

When this occurs, they should then return to their seat.

 

 

Steve Hackett

Public Officer

02 4732 7637                                                        August 2003

   



Mayoral Minutes

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

1        2006 Western Sydney Region Trainee of the Year Awards                                                   1

 

2        Council Highly Commended in the RH Dougherty Communication Awards                            2

 

3        St Marys Band Club 50th Anniversary                                                                                  3

 

 



Ordinary Meeting

7 August 2006

Leadership and Organisation

 

Mayoral Minute

2006 Western Sydney Region Trainee of the Year Awards 

 

I am pleased to advise Council that Alecia Vella from Council’s Werrington County Children’s Centre has been named as the 2006 Western Sydney Region Trainee of the Year.  The announcement of this award, which recognises outstanding achievement in education and on the job success, was made by the Department of Education and Training.  It is the third year running that this prestigious award has been won by a trainee from Penrith City Council.  To put this achievement into perspective, there are close to 20,000 learners participating in Traineeship Programs across the Western Sydney Region.

Alecia completed a Traineeship at Council’s Wattle Glen Children’s Centre in February 2006.  Since then, Alecia has been successful in securing permanent full time employment as a Child Care Assistant at our Werrington County Children’s Centre.  Alecia has also decided to further her studies by commencing a Diploma in Children’s Services at the Western Sydney Institute of TAFE.

Before she won this award, Alecia was also awarded the Institute Medal in Student Excellence in May 2006 which is also a category of the Trainee of the Year Award.  She was nominated for the Institute Medal by TAFE NSW.

Winning the Western Sydney Region Trainee of the Year Award places Alecia in the running for the NSW (State) Trainee of Year award, and she has recently been advised of her selection as a finalist for this award.  The NSW (State) Trainee of the Year award ceremony will be held in September at the Ballroom, Sydney Convention and Exhibition Centre, Darling Harbour, and Alecia will be attending the night with her mother, and senior representatives from Penrith City Council.  This will be the first time that a Penrith City Council Trainee has reached this level in the competition.

On behalf of Penrith City Council, I would like to take this opportunity to congratulate Alecia on her outstanding achievement so far, which highlights the impressive standard of people taking on traineeships with Penrith City Council. We are extremely proud of Alecia and look forward to supporting her through her career with Penrith City Council.

 

 

John Thain

Mayor

 

 


Ordinary Meeting

7 August 2006

Leadership and Organisation

 

Mayoral Minute

Council Highly Commended in the RH Dougherty Communication Awards 

 

At the Local Government Week Awards 2006, held on 2 August at Bicentennial Park, Penrith City Council was highly commended for its Sustainability Street Program 2005 in the Excellence in Communication category of the RH Dougherty Communication Awards.

The RH Dougherty Communication Awards are administered by the Local Government Association of NSW and the Shires Association of NSW and promote excellence in communication within local government.

Penrith City Council’s Sustainability Street program brings people together in their neighbourhood to work together to learn how to live more sustainably.  The key outcomes of the program are to increase community awareness of our impacts on both our local and global environments, and to provide community members with the knowledge, tools and skills to live more sustainably.

The program employed a range of different and innovative communication methods throughout its duration, extending beyond the norm of simply distributing flyers, placing advertisements, and holding ‘one off’ educational type seminars or workshops.  It focussed instead on gaining the commitment of two ‘streets’ or ‘groups’ from within the community to deliver a targeted program that encouraged behaviour change towards more sustainable practices, and which created champions within our community to inspire, encourage, and assist others.  Both streets,  Banool Avenue and Sir John Jamison Circuit, have continued group projects beyond the six-month program.

Participants also put in a joint application to the Commonwealth Community Water Grants for funding towards rainwater tanks and water-saving projects for their homes and garden, which could be showcased to the wider community, and Banool Avenue participants have recently received funding under an NRMA Community Grant to plant 1000 trees in Greenhills Avenue.

In 2006, the program has been extended to include another two ‘streets’ including Blackwell Public School in St Clair, and Challenger Way in Cranebrook.  Both ‘streets’ have continued to build relationships within our community, and to develop a community spirit around the shared goal of sustainability.

On behalf of the Council, I would like to congratulate the staff involved in this outstanding program, including Carmel Hamilton, Krystie Race, Bernadette Riad, John Guzman, Frances McWilliams, Louise Petchell, and Council’s former Sustainability Education Officer, Amanda Kane on the recognition they have received through this award.  I encourage their important work in developing community awareness of the need to move towards a sustainable future.

John Thain

Mayor

 


Ordinary Meeting

7 August 2006

Leadership and Organisation

 

Mayoral Minute

St Marys Band Club 50th Anniversary

 

Last Saturday night, 5 August, I attended the 50th anniversary celebrations of St Marys Band Club with the Deputy Mayor, Jackie Greenow, my Councillor colleagues, Kaylene Allison, David Bradbury, and Greg Davies, and the General Manager, Alan Travers.

It was a great pleasure to represent the City of Penrith at this very enjoyable evening to recognise the great involvement that the Club has had with the cultural life of our City for half a century. A highlight of the event was listening to the Australian trumpet virtuoso, James Morrison, playing alongside the Club’s superb Brass Band.

The club traces its roots back to 1882 when the St Marys District Band was first organised, but it has been fifty years since the St Marys Band Club gained its liquor licence in 1956 and began an uninterrupted contribution to the sporting, musical, and social activities of the community

As well as these activities, the Club has donated hundreds of thousands of dollars to the community over the years, in both financial aid and in-kind donations, that have improved the quality of life for thousands of people, both young and old.

The club currently supports three local bands - a Junior and Senior Brass Band, and a Pipes and Drums Band.  These bands perform regularly and support our community by taking part in concerts, competitions, marches and other community celebrations.  All are held in high esteem in music circles and have won many state and national titles over the years, representing our city regularly with great distinction.

On behalf of Penrith City Council I would like to thank and congratulate the many committed people who have put so much time and effort into the club’s development over the years on reaching this significant milestone in the club’s history.  They have built a wonderful institution for which the community is very grateful, and which has brought great benefits to our city, which is increasingly becoming a cultural centre for the region. 

I extend Council’s best wishes for the Club’s continued success into the future.

 

 

John Thain

Mayor

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


Reports of Committees

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

1        Report and Recommendation of the Policy Review Committee 24 July 2006                         1

 

2        Report and Recommendations of the Penrith Valley Community Safety Partnership held on 29 June 2006                                                                                                                                              7

 

 



Ordinary Meeting

7 August 2006

Leadership and Organisation

 

REPORT AND RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE
 Policy Review Committee MEETING

HELD ON 24 July, 2006

 

 

PRESENT

His Worship the Mayor Councillor John Thain, Councillors Jim Aitken OAM, Kaylene Allison, David Bradbury, Lexie Cettolin, Kevin Crameri OAM, Greg Davies (arrived 7:08PM), Mark Davies, Ross Fowler, Jackie Greenow, Karen McKeown, Garry Rumble, and Steve Simat (arrived 7:14PM).

APOLOGIES

PRC 46  RECOMMENDED that apologies be received and accepted from Councillors Susan Page, Greg Davies and Steve Simat.

LEAVE OF ABSENCE

Leave of Absence was previously granted to Councillor Pat Sheehy for the period 14 July 2006 to 9 August 2006 inclusive.

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

Councillor Kevin Crameri declared a non pecuniary interest in Item 7 ADI Site, St Marys - Request by Delfin Lend Lease for Declaration of Remaining Precincts on the ADI Site as Release Areas as he lives in the vicinity.  He reserved his right to speak and vote on the item.

MASTER PROGRAM REPORTS

 

THE CITY AS A SOCIAL PLACE

 

6        Disability Access Committee 2004-06 Highlights

PRC 49  RECOMMENDED that the information contained in the report on the Disability Action Committee achievements be received.

The City in its Broader Context

5        Penrith Regional Cities Taskforce

PRC 50  RECOMMENDED

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Penrith Regional Cities Taskforce be received

2.     The proposed Regional Cities Taskforce arrangements be endorsed

3.     Council be consulted on the makeup of the Reference Panel

4.     Reports be made to each subsequent Policy Review Committee meeting on progress of the development of the regional plan for Penrith by the Regional Cities Taskforce.

 

2        Proposed Membership of the Hawkesbury Harvest Network

PRC 51  RECOMMENDED

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Proposed Membership of the Hawkesbury Harvest Network be received

2.     Council join the Hawkesbury Harvest and make a financial contribution of $20,000 from existing budgets as outlined in the report.

 

1        Results of the Survey of the Agricultural Business Sector in Penrith

PRC 52  RECOMMENDED

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Results of the Survey of the Agricultural Business Sector in Penrith be received

2.     Representations be made to the State Government through the Greater Western Sydney Economic Development Board to examine and address the issue of predatory pricing by major buyers of agricultural produce in the Sydney basin.

 

3        St Marys Town Centre Strategy

PRC 53  RECOMMENDED

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on St Marys Town Centre Strategy be received

2.     Council adopt the revised St Marys Town Centre Strategy (attached to this report)

3.     Council endorse the recommended actions outlined in this report

4.     Responses, as outlined in this report, be provided to persons who made submissions on the draft Strategy

5.     The St Marys Town Centre Strategy, including the Activity Precinct and Public Domain maps, be used to inform further planning, funding and implementation processes

6.     A further report that identifies options for improving the connectivity of, and access to, Queen Street, and that identifies possible options for the funding of such improvements be brought to Council.

 

4        Penrith City Centre Strategy

PRC 54  RECOMMENDED

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on the Penrith City Centre Strategy be received

2.     Council adopt the revised Penrith City Centre Strategy (attached to this report)

3.     Council endorse the recommended actions outlined in this report

4.     Responses, as outlined in this report, be provided to persons who made submissions on the draft Strategy

5.     The Penrith City Centre Strategy, including the Activity Precinct and Public Domain maps, be used to inform the planning to be undertaken with the State Government’s Regional Cities Taskforce

6.     A further report on extending the Riverlink project as far as the M4 Motorway be brought to Council

7.     A further report identifying options for improving traffic movement and flow in Penrith, including the option of an underpass under the railway line be brought to Council.

 

The City as a Social Place

7        ADI Site, St Marys - Request by Delfin Lend Lease for Declaration of Remaining Precincts on the ADI Site as Release Areas

PRC 55  RECOMMENDED

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on ADI Site, St Marys - Request by Delfin Lend Lease for Declaration of Remaining Precincts on the ADI Site as Release Areas be received

2.     Council advise the Department of Planning that it has no objections in principle to the Minister for Planning declaring the remaining precincts on the ADI site as Release Areas subject to:

       (a)   The establishment of an annual audit process which demonstrates that specific employment targets for the ADI Site are being met on a staged basis

       (b)   The Department of Planning ensuring that the Employment Development Strategy Committee meet on a six-monthly basis to review progress on the implementation of the Employment Development Strategy

       (c)   The formulation of an employment delivery program on a Precinct specific basis which identifies expected job growth in the nominated sectors over the life of the development

       (d)   The establishment of a clear process for ensuring the staged, early delivery of transport and service infrastructure for all Precincts on the ADI site

       (e)   The urgent completion of the draft Plan of Management for the Regional Park for public exhibition and a fast-tracking of infrastructure works to allow the opening of the Regional Park at the earliest practical opportunity

       (f)    The progression of the planning and implementation of the proposed Central Park facility to be located in the Regional Open Space on the ADI Site.

The City as an Economy

8        Penrith City Centre Association and St Mary's Town Centre Association Business Plans for 2006-07

PRC 56  RECOMMENDED

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Penrith City Centre Association and St Mary's Town Centre Association Business Plans for 2006-07 financial year be received

2.     Funding for the Penrith City Centre Association in the amount of $268,708 for the 2006-07 financial year be endorsed to be paid on a quarterly basis

3.     Funding for the St Marys Town Centre Association in the amount of $201,585 for the 2006-07 financial year be endorsed to be paid on a quarterly basis

4.     The Associations submit in February 2007 six monthly performance reports for review by Council’s Director City Strategy

5.     Council officers work with both Associations to develop key performance indicators (KPI’s) for the components of their business plans, and that the development of these KPI’s be the subject of a further report to Council.

 

9        Penrith Valley Economic Development Corporation Business Plan 2006-07

PRC 57  RECOMMENDED

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on the Penrith Valley Economic Development Corporation Business Plan 2006-07 be received

2.     Funding for the Penrith Valley Economic Development Corporation for the 2006-07 financial year, in the amount of $260,623, be endorsed, with half the amount to be paid in August 2006

3.     Arrangements for the balance of the funding be deferred until the next Policy Review Committee meeting to allow for a meeting between the Council’s Chief Financial Officer and the Penrith Valley Economic Development Corporation to clarify the details of the requested additional funding, and to ascertain from the Corporation details of all grants applied for by the Corporation and the results of those applications.

The City Supported by Infrastructure

10      Agreed Stormwater Drainage Capacity Standards

PRC 58  RECOMMENDED

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Agreed Stormwater Drainage Capacity Standards be received

2.     The design parameters as outlined be adopted by Council for all future drainage design

3.     A further report be submitted to Council addressing any inadequacies in the existing drainage system.

Leadership and Organisation

11      Service Specification Program

PRC 59  RECOMMENDED

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on the Service Specification Program be received

2.     The specification for the Waste Management Services be adopted

3.     The specification for the Printing Services be adopted.

 

12      Proposed Policy on Grant Applications by Staff

PRC 60  RECOMMENDED

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Proposed Policy on Grant Applications by Staff be received

2.     The proposed Policy on Grant Applications by Staff, as shown in the Draft Policy Document appended to this report, be adopted with the following amendment:

The policy to read:

“Council Managers, in consultation with the relevant Director, may apply for grants to the value of $20, 000 (excluding GST) without first obtaining Council endorsement of the application, provided that:

·    A contribution or commitment of Council funds is not a requirement of the grant program,

and

·    The project to be funded will contribute to either:

    At least one of Council’s Term Achievements in its current Strategic Plan,

or

    The completion of a Task in the current Management Plan.

Under this policy, Council retains responsibility for and control over the acceptance of any grant offered.

Councillors are to be informed by memo as soon as possible by the relevant Manager when a grant application has been made.”

3.     A further report that details Council’s processes for dealing with grant applications and how these processes are resourced be brought to Council.

 

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the recommendations contained in the Report and Recommendations of the Policy Review Committee meeting held on 24 July, 2006 be adopted.

 

 


Ordinary Meeting

7 August 2006

Leadership and Organisation

 

REPORT AND RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE
 Penrith Valley Community Safety Partnership MEETING

HELD ON 29 June, 2006

 

 

PRESENT

Councillor Karen McKeown; Councillor Kaylene Allison; Councillor Gary Rumble, Councillor Pat Sheehy, Laura Williams, South Penrith Youth Service; Terry McGivern, Penrith City Council; Fiona Burgess, Penrith City Council; Gladys Reed, Penrith City Centre Association; Ben Feszczuk, Penrith Local Area Command; Paul Haines Penrith Local Area Command; Julie Passau, Penrith Local Area Command; Ray Filewood, St Marys Local Area Command; David Jones, St Marys Local Area Command; Kristy Williams, St Marys Local Area Command; Yvonne Perkins, Penrith City Council; Erin Davidson, Penrith City Council; Jeni Pollard, Penrith City Council; Kylie Howard, Penrith City Council.

 

APOLOGIES

Mayor Councillor John Thain; David Burns, Penrith City Council; Lawrence Bonello, Penrith Local Area Command; Debbie Moore, St Marys Area Command; Wendy Herne, St Clair – Erskine Park Community Safety Association; Katerina Tahija, Penrith City Council; Yvonne Howie, Penrith Valley Chamber of Commerce; Felicity Sheaves, Needle & Syringe Program Health;

 

PVCSP6    RECOMMENDED That apologies be received and accepted.

 

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES - Penrith Valley Community Safety Partnership Meeting - 29 March 2006

PVCSP7  RECOMMENDED That minutes be received and accepted

 

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

 

 There were no declarations of interest.

 

MASTER PROGRAM REPORTS

 

The City as a Social Place

 

1        Penrith Valley Community Safety Plan - Key Area Strategy Development and Project Updates    

Yvonne provided the Partnership members with an updated report on the status of strategy development and project updates as detailed below.

 

Key Area 1: Personal Safety

 

Domestic Violence Website

A planning day for the Nepean Domestic Violence Network was held on Thursday 23 March 2006 at Harold Corr Hall. An outcome of the day has been to set up small working groups with a number of tasks that will be looked at over the year. These groups include:

Group One: Information and Communication

Group Two: Events to Raise Awareness

Group Three: Projects to be Advanced

Group Four: Advocacy and Action

Group Five: Network development

Yvonne Perkins is the convenor of group 1, Information and Communication, which includes maintaining and updating the Domestic Violence website, Domestic Violence information stand in Westfields Penrith Plaza and all network publications.

 

Domestic Violence Website – www.dvhelppenrithregion.nsw.gov.au

Community Safety staff have now completed training on how to update and implement changes on the Domestic Violence website. Group one from the Domestic Violence Network, Information and Communication, met on 27 June to look through the website and discuss any relevant changes that needed to be made.

 

Domestic Violence Information Stand – Westfield Penrith Plaza

The information stand that was previously located on level one near the Centre Management Office has been relocated since the construction and opening of the Reject Shop. Since the relocation there has been an increase in material that has been taken from the stand.

