13 September 2006

 

Dear Councillor,

In pursuance of the provisions of the Local Government Act, 1993 and the Regulations thereunder, notice is hereby given that an ORDINARY MEETING of Penrith City Council is to be held in the Council Chambers, Civic Centre, 601 High Street, Penrith on Monday 18 September 2006 at 7:00PM.

Attention is directed to the statement accompanying this notice of the business proposed to be transacted at the meeting.

Yours Faithfully

 

Alan Stoneham

Director – City Strategy

 

BUSINESS

 

1.           APOLOGIES

 

2.           LEAVE OF ABSENCE

Leave of absence has been granted to:

Councillor Ross Fowler - 3 September 2006 to 25 September 2006 inclusive.

Councillor Garry Rumble - 6 September 2006 to 28 September 2006 inclusive.

 

3.           CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES

Ordinary Meeting - 4 September 2006.

 

4.           DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

Pecuniary Interest (The Act requires Councillors who declare a pecuniary interest in an item to leave the meeting during discussion of that item)

Non-Pecuniary Interest

 

5.           ADDRESSING THE MEETING

 

6.           MAYORAL MINUTES

 

7.           NOTICES OF MOTION

 

8.           ADOPTION OF REPORTS AND RECOMMENDATION OF COMMITTEES

Local Traffic Committee Meeting - 4 September 2006.

Policy Review Committee Meeting - 11 September 2006.

 

9.           MASTER PROGRAM REPORTS

 

10.         URGENT REPORTS (to be dealt with in the master program to which the item relates)

 

11.         QUESTIONS WITHOUT NOTICE

 

12.         COMMITTEE OF THE WHOLE


ORDINARY MEETING

 

Monday 18 September 2006

 

table of contents

 

 

 

 

 

seating arrangements

 

 

meeting calendar

 

 

confirmation of minutes

 

 

report and recommendations of committees

 

 

master program reports

 


 

 

 

 

PRAYER

 

 

 

“Sovereign God, tonight as we gather together as a Council we affirm that you are the giver and sustainer of life.  We come together as representatives of our community to make decisions that will benefit this city and the people within it. 

 

We come not in a spirit of competition, not as adversaries, but as colleagues.  Help us to treat each other with respect, with dignity, with interest and with honesty.  Help us not just to hear the words we say, but also to hear each others hearts.  We seek to be wise in all that we say and do.

 

As we meet, our concern is for this city.  Grant us wisdom, courage and strength.

 

Lord, help us.  We pray this in the name of Jesus Christ our Lord.  Amen.”

 

 

 

 


Statement of Recognition of Penrith City’s

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander
Cultural Heritage

 

 

Council values the unique status of Aboriginal people as the original owners and custodians of lands and waters, including the land and waters of Penrith City.

 

Council values the unique status of Torres Strait Islander people as the original owners and custodians of the Torres Strait Islands and surrounding waters.

 

We work together for a united Australia and City that respects this land of ours, that values the diversity of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural heritage, and provides justice and equity for all.

 

 

 



MEETING CALENDAR

 

September 20­06 - December 2006

 

 

TIME

SEPT

OCT

NOV

DEC

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Ordinary Meetings

7.00 pm

4ü

9

6

4

18

25^

23

20 #

11

Policy Review Committee

7.00 pm

11@

16

13

 

 

#  Meetings at which the Management Plan quarterly reviews are presented.

v Meeting at which the Draft Management Plan is adopted for exhibition

#+  General Manager’s presentation – half year and end of year review

*   Meeting at which the Management Plan for 2006/2007 is adopted

@  Strategic Program progress reports (only business)

ü  Meeting at which the 2005/2006 Annual Statements are presented

 

^   Election of Mayor/Deputy Mayor (only business)

 

·         Council has two Ordinary Meetings per month where practicable.

·         Extraordinary Meetings are held as required.

·         Policy Review Meetings are held monthly where practicable.

·         Members of the public are invited to observe meetings (Ordinary & Policy Review) of the Council.

Should you wish to address Council, please contact the Executive Officer, Glenn McCarthy on 47327649.

 

 



UNCONFIRMED MINUTES

 OF THE ORDINARY MEETING OF PENRITH CITY COUNCIL HELD IN THE

COUNCIL CHAMBERS

ON MONDAY 4 SEPTEMBER 2006 AT 7:04PM

 

NATIONAL ANTHEM

The meeting opened with the National Anthem.

STATEMENT OF RECOGNITION

His Worship the Mayor, Councillor John Thain read a statement of recognition of Penrith City’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cultural Heritage.

 

PRAYER

The Council Prayer was read by the Rev Neil Checkley.

PRESENT

His Worship the Mayor Councillor John Thain, Councillors Jim Aitken OAM, David Bradbury (arrived at 7:16 pm), Lexie Cettolin, Kevin Crameri OAM, Greg Davies, Mark Davies,  Jackie Greenow, Karen McKeown, Susan Page, Garry Rumble, Pat Sheehy AM, and Steve Simat (arrived at 7:33 pm).

 

APOLOGIES

1035  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Jackie Greenow seconded Councillor Pat Sheehy that apologies be accepted for Councillors Kaylene Allison, David Bradbury and Steve Simat.

 

LEAVE OF ABSENCE

Leave of Absence was previously granted to Councillor Ross Fowler for the period 3 September 2006 to 25 September 2006 inclusive.

 

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES - Ordinary Meeting - 21 August 2006

1036  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Pat Sheehy seconded Councillor Kevin Crameri that the minutes of the Ordinary Meeting of 21 August 2006 be confirmed.

 

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

Councillor Pat Sheehy declared a non-pecuniary interest in Item 5 - Penrith Whitewater Stadium, as he is a Director on the Board of the Penrith Whitewater Stadium.

 

Councillor Karen McKeown declared a non-pecuniary interest in Item 5 - Penrith Whitewater Stadium, as she is a Director on the Board of the Penrith Whitewater Stadium.

 

 

 

His Worship the Mayor, Councillor John Thain, declared a pecuniary interest in Item 9 - Longwall Mining at locations within the Nepean River Catchment, as he is employed by a company that deals with BHP Billiton, and announced that he would not take part in debate on this matter and would vacate the Chair.

 

SUSPENSION OF STANDING ORDERS

1037  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Jackie Greenow seconded Councillor Pat Sheehy that Standing Orders be suspended to allow members of the public to address the meeting, the time being 7:08 pm.

 

Mr Kenneth Barratt

Item 6         Draft Amendment to Penrith Development Control Plan 2006 Section 6.3 Claremont Meadows Stage 2

Speaking AGAINST the Recommendation

 

Mr Barratt was speaking as an affected resident.

 

Mr Barratt expressed his disagreement with the subdivision and resumption of land for this purpose.

 

Mr Barratt addressed the matter of the buffer zone to Cumberland Woodland, enquiring as to the need for such an extensive buffer. 

 

Mr Barratt stated his concern that the area where his present home is located is considered to be a ‘flood zone’, and that this would effectively prevent him from demolishing the house and rebuilding in the same location.

 

 

Mr Donald William Lawless

Item 3 of Committee of the Whole Business Paper

          Property Matter - Lease of Part of the Former Council Chambers Building to North St Marys Neighbourhood Centre on behalf of Nepean Interyouth Services

Speaking on behalf of North St Marys Neighbourhood Centre

and Nepean Interyouth Services

 

Mr Lawless was speaking as a representative (Chairman) of the North St Marys Neighbourhood Centre.

 

Mr Lawless referred to the Centre’s letter to Council, dated 13 April 2006, seeking a reduction in rent for their use of the premises at the corner of Henry and Station Streets, Penrith, from which they provide the Nepean Interyouth Services program. 

 

Mr Lawless provided a brief history of the organisation’s relationship with Council, and the services that have been provided at this location by the North St Marys Neighbourhood Centre.  He reminded Council of the almost 50% reduction in funding from the Department of Family and Community Services, for the two projects that the Centre provided from the Penrith address, adding that the Jobs Placement Employment and Training (JPET) had originated from the North St Marys Social Plan and was ongoing.

 

Mr Lawless concluded by seeking Council’s reduction of the rental by 50%, to enable the organisation to continue operating this service for the disadvantaged young people of Penrith.

 

Councillor David Bradbury arrived at the meeting, the time being 7:16 pm.

RESUMPTION OF STANDING ORDERS

1038  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Pat Sheehy seconded Councillor Karen McKeown that Standing Orders be resumed, the time being 7:19 pm.

 

 MAYORAL MINUTES

 

1        Recognition of Aisha Poole, Waste Education Officer

 

1039  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor John Thain seconded Councillor Jackie Greenow that the Mayoral Minute on Recognition of Aisha Poole, Waste Education Officer be received.

 

2        2006 Penrith Rotary Mayoral Charity Ball

 

1040  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor John Thain seconded Councillor Jackie Greenow that the Mayoral Minute on 2006 Penrith Rotary Mayoral Charity Ball be received.

 

3        Signing of Friendship Agreement between Penrith City and Lachlan Shire

 

1041  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor John Thain seconded Councillor Jackie Greenow that the Mayoral Minute on Signing of Friendship Agreement between Penrith City and Lachlan Shire be received.

 

Councillor Steve Simat arrived at the meeting, the time being 7:33 pm.

 

4        Congratulations to St Marys Band Club on 50 years of promoting music in Penrith City

 

1042  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor John Thain seconded Councillor Jackie Greenow that the Mayor Minute on Congratulations to St Marys Band Club on 50 years of promoting music in Penrith City be received.

 

Reports of Committees

 

1        Report and Recommendations of the Disability Access Committee Meeting held on 2 August 2006                                                                                                                                     

1043  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Lexie Cettolin seconded Councillor Jackie Greenow that the recommendations contained in the Report and Recommendations of the Disability Access Committee meeting held on 2 August, 2006 be adopted.

 

 

 

 

MASTER PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Leadership and Organisation

Council’s Auditor, Mr Dennis Banicevic, a Director of PriceWaterhouse Coopers, addressed the meeting and gave a short presentation on Council’s Annual Financial Statements.  He said the Statements show Penrith Council to be in a sound financial position and that they demonstrate a high standard of financial reporting.

 

1        2005-06 Annual Statements                                                                                               

1044  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Pat Sheehy seconded Councillor Steve Simat

That:

1.   The information contained in the report on 2005-06 Annual Statements be received.

2.   Pursuant to S415 it is the Council's opinion that:

a.                    The financial statements and schedules have been drawn up in accordance with the Local Government Act 1993 and Regulations, the Local Government Code of Accounting Practice and Financial Reporting, the Local Government Asset Accounting Manual, and Australian Accounting Standards.  The Code requires a phasing in of the new accounting requirements

b.                    Apart from the non-recognition of land under roads as required by the phasing process, the statements comply with Australian Statements of Accounting Concepts

c.                    The financial statements present fairly the Council's financial position as at 30 June 2006 and the operating result for the year then ended

d.                    The statements are in accord with Council's accounting and other records.

3.   Pursuant to clause 21 of the Local Government Financial Management Regulation it is the Council's opinion that:

a.                     The accompanying Special Purpose Financial report has been drawn up in accordance with the Local Government Act 1993 and Regulations, the Local Government Code of Accounting Practice and Financial Reporting, and the requirements of National Competition Policy. The Code requires the inclusion of various charges and subsidies which are not actually paid or payable

b.                     The report is a special purpose report and is not required to comply with Australian Accounting Standards. The above legislative requirements differ from Australian Accounting Standards and hence the report does not comply with Australian Accounting Standards.

c.                     The financial statements present a modelled scenario for comparative purposes.  They do not report an actual result.

 

4.   Council confirms its endorsement of the budget in the knowledge that some of its business activities are not making commercial returns.  The existence of notional subsidies represents Council’s commitment to its community service obligations.

5.   The Statements be forwarded to Council's Auditors.

6.   Abandonments for 2006 as detailed be written off.

7.   The balance of stores and materials be adjusted in the stores and materials registers in accordance with the various write-offs.

8.   The allocation of the budget surplus is considered as part of the September quarterly review.

 

The City in its Broader Context

 

2        State Plan                                                                                                                            

1045  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Pat Sheehy seconded Councillor Kevin Crameri

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on State Plan be received.

2.     Council make a formal submission to the exhibition of the draft State Plan based on the commentary and recommendations outlined in the report.

 

The City as a Social Place

 

5        Penrith Whitewater Stadium                                                                                              

1046  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Garry Rumble

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Penrith Whitewater Stadium be received.

2.     Council advance $60,188 from internal reserves to Penrith Whitewater stadium in expectation of the loan repayments due from Australian Canoeing.

3.     Council make an agreement with Penrith Whitewater Stadium that the repayments for the loan with Australian Canoeing are forwarded to Council as they are received.

4.     Council advance $65,000 to Penrith Whitewater Stadium to be added to the current loan agreement.

5.     A new loan repayment schedule is provided to Penrith Whitewater Stadium.

 

 

 

 

 

6        Draft Amendment to Penrith Development Control Plan 2006 Section 6.3 Claremont Meadows Stage 2                                                                                                                 

1047  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Garry Rumble

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Draft Amendment to Penrith Development Control Plan 2006 Section 6.3 Claremont Meadows Stage 2  be received.

2.     In accordance with the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 and the Regulations 2000, a draft amendment to Penrith DCP 2006 Chapter 6 Section 6.3 Claremont Meadows Stage 2 Development Control Plan be publicly exhibited.

3.     A further report be presented to Council, following exhibition of the draft amendment to Penrith Development Control Plan 2006 Chapter 6 Section 6.3 Claremont Meadows Stage 2, advising of the outcomes of the exhibition, and consideration of formal adoption of the amendments.

 

7        Variation of Restrictive Covenant applying to Lot 100 DP 1058901 (No.81) Regentville Road, Jamisontown. Applicant: David Roberts Architects Pty Ltd;  Owner: Penrith Automotive Pty Ltd                                                                                           DA04/2605

1048  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Garry Rumble

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Variation of Restrictive Covenant applying to Lot 100 DP 1058901 (No.81) Regentville Road, Jamisontown be received.

2.     The terms of the restriction on the use of the land referred to in the Section 88B Instrument of the Conveyancing Act 1919 applying to Lot 100 DP 1058901, be varied in part as detailed in the application to extinguish the restriction.

3.     The Common Seal of Penrith City Council be affixed to all necessary documentation to vary the covenant.

 

8        Variation of Restrictive Covenant applying to Lot 2002 DP 1022422 (No. 18) Cassar Crescent, Cranebrook. Applicant: Joanna Hull;  Owner: Joanna Hull          DA06/0284

1049  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Garry Rumble

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Variation of Restrictive Covenant applying to Lot 2002 DP 1022422 (No. 18) Cassar Crescent, Cranebrook be received.

 

 

2.     The terms of the restriction on the use of land secondly referred to in the Section 88B Instrument of the Conveyancing Act 1919 applying to Lot 2002 DP 1022422 (No. 18) Cassar Crescent, Cranebrook be varied as detailed in the report.

3.     The Common Seal of Penrith City Council be affixed to all necessary documentation to vary the covenant.

 

3        Establishment of Additional Off Leash Areas for Dogs and Closure of Boronia Park Off Leash Area                                                                                                                         

1050  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Garry Rumble seconded Councillor Kevin Crameri

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Establishment of Additional Off Leash Areas for Dogs and Closure of Boronia Park Off Leash Area be received.

2.     Suitable advertisements be placed in the local papers advertising that it is proposed to establish an additional off leash area in Boundary Road, Cranebrook, Jamison Park, South Penrith and the closure of the off leash area at Boronia Park, St Marys and to establish an off leash area at Poplar Park, St Marys.

3.     A further report be provided to Council after advertising and public comments are received.

4.     The further report include comments from the Waste and Community Protection Manager on the possible impact of the Jamison Park Off Leash Area on the existing users of the park, particularly adjacent Racecourse Road.

 

4        Removal of Play Equipment                                                                                               

1051  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Pat Sheehy seconded Councillor Kevin Crameri

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Removal of Play Equipment in the park adjacent to Illawong Avenue, Kingswood Park be received.

2.     The play equipment be removed from the park adjoining Illawong Avenue, Kingswood Park.

3.     A further report be provided, detailing existing play equipment in Kingswood Park and providing a specific timeframe for the replacement of the play equipment to be removed.

 

 

 

 

 

The City In Its Environment

 

Having previously declared a pecuniary interest in Item 9, His Worship the Mayor, Councillor John Thain, left the meeting, and the Deputy Mayor, Councillor Jackie Greenow, took the Chair, the time being 7:55 pm.

 

9        Longwall Mining at locations within the Nepean River Catchment                                

1052  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Karen McKeown

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Longwall Mining at locations within the Nepean River Catchment be received.

2.     Council write to the NSW Premier, Minister for Planning and Minister for Natural Resources, Primary Industries and Mineral Resources expressing its strong opposition to any consideration of approval for any mining activity that places the Nepean River at risk.

 

The Mayor returned to the meeting, the time being 8:00 pm, and took the Chair.

 

10      Adoption of Plan of Management for Weir Reserve                                                        

1053  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Garry Rumble seconded Councillor Kevin Crameri

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Adoption of Plan of Management for Weir Reserve be received.

2.     Council adopt the Plan of Management for Weir Reserve in accordance with the provisions of the Local Government Act.

3.     Public notice be given of Council’s decision to adopt the Plan of Management for Weir Reserve.

4.     A further report be presented to Council detailing the risk management measures taken in relation to the construction of the bridge/boardwalk at the confluence of Peachtree Creek and the Nepean River.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

THE CITY AS AN ECONOMY

 

17      Development Application 05/1929 for proposed commercial development and basement car parking at Lot 110 DP 707681 (No.  331) High Street, Penrith. Applicant: Fiuggi Holdings Pty Limited;  Owner: Fiuggi Holdings Pty Limited                                                DA05/1929

1054  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Jim Aitken

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Development Application 05/1929 for proposed commercial development and basement car parking at Lot 110 DP 707681 (No.  331) High Street, Penrith be received.

2.     Development Application 05/1929 be granted Consent subject to the standard and non-standard conditions listed below:

              Standard Conditions

2.1         A001 (Approved Plans), A011 (Engineering Works DCP), A017 (DA for use), A019 (Occupation Certificate), A026 (Advertising Sign), A038 (Lighting locations), A039 (Graffiti), B001 (Demolition of existing structures), B002 (AS for demolition and disposal to approved landfill site), B003 (Asbestos), B004 (Dust), B005 (Mud/soil), B006 (Hours of work for demolition), D001 (Implement approved sediment and erosion control measures), D007 (Filling of land), D009 (Covering of waste storage area), D010 (Appropriate disposal of excavated or other waste), D025 (Stormwater disposal), E01A (BCA Compliance for Class 2-9), E002 (BCA compliance), E006 (Disabled access and facilities), E008 (Fire safety list with Construction Certificate), E009 (Annual Fire Safety-Essential Fire Safety Class 2-9 buildings), G002 (Section 73 Certificate), G004 (Integral Energy), H001 (Stamped plans & erection site notice 2 (class 2-9), H002 (All forms of construction), H011 (Engineering plans & specifications), H022 (Survey), H025 (Construction of garbage rooms), H041 (Hours of work for construction), I003 (Roads Act approval 1), K001 (Engineering Works DCP), K003 (Drainage Design), K004 (Easement creation), K016 (Stormwater), K019 (Connection to Council’s system), K026 (Stabilised access), K037 (Maintenance Bond),  P002 (Fees associated with Council land), Q001 (Notice of Commencement & Appointment of PCA1), Q003 (Compliance Certificates Engineering), Q006 (Occupation Certificate for Class 2-9)

              Non Standard Conditions

2.2         A detailed Construction Management Plan shall be submitted for written approval to Council’s Traffic Engineer prior to the issue of a Construction Certificate

 

2.3         A Waste Management Plan shall be submitted for approval by Council prior to the issue of the Construction Certificate. The Waste Management Plan shall amend, if necessary, the area of the garbage room to ensure that it satisfactorily caters for the garbage needs of the development. The garbage room shall have dimensions, layout and provide capacity that is consistent with Council’s Waste Management Development Control Plan. The Waste Management Plan is to also detail the method and process of collection

 

2.4         The front façade of the building shall be amended to include a horizontal granite element at the bottom of the ‘pop-out’ section. Details and amended plans to be submitted to Council prior to the issue of a Construction Certificate

 

2.5         Proposed and future proposed roof plant is to be screened at all times so that it is obscured from viewed from outside the site

 

2.6         Access to the roof shall be limited for maintenance purposes only

 

2.7         No advertising or logos are to be installed above the ground level awning in any elevation throughout the life of the development without Council approval

 

2.8         A maximum of 40% coverage of windows on the ground floor is to be used for display of signage

 

2.9         Prior to occupation, lighting for the development is to be provided in the following manner:

             

a)    Street awnings attached to the development shall be fitted with under awning lighting

b)    Entrances and exits to the building and the basement car park shall be well lit

c)    Lighting shall be vandal resistant

d)    Lighting shall not be positioned in a manner that causes glare to approaching pedestrians

 

Written approval is to be obtained from Council prior to the issue of a Construction Certificate for the proposed measures.