There has been discussion, through the Nepean Domestic Violence Network, of moving this stand to an alternative location, though it has been agreed that it remain within Westfield for the time being as any relocation would require the manufacturer to dismantle and transport the stand. The stand will also require re badging and design if it relocated. Whilst information continues to be accessed at Westfield, it can remain in the current location.

 

Key Area 2: Antisocial Behaviour

 

HOST’s Pack

At present the party pack is undergoing a makeover. The original HOST’s book that was developed is now out of date along with old Council badging. This has now been updated and amended with the correct details and logos and given a fresh look.

Community Safety staff are also looking into the possibility of including a plastic disposable tablecloth with the Standard Drinks Guide printed on it. The tablecloth could be set up on the drinks table at functions as a reminder regarding standard drinks for persons consuming and serving alcohol.

A copy of the HOST’s Pack information sheet was distributed.

Key Area 3: Fear of Crime

 

Sharps Needle Bin East Lane St Marys

A meeting was held on 20 June 2006 to discuss the development of a Community Sharps Disposal brochure that would include information such as the location of all sharps disposal bins within the Penrith LGA and information on the safe disposal of sharps.

 

 

General Community Safety Pack

The General Community Safety Pack has evolved from the Young People In Rental Accommodation Kit. The Young People In Rental Accommodation Kit identified the need for additional information to be included in the kit through requests from the public and community organisations on other issues such as personal safety and home security. The package was originally targeted at young people living in rental accommodation, but has been re developed into the General Community Safety Pack including fact sheets on Community Safety Projects, such as:

·    Personal Safety

·    Home Security

·    Fire Safety and Fire Safety Checklist

·    Home Fire Escape Plan

·    City Wide Graffiti Minimisation Strategy

·    Park Smarter

·    HOST’s Pack

·    Walk Wise

·    Report It, Don’t Ignore It!

·    Regional Domestic Violence Website

·    Safe Syringe Disposal and,

·    A ‘contact us’ sheet

 

Report It, Don’t Ignore It

The Report It, Don’t Ignore It project will be taken to Centro Lennox between 10.00am and 11.30am and St Clair Shopping Centre between 1.00pm till 2.30pm on 18 July 2006. This will be part of an awareness program and to promote the project within the community.

 

Key Area 4: Issues affecting people and places

 

Community Safety Audit – Star Court Shopping Centre Cambridge Gardens

A community safety audit is being planned in conjunction with St Marys Police and local stakeholders for Star Court Shopping Centre Cambridge Gardens.

 

Ben Feszczuk gave an overview of the behaviour that was happening at the precinct, including antisocial behaviour such as graffiti and broken fencing and kids hanging out at the McDonalds restaurant on Friday and Saturday nights.

 

The precinct includes Caltex Service Station, McDonalds Restaurant and the Overlander Hotel. The precinct is surrounded by public reserve and open space, which also has a number of pedestrian walkways.

 

Councillor Pat Sheehy raised the issue of why there were still problems there as a committee was to be formed to resolve issues in the area.  Yvonne Perkins advised that a report was to be presented to Council on this matter in the near future.

 

Key Area 5: Theft of or from a Vehicle

Operation Bounce Back

Operation Bounce Back was launched on 31st May 2006 with shopping centre displays at Centro Nepean and St Marys Village Shopping Centre with the support of both Penrith and St Marys Police. Further promotion of the program was through local newspaper advertisements during the middle of June as a requirement of the funding agreement.

 

Penrith and St Marys Police identified a number of candidates to receive the free car engine immobiliser, which resulted in a number of vouchers being distributed.

 

All 100 vouchers that were allocated to us have been distributed with a waiting list of 24 people. Council is able to acquire an additional 24 vouchers from National Motor Vehicle Theft Reduction Council to cover these requests.

 

The demands for the vouchers have come from a wide demographic group. Initially the program was aimed at young people, but a large number of older residents have requested the vouchers.

 

PVCSP8 RECOMMENDED That the information contained in the report on the Penrith Valley Community Safety Plan - Key Area Strategy Development and Project updates be received.

 

2        Graffiti Minimisation Sub Group Update                                                                          

Yvonne gave an update on the graffiti minimisation group.

 

The Community Safety staff are continuing to gather, date and photograph graffiti across the LGA, from both public and private properties. To date there are over 350 entries in the Australian Graffiti Register database.

 

The Report It, Don’t Ignore program and the Graffiti Removal Information Package  continues to be promoted throughout the LGA. The Report It, Don’t Ignore It project is encouraging the reporting of crime to local police.

 

The AREAS (Asset Renewal and Established Areas Strategy) includes a component on graffiti removal. During the development of the Management Plan, Council resolved to seek a special rate variation. The special rate initiative includes an amount of $250,000pa, for a 10 year period for additional graffiti management/removal.

 

In addition to the AREA strategy, the Management Plan has also allocated an additional $216,500 for graffiti management and removal.

 

To date there has been no advice from the Attorney Generals Department in regards to the Grants submission that Council submitted for funding to develop the interactive web based educational graffiti minimisation game. 

 

Ben Feszczuk advised the group that the reporting of malicious damage was up and this could be attributed to the Report it, Don’t Ignore It project.

 

PVCSP9     RECOMMENDED That the information contained in the report on the Graffiti Minimisation sub group update be received.

 

3        Cranebrook Streetwork Project - Sharing the Public Domain                                         

Yvonne advised that the Cranebrook project had been extended from it’s original grant funding of $20,000 to a further $49,850 to bring the project to $69,850.

 

The extension of this project from the original grant ‘The Cranebrook Town Centre – Sharing the Public Domain’ was due to further issues in the wider Cranebrook area such as malicious damage to private property, safety issues related to public transport.

 

The original project has been expanded to become the Cranebrook Streetwork Project – Sharing the Public Domain.

 

The Cranebrook project aims to bring in local services to engage young people through referral and partnership activities.

 

PVCSP10  RECOMMENDED That the information contained in the report on Cranebrook Streetwork Project – Sharing the Public Domain be received.

 

Regular Items

 

a)         Police Statistics

 

St Marys Police – Acting Crime Prevention Coordinator, David Jones

 

Category

Increase Or Decrease

Average Monthly

Assault

107

Robbery

14

Break and Enter

86

Stealing

127

SMV

50

Malicious Damage

147

 

 

 

 

Penrith Police – Crime Prevention Officer Julie Passau

 

Category

Increase Or Decrease

Average Monthly

Assault

96

Robbery

10

Break and Enter

82

Stealing

194

SMV

44

Malicious Damage

133

 

 

What’s in the Media:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GENERAL BUSINESS

 

GB 1          Glenmore Park Action Group       

 

Councillor Rumble requested Yvonne Perkins to attend future meetings of the GPAG to assist in the coordination of requests for information and assistance.

 

GB 2          St Marys Local Area Command Re-Building 

Ray Filewood advised the Partnership that Richard Crook Constructions have been engaged to build the new police station at St Marys. The construction company also built the John Moroney Correctional facility. He said that by the end of July, early August they will be temporarily moved to the Regentville site.

 

GB 3          Message in a Bottle   

Yvonne presented the ‘Message in a Bottle’ project that was highlighted as a project for investigation by Ben Feszczuk. The program as been promoted through the Rotary movement in Australia. The project is aimed at elderly people, but anyone with a medical condition can use it. The idea is to place all your emergency details in a plastic bottle in the fridge. In conjunction with the bottle, a sticker with a green cross is placed at the front door, so if emergency services are required to attend your premises, the services know the emergency details are in the fridge.

 

The Partnership agreed that this project had some merit and should be investigated further.

 

GB 4          Penrith City Council Open Day

         

Open day will be held on the second Saturday of August, 12 August 2006, and everyone is invited to help support.

 

Meeting Close

 

There being no further business the Chairperson declared the meeting closed, the time being 8:00pm.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the recommendations contained in the Report and Recommendations of the Penrith Valley Community Safety Partnership meeting held on 29 June, 2006 be adopted.

 

 

 



 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

The City in its Broader Context

 

1        Great River Walk Stage 1                                                                                                     1

 

The City as a Social Place

 

2        Children's Week Activities                                                                                                    7

 

3        Development of the 2006-2009 Penrith Valley Community Safety Plan                                11

 

4        Development Application 06/0758 proposed partial enclosure of rear verandah of an existing commercial premises at Lot 16 DP 651337 (No.  30) Mulgoa Road, Regentville. Applicant: Frank Kosztelnik;  Owner: James A Aitken & D J Reeves DA06/0758                                                            16

 

5        Development Application 05/0232 for change of use from outbuilding to dwelling at Lot 2149 DP 255370 (No. 9) Benaud Court, St Clair. Applicant: Mr G and Mrs V Thorpe;  Owner: Mr G and Mrs V Thorpe DA05/0232                                                                                                           21

 

6        Penrith Football Stadium                                                                                                     31

 

The City In Its Environment

 

7        Urban Sustainability Program Grants                                                                                   37

 

The City as an Economy

 

8        Outdoor Eating and Trading - Status Update                                                                       43

 

The City Supported by Infrastructure

 

9        RTA 2006/07 Road Funding Grants                                                                                   48

 

10      Tender 01-06/07: Concrete Path Paving 2006/07 in Three Separate Wards                        51

 

Leadership and Organisation

 

11      2006 Local Government Association NSW Conference Motions                                        58

 

12      Disclosure of Election Funding                                                                                            68

 

13      Activities of Grants Support Officer - 10 October 2005 to 30 June 2006                            69

 

14      Council Property - Lot 1033, D.P. 849297, High Street, Penrith - Electricity Easements at Joan Sutherland Performing Arts Centre                                                                                      76

 

15      Council Property - Easement to Drain Water over Lot 75, D.P. 28707, No. 37 Elizabeth Crescent, Kingswood.  Owner:  Penrith City Council;  Applicant:  John Nichols                                  79

 

16      Local Government Exchange and Co-operation Seminar 2006                                            82

 

17      Council Property  -  Lot 202, D.P. 700947, Lenore Drive, Erskine Park Dedication as Road.  Owner:  Penrith City Council.  Applicant:  Penrith City Council                                                         84

 

 


The City in its Broader Context

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

1        Great River Walk Stage 1                                                                                                     1

 

 



Ordinary Meeting

7 August 2006

The City in its Broader Context

 

 

The City in its Broader Context

 

 

1

Great River Walk Stage 1   

 

Compiled by:                Karin Schicht, Landscape Architecture Supervisor

Authorised by:             Craig Ross, Design and Technical Advice Manager 

Strategic Program Term Achievement: Penrith Lakes is developing and being used in a way that establishes it as a principal Sydney destination.

Critical Action: Participate in the planning process for Penrith Lakes and advocate its innovative development as a regional centre for enterprise, water based recreation elite sports, entertainment and events.

     

Purpose:

To advise Council of the status of the Stage 1 works for the Great River Walk and to seek Council's endorsement to allocate additional funds to complete the project.  The report recommends that Council endorse the allocation of funds to complete the Stage 1 works.

 

Background

The Great River Walk is a large scale iconic project that extends the full length of the Nepean-Hawkesbury system.  Penrith Council has given priority to implementing a section of this Walk, primarily between the M4 motorway and the Penrith Lakes Scheme (with connections to the CBD).  A Master Plan has been developed and approved for this section of the Walk and some components have previously been constructed along River Road and through Tench Reserve.  Further implementation is now being pursued with funding through the Department of Planning’s Metropolitan Greenspace Program.  This is being carried out through a number of stages.

 

Stage 1of the Great River Walk extends from the Nepean River weir northwards, crossing two creeks and rises up a significant embankment to a point near Cassola Place.  Key components include: pedestrian and cycle path; a boardwalk across Peachtree Creek and a bridge across Boundary Creek. 

 

The project has been able to be implemented due to the successful grant application submitted in 2003-04, under the Metropolitan Greenspace Program, which provides funds to local governments on a dollar for dollar basis.  The scope and value of the Stage 1 works was based on masterplan scale information, no detailed survey nor design information and very preliminary and crude estimates of values of work.  The project value at that time was approximately $400,000.

 

Works in kind contributions were pledged from: Coffey Engineering ($100,000) for constructing and implementing the bridge and boardwalk, and JK Williams ($100,000) for implementing the civil works.  These funds made up the matching amount for the grant.  Under the grant program, Council has received a total of $202,860 from DIPNR.  A consultant team was engaged to undertake the designs, the necessary approvals were obtained and the project is now well into the construction phase.

 

Civil and bridge/boardwalk works were well underway before Council was notified by JK Williams of their budgetary concerns.  At this point, it became evident that it was not possible to reduce the scope of works as the entire length of the Stage 1 project had been disturbed through earthworks.  Coffey Engineering continued to manufacture the metal works and JK Williams continued with construction.  Several meetings were held between JK Williams and Council to determine the reason and extent of these unforeseen financial implications.  These can be summarised as follows:

·    Some items were not allowed for, such as additional Aboriginal consultant fees due to complications between the groups consulted

·    The site is environmentally sensitive and involves steep gradients and difficulty of access.  Survey information did not accurately reflect the actual ground conditions in all places

·    Erosion control measures and on-site attendance by DLALC during earthworks (no allowance made), and increased site establishment costs due to site conditions

·    Earthworks complications, such as not being able to achieve specified compaction levels and unforeseen construction access difficulties

·    An increase in path width (unsealed) due to the need to accommodate construction plant as well as practicalities arising from bridge installation.  This in turn required greater cut and fill, an increase in the length and height of the gabions supporting the path and additional safety hand-railing

·    Estimates for the boardwalk and bridge were not based on detailed documentation and consequently the value of these items was difficult to estimate

·    The length of the boardwalk increased, due to the nature of pebbly ground at the approaches that could not accommodate an asphalt path.  During the design phase, DPI (Fisheries) required specific methods of supporting the boardwalk

·    A review of bridge abutments was required due to unforeseen site conditions and compaction levels.  This has resulted in the need for a new design, currently being costed.  These figures could impact upon the total project cost estimate

·    The extent of landscaping has increased due to the unanticipated larger areas of disturbance that require restoration. 

 

The total value of the works has exceeded the original budget and caused the project to be put on hold.  Council has approached the project partners and has been successful in securing additional 'in kind' contributions to the value of $98,574 ($20,000 from Coffey Engineering and $78,574 from JK Williams).  Council itself has also been able to make an 'in kind' contribution to the planting works to the value of $16,174, and some components have been funded from remaining funds on completion of the Bike Plan ($40,000).

 

As at June 2006, as a result of the implications listed above, the project value stands at approximately $732,000.  This figure is based on original documentation for bridge abutments that have since been required to be redesigned.  Quotations for this revised component are still pending (as at the date this report was written) and could ultimately influence the project total value once determined.  The construction phase is approximately 75% complete, with only the bridge and its abutments, asphalting, planting and furnishings required to finish the project. 

 

Council has been involved in several meetings and discussions with Department of Planning representatives to resolve the current difficult funding situation with this project.  The Department suggested Council request from it additional funds to match the increase in contributions ($98,574).  A written request was submitted to the Department in July 2006 and is currently being considered.  If this request is successful, there is still a budget shortfall in the order of $75,818 (see summary in table below).  Advice on Council’s submission is not likely to be received until late September.

 

Project estimate

$732,000

 

 

 

Less contributions

 

$120,000

Coffey Engineering

 

 

 

$178,574

JK Williams

 

 

 

$202,860

Dept of Planning

 

 

 

$56,174

PCC (Parks' in kind labour and Bike Plan)

 

Shortfall of

$174,392

 

 

 

Less DoP funding

 

$98,574

Subject of Council submission.

 

Shortfall of

$75,818

 

 

 

 

The Department also advised that Council could submit a new Metropolitan Greenspace Program grant in the 2006-07 round, though with no guarantee of success, for the project shortfall.  The project clearly meets all the assessment criteria.  Applications are due on 1 September 2006 and are anticipated to be determined in February 2007.  It is proposed to submit a grant application for funds to cover the remainder of costs required.

 

The current stage of construction has placed the project at risk from erosion, and to avoid additional costs it is imperative to secure the works and significantly complete the construction at the earliest possible date.  For this to occur, advance funding needs to be secured ahead of any formal advice from the Department regarding either the request for additional funds or the grant submission.  This possibility has been discussed with the Financial Services Manager who has provided the following comment.  To secure the project, advance funding in the order of $175,000 would be required.

Financial Services Manager’s Comment

At this stage, it is not possible to positively ascertain if surplus funds will be available from the wrap-up of the 2005-06 financial year for this purpose.  If surplus funds are available, their allocation will need to be considered against other priorities of Council.  The year-end result will be reported to the Ordinary Meeting of 21 August 2006.

 

As it is possible that a significant component of the shortfall may be met from the Metropolitan Greenspace Program 2006-07, it is proposed that the necessary funds are advanced from internal reserves until such time as the grant application is decided.  If the application is unsuccessful then funding will need to be allocated from any surplus generated in the current financial year.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Great River Walk Stage 1 be received.

2.     Council endorse the submission of a grant application under the Department of Planning's Metropolitan Greenspace Program for the additional funds to complete Stage 1 of the Great River Walk.

3.     Council endorse an advance of up to $175,000 from internal reserves to meet the immediate shortfall of funds required to complete Stage 1 of the Great River Walk as outlined in this report.  This advance to be repaid to reserves from the Metropolitan Greenspace Program if successful.  If the application is unsuccessful there will be a further report to Council to consider the final funding source.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


The City as a Social Place

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

2        Children's Week Activities                                                                                                    7

 

3        Development of the 2006-2009 Penrith Valley Community Safety Plan                                11

 

4        Development Application 06/0758 proposed partial enclosure of rear verandah of an existing commercial premises at Lot 16 DP 651337 (No.  30) Mulgoa Road, Regentville. Applicant: Frank Kosztelnik;  Owner: James A Aitken & D J Reeves DA06/0758                                                            16

 

5        Development Application 05/0232 for change of use from outbuilding to dwelling at Lot 2149 DP 255370 (No. 9) Benaud Court, St Clair. Applicant: Mr G and Mrs V Thorpe;  Owner: Mr G and Mrs V Thorpe DA05/0232                                                                                                           21

 

6        Penrith Football Stadium                                                                                                     31

 

 



Ordinary Meeting

7 August 2006

The City as a Social Place

 

 

The City as a Social Place

 

 

2

Children's Week Activities   

 

Compiled by:                Winifred Sadlier, Children's Services Development Officer

Authorised by:             Denise Gibson, Children’s Services Manager 

Strategic Program Term Achievement: Services are provided to meet the diverse needs of families and to support the development of children.

Critical Action: Deliver Councils Children's Services to meet the current and emerging needs of families and children.

     

Purpose:

To provide information on Children's Week and ways to encourage increased community participation.  The report recommends the approval of a change of venues for Children's Week 2006 and the endorsement of a review of the way we celebrate Children's Week.

 

Background

What is Children's Week?

Children's Week is an annual event celebrated in Australia during the fourth week in October.  It is co-ordinated by the Children’s Week Council of Australia and through the Department of Community Services in NSW.

 

In 1996 a permanent theme: "A Caring World Shares" was adopted as a reflection of Children's Week aims, while at the same time acknowledging the designated year on national posters and other printed materials.

 

A diverse range of events and activities are organised at National, State and local levels. These focus the attention of the wider community on children, their needs and achievements.

 

Children's Week celebrates the right of children to enjoy childhood. It is also a time for children to demonstrate their talents, skills and abilities.

 

Thousands of children and their families around the country are involved in activities and events during "The Week", through the participation of schools, playgroups, childcare, kindergartens, cultural groups, libraries, departments and community groups.

 

Designated by the nations of the world, Universal Children's Day calls society to a greater response to the plight of many millions of children around the world who are denied the basic necessities of a happy childhood and the education to develop their capacities. It also calls us in Australia to consider those conditions in society which affect the lives and future of our own children.  Universal Children’s Day falls within Children’s Week.

How Council Currently Provides Children’s Week Activities

Council provides and promotes a week of activities to celebrate childhood throughout the Local Government Area (LGA).  Activities are provided in each ward with a main activity at the Civic Centre. The activities take place in the mornings between 10am and 12noon.

 

The Mobile Playvan Co-ordinator and the Mobile Playvan staff co-ordinate a week of events with support from other members of the Children’s Services Team (mainly Council’s SUPS Team) and occasionally from other Council departments eg computer games provided by IT staff, and story time provided by Library staff. The Mobile Playvan attends street, shopping mall and the Civic Centre venues during Children’s Week and provides activities and relevant information for parents. The usual Playvan venues in parks and reserves are cancelled during this week and many of the parents who usually attend Playvan sessions attend the Children’s Week activities in the streets, shopping malls and at the Civic Centre.

 

A budget of $7,000.00 is provided from Council to provide Children’s Weeks events, $4,000.00 of this is spent on salary costs and the rest is spent on special entertainment eg a farm, a clown and on promoting the event.

 

Children’s Week activities have varied over the years, moving from outdoor venues to the Civic Centre for the main attractions. In recent years, there has been a move to make the event informative and educational for parents and to include other agencies. Such organisations as the Department of Community Services, National Association for Prevention of Child Abuse and Neglect, Playgroup Association, Anglicare and the Department of Health have been invited and have accepted invitations to join in the activities provided by Council.

 

The Proposed Change for 2006

 

It is proposed to hold Children’s Week activities in the usual Playvan venues in the parks and reserves rather than in the streets and shopping malls. The celebration at the Civic Centre would still be held. A table indicating the change of venues is provided below.

Program of Activities for Children’s Week 2006 compared to Previous Years

Day

Normal Playvan Roster

Roster for Children’s Week in previous years

Proposed Changes for 2006

Monday AM

Wallacia
(Fowler Reserve

Cancelled for preparation

Wallacia
(Fowler Reserve)

Tuesday AM

Cranebrook (North Andromeda Drive)

St Marys Library
(High Street)

Cranebrook (North Andromeda Drive)

Tuesday PM

Claremont Meadows (Cedar Park)

Preparation for Wednesday

Preparation for Wednesday

Wednesday AM

North St Marys (Debrincat Avenue)

Civic Centre activities

Civic Centre activities

Wednesday PM

Glenmore Park (Torquay Terrace)

Civic Centre activities

Civic Centre activities

Thursday

Glenmore Park
(Muru Drive)

Cranebrook
(Shopping Mall)

Glenmore Park
(Muru Drive)

Friday

Claremont Meadows (Community Centre)

Erskine Park
(Shopping Centre)

Claremont Meadows (Myrtle Street)

Reason for Request to Change of Venues for 2006

The request to change the venues for Children’s Week 2006 relate to providing a larger and safer space, involving other child and family services and stretching resources further.

 

·    Streets and shopping malls are becoming increasingly busy.  Parks and reserves where the Playvan usually operates provide a safer venue and can accommodate a wider range of activities.

·    The usual Playvan venues provide more space to make the celebration more inclusive.  Other child and family services in the Penrith LGA will be invited to be part of the Children’s Week Celebrations.

·    Patrons of the event are in the main users of the Mobile Playvan who attend the Children’s Week activities in lieu of attending the Playvan activities that are cancelled during Children’s Week. Including other child and family services would attract their clients and enhance the event, with more parents gaining access to information.

·    The Children’s Services SUPS team has previously provided resources and support in the planning and delivery of Children’s Week activities as part of their role, however the SUPS program has concluded.  The new Inclusion Support Agency and their new role is more prescriptive and it will not be possible to release the staff to participate in Children’s Week.

·    Responsibility for the event will be focussed on the shoulders of a minimal number of staff who will not be able to facilitate Children’s Week as it has previously been provided.

Planning for the Change

Plans to involve a wider community group allows for a greater variety of activities to be available to children and parents during Children’s Week and will have the benefit of connecting the community.

 

A community meeting will be held to seek community involvement during Children’s Week. Strategies are identified below to encourage community partners to join in Children’s Week activities and/or to provide extra activities in the LGA.

 

Children’s services staff will undertake to promote all activities that are happening in the community during Children’s Week 2006.

 

Objectives for Children’s Week:

 

·    To provide a community celebration of childhood (0-12 years)

·    To raise awareness in the community of the needs of children

·    To provide venues and activities that allow families with children to have fun together

·    To provide information on child rearing to parents

·    To provide a range of activities are dispersed throughout the LGA

·    To encourage the community to participate more in the event

·    To foster collaboration and networking to take place in the co-ordination of the event

·    To provide all child and family agencies and organisations in the LGA with an opportunity to showcase and promote their service.

 

 

 

Review of Children’s Week

 

The way in which Penrith City Council celebrates Children’s Week is just one of many all over Australia. For example, Auburn Council provides a marquee in a local park and child and family services unite together to provide a variety of information and activities, with council staff playing a co-ordinating role; Marrickville Council plays a facilitating role in bringing community groups together to provide videos for staff, and invite guest speakers to the area to talk to parents on child rearing topics – these activities are advertised on behalf of the community on Council’s web page.

 

As we become more informed of the benefits of community connectedness and service networking through such State initiatives as Families First, it appears that it would be beneficial to review the way Children’s Week activities are provided in more detail. It is proposed to undertake this review over the next twelve months and place some options before Council prior to Children’s Week 2007.

Summary

Council’s Mobile Playvan and SUPS Team, supported by other Council departments, provide Children’s Week activities in shopping malls, streets and at the Civic Centre. Some community organisations are invited to join in these events.

 

For 2006, a change in venues for Children’s Week activities is proposed. The usual Playvan venues would replace the streets and shopping malls. The benefits of this change are:

 

·    Safer and larger venues that allow more community participation, including a wider range of families who are likely to attend

·    An increased sharing of resources and the opportunity for community networking.

 

It is recognised that there are many different models of celebrating Children’s Week, and due to a more informed perspective on service delivery, it is recommended that a review of how Council celebrates Children’s Week be undertaken prior to the 2007 event.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Children's Week Activities be received.

2.     The change of venues for Children’s Week 2006 is approved as detailed in this report.

3.     A review of the organisation and celebration of Children’s Week for 2007 be undertaken and a further report is provided.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Ordinary Meeting

7 August 2006

The City as a Social Place

 

 

The City as a Social Place

 

 

3

Development of the 2006-2009 Penrith Valley Community Safety Plan   

 

Compiled by:                Yvonne Perkins, Community Safety Coordinator

Authorised by:             David Burns, Asset Manager 

Strategic Program Term Achievement: A community safety plan, building on a partnership with police, the community and other stakeholders is in place and supported by Council’s programs.

Critical Action: Maintain and implement a Community Safety Plan for the City with the aid of relevant stakeholders that responds to current prioritised issues.

     

Purpose:

To advise Council on the development of a Community Safety Plan for the City of Penrith for the period 2006-2009.  The report recommends that the information contained in the report on the development of the new Community Safety Plan for the City of Penrith be received.

 

Background

The first and current Penrith Valley Community Safety Plan was prepared by Penrith City Council in partnership with the Centre for Regional Research & Innovation from the University of Western Sydney.  The plan was adopted by Council on 30 September 2002, and subsequently endorsed by the NSW Attorney General’s Department (AG’s) as a Safer Community Compact from 23 December 2002 to 22 December 2005.

 

Advice was sought from various levels of government, local service providers and community organisations and representatives.  It involved examination of existing Community Safety Plans across Australia, web searches on Community Safety initiatives across the world, the examination of all available crime statistics, and extensive local community consultation.  The Crime Prevention Division of the NSW Attorney General’s Department also provided valuable support during the consultation phase.

 

The development of the plan consisted of three main tasks including:

 

1. The preparation of the Penrith Valley Crime & Safety Profile;

2. Reviewing the existing community safety programs that existed in Penrith at the time; and

3. The selection of appropriate community safety strategies.

 

The Penrith Valley Community Safety Partnership has steered the progress of the Community Safety Plan implementation over the life of the plan to date.  Members of the Partnership, community stakeholders, interested groups and government authorities have contributed to the development and implementation of strategies and actions in five key areas, and they are:

 

1.       Personal Safety

          Including all forms of personal safety with particular emphasis on domestic violence.

 

 

2.       Antisocial behaviour

          Including malicious damage, assault and offensive conduct.

 

3.       Fear of Crime

          Particularly involving the perceptions of drug usage and assault.

 

4.       Issues affecting people and places

          Looking at issues that are specific to different locations and different communities.

 

5.       Theft of or from a Vehicle

          Particularly in CBD precincts and related car parks.

 

The progression of the plan has been reliant on continued networking with our primary Community Safety/Crime Prevention Partners, Penrith & St Marys Police.

 

In June 2004, a detailed report was compiled, providing the first major review of the Penrith Valley Community Safety Plan outcomes at what was then approximately mid-way through the life of the plan.

 

During discussions with the Crime Prevention Division (NSW Attorney General’s Department) in August 2005, regarding the expansion of a Community Safety project being developed for the wider Cranebrook area, is was suggested by AG’s that Council seek a 12 month extension of the existing plan.

 

This was later supported by Council, and approved by AG’s, and the plan is now scheduled to expire on 22 December 2006.

 

A number of other strategies have been developed and implemented since the interim report was prepared and these will build on the half way report in the form of a final report and evaluation of the plan in its entirety, for the period September 2002 to December 2006.

 

Evaluation of the 2002-2006 - Community Safety Plan

 

As stated above, evaluation of actions and strategies from the 2002-2006 plan will be included in a final report currently being prepared.  The evaluation will provide valuable information on programs that have had impact on addressing crime and safety issues across the city. 

 

The following items will be considered during the evaluation process:

 

·    Change or effect achieved as a result of the implementation of specific projects.

 

·    Existing data/knowledge that can be used for measuring the effectiveness of projects.

 

·    The ability to facilitate the need for change in strategy direction to accommodate changing community needs and expectations.

 

·    Development of methods to measure “awareness raising” or “reducing fear of crime”.

 

·    External barriers to the implementation of strategies (factors that we have no control over).

 

Current Situation

 

The Community Safety Plan December 2006 – December 2009

 

Since the introduction of the Community Safety function within Council, community safety and the prevention of crime has been progressed via a range of Council programs.  Many of the programs have been developed as a result of contributions via the community consultations undertaken to develop the 2002-2006 plan. 

 

It is now time to focus our attention on the development of a Community Safety Plan for the period 2006-2009.  This will be achieved through community involvement during various consultation methods that will gather relevant information to ensure that local strategies are implemented for local issues.

Active involvement through the consultation phase allows communities and individuals to:

·      contribute to local community safety and crime prevention planning and actions;

·      help to make local neighbourhoods safer places to live;

·      build relationships with other groups/individuals in local neighbourhoods; and

·      be part of a problem solving approach.

Community Safety Plans identify and prioritise crime prevention and community safety activities and explain the roles and responsibilities of the participating organisations. Through the plan, organisations in the Penrith Valley Community Safety Partnership, and other groups involved for specific projects, will clearly understand their role in tackling crime and improving safety in local communities.

 

The plan will:

·      identify and prioritise local issues of concern;

·            develop responses to issues; and evaluate and measure the success of addressing      each issue.

 

Procedure to develop the new plan

 

The Crime Prevention Division from the NSW Attorney General’s Department provides a comprehensive “how to” guide for developing a crime prevention plan.  This includes the process for seeking endorsement of the plan by the NSW Attorney General. The guidelines provided expand considerably on the advice provided during the development of the first plan.  This information, supported by the knowledge and experience that has been gained over the past few years by the Penrith Valley Community Safety Partnership, provide valuable tools for plan development.

 

The NSW Attorney General’s endorsement means that the plan has been identified as incorporating a thorough understanding of local crime issues alongside best-practice recommendations to reduce these.  The Attorney General seeks and considers advice from the Minister for Police and Minister for Community Services when endorsing a crime prevention plan as a Safer Community Compact.

 

A full time temporary Community Safety Officer has been employed  to assist in the consultation and  preparation for the 2006-2009 Community Safety Plan.  The consultation process will include a range of methods including, for example:

 

·    Community Safety surveys to be conducted at Council’s upcoming Open Day

 

·    Surveys conducted online via the Community Safety pages of Council’s web page

 

·    Consultations with local community groups and networks, special interest organisations and government authorities (in all 56 groups attended Community Consultation during the development of the first plan)

 

·    Consultations with specific key Crime Prevention partners including:

-        Penrith & St Marys Police

-        Nepean Domestic Violence Network

 

·    Opportunities to seek feedback on Community Safety issues or representations made to Councillors on Community Safety issues are also being explored to facilitate Councillor access to the consultative processes.  Updates will also be provided to Councillors by way of regular memos.

 

·    Relevant Council officers and Council departments

 

Examination of available data

 

Data sought during the consultation phase will also include examination of relevant information from:

 

·    The NSW Bureau of Crime Statistics and Research

·    The Australian Bureau of Statistics

·    Local Government Demographic Profiles

 

Conclusion

 

The draft Community Safety Plan proposed for public exhibition and community feedback will be presented to Council at the Policy Review Committee meeting on 16 October 2006.  A report advising Council of the outcomes of the public exhibition period and the final draft of the 2006-2009 Penrith Valley Community Safety Plan will be submitted to Council for adoption and approval for submission of the plan to the NSW Attorney General for endorsement as a Community Safety Compact at the Ordinary Meeting on 4 December 2006.

 

The progression of the development of the 2006-2009 Community Safety Plan will build on the valuable partnerships and program development that has been achieved since the commencement of Community Safety Initiatives in Council’s Management Planning processes in 2000. 

 

The recent announcement of the Special Rate initiative for the Asset Renewal and Established Areas Strategy (AREAS) includes, as a Community Safety component, Public Domain Maintenance and Graffiti Management and Removal.  The consultation phase will also provide occasions to engage and inform the community on the implementation of enhanced Public Domain Maintenance and the Citywide Graffiti Minimisation Strategy.

 

The concept of Community Safety and Crime Prevention is generally understood by the majority of residents across the Penrith LGA and it is expected that people who live and work in Penrith will access consultation and feedback opportunities made available to them to articulate any issues of concern regarding real, perceived or emerging crime and safety issues in the city.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the information contained in the report on Development of the 2006-2009 Penrith Valley Community Safety Plan be received.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Ordinary Meeting

7 August 2006

The City as a Social Place

 

 

The City as a Social Place

 

 

4

Development Application 06/0758 proposed partial enclosure of rear verandah of an existing commercial premises at Lot 16 DP 651337 (No.  30) Mulgoa Road, Regentville  Applicant:  Frank Kosztelnik;  Owner:  James A Aitken & D J Reeves    

DA06/0758

Compiled by:                Matthew Tempest, Environmental Planner

Authorised by:             Paul Lemm, Development Services Manager 

Strategic Program Term Achievement: Redevelopment of existing areas contributes to safe, sustainable, affordable and satisfying living environments and cohesive communities.