 

2.10       Prior to occupation, treatment to the basement car  parking area is to be provided in the following manner:

 

a)    All surfaces are to be painted in light coloured paint

b)    All potential entrapment points are to be eliminated Adequate lighting and mirrors shall be used where possible

c)    An intercom security system shall be installed in both          levels of the car park

 

Written approval is to be obtained from Council prior to the issue of a Construction Certificate for the proposed measures

 

2.11       The building shall achieve a 4.5 star energy efficiency performance Australian Building Greenhouse Rating (ABGR). Certification is to be provided to Council prior to the issue of a Construction Certificate

 

2.12       The car park and ramp are to be designed according to the requirements of the current Australian Standard AS2890. Plans are to show the following information:

 

i            vehicular swept paths and dimensions of clear manoeuvring areas

ii           a longitudinal section through the centre line of the ramp, showing ramp grades and suitable transition at changes of grades

iii           drainage pits and pipes

iv          a pavement design prepared by a suitably qualified Engineer

 

                        A Compliance Certificate shall be submitted to Council prior to the issue of an Occupation Certificate. A work as executed plan and written verification stating that all driveway pavements as built will perform to the criteria set down by the designing Engineer and the work has been constructed in accordance with the Construction Certificate shall also be submitted prior to the issue of an Occupation Certificate

 

2.13       Access to the lower car park level is to be restricted to tenant employee parking only. Provision is to be made to ensure that vehicles do not access the ramp from opposite ends at the same time (this may be mechanical or electronic). Controlled access shall also be provided on the upper car parking level to ensure that 33 spaces are accessible to the general public

 

2.14       The provision of plumbing and maintenance of a rainwater tank/s of minimum 15,000L capacity is to be provided on site and in accordance with the requirements of the National Plumbing and Drainage Code AS/NZS 3500. The rainwater tank must be located in such a position as to maximise rainwater collection and shall include, but not be limited to, the retention of water on-site incorporating first flow diversion devices fixed to all inflows, provided with a functioning pressure pump, and plumbed to service all toilets. The tank must be controlled such that supplemental flows from domestic mains do not take place until the tank is at least 80% empty. The overflow from the tank/s is to be gravity drained to Council’s street gutter drainage system

             

                        Details are to be submitted to Council for written approval prior to the issue of a Construction Certificate

 

2.15       Roof water must be diverted to the rainwater storage tank prior to its disposal to Council's street gutter drainage system

 

2.16       The applicant must supply Council with a dilapidation report for the adjoining properties, which documents and photographs the condition of buildings and improvements. The report must be submitted to Council prior to issue of the Construction Certificate and will be made available by Council in any private dispute between the neighbours regarding damage arising from site and construction works

 

2.17       The applicant must supply Council with a dilapidation report for Council’s infrastructure, which documents and photographs the condition of any existing damage to the road, kerb, gutter, footpath, driveways, street trees, street signs or any other Council assets in the vicinity of the development

 

2.18       Prior to the issue of the Occupation Certificate, suitable street trees are to be planted along the High Street frontage of the building. Council’s Landscape Architect must be consulted to determine the details of the proposed species, size, number and placement of the trees. Paving around the trees shall be in accordance with Council’s Paving Specification for Asphalt “Pavement Texturing”

 

2.19       Prior to the issue of the Occupation Certificate, high quality unit pavers are to be provided along the High Street frontage, and any other paved sections of the proposal. Council’s Landscape Architect must be consulted to determine the details of the paving specifications.

 

2.20        This condition is imposed in accordance with Penrith City Council’s Section 94 Contributions Plan(s) for the Penrith City Centre Car Parking. Based on the current rates detailed in the accompanying schedule attached to this Notice, $65,465.00 is to be paid prior to a Construction Certificate being issued for this development (the rates are subject to a quarterly review). If not paid within the current quarterly period, this contribution will be reviewed at the time of payment in accordance with the adopted Section 94 plan. The projected rates of this contribution amount are listed in Council’s Fees and Charges Schedule.

 

The attached schedule should accompany the contribution payment.

 

 

The Section 94 Contributions Plan for Penrith City Centre Car Parking may be inspected at Council’s Civic Centre, 601 High Street, Penrith.

 

2.21     This condition is imposed in accordance with Penrith City Council’s Section 94 Contributions Plan(s) for the Penrith City Centre Traffic Management. Based on the current rates detailed in the accompanying schedule attached to this Notice, $158,907.00 is to be paid prior to a Construction Certificate being issued for this development (the rates are subject to a quarterly review). If not paid within the current quarterly period, this contribution will be reviewed at the time of payment in accordance with the adopted Section 94 plan. The projected rates of this contribution amount are listed in Council’s Fees and Charges Schedule.

 

The attached schedule should accompany the contribution payment.

 

The Section 94 Contributions Plan for Penrith City Centre Traffic Management may be inspected at Council’s Civic Centre, 601 High Street, Penrith.

 

3.     Those persons who made a written submission during the assessment period be advised of Council’s decision.

 

4.    That $75,000 be allocated to the construction of additional parking in 

       Belmore Street from the Parking Reserve.

 

5.     A report be urgently provided on proposals for parking generated by various contributions.

 

The City Supported by Infrastructure

 

11      Footpath Improvement Program                                                                                        

1055  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor David Bradbury

That:

1.      The information contained in the report on Footpath Improvement Program     be received.

2.      An updated list and map of the path paving program be provided to all Councillors.

3.      No adjustment of the list be made without the approval of Council.

 

 

 

 

12      Richmond/Blacktown Road Upgrade                                                                                

1056  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Kevin Crameri seconded Councillor Pat Sheehy

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Richmond/Blacktown Road Upgrade be received.

2.     The local State Members of Parliament be requested to lobby the Minister for Roads to urgently undertake the upgrade the intersections of St Marys Road and Blacktown Road, and Llandilo Road and Richmond Road.

3.     A letter be written to Hawkesbury City Council, advising of Penrith City Council’s decision in this matter.

 

Leadership and Organisation

 

13      Financial Assistance Grant                                                                                                

1057  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Susan Page seconded Councillor Kevin Crameri that the information contained in the report on Financial Assistance Grant be received and Council’s budget be adjusted accordingly.

 

14      National Risk Management Conference                                                                          

1058  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Susan Page seconded Councillor Kevin Crameri that the information contained in the report on the RMIA National Risk Management Conference be received.

 

15      2006 National General Assembly of Local Government                                                  

1059  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Pat Sheehy seconded Councillor Jackie Greenow

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on 2006 National General Assembly of Local Government be received.

2.     Councillor Susan Page be Council’s voting delegate for the 2006 National General Assembly of Local Government.

3.     Councillor Jim Aitken also attend as an observer at the 2006 National General Assembly of Local Government.

4.     The 3 motions detailed in the report be submitted for inclusion in the 2006 Australian Local Government Association National General Assembly Business Paper.

 

 

 

 

 

 

16      Grassroots Sustainability Conference and 2006 Japan Local Government Centre (CLAIR) Forum                                                                                                                                             

1060  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Jackie Greenow seconded Councillor Pat Sheehy

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on the Grassroots Sustainability Conference and 2006 Japan Local Government Centre (CLAIR) Forum be received.

2.     Councillor Kevin Crameri attend the Grassroots Sustainability Conference as Council’s representative.

3.     A letter of congratulations be sent to CLAIR on the success of the programs they have conducted in partnership with Council.

 

QUESTIONS WITHOUT NOTICE

 

QWN 1      Cleaning of High Street, Penrith                                                                              

Councillor Jim Aitken requested that the footpaths in High Street, in the area between Higgins Street west to the Henry and High Streets intersection, be cleaned of chewing gum and other stains.

 

QWN 2      Leave of Absence                                                                                                     

Councillor Garry Rumble requested Leave of Absence from 6 September 2006 to 28 September 2006 inclusive.

 

1061  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Jackie Greenow seconded Councillor Jim Aitken that the matter be brought forward and dealt with as a matter of urgency.

 

His Worship the Mayor, Councillor John Thain, ruled that the matter was urgent and should be dealt with at the meeting.

 

1062  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Jackie Greenow seconded Councillor Jim Aitken that Leave of Absence be granted to Councillor Garry Rumble from 6 September 2006 to 28 September 2006 inclusive.

 

QWN 3      St Marys Spring Festival                                                                                          

Councillor Jackie Greenow requested that a letter of thanks be sent to the Public Domain staff who worked at the St Marys Spring Festival, and a letter of congratulations be sent to the Organising Committee.

 

Committee of the Whole

 

1063  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Jackie Greenow seconded Councillor Pat Sheehy that the meeting adjourn to the Committee of the Whole to deal with the following matters, the time being 8:33 pm.

 

1        Presence of the Public

 

CW1 RESOLVED on the motion of Councillor Jackie Greenow seconded Councillor Pat Sheehy that the press and public be excluded from Committee of the Whole to deal with the following matters:

 

City as an Economy

 

2        Property Matter                                                                                                                 

 

This item has been referred to Committee of the Whole as the report refers to commercial information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed (i) prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied it; or (ii) confer a commercial advantage on a competitor of the Council; or (iii) reveal a trade secret and discussion of the matter in open meeting would be, on balance, contrary to the public interest.

 

Leadership and Organisation

 

3        Property Matter - Lease of Part of the Former Council Chambers Building to North St Marys Neighbourhood Centre on behalf of Nepean Interyouth Services                                   

 

This item has been referred to Committee of the Whole as the report refers to information that would, if disclosed, confer a commercial advantage on a person with whom the Council is conducting (or proposes to conduct) business and discussion of the matter in open meeting would be, on balance, contrary to the public interest.

 

The meeting resumed at 8:45 pm and the General Manager reported that the Committee of the Whole met at 8:33 pm on Monday 4 September 2006, the following being present

 

His Worship the Mayor Councillor John Thain (not present for consideration of Item 3), Councillors Jim Aitken OAM, David Bradbury, Lexie Cettolin, Kevin Crameri OAM, Greg Davies, Mark Davies, Jackie Greenow, Karen McKeown, Susan Page, Garry Rumble, Pat Sheehy AM, and Steve Simat

 

and the Committee of the Whole excluded the press and public from the meeting for the reasons set out in CW1 and that the Committee of the Whole submitted the following recommendations to Council.

 

CONFIDENTIAL BUSINESS

 

His Worship the Mayor, Councillor John Thain, declared a non-pecuniary interest in Item 3, as he is a member of the North St Marys Neighbourhood Centre Management Committee, and left the meeting.  The Deputy Mayor, Councillor Jackie Greenow took the Chair, the time being 8:34 pm.

 

 

 

 

 

3        Property Matter - Lease of Part of the Former Council Chambers Building to North St Marys Neighbourhood Centre on behalf of Nepean Interyouth Services                                   

1064  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Jim Aitken

CW3 That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Property Matter - Lease of Part of the Former Council Chambers Building to North St Marys Neighbourhood Centre on behalf of Nepean Interyouth Services be received.

2.     Council approve the new rental figure to Nepean Interyouth Services as outlined in the summary of the report.

3.     Council write to the Federal Minister for Employment and Workforce Relations, expressing concern at the reduction in JPET’s funding to the Nepean Interyouth Services.

 

The Mayor returned to meeting, the time being 8:37 pm, and took the Chair.

 

2        Property Matter                                                                                                                 

1065  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Steve Simat seconded Councillor Garry Rumble

CW2 That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Property Matter be received.

2.     The recommendation as proposed in the annexure to the Property Development Manager’s report be adopted.

 

ADOPTION OF Committee of the Whole

 

RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Pat Sheehy seconded Councillor Jim Aitken that the recommendations contained in the Committee of the Whole and shown as CW2 and CW3 be adopted.

 

There being no further business the Chairperson declared the meeting closed, the time being 8:46 pm.

 



PENRITH CITY COUNCIL

 

Procedure for Addressing Meetings

 

Anyone can request permission to address a meeting, providing that the number of speakers is limited to three in support of any proposal and three against.

 

Any request about an issue or matter on the Agenda for the meeting can be lodged with the General Manager or Public Officer up until 12 noon on the day of the meeting.

 

Prior to the meeting the person who has requested permission to address the meeting will need to provide the Public Officer with a written statement of the points to be covered during the address in sufficient detail so as to inform the Councillors of the substance of the address and a written copy of any questions to be asked of the Council in order that responses to those questions can be provided in due course.

 

In addition, prior to addressing the meeting a person addressing Council or Committee will be informed that they do not enjoy any privilege and that permission to speak may be withdrawn should they make inappropriate comments.

 

It should be noted that speakers at meetings of the Council or Committee do not have absolute privilege (parliamentary privilege).  A speaker who makes any potentially offensive or defamatory remarks about any other person may render themselves open to legal action.

 

Prior to addressing the meeting the person will be required to sign the following statement:

 

“I (name) understand that the meeting I intend to address on (date) is a public meeting.  I also understand that should I say or present any material that is inappropriate, I may be subject to legal action.  I also acknowledge that I have been informed to obtain my own legal advice about the appropriateness of the material that I intend to present at the above mentioned meeting”.

 

Should a person fail to sign the above statement then permission to address either the Council or Committee will not be granted.

 

The Public Officer or Minute Clerk will speak to those people who have requested permission to address the meeting, prior to the meeting at 6.45pm.

 

It is up to the Council or Committee to decide if the request to address the meeting will be granted.

 

Where permission is to be granted the Council or Committee, at the appropriate time, will suspend only so much of the Standing Orders to allow the address to occur.

 

The Chairperson will then call the person up to the lectern or speaking area.

 

The person addressing the meeting needs to clearly indicate:

 

·   Their name;

 

·   Organisation or group they are representing (if applicable);

 

·   Details of the issue to be addressed and the item number of the report in the Business Paper;

 

·   Whether they are opposing or supporting the issue or matter (if applicable) and the action they would like the meeting to take;

 

·       The interest of the speaker (e.g. affected person, neighbour, applicant, applicants spokesperson, interested citizen etc).

 

Each person then has five minutes to make their address.  Those addressing Council will be required to speak to the written statement they have submitted.  Permission to address Council is not to be taken as an opportunity to refute or otherwise the points made by previous speakers on the same issue. 

 

The Council or Committee can extend this time if they consider if appropriate, however, everyone needs to work on the basis that the address will be for five minutes only.

 

Councillors may have questions about the address so people are asked to remain at the lectern or in the speaking area until the Chairperson has thanked them.

 

When this occurs, they should then return to their seat.

 

 

Steve Hackett

Public Officer

02 4732 7637                                                        August 2003

   


Reports of Committees

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

1        Report and Recommendations of the Local Traffic Committee Meeting held on 4 September 2006 

 

2        Report and Recommendations of the Policy Review Committee Meeting held on 11 September 2006 

 

 



Ordinary Meeting

18 September 2006

Leadership and Organisation

 

REPORT AND RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE
 Local Traffic Committee MEETING

HELD ON 4 September, 2006

 

 

 

PRESENT

Steve Barnes – Senior Traffic Engineer (Chairperson), Councillor McKeown – Representative for the Member for Mulgoa, Councillor Sheehy – Representative for the Member for Londonderry, Sergeant Scott Smith – Penrith Police, Senior Constable Mark Elliott – St Marys/Regentville Police, Suthes Kumar – Roads and Traffic Authority, Tim Horan – Representative for the Member for Penrith

 

IN ATTENDANCE

 

Michael Pruss – Westbus, Rosemarie Barretto – Senior Traffic Engineer, Mary Jaser – Trainee Engineer

 

APOLOGIES

LTC 109  Deputy Mayor – Councillor Greenow, David Burns – Asset Manager, Mick Alderton – Road Network Services Engineer, Sharon Maddox – Road Safety Co-ordinator, Councillor Rumble, Richard McHenery – Roads and Traffic Authority.

 

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES - Local Traffic Committee Meeting – 4 September 2006

LTC 110  The minutes of the Local Traffic Committee Meeting of 4 September 2006 were confirmed, with the following amendments noted:

 

Item 3 – Muru Drive, Glenmore Park – Proposed Double Barrier Linemarking

 

LTC Comment:

Penrith Police representative commented that community consultation should be done first prior to the installation of the linemarking.

 

Recommendation:

2.  Approximately 40m of double barrier linemarking and raised pavement markers be provided around the bend…..

This should read, “Approximately 40m of double barrier linemarking and raised pavement markers be investigated around the bend…..”

 

 

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

There were no declarations of interest.

 

 

 

 

 

MASTER PROGRAM REPORTS

 

The City Supported by Infrastructure

 

1        Derby Street, Kingswood - Request for changes to parking restrictions.                       

LTC 111  RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Derby Street, Kingswood - Request for changes to parking restrictions. be received

2.     The existing 30m of 15 minute Parking 8:30am-6:00pm Mon-Fri 8:30am-12:30 pm Sat signposting on the southern side of Derby Street east of Parker Street, Kingswood be changed to15 minute Parking 8:30am-3:00pm Mon-Fri 8:30am-12:30pm Sat with an additional supplementary sign indicating No Stopping 3:00pm-7:00pm Mon-Fri.

3.     The existing 18m of unrestricted parking fronting House No’s 70&72 Derby Street, Kingswood be changed to 15 Minute Parking 3:00pm-6:00pm Mon-Fri.

4.     The owners of House No’s 70 & 72 Derby Street, Kingswood and the shop proprietor be advised of the Committees recommendations.

5.     Councillor Susan Page be advised of the Committee’s recommendations.

 

2        York Road, South Penrith- Request for provision of pedestrian crossing facility          

LTC 112  RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on York Road, South Penrith- Request for provision of pedestrian crossing facility be received

2.     The provision of a marked pedestrian crossing in York Road between Able Street and Batt Street, Penrith not be supported.

3.     Further investigations be carried out into the feasibility of providing a pedestrian refuge island in York Road between Able Street and Batt Street, Penrith.

4.     A speed classification survey be carried out in York Road, between Abel Street and Batt Street, to determine the speed profile at this location.  If the 85th percentile speed is considered excessive, the results of the survey be forwarded to the Police for monitoring/enforcement of vehicle speeds in York Road, Penrith.

5.     Karyn Paluzzano MP – Member for Penrith be advised of the Committee’s recommendations.

 

 

 

 

3        Proposed No Stopping Restrictions - High Street, Penrith                                              

LTC 113  RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Proposed No Stopping Restrictions - High Street, Penrith be received

2.     The existing locations of the ½ Hour Parking 8:30am-6:00pm Mon-Fri, 8:30am –12:30pm Sat parking restriction signposting in High Street, Penrith between Station Street and Woodriff Street in the vicinity of the two raised thresholds remain unchanged.

3.     Full time No Stopping restrictions be implemented across the two raised thresholds in High Street between Station Street and Woodriff Street, Penrith.

 

4        North St Marys and Oxley Park - Proposed Local Area Traffic Management (LATM) Scheme                                                                                                                                

LTC 114  RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on North St Marys and Oxley Park - Proposed Local Area Traffic Management (LATM) Scheme be received.

 

2.     Provision of further traffic calming devices in various locations, as shown on the concept LATM Scheme for both Study areas, be endorsed in principle by the Local Traffic Committee.

 

3.     The proposed traffic facilities be included in the list under Council’s Traffic Facilities Program to be constructed within the five-year program, subject to funding availability from various sources (ie. RTA/Council).

 

4.     Further community consultation be carried out upon receipt of approved funding allocation (by stages) for the proposed LATM Scheme, detailed design stage and prior to construction of these facilities.

 

5.       The proposed LATM Scheme for these areas be submitted to the RTA for possible funding consideration under the Authority’s Blackspot and Urban Amenity Program (Traffic Calming) within the five-year program (ie. from 2007/2008 to 2011/2012).

 

GENERAL BUSINESS

 

GB 1          Gibbes Street, Regentville – Traffic Facility

(Raised Penrith Police)

Penrith Police representative advised that there have been a number of drivers making dangerous “U-turn” movements into Gibbes Street at its intersection with Mulgoa Road, due to extensive delays during morning peak hours on Glenmore Parkway (right turn lane) and Mulgoa Road roundabout.  Drivers then turn left at the roundabout and make a dangerous “U-turn” movements into Gibbes Street intersection.

It is considered that the feasibility of providing a concrete median island in Gibbes Street at its intersection with Mulgoa Road be investigated to prevent drivers from making unsafe “U-turn” movements at this location.

LTC 115  RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.   the feasibility of providing a concrete median island in Gibbes Street at its intersection with Mulgoa Road be investigated to prevent drivers from making unsafe “U-turn” movements at this location.

2.   A further report be submitted back to the Committee following completion of the investigation.

 

GB 2          Riley Street, Penrith – Pedestrian Safety Issues (Raised Westbus)                       

Westbus representative indicated that some of the drivers have raised concerns at the potential hazards to pedestrians in Riley Street between Henry Street and Jane Street at the Penrith Plaza crossing. The drivers have indicated that on occasions pedestrians to disobey  the “Don’t Walk” signage and step out in front of oncoming vehicles including buses.

The drivers have suggested that the tiles on the crossing in Riley Street be changed to a different colour to better delineate the break in the continuity of the shopping mall.

Council’s Senior Traffic Engineer indicated that a number of improvements in the delineation of the crossing have been implemented since the opening of the Plaza including the installation of bollards, tactile devices and signage.

LTC 116  RECOMMENDATION

That the information be noted.

 

GB 3      Park Avenue, Kingswood – Pedestrian Safety around St Joseph’s Primary School   (Raised Westbus)                                                                                                                           

Westbus representative indicated that some of the drivers have raised concerns that since an internal fence between the school and church properties has been erected parents are now using Park Road as a Kiss and Ride area with no 40 km/h school zone in place.

LTC 117  RECOMMENDATION

That this matter will be investigated.

 

GB 4 Ninth Avenue, Llandilo – Xavier College internal traffic control

(Raised Westbus)                                                                                                                           

Westbus representative indicated that some of the drivers have raised concerns regarding the ambiguity in the existing internal traffic control currently in place within the drop off  area of Xavier College leading to potential conflicts between buses and cars.

LTC 118  RECOMMENDATION

That this matter be investigated.

 

GB 5 Grays Lane, Cranebrook – Proposed No Stopping in the vicinity of Samuel Terry Public School. (Raised Council)

Council’s Rangers previously raised concerns about parking at the southern end of Grays Lane, Cranebrook (where it used to meet Boundary Road and is now a garden).  It was advised that “parents are using this area to park, double park, etc, and there is no traffic control at the end of it.  The Rangers are requesting the provision of three No Stopping signs so the area is enforceable”.

Council at its meeting on 1 May 2006 resolved, on the recommendation of the Committee, that “the matter be investigated and a report be referred to the Local Traffic Committee if warranted”.

A site inspection between Council Senior Traffic Engineers and the Penrith Police representative, held on Thursday, 31 August 2006, revealed that it is considered to install “No Stopping” zones in Grays Lane at the following locations:

·    at the cul-de-sac turning area, and

·    on both sides of the driveway to the carpark, as parents use this section of the road to park their vehicles during before and after school hours. 

 

LTC 119  RECOMMENDATION

That “No Stopping” zones be provided in Grays Lane, Cranebrook near Samuel Terry Public School at the following locations:

·    at the cul-de-sac turning area, and

·    on both sides of the driveway to the carpark, as parents use this section of the road to park their vehicles during before and after school hours.  The “No Stopping” zone on the north-west corner to be extended to the existing “Bus Zone”.