Critical Action: Work in partnership with the local community to foster understanding of the reasons why established areas are redeveloping.

     

Purpose:

To determine an application for minor additions to an existing commercial building.  This matter is reported to Council in accordance with the policy "Submission of Application for Approval by Council Employees or Councillors".

 

Site Description

The property is located on the northwest corner of the intersection of Mulgoa Road and Spencer Street, Regentville. The area is primarily residential, however established commercial premises front Mulgoa Road including this site and the adjoining Service Station.

 

The site is 696 m2 in area, with an existing commercial floor space of 205.5 m2 and a proposed storage space of 23 m2. It currently provides eight (8) on-site car parking spaces accessed by a driveway off Spencer Street.

 

The site is currently occupied by a commercial building and is being used as a real estate office.

The Proposal

A development application has been received to enclose the rear verandah of the existing commercial building (real estate) for the purpose of on-site archival storage.

 

The details of the proposal are:

 

·    The new rear infill storage space will be of masonry construction with 3 highlight metal-framed windows 300 mm high x 1200 mm wide and a solid core security door

 

The existing building design is contemporary and a features colonial brick finish, large metal pitched roofing, an incorporated loft space above, and large wrap around verandahs that lead out into the driveway access, parking and service area.  The site has a total of 8 car parking spaces.

Planning Assessment

The development has been assessed in accordance with the matters for consideration under Section 79C of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979, and having regard to those matters, the following issues have been identified for further consideration

Section 79C(1)(a)(i) – Any Environmental Planning Instrument

Statutory Situation

The site is zoned 2(b) Residential (Low Density) under Penrith Local Environmental Plan 1988 (Urban Land). The LEP supports a limited range of compatible non-residential uses with consent.

 

The current approved use of the property for commercial premises is prohibited by the LEP. The site benefits, however, from existing use rights.  There is no proposal to change the current use and the proposal to enclose the rear verandah is considered to be ancillary to the approved use.  Section 41 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Regulation 2000 and Clause 108 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act, 1979 allows the enlargement of existing uses.

Section 79C(1)(b) – The Likely Impacts of the Development

Built and Natural Environment

The enclosure will not increase the existing footprint and will be constructed using materials in line with the existing character of the building. The proposed design of infill brick walls, while maintaining the existing verandah posts to partially enclosing the rear verandah, will serve to articulate the rear facade. The placement of highlight windows will break up the rear brick wall even further and create a homogenous urban form that will maintain the existing visual aesthetics.  The new building form will not therefore impact on adjoining properties.

 

The proposed operating hours for the commercial premises (7.00 am - 7.00 pm seven days per week) are not changed as a result of the proposal.

 

Access, traffic and transportation will not change as part of the proposed development.

 

The number of spaces currently provided on site accords with Council's parking requirements, including the increased floor area.

 

On merit, this development is considered to be beneficial to the commercial site as it promotes a safer building design by providing less concealment opportunities along this part of the building.

Section 79C(1)(c) – The Suitability of the Site for the Development

The proposed development is contained within the existing footprint of the building, which is conducive to the site’s current attributes.

Section 79C(1)(d) – Any Submissions made in relation to the Development

Community Consultation

Adjoining owners and occupiers were not required to be notified of the application in accordance with the Advertising and Notification Development Control Plan as they are not likely to be negatively impacted by the proposal.

Conclusion

The use of the subject property for a real estate office is an approved use. This application seeks approval to enclose the rear verandah, which is considered to be ancillary to the approved use.  The design change is complementary to the existing development through its use of matching materials and form.

 

Therefore, the proposed development is considered reasonable and satisfies the heads of consideration under the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 as amended and the objectives of the relevant planning instruments.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Development Application 06/0758 proposed partial enclosure of rear verandah of an existing commercial premises at Lot 16 DP 651337 (No.  30) Mulgoa Road, Regentville be received

2.     Development Application No. 06/0758, which proposes Development Application 06/0758 proposed partial enclosure of rear verandah of an existing commercial premises at Lot 16 DP 651337 (No.  30) Mulgoa Road, Regentville be determined by the granting of development consent subject to the following conditions:

A001   approved plans that are architecturally drawn

A008   Works to BCA requirements

A019   Occupation Certificate

A026   Advertising sign

A032   Goods In buildings

A038    Lighting locations

A039    Graffiti

D009    Covering of waste storage

D010    Appropriate disposal of other waste

E001    BCA Compliance (Class 2-9)

H01F   Stamped plans and erection of site notice

H041   Hours of work

H011   Engineering plans & specification

H015   termites

K016   Stormwater

Q01F   Notice of Commencement & Appointment of PCA

Q05F   Occupation Certificate

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1. View

Site Plan

1 Page

Appendix

2. View

Locality plan

1 Page

Appendix

 


Ordinary Meeting

7 August 2006

Appendix 1 - Site Plan

 

 

 


Ordinary Meeting

7 August 2006

Appendix 2 - Locality plan

 

 

 


Ordinary Meeting

7 August 2006

The City as a Social Place

 

 

The City as a Social Place

 

 

5

Development Application 05/0232 for change of use from outbuilding to dwelling at Lot 2149 DP 255370 (No. 9) Benaud Court, St Clair  Applicant:  Mr G and Mrs V Thorpe;  Owner:  Mr G and Mrs V Thorpe   

DA05/0232

Compiled by:                Peter Wood, Development Assessment Co-ordinator - North

Authorised by:             Paul Lemm, Development Services Manager

Requested By:             Councillor Greg Davies

Strategic Program Term Achievement: Redevelopment of existing areas contributes to safe, sustainable, affordable and satisfying living environments and cohesive communities.

Critical Action: Work in partnership with the local community to foster understanding of the reasons why established areas are redeveloping.

     

Purpose:

To seek Council approval to formalise the unauthorised use of detached outbuilding for residential purposes. The matter has been requested to be reported by Council for determination.  The report recommends that the application be approved.

 

The Proposal

This application seeks approval for the continued use of an outbuilding for residential purposes as a detached addition to the existing dwelling. The nature of the proposed use of the building, and plans, are contained in the Statement of Environmental Effects prepared by Mullane Planning Consultants accompanying the application.

 

In support of the proposal the applicant contends:

 

·    The detached outbuilding has no kitchen or cooking facilities, and such facilities are not intended to be provided. The outbuilding is therefore part of the existing dwelling

·    The detached outbuilding is well constructed and is appropriate for residential purposes

·    The detached outbuilding has been used for some time for residential purposes as part of the existing dwelling house without causing any loss of amenity to neighbouring properties, and without any environmental impacts.

Background

Development Application (DA03/0433) and Construction Certificate (CC03/0296) sought consent to construct a detached outbuilding (9m x 7m) positioned in the northwest corner of the allotment, with setbacks of 900mm from the northern and western site boundaries. The plans show a bathroom in a corner of the garage but the internal space is otherwise not divided.

 

The Development Consent Notice, dated 16 April 2003, approved the subject building as a garage. The Construction Certificate approval, dated 23 April 2003, similarly identified the building as a garage.

 

In January 2004, Council received complaints from a neighbour that the outbuilding was being used for residential purposes.

 

After an inspection of the property by Council’s Building Surveyor a Notice of Intention to Serve Order, dated 15 January 2004, was issued to the builder, requiring that:

 

·    Unauthorised partitions within the garage be removed

·    Unauthorised walls within the garage be removed

·    A request to modify the development consent be lodged seeking approval for the changes that had occurred

·    Documentary evidence be provided in relation to various structural components of the building.

 

On 10 March 2004, a Section 96 application was received from the property owners, seeking to modify DA 03/0433 to:

 

·    Allow internal partitioning of the building

·    Construct a privacy screen on top of an existing boundary fence opposite an existing window in the western wall of the building.

 

The Section 96 application form described the subject building as a ‘teenagers retreat’ and not a garage.

 

A letter, dated 11 August 2004, was issued to the applicant advising that:

 

·    A Section 96 application was not the appropriate manner in which to seek to change the use of the building from garage to ‘teenagers retreat’

·    The Section 96 application should be withdrawn

·    A new Development Application be lodged accompanied by certain information should the applicant wish to proceed with the proposal, including a SEPP 1 objection to Clause 12(4) of LEP 1998.

 

By letter dated 27 August 2004 the applicant the Section 96 application, and after follow-up letters from Council, Development Application 05/0232, the subject of this report was lodged on 14 February 2005.

 

The history of this matter and the need to define the nature of landuse raises certain issues which when addressed provide direction as to the appropriate determination of this application.

 

Section 79C Considerations

This Section of the Act prescribes those matters which are to be considered by Council in its determination of a development application. The planning controls to be considered in the assessment of this proposal are:

 

·    SREP 20 – Hawkesbury Nepean River

·    LEP 1991 – Environmental Heritage

·    LEP 1998 – Urban Land

·    Draft Amendments to LEP 1998 – Urban Land

·    Residential DCP 2000 (Volume 1) – Single Dwellings

·    Landscape DCP

·    South St Marys DCP

 

 

79C(1)(a)(i) - Any environmental planning instrument

 

Sydney Regional Environmental Plan No.20 – Hawkesbury Nepean (SREP 20)

 

SREP 20 aims to protect the environment of the Hawkesbury-Nepean River system by ensuring that the impacts of future land uses are considered in a regional context. The change of use of the building to residential purposes would not result in any impacts on water quality.

 

LEP 1991 – Environmental Heritage

 

The subject site is not a listed as a heritage item under this LEP, nor is it in the vicinity of any such item.

LEP 1998 – Urban Lands

The site is zoned Residential Zone 2(b) (Low density) under LEP 1998.  The Statement of Environmental Effects accompanying this application includes the following:

 

·    This application seeks approval to use the building as a component of the existing single-family residential use of the subject property

·    The subject building is not used as separate domicile or dwelling. It is a component of, and relies upon the principal house for kitchen/cooking/eating purposes

·    The subject building is used as additional living/sleeping space only for persons who co-habit the principle structure

 

The relevant land use table in clause 9 of LEP 1998 states, at (b)(ii), that the following developments can only proceed with development consent:

 

·    Buildings or other structures ordinarily associated with dwelling houses

·    Dual Occupancies

·    Dwelling houses

 

The issue to therefore be resolved is how should the residential use of the subject building be defined for the purposes of establishing permissibility under LEP 1998. In this regard, the following definitions are relevant:

 

‘building or structure ordinarily associated with a dwelling house’ means a garage, carport, pergola, swimming pool or the like, and includes alterations and additions to an existing dwelling house.

and

‘dual occupancy’ means a development that results in two dwellings (whether attached or detached) on a single allotment of land (or which would have that result were it not for the fact that the allotment is to be subdivided as part of the development), however that development is described or provided for in an environmental planning instrument.

and

‘dwelling’ means a room or number of rooms occupied or used, or so constructed or adapted as to be capable of being occupied or used, as a separate domicile

and

‘dwelling house’ means a dwelling which is the only dwelling erected on an allotment of land

 

In considering these options it is concluded that the proposal is not a dual occupancy or separate dwelling as it is not capable of being occupied on a separate domicile without a kitchen. The proposal is a ‘building or structure ordinarily associated with a dwelling house’ as it is a garage or outbuilding used as a detached residential addition to the existing dwelling house.

 

Change of building use provisions in LEP 1998

 

The Residential 2(b) land use table in clause 9 of the LEP prescribes the following development as being permissible only with consent:

 

·    Changes of use of a building (as defined in the Act)

 

As implied, the LEP does not define this matter in Schedule 2 (Definitions) but instead relies upon the definition in clause 4 of the Act, being:

 

·    Change of building use means a change of use of a building from a use that the Building Code of Australia recognises as appropriate to one class of building to a use that the Building Code of Australia recognises as appropriate to a different class of building

 

This provision of the LEP is relevant to the extent that although the exact use of the originally approved building was never specified, a proposed change in the use of the subject building from a garage to a habitable outbuilding would result in the BCA classification of that building changing from class 10a to class 1a. This circumstance is considered to be the primary trigger for development consent.

 

As outlined above, the use of the building for residential purposes is consistent with the definition of a building or structure ordinarily associated with a dwelling house and not a separate domicile.  LEP 1998 also permits a change of use of the existing outbuilding on this allotment and Council’s Legal Officer has advised that this use of the building is permissible. Council is therefore able to grant approval for the continued use of the building for residential purposes as, on assessment, the proposal is permissible under LEP 1998.

 

Consideration of the remaining provisions of the LEP for the purpose of satisfying Section 79C of the EPA Act, finds that non-compliance with numerical controls within the LEP relating to size and siting of the building are irrelevant as the building exists with approval and this application involves only the change of use.

79C(1)(a)(ii) - Any draft environmental planning instrument

Draft amendments to LEP 1998 are not relevant to the subject application.

 

79C(1)(a)(iii) - Any development control plan

 

DCP 2000 – Volume 1- Single Dwellings

 

As the proposal represents a use of an existing detached outbuilding, no design requirements of this DCP are relevant.

 

Landscape DCP

 

A landscape plan was not required with this application. This matter is discussed further under Likely Impacts of the Development.

 

South St Marys DCP

 

This DCP requires that any dwelling erected on the land faces the adjoining reserve. This provision is satisfied by the existing dwelling, but not by the building the subject of this application.  The provisions of the DCP are met by the primary part of the dwelling.

 

79C(1)(a)((iiia) - Any planning agreement

 

There are no planning agreements relevant to the consideration of the proposal.

 

79C(1)(a)(iv) - The Regulations

         

The proposal has been assessed by Council’s Building Surveyor to comply with the relevant requirements of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Regulations.

 

79C(1)(b) - The likely impacts of that development

 

Potential impacts from the proposal the subject of this application can only relate to the intensity of the use of the already approved building in terms of occupancy. These are:

 

·    Acoustic and Visual Privacy

·    Resident Parking Demand

 

The siting of the outbuilding is in an area adjoining the backyards of five neighbouring properties due to the battle-axe allotment configuration, creating potential conflict between indoor and outdoor residential uses. This potential is mitigated in most instances by the existing boundary fences, which are close to the wall height of the outbuilding, its lack of windows and a reasonable separation distance of 10.6m from the entry to the eastern boundary on which an open carport is located.

 

A window on the western elevation of the outbuilding and above the height of the fence line introduces potential for overlooking into the adjoining property to the west, which includes a backyard pool. The application proposes a privacy screen adjacent to this window to minimise this potential.

 

In order to ensure the privacy of adjoining residents, this is recommended as a condition of development consent to be enhanced through the planting of a suitable climbing plant such as Ficus pumila “Climbing Fig” in accordance with Penrith Landscape Development Control Plan 2002 (refer special condition 2.1.1).

 

Potential acoustic impacts on adjoining properties may result from the “backyard” location of the outbuilding in proximity to adjoining dwellings and backyards, the number of occupants, and due to the limited thickness of the metal walls.

 

On-site parking demand could be increased where the extent of residential use is not ancillary to the primary dwelling, for which parking is currently provided on site in an existing carport. This may introduce a demand for parking within the carriageway leading to the property, creating a potential conflict for vehicles accessing this and the adjoining site.

 

In order to mitigate these potential impacts, the following conditions are recommended (refer special conditions 2.1.2 & 2.1.3):

 

·    Partitioning within the outbuilding is to be limited to create a maximum of two rooms excluding the bathroom being one bedroom and one living area. Kitchen/cooking facilities are not permitted within the outbuilding at any time under any circumstances.

 

·    The outbuilding is to be insulated to prevent transmission of noise to the satisfaction of Council’s Building Surveyor within three (3) months of the date of this consent

 

·    No resident vehicles are to be parked within the carriageway being the driveway access handle to the property at any time

 

79C(1)(c) - The suitability of the site for the development

 

The proposal represents a suitable use of an existing building as a detached residential use subject to the recommended conditions of approval.

 

79C(1)(d) - Any submissions made in accordance with this Act or the regulations

 

The application was notified to adjoining and nearby property owners as use of an existing shed as an extension of the residential use of the property. The notification period was from 1 March 2005 to 15 March 2005. Two submissions were received in response, both raising objections to the application. The issues raised are summarized below:

 

·    The creation of any additional living space should be done as an extension to the existing dwelling

·    The building was originally approved for use as a garage

·    Use of the building for residential accommodation requires additional parking to be provided. There is already tension between neighbours as a consequence of the existing shared driveway being used for parking

·    The existing garage building is visually unattractive, and causes a nuisance from reflection from afternoon sun

·    Loss of privacy to adjacent sites from windows in the building

·    Use of the building for residential purposes results in increased noise

·    The building is not occupied in conjunction with the existing dwelling, but is leased

·    Existing building overshadows the pool area of an adjacent site

·    Drainage runoff from the existing building affects an adjacent site

 

A response to the issues is provided under the previous heading of the likely impacts of the development. As discussed earlier issues relating to the size and location of the existing outbuilding are not relevant to this application as the building is as already approved.

 

79C(1)(e)  - The public interest

 

The proposed use is in the public interest as a residential use of the existing outbuilding provided that it remains ancillary to the primary dwelling and subject to conditions of consent.