 

There being no further business the Chairperson declared the meeting closed the time being 10.35am.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the recommendations contained in the Report and Recommendations of the Local Traffic Committee meeting held on 4 September, 2006 be adopted.

 

 


Ordinary Meeting

18 September 2006

Leadership and Organisation

 

REPORT AND RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE
 Policy Review Committee MEETING

HELD ON 11 September, 2006

 

 

 

PRESENT

His Worship the Mayor Councillor John Thain, Councillors Jim Aitken OAM, Kaylene Allison, David Bradbury (arrived 7:33pm), Lexie Cettolin (arrived 7:07pm), Kevin Crameri OAM, Mark Davies, Jackie Greenow, Karen McKeown, and Pat Sheehy AM.

 

APOLOGIES

PRC 73  RECOMMENDED that apologies be received and accepted from Councillors David Bradbury, Lexie Cettolin, Greg Davies, Susan Page and Steve Simat.

 

LEAVE OF ABSENCE

Leave of Absence was previously granted to Councillor Ross Fowler for the period 3 September 2006 to 25 September 2006 inclusive.

Leave of Absence was previously granted to Councillor Garry Rumble for the period 6 September 2006 to 28 September 2006 inclusive.

 

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES - Policy Review Committee Meeting - 14 August 2006

PRC 74  RECOMMENDED that the minutes of the Policy Review Committee Meeting of 14 August 2006 be confirmed.

 

 

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

 There were no declarations of interest.

 

MASTER PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Leadership and Organisation

 

The General Manager, Mr Alan Travers, gave a brief overview of the progress of the 2005-2009 Strategic Program to June 2006. Each Director then made a presentation detailing the progress with Term Achievements and Critical Actions within each Master Program as follows:

 

Leadership and Organisation                  Chief Financial Officer, Barry Husking

 

                                                                   Director – City Strategy, Alan Stoneham

 

                                                                   Director – City Services, Steve Hackett

 

The City Supported by Infrastructure     Director – City Operations, Ray Moore

 

The City in its Broader Context and The City as an Economy

 

                                                                   Director – City Strategy, Alan Stoneham

 

                                                                   Director – City Planning, Craig Butler

 

The City as a Social Place                       Director – City Services, Steve Hackett

 

                                                                   Director – City Planning, Craig Butler

 

                                                                   Director – City Operations, Ray Moore

 

The City in its Environment                    Director – City Planning, Craig Butler

 

                                                                   Director – City Operations, Ray Moore

 

1        2005-09 Strategic Program - Annual Review                                                                      

PRC 75  RECOMMENDED

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on 2005-09 Strategic Program - Annual Review be received

2.     The proposed change to Director Accountabilities as detailed in the report be endorsed.

3.     The proposed amendments to Term Achievements and Critical Actions as detailed in the report be adopted from 1 July 2006.

4.     Congratulations be passed on to the staff who worked on the Strategic Program Progress Report document.

 

 

There being no further business the Chairperson declared the meeting closed the time being 9:45pm.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the recommendations contained in the Report and Recommendations of the Policy Review Committee meeting held on 11 September, 2006 be adopted.

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


 

 

Leadership and Organisation

 

 

There were no reports under this Master Program when the Business Paper was compiled



 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

The City in its Broader Context

1        Australia's International Solar Boat Challenge 

 

2        University of Western Sydney - Marketing Initiatives 

 

The City as a Social Place

3        Grant Application - 2006/07 WSAAS Funding Round 

 

4        North St Marys Neighbourhood Centre 

 

5        Arms of Australia Inn Museum, Emu Plains 

 

6        Penrith Football Stadium - Future Management 

 

7        Section 96 Modification for the extension of operating hours for the drive-through McDonald's Restaurant at Lot 100 DP 1037595 (No. 2 - 6) Star Court, Cambridge Gardens. Applicant: McDonald's Properties (Australia) Pty Ltd;  Owner: McDonald's Properties (Australia) Pty Ltd DA991877

 

The City In Its Environment

8        Successful grant application under the Water Savings Fund Round 2 - 2006 

 

9        Sale of Cleanaway Australia and New Zealand 

 

10      Floodplain Management Authorities (FMA) Conference - 27 February to 2 March 2007 

 

The City Supported by Infrastructure

11      Rescue Services in the Penrith Local Government Area 

 

12      Tender Number 02-06/07 Provision of Tip Truck Hire 

 

Leadership and Organisation

13      Summary of Investments & Banking for the period 1 August 2006 to 28 August 2006 

 

14      City Operations Directorate Report to end of August 2006 

 

15      Signing of Friendship Agreement between Penrith City Council and Lachlan Shire Council 

 

16      2006 Penrith Rotary Mayoral Charity Ball 

 

 


The City in its Broader Context

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

1        Australia's International Solar Boat Challenge 

 

2        University of Western Sydney - Marketing Initiatives 

 

 



Ordinary Meeting

18 September 2006

The City in its Broader Context

 

 

The City in its Broader Context

 

 

1

Australia's International Solar Boat Challenge   

 

Compiled by:                Paul Page, Acting Economic Development and City Marketing Manager

Authorised by:             Paul Page, Acting Economic Development and City Marketing Manager   

Strategic Program Term Achievement: A decision has been secured from relevant groups to develop a nominated institution or event that has the status to cause Penrith Valley to be widely recognised locally, throughout the State, nationally and throughout the world.

Critical Action: Identify and work with partners to develop and implement a strategy to secure the selected institution or event.

     

Purpose:

To advise Council about the Solar Boat Challenge which is being held in conjunction with Activate and present a request for sponsorship.  The report recommends that Council approve the sponsorship.

 

Background

Earlier this year Council was approached by the Roland Corporation to support Australia’s International Solar Boat Challenge which it proposed to host at the International Regatta Centre. 

 

The Roland Corporation is a large international company based in Japan which makes large printers and plotters. It is a branch of the well known manufacturer of electronic musical instruments.  The local subsidiary is keen to promote sustainability values through the proposed event. 

 

The objective is to stage an event which will provide an enjoyable and stimulating educational experience while raising the awareness of the importance of solar power as an alternative power source.  Every school in Australia is being invited to design and build a solar powered model or piloted boat to enter in the Solar Boat Challenge.

 

This proposal was quickly recognised as having potential to be of benefit to Penrith Valley, both as an event in its own right and as a component of Council’s sustainability program.  It is felt that this event has the potential to fulfil the event component of Critical Action 1.1 which seeks to secure an event or institution that “has the status to be widely recognised locally, throughout the state, nationally and throughout the world.”

 

It was agreed that the best way to nurture its development as an annual event was for it to be held in conjunction with Council’s ACTIVATE event in 2006 and possibly in 2007.  This would provide cost efficiencies and provide a ready made audience for the event. 

 

Current Situation

Over the past few months officers from City Marketing, Facilities Operations and the Sustainability Unit have worked with representatives of the Roland Corporation to develop the proposal and to provide assistance in integrating it with ACTIVATE. 

 

Roland has formed Social Environment & Economic Sustainability (SEES) Ltd, a non-profit company which will run the Solar Boat Challenge and undertake other activities for the general encouragement of science.  Roland is the founding sponsor of this organisation. 

 

There are two main levels of competition in the Solar Boat Challenge – model boats and piloted boats. 

 

Within the model boats category are radio and wire controlled boats.  SEES is providing starter kits for the model boats which cost about $250 each and will include polystyrene, solar panels, motors, propellers, agents for the milling of hulls and finishing products.  It is hoped to provide 50 of these kits and to fund them with sponsorships.  This category will be available to Primary and High Schools. 

 

The piloted boats will be single person units with restrictions on battery, solar panel and engine capacity.  Each boat will compete in a sprint slalom and endurance races. 

 

The kits for the piloted boats cost approximately $5,000 each and SEES hopes to make 10 of these available, again funded through sponsorships.

 

The piloted boat category will be available to high schools, tertiary institutions and hobbyist groups. 

 

At the time of writing over 20 schools have confirmed their involvement.  Two local schools, Mamre Christian School and Claremont Meadows Public School have tentatively indicated  their participation, with several others expected to commit in the next few weeks. 

Marketing

We are working closely with SEES to ensure that the event is well promoted.  The event organiser, Mr Tim Levy, presents a children’s program on subscription television and has good connections with the media, especially children’s and scientific media.  Already there has been good exposure in national media.

 

Schools are being mailed and emailed with details of the inaugural event and invitations to register.  Initially, this will be restricted to schools in the area surrounding the Penrith district, of which there are approximately 130.  They have a database of 3498 NSW Schools.

 

Emphasis will be placed on local school participation, giving local children the opportunity to become involved at an early stage with what is anticipated to become a growing international event.

 

The press program, organised by Roland DG includes approaching all of the major network shows for feature stories and general coverage.

 

Roland DG have developed a partnership with Groovedelicious TV (www.groovedelicious.com/gdtv). This program is shown on Foxtel’s channel 183, the Aurora Channel, three times a week. It is focused on children and education in primary and secondary schools nationally.

 

The program has agreed to shoot and broadcast four segments over two shows. The first, shot on location at the USA Solar Cup in Los Angeles, went to air on 25 July and can be viewed at the Solar Boat Challenge Web Site.

 

The show is also partnered with DMAG, a top children’s magazine with a circulation of 190,000 copies monthly. DMAG has agreed to do an educational eight page feature on Solar Energy in their November issue.

 

Local marketing will be integrated into the campaign for ACTIVATE.  This schedule includes

 

August

·    12th  - Solar Boat was on display in Civic Centre foyer for Open Day and through much of the remainder of the month.

·    26th to 27th  - Penrith City Show – Penrith City Council event leaflets (including ACTIVATE/Solar Challenge information) were distributed from Council’s event stall on both days of the show.

September

·    1st - Editorial and pictures in the Penrith City Star/Oxigen Mind and Body Fitness newspaper supplement “Essential for Life”

·    Editorial and pictures in Council newsletter (distributed to all Penrith LGA households)

October

·    Council and Regatta Centre event websites ‘live’ (1st October)

·    Full page advertisement and editorial in Panthers Magazine

·    1st to 16th - 100 A3 colour posters distributed to libraries, youth centres, childcare and vacation centres, recreation centres etc.

·    15,000 DL size fliers distributed to schools, Active Out of Schools Program,

·    16th to 30th - Panthers on the Prowl Program.

·    5,000 DL fliers distributed to shopping centres and shops, sports groups, recreation centres and groups, youth facilities, accommodation providers etc.

·    16th to 30th - Three street banners to be supplied “in kind” by Roland DG erected in Penrith and St Marys

·    10th - Media Launch for editorial in Western Weekender, Penrith Star and Penrith Press

·    27th - ¼ page advert in Western Weekender

·    31st - ¼ page advert Penrith Press

·    ¼ page advert Penrith Star (31st)

 

 

November

·    1st - 1/4 page advert in Blue Mountains Gazette

·    3rd - ¼ page advert in Western Weekender

 

Existing Sponsorships and Partnerships

SEES has been successful in attracting other partners.  These include, CSIRO (Double Helix Club), Hunter Valley Council, Lane Cove Municipal Council, Groovedelicious TV, The USA Solar Cup and the Ultimo Science Festival which was a joint initiative of UTS / ABC / TAFE and The Powerhouse.

Comment from Facilities Operations Manager

 ‘ACTIVATE’ is a free community event organised by Council and the Sydney International Regatta Centre, and is supported in 2006 by Oxigen Mind & Body Fitness and Penrith Panthers.  Now in its eighth year the event has grown in popularity with both sporting clubs and the community. This year it is anticipated that over 30 sporting clubs and associations will provide activities, which visitors to the event can take part in. The anticipated 5,000 – 8,000 visitors will also have the opportunity to watch dance and sports demonstrations, and have fun on three large inflatable rides.

 

To date this year’s confirmed activities include rock climbing, sailing, canoeing, the Heart Foundation’s ‘Heart Move Programme’, swimming, circus skills, archery, dragon boat paddling, fishing, tai chi, roller skating, personal fitness, tennis, athletics, wrestling, weightlifting and many more. There will also be displays and activities provided by Council’s Health People Partnerships section as well as the Cancer Council.  

 

ABC’s Active Kidz will provide the headline entertainment on the main stage as well as a ‘meet and greet’ for participants on the day. Active Kidz feature songs, exercise routines and Active tips — quirky facts about health, fitness, lifestyle and the human body.

 

‘ACTIVATE’ is designed to promote the importance of leading an active lifestyle and attendees are encouraged to be physically active by participating in the organised activities.  By taking part in the activities on the Day, visitors will have the chance to win some fabulous prizes.

 

Operation and logistics meetings and planning have been coordinated between the ACTIVATE Organising Committee and Roland DG. This planning will ensure that ACTIVATE and Australia’s International Solar Boat Challenge provides a high quality visitor experience and showcases health and environmental sustainability.

Comment from Corporate Development Manager

Council’s Strategic Program calls for leadership in and promotion of strategies that encourage energy conservation. A particular task in the current Management Plan is to improve our knowledge of and engage the City’s communities in initiatives that encourage the use of energy from sustainable sources. A range of measures are being undertaken to pursue this.

 

Council will recall the ‘Solar Splash’ event which was organised at the Regatta Centre in 2003 as part of our sustainability program. That included not only solar boat races but an Eco Energy Fair with stalls, information sessions, workshops and other activities to showcase ways to reduce business and household energy use and save money. While Solar Splash was a very worthwhile event, its heavy dependence on Council as organiser and principal sponsor and on hobbyists as the main participants made it difficult to successfully repeat.

 

The Solar Challenge initiative from the Roland Corporation (now through SEES) has the potential to establish, in partnership with Council, the Regatta Centre and other sponsors a major sustainability event for the City. The focus on the participation of schools (while allowing also for hobbyists, tertiary institutions and corporate participation) is particularly appropriate and significant. The initial linking of the event with ACTIVATE is a natural ‘fit’ and should enable the Solar Challenge to grow into a stand-alone iconic event in succeeding years. It is hoped that, as the event grows, it will in turn become the basis for a broader sustainability festival.

 

This initiative will also make a major contribution to Council’s recent commitment (through the Mayors’ Asia Pacific Environmental Summit) to fostering a ‘Green Events’ standard for the City.

Sponsorship request

SEES is seeking sponsorship support from Council and in accordance with Council’s sponsorship policy has submitted a Business Plan.  A copy of this business plan is attached.  They are seeking $7,000 to cover the cost of 26 model boat kits and to support the direct mail campaign to schools. 

 

Funds for this request are available in the City Marketing budget. 

 

The business plan demonstrates that the event meets the criteria of the sponsorship policy in that it will attract visitors from outside the City and coverage in national media.  It is believed that this will be an investment in the future of a worthwhile event that will be of ongoing benefit to the City, as well as supporting our sustainability objectives.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Australia's International Solar Boat Challenge be received.

2.     Council approve the request for $7,000 in sponsorship for the Solar Boat Challenge as an element of the Council’s ‘ACTIVATE’ event.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.  

Solar Boat Challenge Business Plan

7 Pages

Attachment

 


Ordinary Meeting

18 September 2006

The City in its Broader Context

 

 

The City in its Broader Context

 

 

2

University of Western Sydney - Marketing Initiatives   

 

Compiled by:                Gary Dean, Facilities Operations Manager

Authorised by:             Steve Hackett, Director - City Services   

Strategic Program Term Achievement: Penrith is recognised locally and throughout Sydney as vibrant, innovative and attractive, distinguished from the rest of Sydney, with a range of services and experiences, complemented by those available in the Blue Mountains and Hawkesbury.

Critical Action: Maintain a marketing program that presents Penrith Valley as the attractive, vibrant centre of outer northwest Sydney, designed to distinguish it from other parts of Sydney and attract visitors.

     

Purpose:

To advise Council of marketing initiatives being developed by students of the Universiry of Western Sydney for nominated Council entities.  The report recommends that the information be received.

 

Introduction

In June this year, the University of Western Sydney sought expressions of interest for “UWS School of Marketing Student Consultancy Team Support”.  This program was to apply to the Spring 2006 Semester as part of the students’ coursework.  The topics which were being offered were:

 

·    Applied Marketing Research

·    Marketing Planning Project

 

These topics were for final year undergraduate student consultancy teams.

 

·    International Marketing

·    International Marketing Management

 

These topics were for postgraduate student consultancy teams.

 

These offers were forwarded to each of Council’s controlled entities for consideration of an appropriate submission.

 

Approved Programs

The following submissions have been successful:

 

·    Ripples Leisure Centre – Marketing Planning Project

“Review current and development future marketing plan for Ripples Leisure Centre.  Outcomes: increased market exposure and increased patronage.”

 

·    Joan Sutherland Performing Arts Centre – Applied Marketing Research and Marketing Planning Project

“The major issues would be the research and development of methodologies, collateral and strategic planning initiatives to engage and reach new local and regional audiences (with particular emphasis on families, 18-35 years demographic and 50+ demographic).  The project would also work in unison with proposed project to develop new graphic materials et al.”

 

·    Penrith City Council Children’s Services – Applied Marketing Research and Marketing Planning Project

“Need to do some research around the perception of staff in relation to what they see their role and responsibilities in the promotion and marketing of their childcare services to families and the wider community.  How they would do this and whether this is aligned to families expectation.  Meaning staff perceptions matching parent expectations (what attracts them to our services).  The outcome being that we will be able to strengthen family expectations and include this in our marketing.  Outcome – identifying what training is required for our staff around marketing and what marketing tools is required to target parents and the community.

 

Investigating and sourcing potential sponsors to support marketing initiatives within the childcare sector and providing a plan on how to go about engaging sponsors that are appropriate to the service.”

 

Conclusion

These initiatives are another excellent example of ‘partnership’ between Council and the University.  This program will provide mutual benefits to both students and the Council entities.

 

The results of the students’ work will be presented at the end of November 2006.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the information contained in the report on University of Western Sydney - Marketing Initiatives be received.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


The City as a Social Place

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

3        Grant Application - 2006/07 WSAAS Funding Round 

 

4        North St Marys Neighbourhood Centre 

 

5        Arms of Australia Inn Museum, Emu Plains 

 

6        Penrith Football Stadium - Future Management 

 

7        Section 96 Modification for the extension of operating hours for the drive-through McDonald's Restaurant at Lot 100 DP 1037595 (No. 2 - 6) Star Court, Cambridge Gardens. Applicant: McDonald's Properties (Australia) Pty Ltd;  Owner: McDonald's Properties (Australia) Pty Ltd DA991877

 

 



Ordinary Meeting

18 September 2006

The City as a Social Place

 

 

The City as a Social Place

 

 

3

Grant Application - 2006/07 WSAAS Funding Round   

 

Compiled by:                Judy Cobb, Community Programmes Coordinator

Authorised by:             Erich Weller, Community Development Manager   

Strategic Program Term Achievement: Strategies are in place to respond to the social and health needs of the community.

Critical Action: Implement social planning, health planning and community development strategies through the Social Planning Framework.

     

Purpose:

To seek Council's retrospective endorsement of an application for funding under the Western Sydney Area Assistance Scheme (WSAAS) 2006/07 funding round for a Northern Rural Areas Community Development Project - Penrith LGA.  The report recommends that Council endorse the submission of the application.

 

Background

At the Ordinary Meeting of 19 September 2005, Council endorsed an application to the 2005/06 WSAAS funding round for a Northern Rural Areas Community Development Project – Penrith LGA.  The application was unsuccessful.  Advice from the Western Sydney Area Assistance Scheme officers was that the project was highly regarded in their assessment process.  However only a limited number of projects across Western Sydney could be funded.

 

The northern rural areas of the Penrith LGA experience geographic isolation and social disadvantage.  There are few community services located in these areas or outreach services provided from Penrith.  According to the ABS 2001 Socio Economic Index for Advantage and Disadvantage (SEIFA), Londonderry and Llandilo in particular experience a relatively high level of disadvantage, compared to other suburbs and areas across the city.  There are approximately 7,500 residents in the northern rural areas.

 

Existing non-government Community Development organisations do not have the capacity to deliver community capacity building initiatives and programs in the rural areas of the city.  These organisations are funded to service largely urban catchments.  After careful assessment of this project, it is proposed that Council is in the best place to auspice this project.  Council, through its city-wide leadership role and advocacy capacity, will be able to more effectively address some of the social issues already identified in the development of the project.

 

Within the 2005/09 Strategic Program, Council has identified two Terms Achievements that are relevant to this project.  They are:

 

·    Effective responses are made to the social impacts of growth, redevelopment and change.

·    Strategies are in place to respond to the social and health needs of the community.

 

Current Situation

The previous application has been only slightly amended to reflect increased project delivery costs.  The due date for applications for funding under the 2006/07 WSAAS round was 6th September 2006, and an application for funding of the Northern Rural Areas Community Development Project was submitted by the due date.

 

The Northern Rural Area Community Development Project is proposed to fund the employment by Council of a Community Development Officer for four days per week over three years.  The project worker will be based within the local public schools of Londonderry and Llandilo three days per week, with the support of the Principals of both schools.  The Principals have indicated they have suitable rent free office space within their respective schools, which would assist in the development and implementation of the project.  One day a week would be spent at Council, or with other services, implementing components of the project.

 

The project addresses the identified WSAAS outcome of building community leadership and capacity.  This project has been developed as a time limited three-year project within the WSAAS category of Community Infrastructure Development.  The budget for the project is approximately $70,725 per annum for 3 years and totals $212,177.  Council’s in-kind contribution would include:

 

·    Supervision and support

·    Public Liability Insurance

·    Administrative support

·    Annual Financial Audit

 

The objectives of the Northern Rural Community Development Project are to:

 

·    Consult with the northern rural communities and determine the priority needs

·    Develop an action plan to implement priorities

·    Develop partnership projects with key rural services and Penrith and Nepean-wide service providers to address priority needs

·    Seek additional funding opportunities to address the priorities if required (e.g. CDSE)

·    Implement priority programs and activities

·    Involve the community in the development and implementation of the project to build local capacity and social capital.