Section 94 contributions

Section 94 contributions are not payable as the proposal represents an extension of the existing dwelling, not a new dwelling.

Conclusion

Various circumstances have combined to create a complex situation, however regardless of the history attached to this building, LEP 1998 specifically permits the proposed change of use of the existing building. This application represents an opportunity to endorse the residential use of an existing approved building, and condition that approval to ensure it is an orderly use of the site and ancillary to the main dwelling. 

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.  The information contained in the report on Development Application 05/0232 for change of use from outbuilding to dwelling at Lot 2149 DP 255370 (No. 9) Benaud Court, St Clair be received.

2.  Development Application 05/0232 for change of use from outbuilding to dwelling at Lot 2149 DP 255370 (No. 9) Benaud Court, St Clair be approved subject to the following conditions:

 

 

2.1  In order to ensure the privacy of adjoining residents, the privacy screen adjacent to the window on the west elevation of the outbuilding is to be enhanced through the planting of a suitable climbing plant such as Ficus pumila “Climbing Fig” in accordance with Penrith Landscape Development Control Plan 2002.

 

2.2  Partitioning within the outbuilding is to be limited to create a maximum of two rooms excluding the bathroom being one bedroom and one living area. Kitchen/cooking facilities are not permitted within the outbuilding at any time under any circumstances.

 

2.2  The outbuilding is to be insulated to prevent transmission of noise to the satisfaction of Council’s Building Surveyor within three (3) months of the date of this consent.

 

2.3  No resident vehicles are to be parked within the carriageway being the driveway access handle to the property at any time.

 

3.  Those making submissions be advised of Council’s decision.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1. View

DA05/0232 - 9 Benaud Court, St Clair

3 Pages

Appendix

 


Ordinary Meeting

7 August 2006

Appendix 1 - DA05/0232 - 9 Benaud Court, St Clair

 

 

 




Ordinary Meeting

7 August 2006

The City as a Social Place

 

 

The City as a Social Place

 

 

6

Penrith Football Stadium   

 

Compiled by:                Gary Dean, Facilities Operations Manager

Authorised by:             Barry Husking, Chief Financial Officer 

Strategic Program Term Achievement: The City’s recreation and leisure facilities and services meet its needs and are optimally used.

Critical Action: Ensure facilities and services reflect the City’s diverse current and future recreation and leisure needs.

     

Purpose:

To advise Council of the status of the Stadium redevelopment and of a request from Penrith Rugby League Club Ltd to relocate its football administration/operations to the Stadium.

The report recommends that the information in the report be noted and that Council support 'in principle' the proposal, that the Lands Department's (as landowner) authorisation be sought for the lodgement of the Development Application and that Penrith Rugby League Club Ltd be advised of Council's actions.

 

Background

Last year Council receive several reports regarding the Stadium Redevelopment Project.  These reports focused on the formulation of a Masterplan for the Stadium redevelopment and the scope of work which would constitute Stage 1 for which Panthers had received a $10 million Federal Government Grant.

 

Council formed a Councillor Working Party to guide this project.  A redevelopment Masterplan and a scope of work for Stage 1 were subsequently adopted by Council.  A Development Application and Construction Certificate were issued late last year and construction commenced shortly thereafter.

 

The project is nearing completion and an official opening ceremony is planned for September 2006.  An inspection of the Stadium was arranged for Councillors and Council officers today.

 

Current Situation

 

The scope of works that were approved by Council that constituted Stage 1 involved:

 

·        Concourse and terrace seating, existing western grandstand upgrade (which included change rooms and media/coach facilities), new north-west spectator entry and a new playing surface  

·        Southern extension to the western grandstand to include new corporate facilities, additional tiered spectator seating and ‘shells’ for future administration, gym and change facilities.

 

Representatives from Panthers have been discussing with Council officers recently, the details of the “fit-out” of the ground and first floor levels (the ‘shell’ space) of the grandstand extension.  Essentially, what Panthers propose is to relocate its football administration/operations to the Stadium which are presently located elsewhere in Penrith and are required to vacate by October this year.

 

The ground floor would accommodate a specialised gymnasium, offices and attendant services e.g. health, fitness and education programs.  Whilst these facilities would meet the specific needs of the Panthers NRL team, they would also be available to other elite athletes whether as users of the Stadium or other venues in the City.  These facilities would not be available to the general community because of their specialised nature.

 

The first level is to contain a number of offices, conference and storerooms and reception areas.  These spaces are proposed to be occupied by the NRL and Penrith Junior League administration, ARL development programs and the “Panthers on the Prowl” Community Development Foundation.  These proposed spaces could also be utilised by venue management and by other principal users of the Stadium whether sport or entertainment related.

 

Panthers submit that each of these activities provide significant community benefit and would assist in enlivening the refurbished Stadium by having activity at the venue most days of the week throughout the year.

 

In support, Panthers point out the following:

 

“…Penrith’s NRL side, the Panthers, is a core identity – providing institution in the region.  The team provides a reason for the community to unite and come together, and it gives thousands of young locals something special to aim for and be part of…”

 

“The health, fitness and education services provided by Panthers enables many of Penrith’s elite young athletes achieve their potential.  Many go on to represent their state and country and fill coaching, training, medical and management roles throughout the country…”

 

“The Junior Rugby League direct, manage and administer the largest junior league competition in Australia… the people that support them benefit from participating in the competitions and skills development courses…”

 

“ARL Development aims to develop the grass roots of the sport from introductory level up to age 18.  Working within the pre-existing development framework established by Clubs, it accomplishes its goals through a number of in and out of school programs such as the Joey League, a 6 weeks in schools round robin for 9 to 10 year olds, and the Telstra Kids to Kangaroos Coaching Clinics.

 

“The ‘Panthers on the Prowl Community Development Foundation’ works in conjunction with the Department of Education and Training to address issues such as obesity, nutrition, non-participation in sport, scholastic and behavioural problems.  Initiatives include a program to promote a healthy lifestyle…  Students identified as being at risk by DET participate in specific learning activities each afternoon in Panthers facilities; DET provides a teacher.  Individual needs are identified and worked on in a stimulating environment which includes local sporting heroes…”

 

It is pointed out by Panthers that most of these entities are not for profit organisations established to benefit the community.

 

A Development Application is required to be approved by Council for the proposed uses and fit-out.  The Stadium is Crown Land, with Council as the Trustee.  The Lands Department’s authority (as landowner) is required for the Development Application.

 

Council officers (and Panthers representatives) have held preliminary discussions with the Department about what is proposed.  The Department reminded those present, as was the case with the Stage 1 Development Application, that as the Stadium is a Crown Reserve, any new work or use proposed must be for a “community benefit”.

 

This matter was addressed (by Panthers – the proponent) in the following ways.  Housing the proposed activities at the Stadium was felt to enhance the “community benefit” by:

 

·        Strengthening the Stadium as a local identity-providing centre

·        Competitive teams in high-profile sports unite communities – this has been seen locally with the success of the Panthers NRL team

·        An enlivened Stadium with activity almost ‘all year round’

·        Broadens the range of uses at the Stadium – sport, education, community services etc

·        Build on the success of Panthers by establishing a ‘place of excellence’ in sport, health, fitness etc

·        Improved competitiveness of the NRL side by keeping team together fulltime on and off field

 

There was general ‘in principle’ support indicated by the Department’s representatives.  They felt that the ‘spirit’ of the legislation that applies to Crown Reserves was met.

 

A formal submission is required to now be made.  Tonight’s report is about seeking Council’s authority to make that submission which would need to signal Council’s attitude to the proposal.

 

Council officers have reviewed the submission having regard to the legislation that applies to the Stadium.  The views expressed by the Lands Department representatives are likewise shared by Council officers.

 

The other issue which is currently under consideration by Council officers is the future management arrangements for the Stadium.  Council officers are now developing an Options Paper for consideration by Council in the near future.  As advised to Council in a report earlier this year, Panthers has formally requested Council to commence negotiations for a new lease with them on the Stadium.  The current lease expires at the end of next year.  That request for the renewal of the current lease is being considered in the context of other management options.

 

If Council is of the mind to support the occupation of the Stadium for the Panthers football administration/operations, then it should be on the basis that it does not infer Council’s support for the renewal of the lease.  The future management will be dealt with as a separate and independent issue.  Panthers should be advised accordingly.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Penrith Football Stadium be received.

2.     Council support the proposal to accommodate the Panthers football administration/operations at the Penrith Football Stadium in the manner proposed by Panthers.

3.     Council officers be authorised to make application to the Lands Department seeking owners authorisation to the lodgement of the required Development Application.

4.     Panthers be advised in the terms outlined in the report.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


The City In Its Environment

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

7        Urban Sustainability Program Grants                                                                                   37

 

 



Ordinary Meeting

7 August 2006

The City in its Environment

 

 

The City in its Environment

 

 

7

Urban Sustainability Program Grants   

 

Compiled by:                Janet Rannard, Bushland Management Officer; Ross Kingsley, Corporate Development Manager

Authorised by:             Raphael Collins, Parks Construction & Maintenance Manager 

Strategic Program Term Achievement: The City’s biological diversity is being protected and conserved through the implementation of a biodiversity conservation and bushland management strategy.

Critical Action: Integrate biodiversity conservation and natural resource management.

     

Purpose:

To advise Council of additional information to the report presented to the Ordinary Meeting of 17 July 2006 regarding the Urban Sustainability Program, a NSW Government fund provided through the Environmental Trust.  The report recommends that the program alliance between Council and Blue Mountains City Council for the project outlined be endorsed.

 

Background

The Premier announced the NSW City and Country Environment Restoration Program in November 2005. It is administered by the NSW Environment Trust. In May 2006, the Trust announced the Urban Sustainability Program as part of that overarching program funding.

 

The Urban Sustainability Program has a fund of $439 million over 5 years drawn from the Domestic Waste Levy. Given this funding source, it is seen as an opportunity to which local government should maximise access.

 

The programs aim it to:

Facilitate projects of significant environmental benefit to NSW, delivered by local government organisations in partnership with other government agencies, local businesses, community organisations and householders. Through these projects, the Program also aims to improve the capacity of communities and organisations to protect, restore and enhance the sustainability of our urban environment.

 

The grant category Major Project funding is available to councils to implement sustainability strategies in partnership with other government agencies, local businesses, community organisations and householders.

 

Funding for major projects is available for periods of 1 to 3 years. Up to $57 million is available in the first year (commencing 2007).

 

Grants will range from $100,000 to $250,000 per annum for a single council, or $100,000 to $2 million for an alliance of councils (shared between those councils).

Grant Applications Previously Approved

Council received a report on this grants program at its Ordinary Meeting of 17 July 2006. Council endorsed the preparation of two major project applications in which Penrith would be the lead council in an alliance or (if necessary) the sole applicant.

 

These projects are:

 

Implement Ropes & South Creek Regional Open Space Management Plan

Now confirmed as an alliance with Blacktown City Council and other partners including Greening Australia, the Department of Planning and Hawkesbury-Nepean Catchment Management Authority.

 

Sustainable Playing Fields for Western Sydney

Now confirmed as an alliance with Camden and Auburn Councils as well as Lachlan Shire (to be part of the alliance without financial commitment) and other partners including WSROC, UWS and Sydney Water.

 

Further Alliance Opportunity

 

Subsequent to the previous report to Council, Blue Mountains City Council (BMCC) invited Penrith to form an alliance for a grant application in which BMCC would be lead council.

 

The proposed project was assessed as strongly based and justified by Council’s strategy. It is of high direct public value, as well as affording a strategic alliance opportunity.

 

Given Council’s direction to management to pursue all necessary steps to secure successful applications of maximum benefit to the City from this program, the alliance opportunity with BMCC was accepted.

 

Due to the closing date for the grant program (4 August 2006) it was not possible to formally seek Council’s endorsement prior to the submission of the application for this project. 

 

Proposed Project

 

The alliance project with BMCC is for weed and erosion control of key catchment areas. This  will include four sites in the Blue Mountains with the greatest financial commitment being in the area near to the decommissioned Glenbrook Sewage Treatment Plant. Since some of Penrith City’s land below the escarpment within Leonay, Emu Heights and Emu Plains (in the Jamison Creek and Lapstone Creek catchments) has been adversely affected by urban runoff, it is highly appropriate that grant funding be provided to Penrith City Council to alleviate such impacts. Proposed works will address issues that have been highlighted in the draft Plan of Management for Jamison Creek Riparian Corridor, as well as environmental impacts on the Nepean River outflows.

 

The grant application is for the maximum of $2 million, over a period of two years. The maximum allocation to Penrith City is $400,000 over two years (subject to the Trust’s approval of the full grant sought).

 

The Trust does not require matching funding, but expects a contribution towards the project. Council can contribute substantial in kind work under planned programs to fulfil the Plans of Management noted above.

 

Conclusion

 

This further opportunity to form an alliance with Blue Mountains City Council for the purposes of the Urban Sustainability Program provides an excellent and significant opportunity to substantially advance important outcomes for the City.

 

Council’s endorsement is sought for the action taken to apply for this grant.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Urban Sustainability Program Grants be received.

2.     Council endorse the alliance with Blue Mountains City Council for the further grant application made to the Urban Sustainability Program.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


The City as an Economy

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

8        Outdoor Eating and Trading - Status Update                                                                       43

 

 



Ordinary Meeting

7 August 2006

The City as an Economy

 

 

The City as an Economy

 

 

8

Outdoor Eating and Trading - Status Update   

 

Compiled by:                Peter Blazek, Property Officer - Management

Authorised by:             Brian Griffiths, Property Development Manager

Requested By:             Councillor David Bradbury

Strategic Program Term Achievement: Policies are in place as the basis for directing private and public investments in the City Centres of Penrith and St Marys.

Critical Action: Identify Council land holdings that can be used to support economic centres and integrate agreed property developments with City Centres Review strategies.

     

Purpose:

To provide a status report on the outcomes of the implementation of the new policy for Outdoor Eating and Trading. The report identifies any need for enforcement with traders that may have encroached onto the footpath area, as well as the effect on those businesses that have had to pay for their licenses. The report recommends that the information be received.

 

Background

The policy for Outdoor Eating & Trading (O E & T), has been in place since October, 2004 in accordance with the Development Control Plan (DCP) which has been adopted within specific areas for the Penrith and St Marys CBD areas.  A Development Application (DA) is now not required in these areas as they are exempt from the DA process.  However, those areas outside the identified areas still require DA consent.

 

O E & T areas, which did not comply with the aims and standards of the DCP, will not be classified as exempt development and will require development consent.

 

A report was presented to Council at its meeting of 12 December 2005, concerning an application by a community organisation (Salvation Army Youthlink), for waiving of their payment for O E & T license fees to Council outside their leased retail premises, located adjacent to their Shop 1A, 40 Phillip Street, St Marys.

 

Council, at this meeting, approved the waiving of their O E & T license fees for the initial annual term only.

 

A further report was required at Council’s meeting on 6 February 2006, addressing the issue of other non-profit organisations making application to Council for similar subsidies for O E & T facilities where such fees apply.  It was reported to Council that similar applications were highly unlikely and would be considered on merit if any were submitted for consideration in the future.

 

Following this report, Councillor Bradbury requested a further report be submitted to Council in relation to outcomes of the implementation of the new O E & T policy as well as indicating if there had been any need for enforcement with traders that may have encroached onto the public footpath area, together with any effect that payment of license fees may have on such businesses.

 

Current Situation

 

Since the initial O E & T policy relating to exempt areas that became effective as of 24 October 2004, Council has executed fifty (50) applications for O E & T licenses within the Penrith and St Marys CBD areas.

 

In this initial twenty (20) month period, Council has experienced minor operational issues that have surfaced through implementation of this policy. However, it was a new policy and the public footpath area is an essential thoroughfare being utilised by the public.

 

As identified earlier, Council has processed fifty (50) applications for O E & T facilities within the Local Government Area and has experienced the following issues:

 

§ Those businesses that operated outside the exempt area are required to obtain DA consent before an O E & T license can be supplied to the applicant. This was a concern to some traders that were not situated within this area, because it was an extra cost of $220.00 for DA fees, and an extended length of time in having the DA processed before they could apply for the O E & T license agreement.  Further consideration of the appropriate areas for O E & T will be undertaken as part of the broader Penrith and St Marys City Centres’ Review.

 

§ Some parts of Queen Street footpath are on private land and fees for O E & T licenses to Council are not required as Council would not be responsible for leasing those areas nor applying a fee.  Other parts of footpaths in Queen Street are on public land and do require a fee for the leasing of Council’s land/footpath.  This scenario has created some anxiety with adjoining traders that must pay fees. 

 

§ Generally, in the initial stages there were concerns from the public, especially from people with disabilities, that the areas set aside on parts of public footpaths for O E & T would restrict, impede and hinder users wishing to navigate around displays, tables, chairs and barriers.  The DCP allows the outdoor dining area to only extend 1.5 metres out from the shopfront and requires the provision of a 2.0 metre wide clear pathway for pedestrians.  In cases where the footpath is wider than 3.5 metres, the location of dining areas adjacent to the kerb will be encouraged.  These concerns were also raised in regard to areas located outside parts of public footpaths in the new section of Penrith Plaza located on Riley Street, Penrith.