 

It would achieve these objectives by:

 

·    Undertaking consultation and networking, to determine priority projects and programs for development and implementation, and finalise action plan

·    Linking other service providers in Penrith, with target groups in the community that require particular types of assistance and programs eg families, young people, older people

·    Developing steering committees/reference groups to implement specific programs to assist local capacity building eg transition to school initiatives, parenting courses, community events such as family fun days, information on services for older people

·    Developing timelines for program implementation

·    Formalising outreach service arrangements to the local area (e.g. Londonderry village) in key areas of social service provision

·    Regularly evaluating progress towards addressing priorities as identified

·    Maximise the sustainability of project outcomes through formalising linkages between local service venues and outreach service providers.

 

In addition if the submission is successful the project will complement and be integrated into Council’s Established Areas Strategy and provide additional resources to devote to the northern rural areas of the City.

Summary

Generally, the range of community programs and activities that are available within the urban areas of the City are not locally provided in the rural areas.  The northern rural areas of the City experience a relatively high level of socio-economic disadvantage as well as some geographic isolation compared to other areas of the City.

 

The proposed Northern Rural Areas Community Development Project will provide resources to build community leadership and capacity, and co-ordinate enhanced service provision in these areas.

 

Lastly, if funded the project will complement Council’s Established Areas Strategy and enable additional resources to be directed towards these areas.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Grant Application - 2006/07 WSAAS Funding Round be received.

2.     Council endorse the submission of the Northern Rural Areas Community Development Project – Penrith LGA application for funding under the 2006/07 WSAAS funding round.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Ordinary Meeting

18 September 2006

The City as a Social Place

 

 

The City as a Social Place

 

 

4

North St Marys Neighbourhood Centre   

 

Compiled by:                Judy Cobb, Community Programmes Coordinator

Authorised by:             Erich Weller, Community Development Manager 

Strategic Program Term Achievement: A program of renewal for selected neighbourhoods that contributes to a sense of community identity and cohesiveness is being implemented.

Critical Action: Implement agreed strategies for the delivery of facilities, services and infrastructure.

     

Purpose:

To advise Council of some operational issues that have emerged since the opening of the North St Marys Neighbourhood Centre in late August 2005.  The report recommends that Council address these operational issues as outlined in the report.

 

Background

In 2002, Council convened the North St Marys Neighbourhood Renewal workshops. Over forty participants from government agencies, community organisations and local stakeholders attended each of the two workshops.  The construction of a new purpose-built neighbourhood centre was identified as a high priority at these workshops, to enable the delivery of an enhanced range of social services and programs to the residents of North St Marys.

 

At the Ordinary Meeting of 18 October 2004, Council resolved to proceed with the construction of the new North St Marys Neighbourhood Centre, accepting the tender of John M Coyle and Co Pty Ltd in the amount of $911,084.00.  Total project cost, including design, contract supervision, construction contingency, landscaping and fitout was $1,203,084.00.

 

At the time of proceeding with the construction project in late 2004, the proposed funding was from a number of sources as outlined below.

 

Council                                                                                          $800,000

NSW Department of Housing                                                         $290,000

Premier’s Department Community Solutions Program                       $60,000

Community Development Support Expenditure Scheme                    $54,000

Total                                                                                          $1,204,000

 

The CDSE allocation in 2004 was for the fitout of the Centre.  This was jointly funded by St Marys Leagues, St Marys Band Club and Penrith Panthers.

 

The NSW Department of Housing contribution was to be funded by the sale of the old Department of Housing Neighbourhood Centre cottage in North St Marys.  When this property was finally sold in May 2006 (after the Neighbourhood Centre operations had relocated to the new facility) the Department of Housing contribution was only $210,000 after the deduction of costs.  The property was also sold at a time when the housing market was depressed compared to when the original valuation was undertaken.

 

The shortfall of $80,000 in the Department of Housing contribution was met by an additional $40,000 contribution from the Department of Housing and an additional $40,000 allocation from Council as reported to Council as part of the June 2006 Quarterly Review of the Management Plan.

 

Practical completion of the construction of the new Centre was achieved by the end of June 2005.  Landscaping was largely completed by August 2005.  Job Quest, a local Job Network provider, completed the landscaping for the Centre, and a number of local unemployed people with a mutual obligation were part of the landscape team. 

 

The Centre was officially opened by the Mayor of the day, Councillor Jackie Greenow, in late August 2005 and is managed by North St Marys Neighbourhood Centre Inc.  This community-based committee is also responsible for managing the local community development project and youth development project which are funded by the State and Federal Governments.  A number of other programs are also run at the Centre.

 

In the second half of 2005, North St Marys Neighbourhood Centre Inc was successful in receiving a CDSE grant of $50,000 for a playground, soft-fall and related enhancements.  They have also been successful with a further grant of $16,000 from the 2006 CDSE process for the design and construction of a purpose built shade structure for the new playground.

Current Situation

The North St Marys Neighbourhood Centre has now been fully operational for twelve months.  The Centre provides a vibrant community hub that is accessed by over 200 residents each week.  This does not include the approximately 100 children that accompany their parent/guardian to activities and programs.  Centre activities and programs include kids craft activities (4-8 yr old and 9-12 yrs old groups), a number of relaxation support groups, young parents’ network with childcare, and two women’s groups including a multicultural group.  Other activities include adult craft and embroidery groups, a weight control group and an Al-Anon Family group.  The South Creek Mobile Youth Service also provides family counselling and youth programs two afternoons a week from the Centre.

 

Council’s Mobile Playvan and the St Marys Community Health Centre also provide outreach services at the Centre, including an early childhood clinic and pregnancy care.  Over 20 children, and as many parents, attend the Mobile Playvan session.  A TAFE Outreach computer course commenced in early May and ran for eight weeks.  There were thirteen participants. Further courses are planned for Term 4.

Operational Issues

During the first twelve months of operation, North St Marys Neighbourhood Centre Inc has identified two operational issues at the new facility.  Given that these issues have arisen in the first 12 months of operation the Community Development Manager has taken responsibility to resolve these matters.  The Facility Operations Manager and Building Services Manager have been consulted on the proposed solutions outlined in this report.

 

Drainage

As indicated in the background to this report CDSE funding has been obtained by the North St Marys Committee for the playground and installation.  On at least two occasions when there has been heavy rain, some pondage has occurred in one corner of the site for the proposed playground, as well as some water-logging in the adjacent landscaped areas.  As a consequence, installation of the playground has been delayed. 

 

In June 2006, forty metres of additional drainage line was installed inside the fence line adjacent to the internal landscaping along Debrincat Avenue.  Advice from Neighbourhood Centre staff indicates that this drainage work has addressed the water ponding issue.  This work was completed as part of the Neighbourhood Centre construction project.

 

Council Officers are now working with the Centre staff to finalise design and installation details for the play equipment and shade shelter. 

 

Managing Heat in the Centre

The second operational issue that has emerged is that the design of the Centre has not been as successful in managing heat as expected.  This is particularly relevant during the summer months. 

 

During the design process for the Centre, Council had the detailed design documentation reviewed by a Sustainability Architect.  As a result of this review, a number of adjustments were made, according to the advice provided.  The sustainability and internal climate control enhancements incorporated in the design include:

 

·     Passive solar design principles have been adopted having regard to access, orientation and the limitations imposed by the visual impact of the back of the shopping centre.

·    Windows and clerestories (high windows in roof) have been provided on northwest side of the building to get maximum daylight into the building, reduce the use of artificial lighting during the daytime, minimising power usage.

·    Windows and clerestories have been positioned specifically to allow cross ventilation to cool down the building.

·    Light coloured metal roof sheets have been used to minimise the heat transfer by reflecting the direct sun rays.

·    The elevated verandahs on the south-eastern side have been designed to gain maximum daylight and allow airflow for cooling effects.

·    An underground rainwater storage tank has been provided for garden irrigation.

·    Light sensors have been provided to minimise power usage.

·    Windows and clerestories proportions have been verified with desirable winter and summer sun angles.

 

Usage of the new Centre has indicated however, that these sustainability and climate control features have not been as successful as expected.  In particular, the Jim Anderson Room (small hall), Youth Office and Youth Lounge get very hot in summer.  Council has received a number of letters from Centre users regarding heat management issues.

 

Council has undertaken a follow-up sustainability assessment of the centre.  This assessment was particularly focused on heat management and the most efficient way to cool the centre during the summer months.  An important related consideration is minimising power usage and thus the operational cost to the centre.  The assessment included discussions with staff at the Centre, regarding options for improving the indoor environment at the Centre. 

 

The sustainability assessment recommends a number of heat management and climate control measures be considered for the Centre.  These recommendations include the construction of a pergola on the northwest side of the centre, installation of flyscreens, security screen doors, and window grills, the planting of nine established trees on the western side of the Centre outside the fence line, window tinting, airconditioning in offices and meeting rooms, and the development of a night cooling strategy (including development of a staff manual and staff training). 

 

The sustainability assessment measures recommended above are components of a package of enhancements that complement each other to deliver a resolution to heat management at the Centre.  The staff manual and training will provide the Committee and staff within the building the knowledge to implement the heat management strategies.  A Quantity Surveyor has estimated that the total cost of this work would be approximately $80, 762.

 

It should be noted that the provision of ducted airconditioning in the Centre is not an option due to the design of the roof.  Therefore, wall-mounted air conditioning units need to be retrofitted into each main functional area to assist in managing heat during summer.  The motors to each unit would be located on the outside of the centre, and caged in suitable material to blend with the brick building, as well as for safety. 

 

The Building Services Manager has been consulted on the proposed heat management strategies and agrees with the proposed solutions.  There are no available funds for this project in the Building Services 2006/07 budget.

 

It should be noted that it has been Council practice to provide heating, but not airconditioning, as part of the design of new neighbourhood centres.  However, a number of centres in the LGA have over the years had airconditioning provided, particularly in office areas where employed staff work. The only room currently airconditioned in the North St Marys Neighbourhood Centre is the main staff office adjacent to the foyer.  This relatively new system was relocated from the old centre in Poplar Street to the new facility.

Proposed Funding Option for Heat Management Strategies

It is proposed that implementation of the recommendations identified in the follow-up sustainability assessment for North St Marys Neighbourhood Centre be funded through the following sources:

 

Proposed Funding Sources

Budget Estimate

Council’s Community Safety and Neighbourhood Renewal Program

Installation of Flyscreen, sliding screen doors, window grills, established trees, window tinting, air conditioning units in offices, meeting rooms, and Jim Anderson Room.

$39,762

Council’s Sustainability Design Adviser Funding

Development of a Night Cooling Strategy (including development of a staff manual and staff training)

$5,000

Regional Partnerships Funding (GROW Inc)

Design and construction of louvred pergola/sunscreen to northwest elevation of building

$36,000

Total

$80,762

 

The Asset Manager has confirmed that the Neighbourhood Renewal (physical infrastructure improvements) component of the Community Safety and Neighbourhood Renewal Program is an appropriate source of funding given that North St Marys is a priority Neighbourhood Renewal area. This program had previously contributed funding towards the construction of the Neighbourhood Centre.

 

Discussions have been held with the GROW Sydney Inc. Project Manager regarding the prospects of success of an application for part-funding of the heat management strategies for North St Marys Neighbourhood Centre.  GROW funding is based on a principle of a dollar for dollar contribution to projects.  The proposed funding option provides for a 55% Council contribution and a 45% GROW contribution.  The discussions with GROW referred to above indicate that the project meets the program guidelines and responds to the high priority assessment criteria.  If Council endorses the recommendations in this report a submission will be lodged under the GROW Regional Partnerships Funding Program.  If unsuccessful, the pergola component of the heat management strategies will not proceed.  Based on experience, the outcome of applications under the Regional Partnerships funding are communicated to the applicant within three months after the submission is lodged.  If Council endorses the recommendations of this report, Council’s implementation of the heat management strategies can occur before the next summer.  If the GROW application is successful the pergola will be constructed in the first quarter of 2007.

Summary

Nth St Marys Neighbourhood Centre has been operational for just over 12 months.  The new centre provides a vibrant community hub that offers an extensive range of activities and programs for over 200 residents each week.

 

The Centre features a number of sustainability enhancements.  Many of these features have been very successful.  Usage of the new Centre has indicated however the heat management and climate control features included in the design have not been as successful as expected. 

 

A package of heat management and climate control strategies have been recommended as a result of a follow-up sustainability assessment.  These strategies complement each other to deliver a resolution to heat management issues at the Centre.

 

A Quantity Surveyor has estimated that the total cost of the heat management and climate control strategies would be approximately $80, 762.  It is proposed that

these sustainability measures be funded through three sources including Council’s Community Safety and Neighbourhood Renewal Program, Council’s Sustainability Design Adviser Funding, and Regional Partnerships Funding (GROW Inc.)

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

          That:

 

1.   The information contained in the report on North St Marys Neighbourhood Centre be received.

 

2.   The heat management strategies for North St Marys Neighbourhood Centre be endorsed.

 

3.   An application for $36,000 be submitted under the GROW Regional Partnership Funding Program to part fund the heat management strategies.

 

4.   The remaining cost of the heat management strategies be funded from the Community Safety and Neighbourhood Renewal ($39,762) and Sustainability Design Adviser Funding ($5,000).

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Ordinary Meeting

18 September 2006

The City as a Social Place

 

 

The City as a Social Place

 

 

5

Arms of Australia Inn Museum, Emu Plains   

 

Compiled by:                Andrew Robinson, Recreation and Cultural Facilities Coordinator

Authorised by:             Gary Dean, Facilities Operations Manager 

Strategic Program Term Achievement: The City’s recreation and leisure facilities and services meet its needs and are optimally used.

Critical Action: Ensure facilities and services reflect the City’s diverse current and future recreation and leisure needs.

     

Purpose:

To advise Council of a request from Nepean District Historical Society (NDHS) to increase its present landholding at the Arms of Australia Inn Museum located in Emu Plains.  The report recommends that the landholding be extended 12 metres to the west for the purpose of accommodating additional Museum related activities.  The report also recommends that a new fence be constructed and that Council meet the costs of that fence.

 

Background

Council owns the land on which the former ‘Arms of Australia Inn’ stands, together with the reconstructed stables/barn and an amenities building. Council also owns the land in the adjacent reserve and road reserve which form part of the curtilage of the primary building.  The land and buildings are occupied by the Nepean District Historical Society (NDHS), under terms that require Council to carry out all major maintenance on the primary building. Council is advised in regard to this site by a Section 377 Committee - Arms of Australia Inn Management Committee. NDHS take responsibility for the operation of the site as a Museum.

 

The NDHS uses the site as its ‘home’, with an historical museum and research area in the former inn building, and related activities in the adjacent stables/barn, as well as using the amenities building for meetings and visitor purposes (including education).

 

A number of representations have been made by the NDHS over recent years, to Council officers, regarding the further development and refurbishment of the Arms of Australia Inn, particularly in respect of the venue becoming a Regional Museum. Independent consultants (Bowie 1997, Berzins 2000) were commissioned to explore the possibilities of the facility becoming a Regional Museum, and the findings, recognised by Council and NDHS, were that the site does not present the ideal circumstance for development over time of a Regional History Museum.

 

Instead, Council in May 2000, resolved in part, that there be a principle of limited expansion of museum related uses on the site, and the preferred option for any future development is generally westward along the Public Reserve. Furthermore, notwithstanding the recommendation that the facility is not ideal for a Regional Museum, Council has assisted NDHS endeavours over time, in many ways, to sustain the operations of the group and to ensure that the facility is well maintained, for example:

 

·    Provision of accommodation, rent free

·    Recent examples of major works include roof shingle replacement and upgrade of perimeter fence

·    Preparation of a site management plan

·    Grant application assistance

·    Re-laying of the sandstone verandah

·    Improvements to drainage

·    The construction of accessible toilets

 

Current Situation

The Arms of Australia Inn Museum and the NDHS provide a superb cultural and social asset for the City, preserving the heritage of the Region, providing a valuable education resource, and contributing to the tourism attraction of the Penrith Valley.

 

An opportunity has recently been presented to Council officers by the NDHS Committee, which will enable the Committee to provide an increased heritage service to the local community and attract both visitors and user groups from the wider region.

 

At Australia Day 2006, the NDHS shared an area in the ‘Heritage Zone’ with the NSW Corps of Marines. During discussions on the Day, it emerged that the NSW Corps of Marines are seeking a permanent home base for their organisation, and it was agreed that the Arms of Australia Inn could possibly be that base. The NDHS undertook to make further enquiries.

 

The Corps is based on the Marine Corps Troops that were stationed in the colony in the first five years. Their members are currently spread around Western Sydney and the Central Coast. It is the intention that, should the Arms of Australia Inn become their home base, the facility will be used for drilling practice, setting up ‘camp’ for demonstrations and events, and holding monthly meetings within the meeting room at the venue.  No weapons will be stored on the premises as muscats are individually licensed and are required to be kept in an approved safe. Only the Corps’ encampment equipment will be stored on the premises in an area agreed and identified by NDHS. All equipment will be removed and stored after each drilling session, demonstration or event. The Marines have their own insurance which covers individual members and their activities.

 

Requirements

To facilitate the accommodation of the NSW Corps of Marines, the NDHS seek permission from Council to enter into this partnership, and to extend the Western Boundary fence at the Arms of Australia Inn Museum (see attached diagram) to accommodate their activities.

It is their intention to extend the fence line 12 metres to the west and enclose the additional area. It is anticipated that this extension will not only allow the NSW Corps of Marines to locate to the site, but also will allow the NDHS to reconfigure existing display materials for the betterment of both visitor access and, more importantly, the long term preservation of existing exhibits and expansion of collections. The expansion of the fence line will allow additional room to place a walkway around the existing barn and set out a number of hanging ‘horse drawn plough’ exhibits.  Second-hand timber will be used to form the frames displaying several of the larger agricultural ploughs and farming equipment, thus keeping the displays off the ground, preventing rust and corrosion. Space will also be ‘freed up’ in the barn for smaller equipment.

A site investigation has also revealed that extension of the fence line, as proposed, will incorporate two large mature trees and will prevent the need for their removal.

The work to extend the fence line will be the responsibility of Council as per the terms of the existing management agreement. To this extent, the NDHS have requested that, should the extension be agreed to, Council organise and carry out the work. A cost estimate for the work has been received for $2,850 (including GST).

Parks, Reserves and Construction Manager’s Comment

There is no objection to the extension  of the fence line. There are no proposed long term plans or commitments for the identified land. Extension of the fence line will entail NDHS maintaining the additional land within their site, and I am aware that the Society has the equipment, skills and dedication to maintain the land to the required standard.

 

Heritage Advisor/Officer’s Comment

Initial concerns about the proposed use of the extended site have been addressed after discussion with the NDHS. Of particular concern was the chance that the area might be used for storage containers and activities inappropriate to the heritage significance of the venue. NDHS have clearly described and documented the intended use of the extended area, as outlined in this report, and I am satisfied that the area’s use will not adversely affect the heritage significance of the site and its presentation to the public.

 

Development Services Manager’s Comments

The former Inn and related buildings are located on Lot 22, DP 242300.  This land is zoned 6(a) Public Recreation and Community Uses under Penrith Local Environmental Plan 1998 (Urban Land).   A number of land uses are permissible with development consent in the zone, and most notably in respect of this matter:

 

“Uses or buildings specifically permitted by an adopted plan of management of the land prepared pursuant to the Local Government Act 1993 and which are under the care, control and management of the Council.”

 

Under Clause 12 of Penrith Local Environmental Plan 1991 (Environmental Heritage Conservation), the Council may grant consent “to use, for any purpose, a building that is a heritage item or the land on which the building is erected, … if it is satisfied that

 

(c)   the proposed use would have little or no adverse effect on the amenity of the area; and

 

(d)   the conservation of the building is unlikely unless the Council grants consent as referred to in this clause.”

 

Detailed plans and a Statement of Environmental Effects, along with a Heritage Assessment Statement, should support any development application lodged for an activity or works at the site. 

 

Property Development Manager’s Comment

The land described at Lot 22 in DP 242300, on the corner of Great Western Highway and Gardenia Avenue, is a dedicated Public Reserve and classified as ‘Community’. The proposals to extend the fence line are in accordance with the land classification. The Property Development Department has no objection to the proposal outlined in this report.

 

Building Services Manager’s Comment

The fence that will be erected will require minimal long term maintenance and, as such, any further asset management requirements will be achieved through routine maintenance procedures and resources.  The funds for the new fence can be provided from the Department budget.

 

Conclusion

The current proposal to extend the fenceline will encompass part of the area identified in May 2000.

 

The incorporation of the NSW Corps of Marines into the activities provided at the Arms of Australia Inn will further increase the profile of the venue locally and, on a regional basis, allow greater scope for programming, eg educational, events, and tourism.

The partnership supports Council’s Management Plan, including:

·   ‘Establish vibrant and viable cultural precincts across the City’

·    ‘The City’s recreation and leisure facilities and services meet its needs and are optimally used.’

Council has previously resolved, in part, that there be a principle of limited expansion of museum related uses on the site, and the preferred option for any future development is generally westward along the Public Reserve.  What is now proposed is consistent with Council’s previous decision.

 

It is anticipated that the impact on local residents, as a consequence of the expanded Museum activities, will be no greater than the activities currently undertaken at the Inn.

 

A development application will be required to be submitted by the Society for the use of the additional area for Museum related use.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Arms of Australia Inn Museum, Emu Plains be received.

2.     Council agree to the Nepean District Historical Society’s landholding at the Arms of Australia Inn being extended 12 metres to the west for the purpose of accommodating additional Museum related activities.

3.     Arrangements be made to erect a new fence to enclose the additional land, the cost of which be met by Council.

4.     The Nepean District Historical Society be advised of Council’s actions and that it should lodge a Development Application for the use of the additional area for Museum related activities.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1. View

Arms of Australia Inn Museum site map

1 Page

Appendix

 


Ordinary Meeting

18 September 2006

Appendix 1 - Arms of Australia Inn Museum site map

 

 

 


Ordinary Meeting

18 September 2006

The City as a Social Place

 

 

The City as a Social Place

 

 

6

Penrith Football Stadium - Future Management   

 

Compiled by:                Gary Dean, Facilities Operations Manager

Authorised by:             Barry Husking, Chief Financial Officer   

Strategic Program Term Achievement: The City’s recreation and leisure facilities and services meet its needs and are optimally used.

Critical Action: Ensure facilities and services reflect the City’s diverse current and future recreation and leisure needs.

     

Purpose:

To recommend to Council the formation of a Councillor Working Party to address future management options for the Penrith Football Stadium.