 

It was also raised that the public footpath area being used for O E & T would greatly diminish access by people with disabilities. The public concerns have not materialised since the opening of this O E & T area by Penrith Plaza.  A substantial amount of footpath walkways were left cleared and unimpeded for persons to satisfactorily navigate their way around them.

 

The opportunity for specifically designated outdoor dining areas is further examined through the City Centre’s Review process.

 

Traders were continually in dialogue with Council and their respective Town Centre Managements, on the intention of the DCP and the benefits this would achieve in the long term to the CBDs and their particular businesses.

 

Subsequently, as Council processed the applications for O E & T licenses to traders in Penrith and St Marys, on parts of the public footpath, it was evident that the traders were beginning to understand and accept the intentions of this DCP.

 

Payment of fees for O E & T licenses has not been a foremost issue to all traders, except the adjoining six to ten traders in Queen Street that were outside the designated DCP area, who were required to submit a separate DA to Council and pay for usage of this public land. However, the majority of traders were reasonably satisfied with the structure of the fees and benefits received from usage of the O E & T facilities relating to their business. It was also a major activity that brought more public interest to their premises and invigorated the CBD areas.

 

Council’s Rangers have confirmed there were initial compliance concerns raised by some traders in relation to implementation of the DCP, mainly through misinterpretation or misunderstanding of the compliance issues. These included portions of footpath that could be utilised, type of furniture required, type of barriers required and signage boards displayed. As licenses were processed, and more traders exposed to the DCP, they became aware and better informed on relevant compliance issues.  Rangers further confirm the current status of the O E & T facilities within the Local Government Area has been complied with and managed appropriately.

 

The Planning Policy Unit within the Local Planning Department will need to update and provide any likely amendments, in due course, to the O E & T provisions, to effectively improve the DCP.  Any further changes to the DCP will need to be included in the general review of the comprehensive DCP.

 

Summary

 

The implementation of O E & T facilities within the Local Government Area has been successfully phased in over a period of time and accepted by the majority of traders.

 

Furthermore, it is also evident that the majority of the public and organisations on behalf of people with disabilities have also embraced this concept as they can visualise the benefits this facility has over the CBD precincts.

 

Additionally, as we move into the first renewal stage of O E & T licenses, it is apparent that the traders have accepted Council’s plan and most of the initial concerns and resistance have abated.

 

 

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the information contained in the report on Outdoor Eating and Trading - Status Update be received.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


The City Supported by Infrastructure

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

9        RTA 2006/07 Road Funding Grants                                                                                   48

 

10      Tender 01-06/07: Concrete Path Paving 2006/07 in Three Separate Wards                        51

 

 



Ordinary Meeting

7 August 2006

The City Supported by Infrastructure

 

 

The City Supported by Infrastructure

 

 

9

RTA 2006/07 Road Funding Grants   

 

Compiled by:                Hans Meijer, Asset Systems Engineer

Authorised by:             David Burns, Asset Manager 

Strategic Program Term Achievement: An asset management strategy is in operation for civil infrastructure that optimises its use and maintains it to agreed standards fit for its contemporary purpose.

Critical Action: An Asset Management Strategy for Civil Assets is developed, maintained and implemented.

     

Purpose:

To advise Council of the RTA 2006/07 Road Funding Grants.   The report recommends that Council accept the grants.

 

Background

The Roads and Traffic Authority provides various Road Funding Grants to Councils each year to assist with the maintenance of regional roads, road safety and traffic related issues.  Advice has been received from the RTA of the following grants for 2006/2007.

 

1.   Regional Roads

 

The Regional Road Block Grant is made up of the following components:

 

       Road Component: Allocated to maintenance work on regional roads.

 

       Ex 3 x 3 Component:    The 3 x 3 Council Determined Program ceased in

1999/2000, however the State Government gave a commitment to supply an

equivalent level of funding to that received under the programme in 1999/2000.

This is a continuation of that programme. The Ex 3 x 3 component is available

for road work as determined by Council on regional roads. In 2005/06, this

component was allocated to the Rural Roads Widening Programme for the staged

widening of Luddenham Rd, a 600m section south from South Creek (0.67km to

1.27km south of Mamre Road).

 

       Traffic Facilities Component: For the installation and maintenance of regulatory

signs and lines on local and regional roads.

 

Council can access a 50% contribution for specific works under the REPAIR Program.  Penrith City Council’s allocation under this program in recent years has been as follows:

 

·    2005/2006:     $250,000

·    2004/2005:     $250,000

·    2003/2004:     $250,000

·    2002/2003:     $250,000

·    2001/2002:     $250,000

·    2000/2001:     $244,500

·    1999/2000:     $249,000

 

It should be noted that the maximum grant available to a Council under this program is $250,000.

 

The REPAIR Program Funding is allocated annually to the Road Reconstruction Program from which Council allocates its required 50% contribution to match the RTA grants.  Roads reconstructed utilising the REPAIR Program funding include Coreen Avenue, St Marys Road and Glossop Street.

 

The RTA advises that the following 2006/07 Program Funding is available to Council:

 

Regional Roads

2006/07

Basis of Grant

Block Grant - Road Component

$373,000

100%

Block Grant - Ex 3 x 3 Component

$156,000

100%

Block Grant - Traffic Facilities Component

$346,000

100%

Total Allocation to Penrith City Council

$875,000

 

The Ex 3 x 3 component of the Block Grant has been allocated to the next stage of upgrading

Luddenham Rd, a 400m section south of South Creek (1.27km to 1.67km south of Mamre

Road).

 

The RTA has advised that Council has been successful in achieving the maximum amount of $250,000 in the 2006/2007 REPAIR Program for the reconstruction of Forrester Road, St Marys between Glossop Street and Catalina Street.  The total cost of the project is estimated at approximately $652,000.  The balance of the project costs ($402,000) are included in the 2006/2007 Road Reconstruction Program.

 

2.   Road Safety

 

The RTA has advised that Council will be offered $39,000 in 2006/2007 to partially fund the position of Road Safety Coordinator.  The funding is not guaranteed to be ongoing, however Council is currently negotiating with the RTA to extend the partial funding of this position to 2010.

 

3.   Traffic Management

 

Penrith City Council has been advised that a grant of $85,000 is available towards the installation of traffic signals on Dunheved Road at Greenbank Drive (west), Werrington Downs.  The total estimated project cost is $335,000 and includes pavement works at the intersection.  The remaining funding required for the project is available through the use of funds within the annual road resurfacing program ($160,000) and the Regional Road Block Grant ($90,000), referred to above.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on RTA 2006/07 Road Funding Grants be received.

2.     The RTA 2006/07 Program Funding Block Grant in the amount of $875,000 be accepted.

3.     The Ex 3 x 3 component in the amount of $156,000 be allocated to the next stage of the upgrading of Luddenham Road, a 400m section South from South Creek.

4.     Council accept the grant of $250,000 offered under the 2006/2007 Roads and Traffic Authority REPAIR Program for the reconstruction of Forrester Road, St Marys between Glossop Street and Catalina Street.

5.     The Common Seal of the Council of the City of Penrith be affixed to the

“Agreement for Block Grant Assistance to Council for Regional Roads 2006/2007”.

6.     Council accept the grant of $39,000 offered under the Road Safety Program to partially fund the position of Road Safety Co-ordinator.

7.     Council accept the grant of $85,000 offered toward the installation of traffic signals at the intersection of Dunheved Road and Greenbank Drive (west), Werrington Downs.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Ordinary Meeting

7 August 2006

The City Supported by Infrastructure

 

 

The City Supported by Infrastructure

 

 

10

Tender 01-06/07: Concrete Path Paving 2006/07 in Three Separate Wards   

 

Compiled by:                Siva Sivakumar, Project Engineer

Authorised by:             David Burns, Asset Manager 

Strategic Program Term Achievement: A plan is being implemented for bus shelters, cycleways and footpath networks having regard for the access, health and recreational needs of the community.

Critical Action: Develop and implement footpath, cycleway and bus shelter programs, incorporating recommendations from the PLAN Study and identify the recurrent maintenance costs and funding sources.

     

Purpose:

To report to Council on the Tender for the construction of path paving in three separate Wards for the 2006/07 financial year.  The report recommends that the tender from Statewide Civil Pty Ltd be accepted to carry out the footpath works in East Ward, that the tender from N A Zappacosta Pty Ltd be accepted to construct footpaths in North Ward and that the tender from Devries Concreting and Excavations be accepted to construct footpaths in South Ward.

 

Background

Tenders were called for the construction of concrete path paving on Council’s 2006/2007 Works Construction Program in three separate Wards.

 

A compulsory pre-tender meeting was held on Wednesday 28 June 2006 to ensure the tenderers were fully aware of the contractual requirements.

 

A performance criteria has been included to ensure the budget allocation is spent by the end of the 2006/2007 financial year.  The contractor will have to complete sixty percent of his allocated program by 30 November 2006, ninety percent by 31 March 2007, and the whole program by 30 June 2007.  Works that cannot be completed by the performance deadlines will be given to other contractors.

 

The tenders were called for a substantial proportion of the program, with the balance to provide skills based training for Council staff and to fill gaps in the Works Program between projects and other items such as service adjustments.

 

Current Situation

 

Twelve (12) tenders were received at the close of tender 3:00pm on 12 July 2006, and one (1) late tender from Mansour Civil Contracting Pty Ltd.  This late tender has not been given any further consideration and the tenderer has been advised of the status of his tender.

 

The tender is a Schedule of Rates Contract to supply all plant, labour and material, etc to complete the following items.

·    75mm thick unreinforced concrete paths

·    100mm thick concrete paths reinforced with F72 mesh

·    extra over for excavation deeper than 150mm below natural surface level

·    pram/perambulator ramps

·    125mm thick paths reinforced with F72 mesh (through reserves)

·    hourly rate for labour

·    3 metre wide 125mm thick concrete paths with F72 mesh

·    utility service locations using a Telstra accredited cable locator

·    “Potholing” - actual Telstra service location using a non-destructive digging machine.  Used only for location of Telstra’s optical fibre cables or shallow major copper cables.

 

Indicative provisional quantities were shown against each item to allow a Total Contract Price to be determined and to enable a fair comparison of the tenders.

 

The table below shows the extended totals from the indicative quantities for all the tenders received by the closing time.  All amounts are GST exclusive.  The lowest tender for each Ward is shaded.

 

TENDERERS

NORTH

WARD

SOUTH

WARD

EAST

WARD

Statewide Civil Pty Ltd

$324,309.00

$353,646.00

$318,994.00

N A Zappacosta Pty Ltd

$336,140.00

$354,540.00

$328,380.00

Devries Concreting & Excavations

$337,860.50

$366,683.50

$330,273.00

Danste Pty Ltd

$352,303.00

$367,387.00

$342,353.00

Westcut Concreting & Excavation Pty Ltd

$352,220.00

$376,600.00

$347,510.00

G P Concreting Australia Pty Ltd

$401,750.00

$428,430.00

$401,750.00

AMP Concrete Pty Ltd

$412,285.00

$441,265.00

$412,285.00

Sydney Civil Pty Ltd

$418,390.00

$441,265.00

$418,390.00

Cav Homes Pty Ltd

$427,495.00

$457,395.00

$427,495.00

Nepean Concrete Industries Pty Limited

n.a

n.a

$428,525.00

Kingston Civil Constructions

$506,385.00

$539,505.00

$506,385.00

Consult Concreting Pty Ltd

$515,600.00

$547,800.00

$515,600.00

 

 

NORTH WARD

 

Statewide Civil Pty Ltd had the lowest tender total price of $324,309.00 for North Ward. 
N A Zappacosta Pty Ltd had the second lowest tender price of $336,140.00 and Devries Concreting and Excavations had the third lowest tender price of $337,860.50.

 

 

 

SOUTH WARD

 

Statewide Civil Pty Ltd had the lowest tender total price of $353,646.00 for South Ward. 
N A Zappacosta Pty Ltd had the second lowest tender price of $354,540.00 and Devries Concreting and Excavations had the third lowest tender price of $366,683.5.50.

 

EAST WARD

 

Statewide Civil Pty Ltd had the lowest tender total price of $318,994.00 for East Ward. 
N A Zappacosta Pty Ltd had the second lowest tender price of $328,380.00 and Devries Concreting and Excavations had the third lowest tender price of $330,273.00.

 

Tender Assessment

 

The three lowest tenderers were interviewed and assessed against the selection criteria being tender price, past performance, availability, and suitability to carry out this type of work.  An examination of the tenders offered by the other companies indicated that there was no real advantage to Council in considering these tenders any further.

 

Statewide Civil Pty Ltd

 

Statewide Civil Pty Ltd has not previously worked for Council.  The tendered prices for all three Wards were lower than the second and third tenderers who had worked for Council in previous years.  The past performance has been checked with other councils where similar type of works have been completed recently by this company.  Councils have been satisfied with Statewide Civil Pty Ltd in relation to its quality of work, meeting program deadlines, and compliance with safety and environmental requirements.

 

However, during the interview to clarify their understanding of the contractual requirements, Statewide Civil was asked to confirm the availability of resources to meet the performance deadlines of the works in all three Wards.  Considering the extent of the work in all three Wards and their current commitments, the tenderer has expressed willingness to accept the works only in one Ward, preferably the East Ward.

 

N A Zappacosta Pty Ltd was awarded contracts in the previous years to carry out the concrete footpath or similar works, and proven satisfactory.  During the interview, Zappacosta indicated their willingness to carry out works in one Ward only.

 

Devries Concreting and Excavations is the third lowest tenderer for all three Wards, and has carried out similar work for Council over several years and proven satisfactory.  This company has been recommended to carry out the works in one Ward due to the lowest two tenderers’ preference for work in one Ward only.

 

Capacity to Complete Program

 

The allocated budget for footpaving in the 2006/2007 Works Construction Program is $750,000, or $250,000 per Ward.  It is expected that additional footpath projects from Parks, Voted Works, Section 94 contributions and bicycle programs will also become available in the current financial year.

 

A comparison of Council’s 2006/2007 Footpath Program using the tendered rates has proven that the Council approved Footpath Program can be completed within the budget.

 

Due to the footpath program’s size, and length of contract period, and completion difficulties that may arise in the event of a contractor not being able to complete the contract, it is recommended that a contractor be given only one Ward with any additional work being offered to the lowest tenderer who is available to complete the work within the contract period.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Tender 01-06/07: Concrete Path Paving 2006/07 in Three Separate Wards be received.

2.     The Schedule of Rates Tender from Statewide Civil Pty Ltd be accepted to carry out the footpath works in the East Ward 2006/2007 Footpaving Program.

3.     The Schedule of Rates Tender from N A Zappacosta Pty Ltd be accepted to carry out the footpath works in the North Ward 2006/2007 Footpaving Program.

4.     The Schedule of Rates Tender from Devries Concreting and Excavations be accepted to carry out the footpath works in the South Ward 2006/2007 Footpaving Program.

5.     In the event of a tenderer not being able to complete work in the allocated Ward by the end of the tender performance deadlines, the work be offered to the cheapest available tenderer as listed in the report.

6.     Any additional work from other programs be offered to the cheapest available tenderer as listed in the report.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


Leadership and Organisation

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

11      2006 Local Government Association NSW Conference Motions                                        58

 

12      Disclosure of Election Funding                                                                                            68

 

13      Activities of Grants Support Officer - 10 October 2005 to 30 June 2006                            69

 

14      Council Property - Lot 1033, D.P. 849297, High Street, Penrith - Electricity Easements at Joan Sutherland Performing Arts Centre                                                                                      76

 

15      Council Property - Easement to Drain Water over Lot 75, D.P. 28707, No. 37 Elizabeth Crescent, Kingswood.  Owner:  Penrith City Council;  Applicant:  John Nichols                                  79

 

16      Local Government Exchange and Co-operation Seminar 2006                                            82

 

17      Council Property  -  Lot 202, D.P. 700947, Lenore Drive, Erskine Park Dedication as Road.  Owner:  Penrith City Council.  Applicant:  Penrith City Council                                                         84

 

 



Ordinary Meeting

7 August 2006

Leadership and Organisation

 

 

Leadership and Organisation

 

 

11

2006 Local Government Association NSW Conference Motions   

 

Compiled by:                Cristy Stevens, Acting Executive Services Officer

Authorised by:             Glenn McCarthy, Executive Officer 

Strategic Program Term Achievement: Council has reviewed its own role and operations and has adopted contemporary practices to best discharge its charter.

Critical Action: Review current structures and procedures supporting Council and Councillors responsibilities.

     

Purpose:

To submit for Council's consideration, motions for the 2006 Local Government Association New South Wales Conference.  The report recommends that the motions, as detailed, be submitted to the upcoming Conference.

 

Background

The Local Government Association of NSW (LGA) will be holding its annual policy-making Conference in Leura from 29 October to 1 November 2006.  The theme of the Conference will be “Community: A Sense of Place”.  Council is entitled to submit motions for consideration at the Conference.  Motions submitted should seek to alter existing policy through the addition or deletion of elements, or to introduce new policy.

Current Situation

Council’s voting delegates were determined at the Ordinary Meeting held on 15 May 2006 to be Councillors Kaylene Allison, Susan Page, Karen McKeown, Kevin Crameri, Greg Davies, Jackie Greenow and Mark Davies. Councillor Kevin Crameri has advised that, due to work commitments, he will be unable to attend the Conference. Councillors Lexie Cettolin, Jim Aitken, Steve Simat, Pat Sheehy and Garry Rumble will be attending the Conference as observers and it would be appropriate for Council to formally determine that one of these Councillors be its voting delegate to replace Councillor Crameri.

Motions to Conference

The following have been identified either by Council or by the Managers responsible for various tasks under Council’s Management Plan as possible issues for which motions can be framed for debate at the Conference.

Motion 1

That the Local Government Association make representations to the Attorney General of New South Wales to alter the Standard Time Act 1987, to have the definition of “summer time period” mean: a period starting at 2:00am on the first Sunday in October in each year and ending at 2:00am on the last Sunday in the following March.

Note from Council:

The alteration of the Standard Time Act 1987 to have the definition of “summer time period” changed to that stated above would mean that the commencement of daylight saving would take place on the first Sunday in October, rather than the last, which is presently the case.

Detailed Supporting Case:

Daylight saving operated nationally during World War I from 1 January 1917 to 25 March 1917, and during World War II for three summers, beginning on 1 January 1942.

 

Daylight saving was introduced again in New South Wales on 31 October 1971 after the Standard Time Act 1971 was passed by State Parliament.

 

A referendum held on 1 May 1976 submitted a proposal that daylight saving be adopted on a permanent basis.  Electors voted at a ratio of 13:6 in favour of the proposal.

 

The regulation of daylight saving is a State Government responsibility that rests with the Attorney General’s Department, and in New South Wales, the Standard Time Act 1987 governs standard time and daylight saving.  Changes to the period of daylight saving may be made by regulation.

 

Daylight saving currently begins at 2:00am Eastern Standard Time on the last Sunday in October and ends at 3:00am summer time on the last Sunday in March.

 

Parliament has in the past legislated to make changes to daylight saving periods to coincide with events of national significance.  Daylight saving was successfully brought forward by two months in 2000 to coincide with the staging of the Olympic Games in Sydney.  More recently, daylight saving has been extended by one week in 2006 to coincide with the Commonwealth Games in Melbourne.  Daylight saving in the 2006/2007 summer will revert to the standard period.

 

Arguments in favour of the extension of daylight saving include increased leisure time, energy savings and reduced road tolls.  There are also benefits to local traders as shops, bars and outdoor cafes which would experience increased trade.

 

The Council of Australian Governments’ Meeting held on 14 July 2006 noted that New South Wales, Victoria, South Australia, Tasmania and the Australian Capital Territory will consider synchronising the start and end dates for Daylight Saving time.

 

The state of Tasmania has recognised the benefit of increasing daylight saving, and currently commences daylight saving each year on the first Sunday in October.

Motion 2

That the Local Government Association lobby the State and Commonwealth governments to provide a simple and cost effective framework to enable and encourage investment in Council issued infrastructure bonds.

Note from Council:

All local governments are experiencing increasing community expectations with regard to maintaining and improving civil infrastructure. To remedy this there may be an opportunity to source funds for this purpose through Council issued infrastructure bonds.  Initial investigations however indicate that the legal and regulatory costs of issuing bonds may be prohibitive and a simpler and more effective mechanism would assist in accessing this alternative funding source.

Detailed Supporting Case:

To finance the cost of maintaining and improving civil infrastructure Penrith City Council is exploring funding opportunities in the Australian debt capital markets as an alternative to traditional debt markets. Issuing infrastructure bonds is seen as an opportunity for the local community to invest directly in their local area.  Initial investigations however indicate that the legal and regulatory costs of issuing bonds, particularly retail bonds to “mum and dad” investors, may be prohibitive. 

 

Is it suggested that some consideration be given to the potential role of these infrastructure bonds in local government.  Issues that could be considered include the possibility of implementing a simpler mechanism for utilising this investor source and to have bonds issued by councils for capital and infrastructure structured in such a way that they are tax effective to the investor.  This may be particularly attractive to Superannuation Funds. 

Motion 3

That the Local Government Association request the Minister for Emergency Services to require a full review of the Rural Fires Act and financial systems associated with the funding of Local Rural Fire Brigades and reimbursement of associated costs to Local Government.

Note from Council:

Whilst there have been several amendments and additional Sections provided to the Rural Fires Act, it (the Act) was developed in 1997, prior to considerable changes in the structure of the NSW Rural Fire Service.

 

Whilst Local Government is a significant supporter of the NSW Rural Fire Service the conflicts caused by outdated practices that either relate specifically to the Act, or from issues relating  to a mismatch of Rural Fire Service, Local Government requirements e.g. budgeting / financial and insurance arrangements must be addressed.

Detailed Supporting Case:

The Rural Fires Act 1997 was introduced after considerable consultation, in an environment where Fire Control Officers were employed by Local Government, and volunteers reported to the Fire Control Officer. This is no longer the case.

 

Whilst the development of a Service Level Agreement between the Local Councils has clarified responsibilities of each organisation the issues of insurance of vehicles and conflicts between the budgetary processes of both organisations remain significant matters that need to be addressed.

 

Local Councils are required to provide care and control of equipment purchased under the Fire Fighting Fund, including vehicles, and therefore an implied responsibility to insure those items. Whilst vehicles are maintained by Councils, they are driven by NSWRFS employees and volunteers whom Council has little or no control over e.g.  for training, operations and day to day administration; the vehicles may travel out of area at any time without the knowledge of the Council; or be used by members of other districts without the knowledge of council; modifications to vehicles by NSWRFS employees and volunteers may occur without Council knowledge affecting vehicle warrantees and insurances .

 

Whilst brigade stations are generally owned by Councils they are occupied by volunteers of the NSWRFS, who effectively have care, custody and control of those buildings. Brigade members may and often need to modify their site accommodation to facilitate the storage of equipment and suit operational purposes.

 

In such circumstances it is difficult to argue that Councils actually have care and control of buildings and vehicles utilised by the NSWRFS, and all liabilities arising from the use of those assets should be placed on the users.

 

The processes involved in reconciling budgets, purchase and supply of equipment and re imbursement of expenditure between the Rural Fire Service and Local Councils is convoluted and outdated. A full review of these processes is required to provide a more streamlined approach.

 

The Rural Fire Services system for the reimbursement of Local Purchase items not aligning with financial years budgets, re-imbursement of a portion of Council costs to maintain the Local Rural Fire Brigades being provided in arrears causing Councils to carry these costs for excessive periods of time, inclusion of state program charges in re-imbursable items claims thereby causing Local Government to pay 13.3% of these costs.

Motion 4

That the Local Government Association request the Department of Local Government to review the registration fee for Dangerous dogs, restricted breeds and cross Pitt Bull breeds.

Note from Council:

There have been numerous amendments and additions to the Companion Animal Act 1997 regarding the control requirements for Dangerous and Restricted breeds of dogs. Councils are required to ensure compliance by the owners of these breeds, heavily impacting on available resources. Consideration should be made to increase the registration fee for dogs of restricted breeds or declared dangerous to help cover the cost of inspection of properties to ensure that the control requirements are being adhered to.

Detailed Supporting Case:

The Companion Animals Act has been amended to provide additional requirements to control Restricted Breeds and Dangerous dogs.

 

The number of dogs declared as restricted breeds has sharply increased with the introduction of new legislation which requires that cross Pit Bull breeds be declared as restricted Dogs.

Control orders are issued to owners of Restricted Breeds and Dangerous Dogs and require the owners to build appropriate child proof enclosures, provide appropriate signage, and generally comply with other requirements as stated in the Companion Animal Act. Councils officer are required to return to a property to provide initial inspections of the subject properties, and often spend considerable time with the animal owners to ensure compliance.

Annual re inspections are required to be provided on an annual basis to ensure ongoing compliance.

 

The once off registration fee provides for the registration of animals at 6 months of age. A proportion of this fee is returned to Local Councils to offset some of the costs involved in maintaining its companion animal programs.

 

Owners of Restricted Breeds and Dangerous Dogs do so at their choice. The general community should not be required to fund the additional expenditure incurred by Local Councils to ensure the requirements of the Companion Animals Acts are being adhered to in these specific circumstances. A higher registration fee for Restricted Breeds, and an additional "top up' registration fee for dogs once they are declared dangerous should be introduced.

Motion 5

That the Local Government Association lobby the NSW State Minister for Community Services to support the establishment of a joint consultative process between Commonwealth, State and Local Governments to review and re-develop policies and programmes in order to establish at a National level a consistent and comprehensive approach to the provision of early childhood services across all States that provides all families and their children with access to beneficial learning and care environment

Note from Council:

Issues associated with the funding of early childhood services (long day care, occasional care, preschools and family day care) and out of school hours services have been well articulated at successive The Local Government Association Conferences. The complexity and multiplicity of Commonwealth and State funding and policies relating to Early Childhood  Services significantly contributes to the inequities relating to access to services that is experienced by families 

 

Whilst recent changes have been introduced by Commonwealth and  NSW State Governments these  measures are not resolving the increasing concerns  related to early  childhood services. Children’s access to services is dependent upon where they live, the families income or social status, or whether or not  their parents are in the paid workforce. Until the differences in approaches by each State are resolved, and until a National strategy is in place to provide one approach to early childhood care and education children cannot be guaranteed equitable access to effective early childhood environments that research informs us contribute to better outcomes for children.

 

There is an increasing amount of evidence that points to the early intervention required to reverse the poor physical and mental health, education and employment outcomes for children within vulnerable families and in the disadvantaged sectors of the community, which result in increasing social and financial costs to the community and to Government. A national and universal approach to the provision of Early Childhood services across all States is cost effective for the country and access to these services should be the right of every child. 

Detailed Supporting Case:

Current concerns with the provision of Early Childhood Services

 

·        the lack of effective planning instruments involving stakeholders to determine how best to provide a range of early childhood services and OOSH  services in communities where there are identified areas of need

·        the inequity of Commonwealth and State operational funding across the country to children’s services

·        the failure of funding and child care benefit to keep pace with rising costs

·        the inequities and inadequacies of funding for the inclusion of children with additional needs

·        the  inadequacy of funding for ongoing programs to overcome barriers for families  of ATSI and CALD backgrounds and for children with disabilities and  those with challenging behaviours regardless of the  early  childhood service type attended

·        the inequities between Commonwealth and State funding for fee relief in early childhood services and  OOSH services

·        the dilemmas that result from short term funding for programmes to build the capacity of services and families

 

These inequities result in:

 

·        the downgrading of staff levels and the qualifications essential to achieve developmental and learning  outcomes for children.

·        the  impact on the  quality  of programmes of the shortage of degree level early childhood teachers

·        deterioration of facilities and increasing risks of potential breaches of licensing regulations

·        unaffordable fees reducing access to services particularly for children in disadvantaged groups in the community or from specific demographic groups such as parents with one parent not in the paid workforce.

·        insufficient and inadequately qualified and experienced staff to support the inclusion of children with additional needs

·        in Penrith an oversupply of places for 3-5 year old children, an undersupply of places for 0-2 year olds and an erratic supply of OOSH places.  In other areas, both City , Regional and Rural there equally be an undersupply of all types of places 

·        unproductive competition between Commonwealth and  State funded services

·        financially unviable services

·        disjointed support services for families through children’s centres

 

 

Children’s Services policy should be based on the premise that experiences in early childhood are a fundamental influence on outcomes for children in later life. Therefore a range of appropriate and optimum environments must be designed enabling equitable access for all children in Australia regardless of the State in which they reside.

 

The delivery of those experiences can build upon existing facilities and systems with a National Planning Framework that provides incentives to deliver services in areas of identified need. Involving Local Government in a National Planning Forum will assist in identifying co-operative approaches to resolve current issues of supply.

 

Removing current barriers to effective early childhood service provision

 Essential to the success of any future model is a co-operative and consultative process involving Commonwealth, State and Local Governments to work with providers of Early Childhood Services on agreed approaches that will address the current dilemmas evident in areas of over supply and under supply, that will ensure the consistent and ongoing provision of financially viable services that deliver effective early childhood service environments that will contribute to better outcomes for children.

 

Future models must address barriers that prevent access to services, particularly where affirmative action is required to reverse the poor physical and mental health, education and employment outcomes predictable for children within vulnerable families and in the disadvantage sectors of the community, as is evidenced in contemporary research.

 

Factors that must also be addressed include affordability; consistent and appropriate standards and regulations across the States; simplified funding models between Commonwealth and State Governments and the availability of tertiary trained professionals (at degree and diploma levels) in the delivery of programmes to children and families in all early childhood service environments.

 

Until the differentiation between preschools and long day care is removed there will always be a two tier system that works against the development of an economically viable and holistic approach to providing optimum early childhood environments for children. This one differentiation is a determinant of whether a child will have access to the benefits of appropriate early childhood environments and supplementary services or not.  The definitions of care versus education cannot be the determining factor for developing effective early childhood service environments. Neither can the status of parental workforce participation. Neither should a family’s cultural background or socio-economic background

 

A simple universal approach can be devised to meet the needs of children of all ages through the establishment of a single model of centre based early childhood service. Access to this service can be determined by various criteria met by families, such as guaranteed access to a minimum numbers of hours attendance that is considered beneficial for all children.  Levels of access can be increased where families have particular needs such as being in the paid workforce, needing respite care or children needing increased exposure to planned early childhood learning environments.

 

Targeted and funded supplementary services and programmes can address specific age or developmental requirements such as transition to school and support for specific cultural or ability requirements, within any individual early childhood service.

 

Until decisions around early childhood services are based on what is appropriate for children rather than which level of government is responsible for education, work place participation, disability services and social welfare programmes, there will not be an effective investment in children in Australia. 

 

A proposed model as a basis for discussion

There is potential to use existing and future physical infrastructure (such as existing long day care, preschools, OOSH and occasional care centres) that are currently providing services to provide the facilities that can offer early childhood service environments that provide for the care and education of young children. This removes the complications that are artificially created by having two models of early childhood services, namely preschools and long day care. It is not appropriate to separate the principles of care and education. Neither can be achieved without the other.  A single model of an early childhood service with appropriately trained staff can deliver the care and education children need.

 

National, State and Local governments should work together to build on existing services, programmes and funding models to develop and implement:

 

·        a planning framework in conjunction with State and Local governments to release funding for services meeting identified needs based on specified criteria

·        one system of service provision across Australia

·        one universal system of fee relief

·        one universal system that recognizes and resources the additional support requirements in services for children with additional needs

·        one universal system of funding for family support within children’s centres

·        a national incentive programme to increase levels of tertiary trained (degree and diploma) staff for centres

·        programmes to provide local level responses to unique local issues

·        a co-ordinated approach between inter-departments and interagencies (government and non-government) to respond to local issues

·        planning  instruments at Local Government level to  support service provision within Local Government areas

 

The recommendation is that joint consultations take place between Commonwealth, State and Local governments to review and develop policies designed to provide on a consistent and comprehensive approach in every State to the provision of Early Childhood Services that provide all families and their children with access to beneficial learning and care environments.

Motion 6

That the Local Government Association lobby the Hon. Reba Meagher, Minister for Community Services, to make representations to the Premier and Deputy Premier to increase the funds available for the provision of core community and youth development social services under the NSW Area Assistance Scheme.  In particular, that the NSW Government increase the amount of funds available for recurrent services under the "pick-up" mechanism that is available under the Area Assistance Scheme administered by the Department of Community Services.

Note from Council:

The Western Sydney Area Assistance Scheme was introduced in the early 1980s by the NSW Government in recognition of the need of areas experiencing rapid population growth for additional social services and programs.  The Area Assistance Scheme soon expanded to other growth areas in NSW including the Illawarra, Hunter, Macarthur and North Coast.

 

With the projected increases in population in Western Sydney and other major growth areas in NSW it is important that these communities have access to local community and youth development services and initiatives that can assist community capacity building and resilience.

 

For a number of years now the number of WSAAS projects that are "picked-up" for recurrent funding in any one year across Western Sydney (eleven LGAS) has been significantly restricted.  This places increasing stress on existing services to meet the social needs of larger population catchments.

Detailed Supporting Case:

In the 2005 WSAAS funding round there was only $100,000 available in "pick-up" funds for new projects across the Western Sydney region.  Additional funding for the Area Assistance Scheme, in particular for recurrent "pick-up" projects, is needed to enable core local community and youth development services to develop community capacity and social capital in major population growth areas. 

 

Governments generally have accepted a principle that new greenfields housing estates must pay for the necessary physical infrastructure that is required to support a new community, including community facilities.  The State Government needs to ensure the core social needs of these new communities are also met.

Motion 7

That the Local Government Association lobby the Premier the Hon. Morris Iemma, the Minister for Ageing and Disability, the Hon. John Della Bosca, the Minister for Community Services, the Hon. Reba Meagher, and the Minister for Health, the Hon. John Hatzistergos to address the issue of the NSW Government financially contributing to the accommodation costs of social and community services that are also funded by the State Government, and often housed in Council facilities including neighbourhood and youth centres.

Note from Council:

A large number of community and social service organisations are housed in Council buildings - in Penrith City Centre, St. Marys Town Centre as well as in Council Neighbourhood and Youth Centres.

 

The majority of these organisations and services are funded by the State Government to deliver social services to residents of Penrith City as well as surrounding Local Government Areas.  This situation is not unique to Penrith City and certainly, to varying degrees, is the case in many parts of NSW.