 

Background

Council, late last year, formed a Councillor Working Party to address the Penrith Football Stadium Redevelopment Project.  The Federal Government had made available a $10 million grant to Panthers to facilitate the commencement of this Project.  The Working Party, which comprised representations from Council, Panthers and the Penrith Valley Sports Foundation, coordinated the formulation of an overall Stadium redevelopment masterplan and identified a scope of work which would constitute Stage 1 for which the grant would be applied.

 

Approvals were subsequently issued for Stage 1, builders were appointed, and the work satisfactorily completed last month.  The western grandstand upgrade was officially opened on 3 September 2006.

 

The Working Party’s ‘terms of reference’ have now been completed.

 

The Stadium is currently leased to Panthers until December 2007.

 

Current Situation

The key focus of the ongoing project is now progressing action to resolve future management options for the Stadium.

 

An initial approach has been made by Panthers representatives, expressing interest in a continuation of the current lease arrangements.  No commitment has been (or can be) given beyond the current lease term.  Panthers has been advised that the lease option will be considered in conjunction with all other management opportunities. 

 

As part of the Stage 1 work, some preliminary review was undertaken by Council officers, including the potential for alternative management approaches against the background of what Council wanted to achieve from any future arrangement.  This would include (but not be limited to):

 

·    providing a sporting, recreation and leisure facility of a national and regional standard which, with further development, could become of international standard 

·    encouraging a maximum use of the facilities by sporting bodies and recreation and leisure providers in the Penrith LGA and beyond    

·    maintaining,  developing and improving the facility and the lands to ensure a fully accessible sporting and leisure complex continues to be provided   

·    managing the Stadium in a commercial manner, with community access and social outcomes

 

Assessment of Future Management Options

The initial investigations by Council officers need to be advanced.  To arrive at a recommendation for a preferred management option, the following matters need to be addressed:

 

·    the ongoing role of the Stadium in the context of the Metro-Strategy and Council’s Strategic Plan

·    the existing lease arrangements    

·    management arrangements at other similar stadia      

·    potential management models – advantages and disadvantages of each

 

To assist this process, it is felt appropriate that a Working Party be formed comprising nominated Councillors.  The terms of reference for this Working Party could be:

 

“to investigate future management options for the Penrith Football Stadium and recommend to Council a preferred arrangement”

 

The Working Party would consult with other parties (Panthers, Penrith Valley Sports Foundation, Department of Lands and others) as required.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Penrith Football Stadium - Future Management be received.

2.     Council form a “Penrith Football Stadium Future Management Working Party” and Councillors be nominated for this Working Party.

3.     The Terms of Reference for the Working Party be:

“to investigate future management options for the Penrith Football Stadium and recommend to Council a preferred arrangement.”

4.     Panthers be advised of Council’s actions.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Ordinary Meeting

18 September 2006

The City as a Social Place

 

 

The City as a Social Place

 

 

7

Section 96 Modification for the extension of operating hours for the drive-through McDonald's Restaurant at Lot 100 DP 1037595 (No. 2 - 6) Star Court, Cambridge Gardens  Applicant:  McDonald's Properties (Australia) Pty Ltd;  Owner:  McDonald's Properties (Australia) Pty Ltd   

DA991877

Compiled by:                Gurvinder Singh, Senior Environmental Planner

Authorised by:             Paul Lemm, Development Services Manager

Requested By:             Councillor John Thain

Councillor Garry Rumble

Councillor Pat Sheehy

Councillor Kevin Crameri

Strategic Program Term Achievement: Redevelopment of existing areas contributes to safe, sustainable, affordable and satisfying living environments and cohesive communities.

Critical Action: Work in partnership with the local community to foster understanding of the reasons why established areas are redeveloping.

     

Purpose:

To address matters for which this item was deferred at the meeting on 4 April 2005, and to seek Council's determination of this application to modify the existing development consent as it relates to the hours of operation of the McDonald's Restaurant at Star Court, Cambridge Gardens.  The report recommends that the application be approved subject to conditions.

 

Site Description

The McDonald’s restaurant is part of a larger commercial complex bounded by Star Court and Boomerang Place, Cambridge Gardens. Approval for the commercial centre was granted via development consent 991887 dated 7 August 2000.  The McDonald’s building occupies the northwest corner of the site, while a Coles supermarket, Pizza Hut and Subway outlets are sited within a separate building at the northeast corner of the complex.

 

The primary parking area serving the Coles/Pizza Hut/Subway building is positioned along the southern boundary and in the centre of the complex, with access from Boomerang Place. A smaller parking area, accessed from Star Court, serves McDonald’s, and is located to the south of that building. Both car-parking areas are connected.

 

To the south of the McDonald’s building, on the corner of Star Court and Boomerang Place, is a service station. Opposite the service station and the Coles building, on the southern side of Boomerang Place, is the Overlander Hotel.

 

Richmond Road separates the McDonald’s building from existing residential development to the west. A public reserve provides approximately 25m of separation between McDonald’s and the existing residential development to the north.

Proposal

The applicant is seeking to modify condition 56 of the development consent number DA991887 issued on 15 August 2000, which currently reads:

 

“With the exception of the McDonald’s drive-through facility, operating hours are to be limited to between 6 am and 12 midnight. Extension of the operating hours will be considered at the expiration of the twelve-month trial period from the date of commencement of the respective uses. The applicant is to make application to Council prior to extending the operation hours”

 

to read:

 

“ The operating hours are to be limited to between 6 am and 12 midnight Monday to Sunday including the McDonald’s drive-through. Extension of the operating hours will be considered at the expiration of the twelve-month trial period from the date of commencement of the respective uses. The applicant is to make application to Council prior to extending the operation hours”

 

and delete amended condition 57 of the development consent number DA991887 issued on 16 July 2001, which reads:

 

“ The McDonald’s drive-through facility is to be closed between 10 pm and 7 am Monday to Saturday and between 10 pm and 8 am on Sunday. Notwithstanding, the drive-through facility may operate until 12 midnight for a trial period of 3 months from the date of the commencement of the restaurant use”

 

In summary, the application seeks to enable the drive- through facility to:

 

·    operate for an additional 2 hours every night

·    commence operating an hour earlier every Monday to Saturday morning

·    commence operating 2 hours earlier every Sunday morning

 

These matters are the subjects of this report.

Summary of Consents and Background

Original consent

By notice dated 15 August 2000, consent was granted to DA991887 for the construction of a McDonald’s restaurant, a general store and commercial premises at Star Court, Cambridge Gardens. Condition numbers 56 and 57 restricted the hours of operation for the commercial centre from 6am until 12 midnight seven days a week and the operations of the McDonald’s ‘drive through facility’, from 7am until 10pm (Monday to Saturday) and 8am until 10pm on Sundays.  

 

In an effort to protect the amenity of the neighbouring residents, Council required construction of a 3m high acoustic fence along those parts of the northern and the eastern boundaries of the site that were not occupied by buildings (Condition number 53). This acoustic fence, comprising metal colorbond supported over masonry blocks presently exists on the site.

Subsequent Modifications

In February 2001, McDonald’s applied to amend development consent 991887, to enable the drive through facility to operate from 6.00am until 12 midnight, 7 days per week consistent with the approved trading hours of the entire commercial complex. On 16 July 2001, condition number 57 of the above development consent that read as:

 

“The McDonald's drive-through facility is to be closed between 10pm and 7am Monday to Saturday and between 10pm and 8am on Sunday.

 

was modified to read as:

 

“The McDonald's drive-through facility is to be closed between 10pm and 7am Monday to Saturday and between 10pm and 8am on Sunday. Notwithstanding, the drive through facility may operate until 12 midnight for a trial period of 3 months from the date of commencement of the restaurant use”.

 

The restaurant commenced its operations in August 2002.

 

A further application, the subject of this report, to modify Development Consent 991887, was received on 12 November 2002. This application sought to rely upon the results of the 3-month trial period (August – November 2002).

 

However, during the above trial period, the drive-through was not fully operational until 12 midnight. Council wrote to McDonald’s on 11 April 2003, stating that the trial period was unsatisfactory, and a re-trial of the drive through was needed. This trial period was conducted from 1 February to 31 April 2004. During this period, 3 submissions were received objecting to the noise from customers and car stereo systems from the same resident.

 

The results of the trail period was reported to Council on 15 November 2004 where it was resolved that:

 

“A further report be brought back to Council that includes information on the acoustic report, Police incident report and whether the fencing requirements anticipated loud music being played from cars in the drive-through.”

 

The details of the acoustic reports, Police incident report and fencing requirements are discussed in the “Planning Assessment” of this report.

 

A further report was subsequently presented to Council’s meeting on 4 April 2005, recommending that:

 

·    The McDonald’s ‘drive-through’ facility be permitted to operate from 6am until 12 midnight, 7 days per week, for a 12 month probationary period that was to commence after Council’s approval of a Site Management Plan

·    An acoustic report is to be provided to Council after 3 months into the trial period. If that report demonstrates that the required noise criteria were not being achieved then the ‘drive through’ was to revert to the original hours of operation of 7am to 10pm on weekdays, and 8am to 10pm on weekends. If the acoustic report demonstrates that the noise levels are satisfactory then, upon completion of the 12 month trial period a further acoustic report is to be submitted to Council, which if approved by Council, would enable the ‘drive through’ facility to permanently operate from 6am until 12 midnight

·    Signage is to be installed to encourage ‘drive through’ patrons to maintain amenity of the neighbouring residents

·    A Site Management Plan is to be prepared in consultation with Council, NSW Police, neighbours and shopping centre management

·    ‘Sound paint’ or an equivalent product is to be applied to the metal acoustic fence adjacent the ‘drive through’ facility prior to the commencement of the 12-month probationary period

·    Council is to be advised in writing prior to the drive through facility commencing to operate from 6am until 12midnight

·    The ‘drive through’ to operate at all times in accordance with relevant statutory noise criteria and approved acoustic reports

 

At it’s meeting on 4 April 2005, Council resolved:

 

“That the matter be deferred for consideration of a further report at the earliest opportunity, the report is to include a detailed summary of the acoustic report, further options for the reduction of noise, options for the reduction of the opening hours of the restaurant and details of how a Site Management Plan might resolve the issues of patrons loitering on the site after being served through the drive through”

 

A detailed summary of the acoustic reports is provided as an Attachment to this report.

Actions since Council’s Resolution of 4 April 2005

9 May 2005                   McDonald’s provided a submission, addressing issues raised by Council, following concerns raised by a neighbouring resident that bass noise from car stereos was not considered in the assessment of noise impacts on the residents.

 

3 August 2005               Meeting between Council and McDonald’s to determine future course of action. Agreed that an ‘in situ’ trial would be conducted, particularly to determine impacts of car stereos in vehicles using the ‘drive through’ facility.

 

10 August 2005             Council staff held an on-site meeting to discuss relevant issues with the objector, who was accompanied by another resident. The residents raised concerns with respect to noise and vibration from vehicles in the drive through. It was considered necessary to assess these noise impacts by undertaking an in-situ trial of the drive through facility.

 

September 2005            Council engaged an independent acoustic consultant, Heggies Australia Pty Ltd to:

·    review previous acoustic reports provided by the applicant

·    provide input for the methodology for the ‘in situ’ trial

·    attend and witness the ‘in situ’ trial

·    review the outcomes of that trial and provide Council with a report of their findings and recommendations

 

22 September 2005       ‘In situ’ trial of ‘drive through’ was conducted between 8:45 pm and 12:15 am on Thursday, 22 September 2005, which was considered to be a good indicative day for maximum activities on the McDonald’s site. All acoustic consultants were in attendance, including McDonald’s and their acoustic consultant, Council and their acoustic consultant, and residents and their acoustic consultant.

 

20 January 2006            McDonald’s submitted to Council an acoustic report, prepared by their consultant, Atkins Acoustics and Associates Pty Ltd, which addressed the methodology, results, findings and recommendations arising from the ‘in situ’ trial held on 22 September 2005.

 

26 April 2006                Heggies Australia Pty Ltd, Council’s independent acoustic consultant, submitted their review of the acoustic report submitted by Atkins Acoustics.

Options for the Reduction of the Opening Hours of the Restaurant

Council, by its resolution of 4 April 2005, sought options for the reduction of the opening hours of the restaurant.

 

In a letter to Council dated 9 May 2005, McDonald’s provided the following response on this issue:

 

“We currently have council approved trading hours for the restaurant of 6am to 12 midnight, 7 days a week. Council has no legal right to change these hours as they have already been granted in DA 991887.”

 

Under the Act, there is no opportunity for Council to revisit the approved trading hours of the McDonald’s restaurant as approved under Development Consent 991887.

Planning Assessment

Section 96(2) of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 (the Act)

This section states that a consent authority may, on application being made by the applicant, and subject to and in accordance with the regulations, modify a consent if:

 

(a)     it is satisfied that the development to which the consent as modified relates is substantially the same development as the development for which consent was originally granted and before that consent as originally granted was modified (if at all), and

(b)     it has consulted with the relevant Minister, public authority or approval body (within the meaning of Division 5) in respect of a condition imposed as a requirement of a concurrence to the consent or in accordance with the general terms of an approval proposed to be granted by the approval body and that Minister, authority or body has not, within 21 days after being consulted, objected to the modification of that consent, and

(c)     it has notified the application in accordance with:

(i)      the regulations, if the regulations so require, or

(ii)     a development control plan, if the consent authority is a council that has made a development control plan that requires the notification or advertising of applications for modification of a development consent, and

(d)     it has considered any submissions made concerning the proposed modification within the period prescribed by the regulations or provided by the development control plan, as the case may be.

 

Comment

The proposed change to the operating hours of the drive-through facility is an amendment to the operational aspects of the development that would result in substantially the same development as previously approved. Council has notified the application in accordance with the regulations, and it has considered the submissions made concerning the proposed amendment. Details of notification and submissions are provided under Community Consultation in a later section of this report. 

Section 96(3) of the Act

This section states that, in determining an application for modification of consent, the consent authority must take into consideration such of the matters referred to in section 79C (1) as are of relevance to the development the subject of the application. The following matters that are relevant to the proposed modification are considered pursuant to section 79C (1) of the Act:

(i)      Section 79C(1)(a)(i) – the provisions of any relevant environmental planning instrument

Interim Development Order (IDO) Number 26 - City of Penrith applies to the site. Under this IDO, the subject property is zoned 3(d) Special Business (Highway Service Area) that permits “drive-through restaurant” with Council’s consent. Council has already granted a development consent-991887 for the above use on 7 August 2000.

(ii)     Section 79C(1)(a)(ii) – the provisions of any relevant Development Control Plan

Penrith Development Control Plan - “Crime Prevention through Environmental Design” (CPTED) is relevant to the proposed amendment.

 

This Plan seeks:

 

to enhance and improve community safety, create environments that encourage a feeling of safety, address community concerns in regard to community safety and crime prevention and prevent the opportunity for criminal activity”.

 

The principal areas to address crime or anti-social behaviour under this Development Control Plan are surveillance, access control, territorial reinforcement and space management.

 

Surveillance

Good surveillance means that people can see what others are doing and that people feel safe in public areas where they can be easily seen and interact with others.  From a design perspective, “deterrence” can be achieved by:

 

·    Clear site lines between public and private places

·    Effective lighting of public places

·    Landscaping that makes places attractive but does not provide offenders with a place to hide

 

The sight lines between the existing McDonald’s restaurant and the external areas, including the ancillary car park, are clear and unobstructed, allowing for active surveillance of the site. Adequate lighting exists in the parking area and access routes to the building. Appropriate landscaping and pedestrian walkways are clearly defined. Access to the restaurant and the drive-through is well designed so as not to create any concealment areas. The extension of the operating hours of the drive-through will have negligible effect on the existing surveillance and access arrangements of the site.

 

Access Control

Physical and symbolic barriers can be used to attract, channel or restrict the movement of people by stipulating where people are permitted to go or not go, and it then becomes difficult for potential offenders to reach and victimise people and their property.  Effective access control can be achieved by:

 

·    Landscapes and physical locations that channel and group pedestrians into target areas

·    Restricting access to internal areas of high risk by the use of physical barriers

 

The subject site does channel pedestrians by clearly defined walkways, and there is landscaping provided which also delineates boundary edges and restricted areas.  The proposed extension of operating hours for the drive-through restaurant will have negligible impacts on these features of the site.

 

Territorial Reinforcement

People often feel comfortable in, and are more likely to visit, places that feel owned or cared for.  Well used places also reduce opportunities for crime.  This can be achieved through:

 

·    Design with clear transitions and boundaries between public and private space

·    Design that encourages people to gather in an open area

 

The site is well used, open in character and well lit.  The property is properly maintained and presents well.  The proposed extended hours of operation are unlikely to have any significant impact on these site characteristics. 

 

Space Management

Like the above principle, areas that are well maintained, are attractive and well used will act as a deterrent for anti-social behaviour.  Space management strategies include site cleanliness, repair of vandalism and graffiti, and removal or refurbishment of decayed physical elements. These issues have been appropriately conditioned in the original development consent DA991887 (condition number 62). 

Incident Report for the site

The NSW Police provided an incident report (Appendix 3) that showed a total of 194 incidents being reported for the entire site (which includes Pizza Hut, Coles, Caltex Service Station, McDonald’s and Overlander Hotel) between January 2005 and August 2006.  Of the 194 incidents, 46 occurred within the McDonald’s site.

The incidents reported generally resulted from groups of youths acting inappropriately. This type of activity is not necessarily generated by the operation of the drive-through, which, by nature, involves vehicles driving through the drive-through and then leaving the site. Council’s Community Safety Co-ordinator advised that the number of incidents is similar to that reported for surrounding businesses. The police incident report also indicates that the incidents on the surrounding properties are of a similar nature to those on the McDonald’s site.

 

Nonetheless, the safety of patrons and employees is paramount to the operation of all businesses. Reducing potential disturbances (due to patron behaviour), and thereby community safety, can be achieved through the implementation of a Site Management Plan that details measures and procedures to control anti-social activities and adverse patron behaviour.  It is recommended that a Site Management Plan be submitted to Council for approval prior to its implementation on the site (New Condition 55(B)).

 

At its meeting on 4 April 2005, Council requested information as to how a Site Management Plan might resolve the issues of loitering on the site after being served through the drive-through.  The applicant advised, in writing, some of the existing strategies and proposed strategies that may be developed to address patron behaviour.

 

Existing strategies

·    Signage at order points requesting patrons to respect nearby residential areas

·    Ensure staff presence in the car park while litter patrols are undertaken to discourage inappropriate behaviour

·    Staff requests inside the restaurant to ensure appropriate behaviour is observed

 

Proposed strategies

(i)      Set up a committee with relevant stakeholders, chaired by Council, to encourage a co-ordinated action plan for the site

(ii)      Install signs at the ‘drive-through facility’ to encourage appropriate behaviour, including turning down car stereos

(iii)     Install boom gates or other devices to prevent vehicle access outside trading hours

 

Comment

Point (i) of this strategy is not supported as it diverts responsibility away from the owner, and places the onus on Council for the management and control of the response.  The development of a Site Management Plan is considered a better option as it will be prepared over “private” land, by the owner, and in response to issues identified by the community and the owner.  The Site Management Plan would be developed by McDonald’s and approved by Council.  It would address the principle areas of consideration, discussed in Crime Prevention through Environmental Design, earlier in the report.  Proposed strategy (ii) and (iii) would form part of the Site Management Plan. 

 

It is considered that the formulation of a Site Management Plan for the site is the most suitable mechanism in which to control the McDonald’s site.  The Site Management Plan will provide Council with agreed actions, stipulated by the owner, to control anti-social behaviour over their site.  It is considered that the responsibility for anti-social behaviour on private property should be the responsibility of the owner/operator.

(iii)   Section 79C(1)(b) - the Likely Impacts of the Development

Noise Impact

Noise from vehicles entering the drive-through facility was considered a significant issue that required a detailed noise impact assessment on the neighbouring residents. This assessment was carried out and Council officers have assessed various acoustic reports. A detailed summary of the acoustic reports is provided as Appendix No. 2 to this report.

 

To control noise, the following works are recommended by Heggies Australia, Acoustic Consultants, who were engaged by Council to undertake a peer review of the acoustic reports submitted by McDonald’s:

 

·    Replace the existing metal clad fence with 150mm thick ‘hebel’ panel wall system. This wall would follow the line and the height of the existing colorbond fence and return along the top of the existing retaining wall (between McDonald’s and Coles) at a height of 2m for a length of about 20m

 

·    Install a10 km/h signpost at the approach to the entrance of the drive-through.

 

It is also recommended that, on completion of the above works, potential noise impacts shall be further trialled for a 12-month period and an acoustic report, addressing compliance with the relevant Department of Environment and Conservation’s (DEC) noise criteria, shall be submitted after 3 months into the trial period. If compliance with the relevant DEC’s noise criteria cannot be achieved, the opening hours for the drive-through facility shall revert to 7am to 10pm on Mondays to Saturdays and 8am to 10pm on Sundays. (See amended condition number 57).

 

Visual Impact

Erection of a hebel block wall in lieu of the existing colorbond fence would be an improvement to the aesthetics of the northern elevation of the complex. No adverse visual impacts are considered to result with the erection of a 3m high hebel wall.

 

The management of any graffiti on the hebel block wall would be imposed through condition number 62 of the original consent number DA991887 issued on 15 August 2000, which reads as:

 

“The finishes of all structures and buildings are to be maintained at all times and any graffiti or vandalism immediately removed/repaired”.

 

(iv)    Section 79C(1)(d)(e) - Any Submissions Made and the Public Interest

Community Consultation

The application was notified in accordance with Council’s Advertising and Notification Development Control Plan. Adjoining and nearby property owners/occupiers were notified directly by letter, when the Section 96 application was submitted, and at the end of the 3-month trial period. The notification period was from 15 March 2004 - 14 April 2004. One submission was received in each notification period, from the same property owner.

 

The submission raised concerns about noise generated by the operation of the drive-through, safety and security, the effectiveness of the fence as an acoustic barrier, noise from the increased vehicle traffic, and the behaviour of late night patrons. 

 

After Council’s meeting of 15 November 2004, a meeting was held with McDonald’s, the concerned property owner and Council officers on 8 February 2005.  This meeting was to allow further dialogue between the objector and the owners of McDonald’s, and to discuss the current operations and management of the site.  

 

Council invited the objector to witness the ‘in-situ’ trial of the drive through on 22 September 2005. The recommendations of the Atkins and Heggies Acoustic Reports to mitigate noise were also discussed in detail with the concerned resident on 30 August 2006. The resident indicated satisfaction with proposed amended and new conditions of consent recommended, including the erection of an acoustic barrier in the form of ‘hebel wall’ on the northern side of the site, however requested the following be considered:

 

·    Noise testing during the trial period to include between 10pm and 12 midnight;

·    Additional signage, limiting the speed limit, also be installed at the exit of the drive through; and

·    Reverting to the original approved hours, should a police incidence report demonstrate an increase in crime incidents associated with the extended hours of operation, during the 12 month trial period.

 

The above requests are considered to be justified and are now reflected in the recommended conditions. The resident has also requested an opportunity to view the site management plan, once submitted, and this opportunity is available, as the documentation will form part of the application and/or development consent.

 

Public Interest

The management of patron behaviour needs to be considered in the context of the wider commercial precinct comprising the Star Court complex, the adjacent service station and the neighbouring hotel. 

 

Council’s Community Safety Co-ordinator has advised that an agreement has been reached with the St Marys Local Area Command, that a joint Community Safety Audit be conducted within the Public Reserve between Trinity Drive and Lewis Road and the open public space in and around the precinct.  This audit will involve precinct business owners and operators, local residents, children’s services and community groups. The owner/operators of premises within the precinct will be canvassed to determine if they are willing to have their car parks and public areas included as part of the audit process.

 

The safety audit will include recommendations to address issues related to the physical aspects of both public and private areas. Private areas will be assessed for safety only if property owners agree to include their property for audit. Treatments recommended for private properties will be the responsibility of the property owners if they wish to implement the recommendations.

 

Conclusion

McDonald’s is seeking consent to extend the operating hours of the existing drive-through facility to match with the approved hours (6 am to 12 midnight, 7 days a week) of the restaurant. The application is considered to be substantially the same development as originally considered and approved by Council.

 

The potential noise impacts of extending the hours of the drive-through on the adjoining residential area have been considered, particularly noise from vehicles, car stereos, and the effectiveness of the existing fence to mitigate loud music. Council officers and acoustic consultants have assessed the noise issues in detail and are of the opinion that, with the erection of a 3m high hebel block wall on the northern side boundary, noise impacts on the adjacent residents can be resolved. 

 

Developing and implementing a Site Management Plan is a positive response to controlling patron misbehaviour on the subject site. Installation of signage that encourages patrons to be considerate to neighbouring residents, by lowering noise levels, will help residents maintain their amenity.

 

Potential noise impacts and patron behaviour should be further tested for a 12-month period, to ascertain the effectiveness of the acoustic wall and site management practices. At the end of the 12-month period, Council will have another opportunity to review the hours of operation of the drive-through facility, should it not meet the relevant noise criteria. It is recommended that Condition 57 be amended, and additional conditions be imposed, setting out the requirements for the extended operation of the drive-through facility.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Section 96 Modification for the extension of operating hours for the drive-through McDonald's Restaurant at Lot 100 DP 1037595 (No. 2 - 6) Star Court, Cambridge Gardens is received.

2.       The application under Section 96(2) of the Act to modify development consent DA99/1887 be approved subject to the following:

2.1     Condition 57 is amended as follows:

The McDonald’s drive-through facility is permitted to operate from 6 am to 12 midnight Monday to Sunday for a twelve-month probationary period commencing after Council’s approval of a Site Management Plan and compliance with conditions 55(A) to (D)

An acoustic audit report prepared by an appropriately qualified person is to be submitted to Council within three months of the probationary period operating. The acoustic audit report is to specifically address compliance with the relevant Department of Environment and Conservation’s (DEC) noise criteria between 10pm to 12midnight and 6am to 7am.  

 

If compliance with the relevant DEC’s noise criteria cannot be achieved, the opening hours for the drive-through facility are to revert to 7am to 10pm on Mondays to Saturdays and 8am to 10pm on Sundays

If compliance with the relevant DEC’s noise criteria is achieved, then, on completion of the 12 month probation period:

·    A detailed acoustic report is to be submitted to Council to demonstrate that the drive-through facility is operating within the relevant noise criteria

·    The permanent operation of the drive-through facility from 6 am to 12 midnight may be granted

·    Should this report demonstrate the drive-through facility has not operated within the relevant noise criteria (on all days of the week), the hours for the facility shall revert back to 7am to 10pm on Mondays to Saturdays and 8am to 10pm on Sundays

·    Should the Site Management Plan prove ineffective in preventing unlawful behaviour resulting from the extended operating hours and evidenced by Police Incidence Report/s, the hours for the facility shall revert back to 7am to 10pm on Mondays to Saturdays and 8am to 10pm on Sundays

2.2     The following new conditions are to be added to the development consent:

New Condition 55(A)

Signage shall be installed at the approach to the entrance and the exit of the drive-through limiting the speed of vehicles to 10km/h and encouraging patrons to be considerate of neighbours and to lower noise levels.  Installation of the signage is to occur prior to commencing the extended operating hours for the drive-through facility

New Condition 55(B)

To address patron noise and behaviour, a Site Management Plan is to be submitted to and approved by Penrith City Council prior to the operation of the extended operating hours for the drive-through facility.  The approved Site Management Plan shall be implemented at the commencement of the twelve-month probationary period. This plan shall be implemented over the site for the life of the development

New Condition 55(C)

Replace the existing fence on the northern boundary with a 150mm thick hebel block wall system, 3m in height as measured from the level of the driveway.  This wall shall return along the top of the existing retaining wall (between McDonald’s and Coles) for a length of about 20m generally in accordance with Attachment 3 of the Environmental Noise Audit Report by Atkins Acoustics dated December 2005

New Condition 55(D)

Council is to be advised in writing prior to the commencement of the operation of the drive-through from 6 am to 12 midnight

New Condition 57(A)

The drive-through is to operate, at all times, in accordance with the relevant Department of Environment and Conservation’s statutory noise criteria and the noise goals specified in the noise impact assessment prepared by Atkins Acoustics dated October 2000.  In the event of any inconsistency, the statutory noise criteria are to prevail.

3.       Those persons who made submissions be advised of Council’s decision.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1. View

Locality Map / Site Plan

2 Pages

Appendix

2. View

Summary Acoustic Reports

5 Pages

Appendix

3. View

Star Court incident report

1 Page

Appendix

 


Ordinary Meeting

18 September 2006

Appendix 1 - Locality Map / Site Plan

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Meeting

18 September 2006

Appendix 2 - Summary Acoustic Reports

 

 

 

Detailed Summary of Acoustic Reports

         

(a)         Acoustic report by Atkins Acoustics - April 2004

 

Purpose:

 

To confirm that noise levels from drive-through (6am-12 midnight) measured at residential properties in Cleeve Place and Grange Crescent meet the noise goal of 55 dB(A)  for transient night-time (10pm to 7am). This noise goal was set in the original consent (DA991887) to avoid possible sleep disturbance during the night time hours. This report was submitted in response to a 3-month trial period and it also presents the results of the audit conducted on Wednesday, 14 April 2004 between 10.30pm and 11.40pm.

 

                   Details and Findings:

 

·    Noise level measurements were conducted at the rear boundary of residential properties at 76 and 78 Grange Crescent, Cambridge Gardens

 

·    Measurements were conducted over 15 minute periods with statistical and instantaneous maximum noise levels recorded. For reference purposes, approximate number of vehicles on The Northern Road, Star Circuit, and vehicles utilising the McDonalds drive-through were recorded

 

·    Observations during site audits confirmed that the transient noise sources from the McDonalds site were difficult to measure due to their low level. Additionally, noise from passing cars on the Northern Road, Star Circuit and intermittent transient activities from the Pizza Hut/ Coles car park were higher than the noise levels emitted from the McDonalds site

 

·    Noise measurements taken on the site confirmed that the noise levels from the McDonalds site were less than the noise levels from the road traffic on The Northern Road and satisfy the recommended 55dB(A) noise goal

 

Council’s resolution:

 

Council, on 15 November 2004, resolved that, “ the item be deferred and a further report be brought back to Council that includes information on the acoustics report, police incident report and whether the fencing requirements anticipated loud music from cars in the drive-through.”

 

In response to the above resolution a Council Officer requested additional information from the applicant on how the fence acts as an acoustic barrier against all noises including loud music from cars and vibration associated with loud music. This is detailed below:

 

 

 

 

 

 

          (b)     Submission by Atkins Acoustics -December 2004

                  

                   Purpose:

 

This submission was prepared in response to Council’s resolution above of 15 November 2004.

 

Details and Findings:

 

·    To reduce the effects of vibration in the metal fence, the application of a material called ‘sound paint’ would provide dampening for the colorbond panels

 

·    The existing metal colorbond acoustic screen provides adequate mass to control noise from the McDonalds ‘drive through’ facility

 

·    Noise audits in October 2002, April 2004 and December 2004 confirm that noise from the ‘drive through’ facility satisfies the design assessment goals of 55 dB(A)

 

·    With regard to bass sound from car stereos, during the site noise audits mentioned above, car stereos were identified, however no vibration in the metal fence was experienced.

 

·    The acoustic efficiency of the existing fence is controlled by its height. Replacing the metal fence with a masonry wall would not reduce existing noise levels at the residential properties.

 

                   Council’s resolution:

 

On 4 April 2005, Council resolved that the matter be deferred, “ for consideration of a further report that includes a detailed summary of the acoustic report, further options for the reduction of noise, options for the reduction of the opening hours of the restaurant and details of how a site management plan might resolve the issues of patrons loitering on the site after being served through the drive through.”

 

In response to the above resolution a Council officer requested further information from the applicant on the extent of bass noise assessment carried out and why an in-situ trial has not been conducted for such a noise. This is detailed below:

 

            (c)   Submission by Atkins Acoustics – 6 May 2005

 

Purpose:

 

Submitted in response to issues raised by Council that bass noise from car stereos was not considered in the assessment of noise impacts on the residents.

 

 

 

Details and Findings:

 

·    No bass noise from car stereos was found on McDonalds site during the site noise audit on 14 April 2004 or 23 October 2002

 

·    An ‘in situ’ trial of a car stereo with high bass output was not conducted, as such a noise source is not considered to be a statistically relevant event

 

·    The percentage of requests by staff of Mcdonalds to turn down stereos during the night was less than 0.5%

 

·    The residential properties located opposite the Pizza Hut/Coles car park are more exposed to noisy activities than those opposite the Mcdonalds site.

                  

            (d)   Noise Audit report by Atkins Acoustics– December 2005

 

Purpose:

 

Submitted in response to concerns on insufficient noise testing raised by an adjacent resident. Council arranged for a simulation noise testing of the drive- through facility. McDonalds acoustic consultant was Atkins, while Council engaged Heggies Australia to act as an independent consultant.  

 

Details and Findings:

 

The noise simulation included agreement between Council and the applicant on the following matters:

 

·    Assessment criteria:

·    Test procedures such as acceleration whilst moving forward in the drive-through queue, engines being revved, car engines idling, people talking and noise emissions from car stereos;

·    Type of vehicle and its noise level

 

The Atkins Noise Audit report provides the following conclusions:

 

·    Ambient noise at the rear of Grange Crescent residential properties had its source from Coles car park and passing traffic on Richmond Road. The existing noise levels generated by transient activities not associated with the McDonalds site ranged up to 65-70dB(A)

·    The normal activities on the McDonalds site did not give rise to noise levels that exceeded DA991887 design assessment goal of 55dB(A) or the compliance audit assessment goal of 62dB(A) established during the site audit

·    Noise generated from car sound systems did not give rise to noise levels that exceeded the recommended noise assessment goals of 55/62dB(a)

·    Noise and vibration from metal clad fence was not perceived when measured at the residential properties

·    The main source of noise exceeding 55/62dB(A) assessment goals was associated with extreme events such as excessive revving of car engines and unsafe driver behaviour

·    The following works are proposed to control noise from the above extreme events:

 

o Replace the existing metal clad fence with 150mm thick ‘hebel’ panel wall system. This wall would follow the line and height of the existing colorbond screen and return along the top of the existing retaining wall (between McDonalds and Coles) at a height of 2m for a length of about 20m

o Install a 10 km/h signpost and three speed humps within the ‘drive through’ lane

(e)     Review by Heggies Australia Pty Ltd – 26 April 2006

Purpose:

 

Heggies Australia were engaged by Council to also undertake a ‘peer review’ of the Atkins Acoustic report, prepared in December 2005, regarding the site noise simulation discussed above.

 

Findings and Recommendations:

 

 The Heggies report provides the following conclusion:

 

“The Atkins report has been reviewed with respect to methodology and technical analysis. While we are in general agreement with the methodology, results, findings and recommendations of the Atkins report, additional recommendations have been provided in this report for consideration by Penrith Council. We consider that the implementation of the proposed acoustic treatment will reduce the potential for sleep arousal at nearby residential receivers”

 

The additional recommendations provided by Heggies are set out below:

 

·    Upgrade of the Coles boundary screen in addition to a site management plan for the Coles parking area should be followed up with Coles

 

·    In addition to speed signage, we also recommend signage to discourage unruly behaviour

 

·    The acoustic screen between McDonalds and the Coles car park should be 3m high, not 2m high

 

·    Consideration needs to be given to the treatment (finish) applied to the hebel wall to minimise noise reflection

 

·    Speed humps tend to encourage unnecessary revving of car engines. We therefore recommend that initially, the speed humps be omitted and ascertain the effectiveness of the remaining noise control measures. If necessary, the speed humps can always be installed at a later date

 

Following the implementation of the proposed noise control treatments, further noise compliance testing be conducted on site during a representative night time period to verify the performance of the noise control measures


Ordinary Meeting

18 September 2006

Appendix 3 - Star Court incident report

 

 

 

 


The City In Its Environment

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

8        Successful grant application under the Water Savings Fund Round 2 - 2006 

 

9        Sale of Cleanaway Australia and New Zealand 

 

10      Floodplain Management Authorities (FMA) Conference - 27 February to 2 March 2007 

 

 



Ordinary Meeting

18 September 2006

The City in its Environment

 

 

The City in its Environment

 

 

8

Successful grant application under the Water Savings Fund Round 2 - 2006   

 

Compiled by:                Krystie Race, Sustainability Research Planner

Authorised by:             Wayne Mitchell, Environmental Health Manager  

Strategic Program Term Achievement: Water and energy conservation strategies are being implemented.

Critical Action: Develop and implement strategies that encourage water and energy conservation.

     

Purpose:

To advise Council of the successful application for funding of the Penrith Swim Centre and Ripples Leisure Centre Backwash Reuse Project from the Department of Energy, Utilities and Sustainability Water Savings Fund 2006.  The report recommends that the information contained in this report be received.

 

Background

The Water Savings Fund was announced as part of the NSW Government’s Metropolitan Water Plan and is expected to save between 30 and 80 billion litres of water per year, which is being administered by Department of Energy Utilities and Sustainability.

 

The Fund will provide $30 million a year for the next four years, for water saving and recycling projects within Sydney Water’s area of operations (Sydney, Blue Mountains and Illawarra). An extra $10 million was allocated to the Fund in February 2006, for high water users in the region to implement savings projects identified in Water Savings Action Plans.

 

Council has been actively pursuing opportunities to reduce its water consumption over the last five years.  Council has produced the Water Way Plan (adopted December 2005) and Water Savings Action Plan (adopted May 2006) that identifies opportunities to reduce Council’s water consumption. One of the potential cost effective measures identified for reducing potable water use, outlined in the Water Savings Action Plan, is to investigate the installation of a backwash reuse system and rainwater tanks at the Ripples Leisure Centre and Penrith Swim Centre. 

 

Council submitted an application in Round 2 of the Water Savings Fund to install a backwash reuse system and rainwater tanks at the Ripples Leisure Centre and Penrith Swim Centre, as outlined in a report to the Ordinary Meeting on 19 June 2006.

Backwash Reuse System and Rainwater Tanks at Ripples Leisure Centre and Penrith Swim Centre Grant

On 30 August 2006, the Department of Energy Utilities and Sustainability announced successful applicants from Round 2 of the Water Savings Fund. A total of $24 million has been offered to 41 projects, saving more than 4.5 billion litres of water a year. Council’s Backwash Reuse System and Rainwater Tanks at Ripples Leisure Centre and Penrith Swim Centre grant application was successful and has approved funding of $325,490 towards the project.

 

The backwash recycling project at the Centres will replace the current practice of sending an average of 246 kL/week of backwash water to sewer by treating and returning approximately 95 percent for reuse in the pool, with the remaining 5 percent to be utilised for subsurface irrigation on the sites.  This project will reuse almost 100 percent of the backwash water normally wasted each year at the swim centres.  The installation of rainwater tanks will replace an additional 1,918kL/pa of potable water currently used for irrigation, providing a combined saving of approximately 15 million litres of water each year.

 

The proposed backwash recycling treatment system is one of the most optimal systems on the market.  Being one of the most energy efficient systems, this system takes into account the need to address energy efficiency to reduce the impacts of climate change, has low running costs, and can be operated with minimal training. 

 

Backwash water first has the pH corrected and is then treated with a coagulation agent.  The water is then passed through the main media filter followed by an ultra membrane filter and finally activated carbon filters to remove any dissolved organic and inorganic contaminants.  The water is then dosed with ultra violet before being returned to the pool.  The remaining sludge and oily water can be used for sub-surface irrigation.

 

The recycled water returned to the pool will be of a higher quality than the existing pool water because the activated carbon has the capacity to remove chlorine, chlorine by-products and other volatile organic compounds.

 

The installation of rainwater tanks at these swim centres will not only add considerable water savings, but it will also allow for more efficient irrigation and will demonstrate to the public alternatives to potable water.

 

It has been estimated that the time required for the implementation of the project is between 5 and 6 months.

Project Costs

The total project cost for the Backwash Reuse and Rainwater Tanks project is $386,750.  This includes administration cost (approval of development and advertising), installation, products and training.  With the successful grant funding of $325,490 from the Department of Energy, Utilities and Sustainability Water Savings Fund, Council will only need to contribute the remaining $61,250, which is available from the Sustainability Revolving Fund. 

Conclusion

As Sydney’s water supply declines, it is imperative that our water resources are managed efficiently and opportunities sought to reduce consumption.  The Backwash Reuse Project will recycle water from the swimming pools as well as harvesting rainwater. The project includes a combination of two separate systems, the backwash to treat water for reuse and the water tanks for irrigation purposes. The proposed project will save a significant amount of potable water making Penrith a more sustainable city. 

 

Furthermore, there are over 100 swimming centres within the greater Sydney area, with many hotels, clubs, fitness centres and other facilities also containing swimming pools. Water re-use in this sector is still an emerging technology, and by utilising networks provided through programs such as Sydney Water’s Every Drop Counts and the ICLEI Water Campaign, Council will be able to showcase this technology and its benefits to other local government agencies and industry partners throughout Sydney and NSW.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.      The information contained in the report on Successful grant application   under the Water Savings Fund Round 2 - 2006 be received.

2.      Council write to the Minister for Energy, the Hon Joe Tripodi MP, and the Minister for Water Utilities, the Hon David Campbell MP, thanking them for the grant funding from the Department of Energy, Utilities and Sustainability.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Ordinary Meeting

18 September 2006

The City in its Environment

 

 

The City in its Environment

 

 

9

Sale of Cleanaway Australia and New Zealand   

 

Compiled by:                Barry Ryan, Waste and Community Protection Manager

Authorised by:             Barry Ryan, Waste and Community Protection Manager   

Strategic Program Term Achievement: Waste to landfill and indiscriminate dumping are significantly reduced and resource recovery is optimised.

Critical Action: Develop and implement service systems to complement waste reduction strategies and satisfy community needs.

     

Purpose:

To advise Council of the sale of Cleanaway Australia and New Zealand, by Brambles Industries Ltd to an affiliate of Kohlberg Kravis Roberts & Co., a US private equity firm.  The report recommends the information be received.

 

Background

In 1997, Penrith City Council entered into a ten-year contract with Brambles Australia Limited, trading as Cleanaway, for the collection and treatment of recyclables from domestic premises.

 

Generally, this contract has been very successful, with the community being very satisfied with the standard of service being provided.

 

In early 2006, the parent company, Brambles Industries Limited (BIL) announced its intention to sell its shareholding in Brambles Australia Limited (BAL) trading as Cleanaway.

 

Council has been advised that Kohlberg Kravis Roberts and Co. (KKR), a United States private equity firm, has been successful in purchasing the BAL shares for $1.8 billion.

 

The contract deems the takeover to be subject to approval by Council.

 

Current Situation

Council has a ten-year contract with Cleanaway Ltd for the collection and treatment of recyclables. The contract expires on the 6 October 2007.

 

The principal activities of Cleanaway Ltd include resource management, recycling, treatment and disposal of waste, site remediation, hazardous waste disposal and landfill operations.

 

It is the largest participant in the Australian waste management industry, with over 65,000 commercial and industrial clients, and provides services to 87 municipal clients. The business employs over 2,000 people across Australia.

 

Kohlberg Kravis Roberts and Co. (KKR), a United States private equity firm, has been successful in purchasing the BAL shares for $1.8 billion.

 

A financial viability report was commissioned on Cleanaway Ltd, which also provided information on KKR. The financial report identified that Cleanaway has a “strong” risk rating. The financial report recognises that Cleanaway’s management will remain in place.

 

KKR operates as an investment firm and accordingly, each company in its portfolio is independently managed and financed. KKR stresses that there are no cross holdings and, in their words, cash flow from one company cannot be used in another company.

 

Kohlberg Kravis Roberts and Co. specialises in managing buyouts of companies and, over the last thirty years, KKR has invested in more than 141 transactions with a total value of US$195 billion.

 

It is understood that KKR owns companies that they have obtained for an average of seven years.  After the company goes public, KKR’s investors still hold the controlling interest.

 

Essentially, KKR look for acquisition opportunities to maximise their members’ returns. The firm takes a long-term fundamental view, on average holding investments for seven years. It is in KKR's interest for its investments to succeed and therefore to increase in value.