 

Councils are generally willing to contribute to the capital costs of provision of accommodation as well as some operational costs.  However the State Government also has an obligation to adequately fund the services they contract the non-government sector to provide - this includes financial contributions towards suitable accommodation.

Detailed Supporting Case:

Penrith Council provides over 8,000 square metres of floor space for community organisations and social services in the Penrith City Centre and St. Marys Town Centre.

 

Council provides additional accommodation for local community development and youth services in suburban neighbourhood and youth centres.

 

Many Councils across NSW also, to varying degrees, provide accommodation for social services funded by the State Government.

 

These organisations and services are funded by a range of State and Federal government agencies.  In particular the NSW Department of Community Services, Ageing and Disability, and Health fund the majority of the social services housed in Penrith Council buildings.

 

In a very small number of cases these organisations and services are provided with a rent component in their funding.  These rent components are not adequate to lease suitable office and associated service delivery floor space.  In this context the responsibility to contribute to the capital and operational costs of housing these services must be a partnership between Local and State Government.

 

This issue is one of relevance and importance to Councils and communities across NSW.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on 2006 Local Government Association NSW Conference Motions be received

2.     Council determine its voting delegate to replace Councillor Kevin Crameri

3.     The seven (7) motions detailed in the report be submitted for inclusion in the 2006 Local Government Association NSW Conference Business Paper.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Ordinary Meeting

7 August 2006

Leadership and Organisation

 

 

Leadership and Organisation

 

 

12

Disclosure of Election Funding   

 

Compiled by:                Glenn McCarthy, Executive Officer

Authorised by:             Glenn McCarthy, Executive Officer 

Strategic Program Term Achievement: The organisation is managing its statutory requirements and the needs of a participatory community in a transparent and balanced way.

Critical Action: Communicate and promote Council policies, services and activities to the community and the City's organisations.

     

Purpose:

To provide Council with information regarding the disclosure of election funding for candidates in the 2004 Local Government Elections. The report recommends that the information be received.

 

Background

Under the provisions of the Electoral Funding Act, candidates for the 2004 Local Government Elections were required to submit to the Electoral Funding Authority (the Authority) information regarding political contributions received and electoral expenditure incurred. At the time of the last report to Council on 16 May 2005, one (1) unsuccessful candidate had failed to submit a return.

Current Situation

The outstanding summary declaration has been provided to Council by the Authority for placement on the public record as required by Section 12(1) of the Local Government Act.

 

The declaration will be maintained in a register which will be available for inspection by the public during office hours.

 

In providing this information, the Authority has requested that the receipt of the declaration be brought to the attention of Council.

 

As indicated above, all candidates have now submitted the required returns.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the information contained in the report on Disclosure of Election Funding be received.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Ordinary Meeting

7 August 2006

Leadership and Organisation

 

 

Leadership and Organisation

 

 

13

Activities of Grants Support Officer - 10 October 2005 to 30 June 2006   

 

Compiled by:                Ray Richardson, Grants Support Officer

Authorised by:             Vicki O’Kelly, Financial Services Manager 

Strategic Program Term Achievement: Council provides adequate resources to deliver its program and has introduced measures to increase its capacity.

Critical Action: Maximise funding opportunities to deliver Council’s program.

     

Purpose:

To update Council on the activities of the Grants Support Officer from 10 October 2005 to 30 June 2006. The report recommends that the Grants Support Officer Report be received.

 

Background

On 6 June 2005, Council adopted the Proposed Trial approach to Grant opportunities for the City Report, including the recommendation that:

 

“The position of a Temporary Grants Officer be advertised for a twelve month period with an option to extend for an additional twelve months subject to review.”

 

The recommendation encompassed two major roles for the Grants Support Officer: the first, a focus on increasing Council revenue from grants; the second, to increase the number and value of grants going to the Penrith community.

 

On Monday 10 October 2005, Ray Richardson commenced a twelve-month temporary appointment as Grants Support Officer, located within Financial Services.

 

At the Managers’ Meeting on 16 November 2005, a recommendation to create a Grants Reference Group (GRG) was adopted. Two managers were sought as members of the Group; three managers volunteered. The initial GRG membership consists of Financial Services Manager (Chair), Community Development Manager, Environmental Health Manager and Waste and Community Protection Manager, with the Grants Support Officer. The GRG has met four times: on 13 December 2005, 10 February 2006, 3 April 2006 and 5 June 2006.

 

Current Situation

The impact of the appointment of a Grants Support Officer on increasing revenue to both Council and the community will only be assessable in the long term, because of the lead time required to identify suitable grant programs in advance of closing dates for applications and the time that expires between application submission deadlines and receipt of advice on decision making processes, then acceptance of the grant and receipt of funds, before a funded project can commence. This process in some cases has extended beyond twelve months.

 

The Grants Support Officer to date has concentrated on establishing strategies and protocols, creating an intranet site for staff reference and a web page for the community’s information, developing databases, acquiring resources and exploring existing networks. Term Achievements in Council’s Strategic Program 2005-2009 that are unfunded and may be eligible for grant assistance have been the priority in efforts to identify suitable grant programs.

 

The Grants Support Officer responds to requests for further advice by undertaking research, or providing feedback, including proofreading of applications, if requested.

 

Initial discussions with the GRG regarding the role of the Grants Support Officer recognised the importance of reaching out to the community, as well as the requirements to assist and advise relevant Managers and staff internally. In this context, the ability of the position to resource a potentially overwhelming demand for assistance from both internal and external sources was assessed. The question of the equity of the GSO providing higher levels of assistance to particular groups or organisations and not to others was also considered as a factor in light of the requirements of Council’s Code of Practice.

 

As a result, strategies were devised to assist the Grants Support Officer to manage the situation.

 

External strategy:

The public strategy includes the creation of a web page on Council’s website containing guidelines for grant applicants, a checklist and links to other websites containing lists of current grants available and useful resources. The web page was established and announced by the Mayor in the week commencing 9 January 2006. This was followed by an article on the position in the Western Weekender on 17 February 2006. The web page has been expanded more recently to include a regular “Bulletin” that includes more details on a selection of grants currently available.

 

[Copies of selected documents from the web page are attached}

 

The Grants Support Officer’s contact details are published on Council’s website and frequent enquiries are made by members of the community. The Grants Support Officer offers specific advice to these callers on relevant programs and resources to assist their application.

The strategy also includes providing workshops for community interest groups on the skills required for writing grant applications.

 

Two workshops were held in March 2006 in partnership with Community Development, GROW Sydney Inc and Western Sydney Regional Information & Research Service, focussing on community service organisations that might apply for the CDSE grants. Community Development mailed invitations to all relevant organisations on its contact lists. The workshops were also advertised publicly through the Mayor’s column in the local media. A total of 68 representatives of community organisations attended and the feedback was very positive.

 

A workshop was scheduled for members of the Penrith Valley Sports Foundation on 30 March 2006, to be addressed by a representative of the Department of Sport and Recreation. The Foundation undertook to publicise this event, but not one member club responded to take advantage of this opportunity. Subsequently it was revealed that a workshop had been held in May 2005, organised by Karyn Paluzzano MP, run by the Department of Sport & Recreation (DSR), to which all sporting groups in Penrith had been invited. Recent discussions with the Member for Penrith have resulted in an intention to provide a similar workshop to which all sporting clubs will be sent invitations, organised as a joint venture between Council and the Member in 2007 prior to the closing dates for the next closing dates for funding to which clubs are eligible to apply.

 

After the Sports Foundation workshop’s cancellation, the Grants Support Officer consulted with the Parks Construction and Maintenance Manager to devise an alternative to involvement of clubs in the Parks works program. A letter was drafted and sent by PCMM to all sporting clubs in Penrith inviting submissions for inclusion in the Parks works program for 2006-07 or 2007-08.

 

A small number of responses were received and only two were eligible for DSR Capital Grant funding. These projects for 2006-07, reported to Council on 1 May 2006, were:

 

Greygums Oval – lighting and storage/shade building: Council $75,000; AFL clubs $30,000; DSR $ 30,000.

 

Jamison Park – construction of training field Council $60,000; Junior Rugby League Penrith $20,000; Nepean District Cricket Association $5,000; DSR $25,000.

 

Advice on the outcome of these applications is not expected until January 2007.

Additional grant writing workshops are planned for cultural groups and the small and home-based business community in September and October 2006.

 

Internal strategy:

Council was a subscriber to the EasyGrants Newsletter, published by OurCommunity. The subscription for this newsletter was renewed and other resources were subscribed to, including the Newswire and Resources, Events Discussions newsletters published by CommunityBuilders and the Australian Directory of Philanthropy. The Australian Green Grants Guide and Winning Grants Funding in Australia were purchased.

 

These resources, together with web-based research, formed the basis for identifying grant opportunities to alert Managers, to publish on the web page and to respond to internal and external requests for advice.

 

A grants information site for staff was established on the Intranet, providing the latest copies of the EasyGrants, CommunityBuilder, Distilled and other newsletters, guidelines for preparing grant applications, relevant forms, a copy of Council’s indemnity to $10m document, links to other relevant websites and other documents that might be of interest or useful to grant seekers within the organisation.

 

[Copies of selected documents from the Intranet site are attached]

 

On receipt of each newsletter, the information has been scanned to identify grant programs of relevance to various Council departments. Emails were then sent to managers containing the information about the grant programs identified.

On 27 April the Corporate Management Team requested that the process of advising Managers of relevant grants be formalised to determine if the grant opportunity was being actioned, or reasons to explain why no action was being taken.

 

This procedure has been in place since the beginning of May and a report back to CMT containing responses from Managers is now due.

 

The latest advice to Managers, sent on 18 and 19 July, included advice on the Regional Sports Facility Program offered by DSR, which closes on 31 August 2006.

 

Other issues:

Technical expertise

Most grant applications require specific expertise to be able to provide appropriate responses to questions within the forms. In instances where capital works are required, specific and detailed information is required from the relevant Council department(s) to complete the form correctly. In these instances, the Grants Support Officer is able to provide feedback on the composition and expression of the information, but is not able to easily comment on the technical details. It is therefore more efficient for the relevant staff to complete the application, with relevant input from the Grants Support Officer and others.

 

Responsibility

The applicant must assume responsibility for both the application and the implementation of the project described within the application. This is a basic principle for all advice provided on effective grant application writing. A legal contract is entered into to fulfil the aims and objectives of the project described in the application. This line of responsibility can become unclear if applications are prepared by a third party. There are instances within Council of difficulties encountered when successful applications have been prepared by one department on behalf of another because lines of responsibility for project management have been in dispute. A manager must be confident that the project is correctly defined and that resources are available to implement the project should the application receive funding.

 

The same principles apply to community groups. The Grants Support Officer’s strategy is to provide relevant advice and offer opportunities to improve grant writing skills to develop expertise and self-reliance within the community. The expectation for a Council officer to prepare applications on behalf of an independent community group, company or individual is not recommended as good practice.

 

Parks have prepared DSR applications for capital works to Council’s assets at the request of clubs. The community group benefits from this, but the Council asset is improved and Council’s approval is required for the application.

Council invariably contributes to the project from its annual Parks works budget and responsibility for ongoing maintenance of the improved asset is often Council’s responsibility.

 

Outcomes

The lead time between identification of a suitable grant program, the completion of an application by the closing date and receipt of advice and funds if successful can be several months.

 

The Grants Support Officer has provided advice on several Council applications, but only a few have received advice on the funding authority’s decision. Advice has also been provided to a number of external organisations with the request that the Grants Support Officer be kept informed, but no progress reports have been received.

 

CDSE grant application decisions have not been advised as yet. It is intended to analyse the results for applicants who attended the grant writing workshops and those who did not, once this process is finalised, to see if the workshops may have had any appreciable impact on the applications submitted by attendees.

 

Resources

The GSO is still in the process of establishing guidelines and policies to guide Council through the complexity of finding suitable grant programs, completing applications and managing grant funded programs.

 

Visiting grant officers from other Councils have been impressed by the strategies developed at Penrith over the past eight months.

 

There is always more that can be done, but research in itself is a time consuming activity. The Grants Support Officer has been developing skills and contacts by attending information sessions on grant programs offered by various State and Federal agencies. Most recently the preparation of two Urban Sustainability Program Major Applications, including hands-on assistance in preparing one of these applications, has consumed the majority of available time over several weeks.

 

Should the current role and expectations for this position be expanded, some services currently provided to Council and the community would need to be curtailed, or additional resources provided to service the additional duties.

 

Summary of activities 10 October 2005 to 30 June 2006

Since October 2005, the Grants Support Officer (GSO) has:

§ Provided advice on the preparation of several Council applications and has requested that this position be the preferred proof-reader of all applications before submission.

§ Facilitated liaison with Council and Hawkesbury Nepean Catchment Management Authority to prepare Expressions of Interest submitted under the Local Government Partnership Program, which resulted in a grant for rehabilitation works on Werrington Creek.

§ Met with representatives of Council’s Entities to explain the role of the GSO position and identify some key needs.

§ Met with community groups, including Penrith City Centre Association, Penrith Museum of Printing, Penrith Valley Economic Development Corporation, Penrith Valley Home Based Business Network, Railway Street Theatre and Karyn Paluzzano MP.

§ Established an intranet site for Council staff, containing procedures, newsletters on grant programs and resources, forms relevant to Council staff managing grant funded projects, links to other websites and reference material. This site is regularly updated and expanded as relevant material is received.

§ Established a Grants Information for the Penrith Community web page on Council’s website, announced by the Mayor in the Penrith media in the week commencing 9 January 2006. The site contains guidelines for completing grant application forms, links to other websites and a Grant Submission Checklist. A Grants Bulletin, providing news on some of the grants that may be of interest to the community and stories about grants recently received, to promote the benefit of grants to the community, is published on this site.

§ Presented two workshops on preparing grant submissions in association with Vesna Kapetanovic, Council’s Community Projects Officer (WSAAS), targeting community groups and the CDSE grants in March. Narelle Wheatland of GROW Sydney and Laurence Kerr of Western Sydney Community Forum contributed to these workshops. The Grants Support Officer prepared a PowerPoint presentation, together with background notes containing advice on completing grant applications and resources. A total of 68 representatives from community organisations attended.

§ Scheduled a workshop on preparing grant submissions for the arts community in conjunction with recreation clubs for 30 August.

§ Discussed, with the Member for Penrith, a joint approach to staging a workshop for the Penrith Valley Sports Foundation members in 2007.

§ Drafted a letter, in consultation with the Parks Construction and Maintenance Manager, sent to all sports clubs within the LGA, inviting eligible proposals for the 2005-2006 and 2006-2007 NSW Department of Sport and Recreation Capital Grants program. Three proposals received were selected for inclusion within the Parks Improvement Program - Greygums Oval and Jamison Park as reported to Council on 1 May 2006.

§ Responded to 16 enquiries relating to grants, from the public, and advised a further 20 contacts regarding grant opportunities.

§ Met with grants officers from Liverpool, Wagga Wagga, Wyong and Gosford Councils with a view to establishing a statewide Grants Officer Network.

§ Established a Grants Register, to capture relevant data on grant applications generated by Council.

§ Subscribed to EasyGrants Newsletter and Raising Funds Newsletter from Our Community and the on-line Australian Directory of Philanthropy. Two publications - The Australian Green Grants Guide and Winning Grants Funding in Australia have been purchased. Other publications have been referred to Penrith Library with the intention of commencing a suitable collection for community reference.

§ Arranged gift subscriptions for the EasyGrants Newsletter for Council’s four entities - Penrith Regional Gallery, the Joan Sutherland Performing Arts Centre, Ripples – St Marys Leisure Centre and Penrith Whitewater Stadium.

§ Drafted an article, published in the January/February 2006 Network, designed to promote the contribution grants can make to resource Council’s programs, and the benefit of these grant funded programs to the community.

§ Attended a Fundraising Seminar for Environmental Groups on 1 March, an Environmental Trust Annual Programs Workshop on 5 April, the Urban Sustainability Program Workshop on 7 June, and Community Water Grants briefing on 4 July.

 

The Grants Support Officer most recently has been assisting relevant Managers and staff to prepare two Major Project applications under the NSW Environmental Trust’s Urban Sustainability Program, in alliance with partner councils.

 

Conclusion

The response received to date on the creation of the position of Grants Support Officer has been strong and positive. Council departments and the community have welcomed the additional resource this position represents. Currently, not all expectations raised by the creation of this resource are being met, as considerable effort has been directed to establishing procedures and processes for the position, researching the breadth of potential funding sources available from Federal, State and philanthropic sources, appropriate circulation of up to date advice, development of a seminar structure and resource materials, networking with other LGAs, specific research in response to individual questions and provision of advice on particular applications, and managing as far as possible the requirements of a potentially extremely broad job description.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the information contained in the report on Activities of Grants Support Officer - 10 October 2005 to 30 June 2006 be received.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.  

Community Bulletin No 7 2006

12 Pages

Attachment

2.  

Grant Submission Checklist for Community

2 Pages

Attachment

3.  

Guidelines for Community Grant Applicants

3 Pages

Attachment

4.  

Guidelines for staff

5 Pages

Attachment

5.  

Links for staff

1 Page

Attachment

6.  

Copyright note for staff

1 Page

Attachment

 


Ordinary Meeting

7 August 2006

Leadership and Organisation

 

 

Leadership and Organisation

 

 

14