 

In discussions with Directors of Cleanaway, they believe that their (Cleanaway’s) separation from BAL will provide them with greater opportunities to focus on their core business, being waste collection, disposal and treatment.

 

Summary

From the investigations undertaken by Council staff, and advice from Cleanaway, it would appear that they (Cleanaway) will continue to operate in the same terms as previous and have substantial capital in their own right.

 

Discussions have been held with Councils Legal Officer who has agreed that given the results of the financial viability report, Council should not object to the transfer of BAL’s shares (in Cleanaway Ltd) to KKR.

 

A letter confirming Councils position in the matter should be sent to Cleanaway Ltd.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Sale of Cleanaway Australia and New Zealand be received.

2.     The Waste and Community Protection Manager send a letter to Cleanaway Ltd in the terms of this report, confirming that Council does not object to the transfer of BAL trading as Cleanaway Ltd to Kohlberg Kravis Roberts and Co.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Ordinary Meeting

18 September 2006

The City in its Environment

 

 

The City in its Environment

 

 

10

Floodplain Management Authorities (FMA) Conference - 27 February to 2 March 2007   

 

Compiled by:                Craig Ross, Design and Technical Advice Manager

Authorised by:             Craig Ross, Design and Technical Advice Manager   

Strategic Program Term Achievement: A floodplain management policy to protect the built environment is being implemented by Council consistent with Government guidelines.

Critical Action: Council’s Floodplain Management Policy is contemporary and is being implemented.

     

Purpose:

To advise Council of the 47th NSW Floodplain Management Authorities (FMA) Conference, to be held in Gunnedah from 27 February to 2 March 2007, and to authorise the attendance of Council's delegates.  The report recommends that Council nominate delegates to attend the 2007 FMA Conference.

 

Background

The NSW Floodplain Management Authorities has as its objectives:

·     Support the primary objective of the State Government’s Flood Prone Land Policy, namely to reduce the impact of flooding and flood liability on individual owners and occupiers and to reduce private and public losses from flooding.

·     Press for optimum financial assistance by State and Federal Government to Flood Mitigation Authorities to implement the Government’s Flood Prone Land Policy.

·     Provide a forum for exchange of information and ideas related to flood mitigation.

·     Foster good relationships and effective liaison between the Authorities and Government departments.

 

To support these objectives, the authorities hold a conference annually.

Current Situation

The 47th Floodplain Management Authorities Conference is to be held in Gunnedah from Tuesday, 27 February to Friday, 2 March 2007.

 

The theme of this conference is “Floods.  Life Blood or Life Buoy.”.  Council’s voting delegates are Councillor Aitken, Councillor Greenow, and Councillor Rumble, however at past conferences other available Councillors have attended.

 

The conference also holds a short course hosted by DNR to provide Councillors and other delegates with background information on flood issues.  This will be held on Tuesday 27 February.  This course was held for the first time at the last conference and will follow a similar format. 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Floodplain Management Authorities (FMA) Conference - 27 February to 2 March 2007 be received.

2.     Council nominate delegates to the 2007 Floodplain Management Authorities Conference and short course, to be held at Gunnedah from 27 February to 2 March 2007.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


 

 

The City as an Economy

 

 

There were no reports under this Master Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

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The City Supported by Infrastructure

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

11      Rescue Services in the Penrith Local Government Area 

 

12      Tender Number 02-06/07 Provision of Tip Truck Hire 

 

 



Ordinary Meeting

18 September 2006

The City Supported by Infrastructure

 

 

The City Supported by Infrastructure

 

 

11

Rescue Services in the Penrith Local Government Area   

 

Compiled by:                Barry Ryan, Waste and Community Protection Manager

Authorised by:             Barry Ryan, Waste and Community Protection Manager  

Strategic Program Term Achievement: Plans are developed and implemented in partnership with emergency service agencies to provide emergency services and facilities to the City.

Critical Action: Protocols for the City’s response to fire, flood and other emergency conditions are established in partnership with the relevant agencies.

     

Purpose:

To advise Council of the rescue arrangements in the Penrith Local Government Area following a review by the State Rescue Board.  The report recommends that the information be received.

 

Background

The Penrith Volunteer Rescue Agency has held the responsibility to provide primary rescue tasks in the Penrith Local Government area for many years.  The NSW Fire Brigades have supported this role by acting as the secondary response agency for rescue.

 

Council has lobbied the Minister for Emergency Services, for some time, to provide adequate funding to the rescue agency for the Penrith LGA.  The State Government fully funds all other rescue agencies (NSW Fire Brigades, Ambulance and Police) in the Sydney Metropolitan Area. 

 

The State Rescue Board is responsible for maintaining efficient and effective rescue services throughout the State.  The Secretary of the State Rescue Board has advised that the Board recommended changes to the rescue arrangements in the Penrith LGA to the Minister for Emergency Services, The Hon Tony Kelly, and the Minister has approved these changes.

 

Current Situation

In early August 2006, representatives of the Penrith Volunteer Rescue Agency met with the Mayor and Council staff, and advised of impending changes to the rescue arrangements in the Penrith Local Government Area.

 

The State Rescue Board was immediately requested to provide information on the impending changes.

 

When requesting information from the State Rescue Board on this decision, the matter of funding of rescue services was raised. It was noted that the decision by the Board does not respond to Council’s position that the rescue services for the Penrith LGA be fully funded by the NSW Government, and that the decision appears that it may provide further financial hardship for the Penrith VRA. 

The Secretary of the State Rescue Board has responded to Council’s enquiries and provided information on the changes in rescue arrangements. No response was received in regard to the funding issues.

 

Council has been advised that the State Rescue Board has undertaken investigations into the performance of the Penrith Rescue Squad.

 

The investigations revealed “there was no operational shortcoming that would give cause to reconsider accreditation of the Penrith Rescue Squad”.  However, whilst undertaking the investigation, the high workload that was being performed by the Squad was seen as an issue that needed to be resolved as soon as possible.

 

The Board recommended to the Minister that there be a division of the district (Penrith LGA) on a geographic basis, using The Northern Road as the dividing line.  The Penrith Rescue Squad being the primary accredited rescue unit for the area west of The Northern Road, and the NSW Fire Brigades (operating out of the Dunheved Fire Brigade Station) being the primary accredited rescue unit for the area east of The Northern Road.

 

The effective date of change was dependent on the certification that the NSW Fire Brigades have met the appropriate standard (in regard to training of staff and provision of equipment).

 

This change took place at the end of August 2006.

 

The Penrith VRA receives funding through their own fundraising activities, donations, State and Federal grants, their parent organisation, and has also received financial assistance from Penrith City Council.

 

Members of the Penrith VRA have advised that they view this decision as having an impact upon their ability to raise funds, as they no longer service the eastern part of the City.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the information contained in the report on Rescue Services in the Penrith Local Government Area be received.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Ordinary Meeting

18 September 2006

The City Supported by Infrastructure

 

 

The City Supported by Infrastructure

 

 

12

Tender Number 02-06/07 Provision of Tip Truck Hire   

 

Compiled by:                Mal Ackerman, Supply Co-ordinator

Ian Pell, Works Coordinator

Authorised by:             David Burns, Asset Manager   

Strategic Program Term Achievement: An asset management strategy is in operation for civil infrastructure that optimises its use and maintains it to agreed standards fit for its contemporary purpose.

Critical Action: An Asset Management Strategy for Civil Assets is developed, maintained and implemented.

     

Purpose:

To seek endorsement to proceed with the implementation of Panel Supply Agreements for the Hire of Tip Trucks on an as required basis for a period of 2 years.  The report recommends that all tenderers who submitted a conforming response be accepted onto the Truck Hire list.

 

Background

Existing Supply Agreements for the hire of Tip Trucks are due to expire on 30 September 2006.

 

New Tenders were issued for the hire of Tip Trucks for a two (2) year period on an ‘as required’ basis, with allowance for rise and fall provisions, and closed on Tuesday, 3 August 2006.

 

Submissions were requested for the following range of Tip Trucks, with operators, that would be required by Council to supplement its existing fleet, and to cater for specific work applications to assist in the timely completion of Council’s work program:

 

·    RTA Class 1R2 8-10 Tonne

·    RTA Class 1R3 13-15 Tonne

·    RTA Class SR4-Short Combination Truck 3x3 42.5 Tonnes or less

 

It was proposed in the Tender documents, that all companies who submitted a conforming response to the tender would be accepted onto the Truck Hire listing.  Council would publish a final list of Suppliers for each truck capacity specified in the Tender. These are to be placed into the following classifications:

 

·    Trucks offered by Owner/operators

·    Trucks offered by Fleet Owners

The order in which trucks are placed on the initial hire lists shall be as follows:

·    Fleet owners by tendered hourly rate, from lowest to highest

·    Lorry owner/drivers, by random order.

All requirements for the hire of tip trucks will be on an as required basis, with no commitment to purchase any specific quantity over the period of the agreement.

 

Tenderers were required to submit their tender on a standard pro-forma sheet, which clearly identified the type and capacity of tip trucks, unit rates (Fleet Operators only), age, registered number, and chassis number.

 

Process for the selection/hire of Trucks

Fleet Owners

The selection process specified in the Tender for the hire of trucks is as follows.  Work shall be awarded to fleet owners’ trucks on Council’s Hire of Trucks list based on the following criteria:

 

·    Type of truck/s required

·    Price

·    Availability of tendered truck/s

·    Reliability of truck/s and/or driver

·    Work performance

·    Age of the Truck(s)

 

Owner/Drivers

Work shall be awarded to those lorry Owner/drivers on Council’s Hire of Trucks list based on the following criteria:

 

·    Type of truck/s required

·    The need to hire from lorry owner/drivers

·    Availability of tendered truck

·    Reliability of truck and/or driver

·    Work performance

·    Local lorry owner/driver preference

·    Age of the truck

 

The process of selection for the hire of Tip Trucks will be closely monitored by the Supply Coordinator to ensure the fair allocation of work to Owner/Drivers and/or Fleet Owners.

Tender Evaluation

The Tender Evaluation committee consisted of Mal. Ackerman (Supply Coordinator), Ian Pell (Works Supervisor) and Harry Brown (Supply Officer).

 

The selection criteria advertised and used in determining the final Hire of Trucks list was as follows:

 

·    Hire rates and location of business

·    Compliance with the truck requirements

·    Compliance with the Operator Competency requirements

·    Compliance with OH&S requirements

·    Compliance with Mandatory requirements.

 

All tenders received were assessed against these criteria.

 

Tender submissions

 

The following tables indicate the tenders received for each of the truck types specified from Fleet Owners and Owner/Operators.

 

Table 1 Fleet Owner Trucks

 


Table 2 Owner/Operators


Comments

There were only 2 Tenderers who did not demonstrate that they met the requirements.

Phil Little (Owner /operator) failed to provide evidence-indicating compliance with the mandatory requirements for Insurance. In addition, there was no statement of compliance regarding Operator Competency, OH&S and truck requirements.

 

Rinker Australia failed to provide specific details of the trucks offered, and this was a mandatory requirement.

 

All other tenderers fully met the tender requirements.

 

In some cases, the same truck from the same provider was offered for both 13-15 tonne capacity and 42.5 tonne capacity.  In the case of the larger capacity tip truck, the same prime mover/truck is offered with an attached Dog Trailer to meet the required capacity.

There were no declared conflicts of interest by any of the tenderers.

 

All fully compliant tenders should be accepted, and the supplier with the required equipment meeting the selection for hire criteria will be utilised, as and when required, in accordance with the terms of engagement.  All tenderers accepted will be given a copy of the Truck Hire listing for the applicable truck capacity, as tendered by them, showing the priority listing, according to the specified tender evaluation criteria.

The complete Truck Hire Listing for each Category and Truck Size can be found in the Attachment to this report. 

 

Industrial Relations

There are two (2) sets of conditions applicable to the Truck hire industry as follows;

Owner/Drivers

All-inclusive hourly rates payable to Owner/Operators (includes capital cost, running cost, Insurance, overheads and labour cost) will be strictly in accordance with the TWU Transport Industry – Excavated Materials Contract Determination IRC No. 4900, as ratified and gazetted by Department of Commerce Industrial Relations Department.

The current all-inclusive Contract Determination rates for each truck size, as specified in the tender documents, are as follows:

 

·    RTA Class 1R2 8-10 Tonne $50.652/hr

·    RTA Class 1R3 13-15 Tonne $78.871/hr

·    RTA Class SR4-Short Combination Truck 3x3 42.5 Tonnes or less $122.692/hr

 

The all-inclusive rates are reviewed and updated annually, on 1 July each year.

 

Fleet Owners (operating more than one truck)

 

The Fleet owners are required to pay Truck operators in accordance with the T.I (Transport Industry) State Award. The structure of the total rate, including the equipment, is purely up to the Fleet Owner. The current award rates of pay for drivers are as follows:

 

·    Grade 4, 9-15 tonne  $19.75 per hr (casual rate)

·    Grade 6, 30-60 tonne $20.82 per hr (casual rate)

 

Under the terms of the Truck Hire agreement, Fleet Owners are required to provide a statement verifying payment of the operators in accordance with the applicable award.

 

In some cases, Fleet Owners submitting a response to the tender have elected to offer their trucks in accordance with the Contract Determination rates.

 

In the event that the existing Industrial Relations conditions are superseded, during the stated term of the agreement, Council will ensure that the legally determined rates are applied for any remaining period.

 

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Tender Number 02-06/07 Provision of Tip Truck Hire be received.

2.     The tenders received from Jeffsan Excavations, MP Shultz, Raygal Pty Ltd, Earth Civil Pty Ltd, CNL Haulage Pty Ltd, J & S Dimech Pty Ltd, P & D Mizzi Pty Ltd, Brefni Excavation (Fleet Owners) be accepted and included in the relevant Truck Hire listing for a period of twenty-four (24) months.

3.     The tenders received from Charles Collins, C & C Cremona Pty Ltd, Michael Collins, JP & J Refalo, J Fairhall Earthmoving Pty Ltd, Ronald Roser, K A Beck Pty Ltd, P & R Xibberas, J & B Buttigieg Pty Ltd (Owner/Operators) be accepted and included in the relevant Truck Hire listing for a period of twenty-four (24) months.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1. View

Truck Hire Tendered Rates

3 Pages

Appendix

 


Ordinary Meeting

18 September 2006

Appendix 1 - Truck Hire Tendered Rates

 

 

 

Attachment to Council Report-Truck Hire Tender 02-06/07

 

 Fleet Owner Truck Hire Lists

 


RTA Class 1R2 8-10 Tonne

 

RTA Class 1R3 13-15 Tonne


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

RTA Class SR4-Short Combination Truck 3x3 42.5 Tonnes or less


 

 

 

 


Owner/Operator Truck Hire Lists

 

RTA Class 1R2 8-10 Tonne


 

RTA Class 1R3 13-15 Tonne


 

 

RTA Class SR4-Short Combination Truck 3x3 42.5 Tonnes or less

 

 


Leadership and Organisation

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

13      Summary of Investments & Banking for the period 1 August 2006 to 28 August 2006 

 

14      City Operations Directorate Report to end of August 2006 

 

15      Signing of Friendship Agreement between Penrith City Council and Lachlan Shire Council 

 

16      2006 Penrith Rotary Mayoral Charity Ball 

 

 



Ordinary Meeting

18 September 2006

Leadership and Organisation

 

 

Leadership and Organisation

 

 

13

Summary of Investments & Banking for the period 1 August 2006 to 28 August 2006   

 

Compiled by:                Pauline Johnston, Expenditure Accountant

Authorised by:             Geraldine Brown, Acting Financial Services Manager   

Strategic Program Term Achievement: Council provides adequate resources to deliver its program and has introduced measures to increase its capacity.

Critical Action: Maximise funding opportunities to deliver Council’s program.

     

Purpose:

To provide summary of investments for the period 1 August 2006 to 28 August 2006, and a Reconciliation of Invested Funds at 28 August 2006.  The report recommends the information contained in the report on Summary of Investments & Banking for the period 1 August 2006 to 28 August 2006 be received, the Certificate of the Responsible Accounting Officer and Summaries of Investments and Performance for the period 1 August 2006 to 28 August 2006 be noted and accepted and the graphical investment analysis as at 28 August 2006 be noted.

 

Background

CERTIFICATE OF RESPONSIBLE ACCOUNTING OFFICER

I hereby certify the following:

 

1.   All investments have been made in accordance with Section 625 of the Local Government Act 1999, relevant regulations and Council’s Investment Policy.

2.   Council’s Cash Book and Bank Statements have been reconciled as at 28 August 2006.

 

Barry Husking

Responsible Accounting Officer

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.   The information contained in the report on Summary of Investments & Banking for the period 1 August 2006 to 28 August 2006 be received.

2.   The Certificate of the Responsible Accounting Officer and Summaries of Investments and Performance for the period 1 August 2006 to 28 August 2006 be noted and accepted.

 

3.   The graphical investment analysis as at 28 August 2006 be noted.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1. View

Summary of Investments Portfolio

4 Pages

Appendix

 


Ordinary Meeting

18 September 2006

Appendix 1 - Summary of Investments Portfolio

 

 

 





Ordinary Meeting

18 September 2006

Leadership and Organisation

 

 

Leadership and Organisation

 

 

14

City Operations Directorate Report to end of August 2006   

 

Compiled by:                Joanne Robertson, AM Secretary

Authorised by:             Ray Moore, Director - City Operations   

Strategic Program Term Achievement: Services and programs that Council provides are determined based on equity, customer requirements, community benefits and best value.

Critical Action: Deliver quality customer services, responsive to contemporary community expectations within available resources.

     

Purpose:

To inform Council on the progress of works of the City Operations Directorate.  The report recommends that the information be received.

 

Background

ASSET MANAGEMENT DEPARTMENT

Civil Operations

 

PROGRAM

 

STATUS REPORT

 

 

 

Urban Drainage Construction Program

Expenditure to Date:

Budget Estimate:

$0

$380,000

Drainage designs have been completed for Park Ave, Kingswood.

 

Kerb & Gutter Program

Expenditure to Date:

Budget Estimate:

$49,365

$453,000

Works are in progress on the construction of kerb and gutter and associated roadworks in The Kingsway, St Marys and Bromley Rd, Emu Plains.

 

Roads Reconstruction Program

Expenditure to Date:

Budget Estimate:

$412,350

$2,723,896

Works are in progress on the construction of the parking areas along the shoulders of The Kingsway, St Marys.  Works are completed on Explorers Way, St Clair and Surveyors Creek Rd, Glenmore Park.

 

Lambridge Estate Drainage

Expenditure to Date:

Budget Estimate:

$1,302,000

$3,774,000

Works are in progress on the installation of pipe drainage, pits and gross pollutant traps in Lambridge Estate.

 

National Blackspot Progam

Expenditure to Date:

Budget Estimate:

$27,149

$137,000

Draft designs have been completed, and community consultation is currently in progress, for proposed facilities at Jamison Rd and Castlereagh St, Penrith.

Path Paving Program

Expenditure to Date:

Budget Estimate:

$33,798

$750,000

Works have been completed on Joseph Street and Shaw St, Cambridge Park.  Works are in progress on Carinya Avenue, St Marys.

Dunheved Road/Greenbank Drive

Expenditure to Date:

Budget Estimate:

$730,000

$848,247

Traffic signals active on 4 September 2006.  Minor works remaining in Francis Street to complete new road deviation.   Street lighting of new Francis Street link in progress.

 

Operational Activities

Road maintenance continues in accordance with priorities identified from regular precinct inspections based upon Auspec No 4 Specifications.

 

Heavy patching crews are currently carrying out the necessary repairs for the road resurfacing program.

 

Concrete crews have assisted in drainage pit construction in Lambridge Estate, Penrith.  Concrete crews have also been focussed on performing service utility restorations across the City.

 

Other recurrent programmed maintenance activities including street sweeping, public domain maintenance, signs installation and maintenance, litter patrol, footpath cleaning and street furniture maintenance continue.

 

Asset Systems

Roads to Recovery Programme 2006/2007

The following road has been resurfaced since the previous report, under the federally funded Roads to Recovery Program:

 

·    Plasser Cr, North St Marys (entire length) (nightwork)

 

A total of 18,000sqm  (0.23% of Councils’ road network) has  been resurfaced under this programme in 2006/2007.

 

Road Resheeting/Resealing Programme

The following road has been resurfaced since the previous report, under the Road resheeting / resealing program:

 

·    Brookfield Ave, Werrington Downs

 

A total of 26,400sqm (0.33%) of the road network has been resurfaced to date, with asphaltic concrete during 2006/07.

 

Repair works are in progress for the 2006/07 road programs. A total of 320m of kerb and gutter and 9,700sqm of road pavement has been repaired to date, for the 2006/2007 road resurfacing program.

 

Audits/Inspections

The twentieth round of Ausspec 4 (routine maintenance inspections) is now complete. The majority of defects identified during the inspection were minor potholes and pavement failures. Pothole repairs are in progress as per set response times.

Community Safety

The development of the 2006-2009 Community Safety Plan continues with the community consultation process well advanced.  The community involvement is being carried out through the use of questionnaires, focus groups and consultations.  This will assist in the identification of safety and crime prevention issues and in the development of strategies to address prioritised issues raised through the consultations.

 

Comments on local safety and crime prevention issues should be forwarded to Council’s Community Safety Officer.

 

Development Services

No developer constructed assets were accepted for this period.

 

No Construction Certificates were issued for this period.

 

No Construction Certificates issued by Private Certifiers where notified for this period.

 

Inspections were carried out on the engineering works for the following developments:

 

·    Second & Tenth Avenue, Berkshire Park- Subdivision road and drainage works

·    Regentville Road, Jamisontown - Drainage works

·    Lenore Lane Erskine Park - Road and Drainage Works.

·    Kohlenburg Close Emu Plains -  Road and drainage works

·    Andrews Road, Cranebrook - ½  Road and Drainage work

·    Mamre Road Erskine Park - Road & Drainage works

·    Shepherd Street Colyton -  Road and drainage works

·    Collins St & Swanston Street - Road & Drainage works

·    David Road & Old Bathurst Road - Road and Drainage works

·    Adelaide Street - On site detention

·    Jay Place - Drainage works

·    Barlow Street - Drainage works

 

Traffic

The Local Traffic Committee (LTC), at its meeting 7 August 2006, considered thirteen items on traffic and road safety issues.  The recommendations of the Local Traffic Committee have been considered and adopted by Council, at its meeting on 21 August 2006.  The traffic impacts of four development application referrals have been assessed from 1 August to 31 August 2006.

 

Investigation and analysis of other traffic and road safety issues received, including footpath requests and determination of speed profiles in nominated locations, are being carried out as required.

 

Concept designs for the 2006/2007 Auslink National Blackspot Program are completed and community consultation has commenced.  It is expected that these projects will be presented to the Local Traffic Committee at its meeting in October 2006.

 

 

 

Road Safety

Working Party for the Criminal Procedure Amendment (Traffic Offender Intervention Program) Regulation 2006

Council’s Road Safety Coordinator is a member of the working party to develop the Criminal Procedure Amendment (Traffic Offender Intervention Program) Regulation 2006.  This legislation aims to regulate participant entry into, and the conduct of, traffic offender programs.  It will also declare a traffic offender program to be an approved intervention program with respect to the Criminal Procedure Act 1986.   The working party met during August and will shortly begin developing guidelines with respect to the conduct and management of traffic offender programs.

 

Sudanese Women’s Road Safety Program

NRMA Motoring & Services has formally handed over the cheque for the Sudanese Women’s Road Safety Program to Penrith Women’s Health Centre during a media engagement.  Council has commenced producing a series of graphics for the program utilising images of the Sudanese women to demonstrate the main points of each session.

 

Operation Eggshell

Police from Penrith/St Marys Highway Patrol have commenced issuing vouchers for the second phase of Operation Eggshell.  A competition to design a bicycle helmet was also held at Corpus Christi school in Cranebrook.  The winners were selected and presented with certificates and Operation Eggshell vouchers. 

 

Slow Down Bin Stickers

Approximately 350 Slow Down bin stickers have been distributed to residents including guidelines for application.  A further 1000 will be distributed throughout September.  The feedback from residents indicates that they are a simple tool which sends a message to motorists that speeding vehicles are not tolerated in their street.

 

BUILDING SERVICES DEPARTMENT

Maintenance Works for August 2006

The Building Services Department received 537 maintenance requests for the month of

August 2006. Out of these, 371 were for graffiti removal.  Council Staff removed graffiti from buildings on 371 occasions during the month of August 2006.

Building Projects

Ø Erskine Park Child Care Centre Extensions

·    Works commenced 29 May 2006

·    Structural elements 80% completed

·    Fitout commenced

·    Works progressing to schedule

 

Ø Jamison Park Netball Extensions

·    Tenders closed 20 June 2006

·    Contract awarded to Caliber Contracting

·    Works to commence 11 September 2006

 

Ø Samuel Marsden Baseball Amenities

·    Contract awarded to Westco Building Consultants

·    Work commenced in mid August.  Slab poured, brickwork commenced

 

Ø Penrith Regional Gallery

·    Work to Anchor House and Covered Way underway

·    External works to courtyard areas and verandah underway

Ø Asset Renewal Program

·    New timber floor, work completed

·    Child Care Centres – new floor coverings, program commenced

 

Ø CWA Alterations & Additions – St Marys

·    Tenders advertised on 29 August 2006 and close on 26 September 2006

 

PARKS CONSTRUCTION & MAINTENANCE DEPARTMENT

 

Major Sporting Events

Two weekends of finals matches for the Nepean District Soccer Football Association were held at Jamison Park recently.  Both weekends attracted huge participation and large crowds of spectators.  Council staff assisted the Association in preparation for and during the events.

 

A gala day was held at Andromeda Oval, Cranebrook by the Cranebrook Soccer Club that also attracted large crowds.

 

Council’s athletics fields are used regularly for major school carnivals during the winter months, especially August.  Large crowds attend these events and Parks staff are heavily involved in preparing the facilities and especially with removal of litter.

 

Improvements to Playing Fields

Inspections of sporting fields have been carried out, and discussions held with the various clubs and associations, to determine priorities for the improvements to playing fields during the off-season.  The work will involve decompaction, topdressing, fertilising and turfing of selected areas.   Funds are available from a parks project and with several of the clubs contributing a share of the cost of the work.

 

Work is proposed at:

 

·    Hunter Fields

·    Leonay Oval

·    Jamison Park

·    Doug Rennie Oval

·    Cook Park

·    Solander Oval

·    Parker Street Oval

·    Greygums Oval

·    Ridge Park

 

An extensive list of parks for spring weed spraying (broad leaf and bindii) has been prepared and a contractor engaged to carry out this work in the middle of September.

 

Preparation for the change from the winter season to the summer season sports in underway.   Several synthetic cricket wicket surfaces have been repaired/replaced, run-ups repaired, cricket nets have been inspected and repaired as required.  All this work has been carried out in consultation with the Cricket Association who will be contributing a share of the costs.  Arrangements for the removal of the soccer and league goal posts have been made and will commence shortly.

 

Parks Projects

The Development Application for the new playing field at St Clair High School has been submitted.  This joint project will see the construction of an additional field that will be available for community use outside of school hours.

 

The building project for the Colyton St Clair Baseball Club at Samuel Marsden Fields commenced in August. 

 

The project for the upgrade of the toilet block at the Jamison Park Netball Facility is due to commence in early September.

 

Planning is underway for Stage 2 of the landscaping for Victoria Park, St Marys.  It is anticipated the work will commence in the second quarter of this financial year.

 

Bushland Management

The bush regeneration staff has continued maintenance works at Tench Reserve and Werrington Creek. The main focus of work has been treating weed vines before their spring growth eg Madeira vine, Cat’s claw creeper and Balloon vine.

 

At Apple Gum Reserve in Glenmore Park, a contractor has started removing large weed African Olive trees before their seed ripens.

 

The noxious weed Mother of Millions has been a target species in the last month. Some areas have been sprayed and the weed is starting to die off.

 

 

 

Clissold Reserve

After all the hard work planting in December 2005 the bushland is now flourishing. Wattles and Indigoferas are flowering (yellow and purple) and the area near the bench is looking very pretty.

 

        

December 2005                                                           August 2006

 

Jamison Creek Community Water Grant

The Federal Government Community Water Grant sign has now been erected at Leonay Oval.

 

Unfortunately all is not good news.  There has been another surge of wanton vandalism in Ellison Reserve at Werrington with a substantial number of mature and small trees being damaged.

        

 

More work is required to educate the community regarding the importance of remnant vegetation.

 

WASTE & COMMUNITY PROTECTION DEPARTMENT

Ranger & Animal Services

The Ranger & Animal Services Unit provided a Companion Animal Officer, Animal Services Officer and a Ranger at a stand for Council’s Open Day. Officers provided information on companion animal issues, as well as running a competition where people could win a prize of pet products for their dog or cat.  People were required to read the display boards to get the answers to the competition.  This was well received, with a winner for dog products from Penrith, and a winner for cat products from St Clair.

 

Animal Services Display at Council’s Open Day on 12 August 2006

 

Outstanding dog registration letters were sent out to approximately 300 dog and cat owners, advising of their requirement to lifetime register the companion animals with Council.

 

Three officers attended the 16th Urban Animal Management Conference in Hobart.  Officers received information from guest speakers on animal behaviour best practice and were able to network ideas from animal behaviour specialists. 

 

Regional Illegal Dumping Squad

During August, the RID Squad commenced 19 new investigations, and completed 27 investigations, into illegal dumping incidents in Penrith. The completed investigations resulted in nine Infringements being issued, having a total value of $4,550.00.

 

Penrith Rural Fire Service

Penrith Brigades responded to 67 emergency calls during August 2006, including:

 

8    Vehicle Fires

5    Serious motor vehicle accidents

3    Rubbish Fires

36  Bush and grass fires

3    Spills on the road

11  Alarm calls

1    False alarm.

 

There was a 60ha hazard reduction burn along Nutt Road in Londonderry to provide a strategic buffer for residents, in the event of a wildfire in the northern area of the Crown Land. Brigades have assisted the public in a number of smaller 1ha burns on private property to reduce grass fuel levels and to limit the spread of any fires.

 

There are approximately six hazard reduction burns approved, under the Bush Fire Environmental Assessment Code, on private property. These burns will need to comply with a range of environmental conditions, and will be conducted by the RFS when the weather suits safe prescribed burning.

 

Penrith SES

The month of August 2006 was quiet for the Penrith State Emergency Service, with the main activity this month being the community event attended annually in support of Council’s Open Day.  This year’s Open Day on 12 August was attended by 16 State Emergency Service people who manned the sausage sizzle, and a public information stand to make the public aware of the steps they can take to minimise storm damage, and to raise awareness for the potential of flooding in the Penrith LGA. 

 

A great success with the young ones was the State Emergency Service Mascot “Paddy”.

 

Waste Services

Waste Education

Specific Litter Education Activities

Personal butt bins are available, free of charge, to smokers at the Civic Centre, Queen Street Centre, St Marys Swimming Centre, and 17 community centres across the local government area.

 

Personal butt bins were distributed to smokers as part of events at Penrith Council Open Day and Penrith Show.

 

Community Waste Education Activities

A waste minimisation, recycling, composting and worm farming display was held at the Civic Centre and the Queen Street Centre.

 

The ‘Can Do’ Steel Can recycling competition was launched on 12 August at Council’s Open Day.  Displays promoting the competition were also held at Penrith Bunnings on 19 August, and at the Penrith Show on 26 and 27 August. 

 

“Can Do” Steel Can Recycling Competition and Waste Education Display at Council’s Open Day

 

Advertisements were placed in the Penrith Press, St Marys Standard, Penrith Star and St Marys Star, and a Mayoral message was placed to promote the competition.  Posters have been put up at Council’s Civic Centre, Queen Street Centre and all five libraries.  Posters have also been sent to ten community centres, 31 childcare centres and all schools in the local government area to promote the competition.  This competition will also be promoted through the Sustainable Times Schools newsletter, in local newspapers, Mayoral messages, community radio announcements, through the Bunnings newsletter mail-out, and at Child Care Centres.  This competition is a joint partnership between Council, Cleanaway and VISY Recycling, supported by Bunnings Warehouse, Old Leura Dairy and Cansmart. 

 

500 customer service surveys were randomly sent out.  219 were returned by the due date, and were included in the following statistics.  99.5% of residents are satisfied with the garbage collection service, 97.7% of residents are satisfied with the recycling collection service and 96.9% of residents who booked a clean up collection are satisfied with the service.

 

226 residents completed a customer service survey at the Penrith Open Day.  This revealed that 99.1% of residents are satisfied with the garbage collection service, 98.7% of residents are satisfied with the recycling collection service, and 97.0% of residents who booked a clean up collection are satisfied with the service.

 

During August, on average, 99.3% of residents were satisfied with the garbage collection service, 98.2% of residents were satisfied with the recycling collection service, and 97.0% of residents who booked a clean up collection were satisfied with the service.

 

Future community education programs include the ‘Can Do’ promotions at:

·    St Marys Spring Festival

·    Nepean Zone of Playgroup Family Fun Day

·    Penrith Bunnings and North Penrith Bunnings.

 

Earthworks workshops are scheduled to be held in October and November at Kingswood and St Clair.  These have been promoted at the Council’s Open Day and the Penrith Show, and will also be promoted at various Spring events as well as in local newsletters, local newspapers, and via posters at libraries, child care centres, schools and community centres.

 

School & Other Children’s Group Waste Education

Education sessions were held at:

·    Strauss Road Child Care Centre (07/08/06)

·    Oxley Park Public School (17/08/06)

 

·    Jamisontown Child Care Centre (21/08/06)

·    Grays Lane Child Care Centre (24/08/06)

·    Emu Village Before & After School Care Centre (24/08/06)

 

Future waste education sessions will be held at:

·    Jamisontown Child Care Centre (12/09/06)

·    St Marys Children’s Centre (05/09/06)

·    Blackwell Public School- Sustainability Street Waste Education (08/09/06)

·    Carita Child Care Centre (15/09/06)

·    The Kids Place Child Care Centre (04/10/06)

·    Waste Education will also be conducted at the Penrith Enviro Adventure on 26 October 2006

 

Home composting and worm farm

4 compost bins and 5 worm farms were sold during August.

8 compost bins and 6 worm farms have been sold YTD.

 

Advertising Activities

Displays held in the Civic Centre Foyer and Queen Street Centre promoted waste avoidance, recycling, home composting and waste service options.  Displays were held at Penrith Council’s Open Day and the Penrith Show promoting waste avoidance and recycling.

 

 

The ‘Can Do’ competition was advertised in the Penrith Press, St Marys Standard, Penrith City Star and St Marys Star.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the information contained in the report on City Operations Directorate Report to end of August 2006 be received.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Ordinary Meeting

18 September 2006

Leadership and Organisation

 

 

Leadership and Organisation

 

 

15

Signing of Friendship Agreement between Penrith City Council and Lachlan Shire Council   

 

Compiled by:                Joanne Ryan, Partnerships, Marketing & Administration Officer

Authorised by:             Paul Page, Acting Economic Development and City Marketing Manager   

Strategic Program Term Achievement: A targeted program of advocacy and policy discussion is being conducted with the support of the community and City organisations around social, environmental, economic and infrastructure priorities.

Critical Action: Partnerships are in place and coordinated by Council to collaboratively advance nominated projects or programs of benefit to the City.

     

Purpose:

To inform Council of the signing of a Friendship Agreement between Penrith City Council and Lachlan Shire Council.  The report recommends that the information in the report on the signing of the Friendship Agreement between Penrith City Council and Lachlan Shire Council be received.

 

Background

The relationship between Penrith City Council and Lachlan Shire Council had its origins in February 2006, when correspondence was received from Lachlan Shire Council requesting that the communities of Penrith City and Lachlan Shire consider developing a relationship that would lead to them working closely together to undertake a series of sporting, cultural and educational exchanges as well as Council to Council activities.

 

Council resolved to agree in principle to developing a partnership that would see both Councils act as facilitators for local groups and organisations, bringing them together and encouraging them to participate in exchanges that would potentially be of benefit to both local government areas.

 

Since that time, a range of community exchanges have commenced and a network of interested people in both communities has been established.

 

Community initiatives underway, or currently being investigated, include:

 

·    A long term relationship that already existed between the St Marys Rugby League Club and the Condobolin Junior Rugby League Club continues to flourish

·    Lions Club of Emu Plains and The Lions Club of Condobolin are investigating a number of projects that they can work on jointly

·    Nepean Arts Society and the Lake Cargelligo Arts Council are looking at conducting at a range of artistic exchanges

·    Penrith Netball Association has approached its clubs to identify possible future interest in reciprocal activities

·    Local Penrith Golf Clubs are also looking at possible future interest in reciprocal activities

·    Baptist Churches of Penrith and Lake Cargelligo are liaising on school holiday activities and the possibility of Penrith pastors relieving the Lake Cargelligo pastor in timres of absence

·    Condobolin’s Amateur Swimming Club expressed an interest in partnering with Penrith’s RSL Swimming Club, for which discussions have commenced.

·    A relationship between McCarthy Catholic College and Condobolin High School

·    A relationship between North St Marys Primary School and Condobolin

 

An initiative that has already come to fruition has been the inclusion of Condobolin High and Tottenham Central Schools into the annual Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute’s Year 11 Science Awards. Instigated by Councillor Pat Sheehy, this gives Condobolin’s best Year 11 Science student the opportunity to be recognised, along with students from 22 other schools in the Penrith Local Government Area.

 

In terms of Council-to-Council activities, a staff exchange program between the two councils has started.  To date, five staff exchanges have taken place in the fields of economic development, finance, information technology, GIS and asset systems, and civil design, providing career development opportunities for staff from both councils.  There has also been cooperation in information sharing between the two councils, in the fields of administration, spatial and asset information systems, information technology and human resources.

 

Arrangements have also commenced to organise a visit to Lachlan Shire by John Kirkman, Chief Executive Officer of the Joan Sutherland Performing Arts Centre, who has expressed his intention to visit Lachlan Shire for four days in November, visiting Condobolin, Lake Cargelligo and Tottenham, to investigate and discuss opportunities for a mutual arts exchange program.

 

Agreement Signing

On Wednesday 23 August 2006, a delegation from Penrith City travelled to Lachlan Shire to participate in the historic signing of the Friendship Agreement between Penrith City and Lachlan Shire Councils.

 

The delegation consisted of Council and community representatives, led by the Mayor of Penrith, Councillor John Thain. Other Councillors who attended were the Deputy Mayor, Jackie Greenow, Garry Rumble, Pat Sheehy, Karen McKeown and Lexie Cettolin as well as General Manager, Alan Travers. Community representatives who attended were Neil Checkley, Senior Pastor of the Penrith Baptist Church, Karen McSpeerin, Principal of St Marys North Public School, Paul O’Brien, English Department Co-ordinator of the McCarthy Catholic College, and Ian West, Assistant Secretary of the Emu Plains Branch of the Lions Club.

 

Also in attendance at the ceremony, were the Minister for Local Government, the Hon Kerry Hickey and the Member for Lachlan, the Hon Ian Armstrong, along with Mayors and General Managers from surrounding shires and approximately 220 invited guests representing sporting, community and cultural organisations throughout Lachlan Shire.

 

The signing ceremony began with a ‘Welcome to Country’ by the Wiradjuri Tribe of Condobolin. The MC for the function was Mr Geordie Muir, the President of the Condobolin RSL Club. He was formerly the Manager of the Henry Lawson Club at Werrington and was partly responsible for Lachlan Shire Council initially approaching Penrith about the possibility of developing a relationship. This was followed by the official ceremony where the Friendship Agreement was signed by both Mayors and General Managers, as well as the Minister for Local Government, the Hon Kerry Hickey. As the agreement was being signed, Mr Muir sang ‘We are Australian’ which set the tone for the evening most appropriately.

 

The Mayor of Penrith was then presented with a Didgeridoo from the Wiradjuri Condobolin Corporation, and Penrith City Council was presented with an Aboriginal painting from Lachlan Shire Council.

 

The following morning, a tree planting ceremony took place in the main street of Condobolin, where two water gums donated by Penrith City Council were planted as a permanent reminder of the relationship between the two regions.

 

The signing of the agreement attracted significant media coverage. The Mayor of Penrith was interviewed by Prime News and the story also received coverage on Stateline on ABC television. In addition, there was extensive coverage by the local newspapers in Condobolin, and local Penrith papers have also run stories about the event.

 

Conclusion

The Friendship Agreement between Penrith City Council and Lachlan Shire Council encompasses various areas of co-operation between the two regions, and is a good example of councils in NSW developing alliances so that they can investigate and pursue opportunities for working together.

 

At the signing ceremony, the Minister for Local Government, the Hon. Kerry Hickey, commented that such ties between city and country could help save ratepayers’ money and meet the challenges of skills shortages in regional NSW. He also said that he hoped other councils would follow the lead of Penrith City Council and Lachlan Shire Council, and establish similar relationships that had the capacity to generate benefits for the communities of the respective regions.

 

Aside from the more tangible benefits that will be delivered as a result of the relationship, the Friendship Agreement promotes a greater awareness of the respective areas and lifestyles of Penrith City and Lachlan Shire. It will give many residents from Penrith a unique opportunity to understand the complexities of a rural community and learn about the values found in rural Australia.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the information contained in the report on Signing of Friendship Agreement between Penrith City Council and Lachlan Shire Council be received.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.  

Images from visit to Lachlan Shire for the signing of the Friendship Agreement

1 Page

Attachment

 

Leadership and Organisation

 

 

16

2006 Penrith Rotary Mayoral Charity Ball   

 

Compiled by:                Tina-Marie Sheil, Civic Programs Officer

Authorised by:             Glenn McCarthy, Executive Officer   

Strategic Program Term Achievement: Council has reviewed its own role and operations and has adopted contemporary practices to best discharge its charter.

Critical Action: Review current structures and procedures supporting Council and Councillors responsibilities.

  

Previous Items:            Mayoral Charity Ball - Policy Review Committee - 22 May 2006  

Purpose:

To provide Council with details of the Penrith Rotary Mayoral Charity Ball held on Friday 25 August 2006. The report recommends that the information be received.

 

Background

At the Policy Review Committee meeting held on 22 May 2006, a report on the possible conduct of a charity ball, in conjunction with the Rotary Club of Penrith, was considered. Council subsequently adopted the Committee’s recommendation as follows:

 

“That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Mayoral Charity Ball be received

2.     Council conduct a Mayoral Charity Ball on Friday 25 August 2006

3.     The name of the Ball be the ‘2006 Penrith Rotary Mayoral Charity Ball’

4.     Investigations into the establishment of a Penrith City Council Mayoral Charity Ball fund continue and if appropriate the fund be created

5.     The beneficiary charity for the proceeds of the mayoral ball be determined by the Mayor of the day.”

 

His Worship the Mayor, Councillor John Thain, selected the Down Syndrome of NSW Inc. as the charity to receive the proceeds of the Ball.

Current Situation

The Ball was held at the St Marys Rugby League Club and was attended by 209­­­­­ people. The John Morrison Swing City Big Band and Latin Fever Dancers provided entertainment and fundraising on the night was by way of a raffle and loud and silent auctions.

 

Delfin Lend Lease and Cleanaway were the major sponsors of the Ball. Other sponsors were IMS Installations, Penrith Press, Penrith Lakes Development Corporation and the HIX Group.

 

In addition to the sponsors, Leonard Holt Robb, CL & VM White, Ripples Recreation Centre, Penrith Whitewater, Vicarys Winery, Joan Sutherland Performing Arts Centre, Good Guys Penrith, Nepean Flower Shop, McDonalds Emu Plains and St Marys Rugby League Club supported the Ball. Evantz Management was engaged to assist with the coordination of the Ball.

 

Mr Ken Hancock, Vice President of the Down Syndrome Association of NSW, expressed his gratitude to the Council and Penrith Rotary for conducting the event and was delighted to be presented with a “cheque” for $25,000 on the night. Now that final accounts have been paid, the actual proceeds from the night have been calculated and are set out in the following table.

 

 

2006 Mayoral Charity Ball Budget

Income

 

Draft

Actual

Ticket Sales

 

$24,3541

                  - Single tickets @ $130

$19,500

 

                  - Tables of 10 @ $1200

$24,000

 

Raffle

$3,000

$3,700

Auction

$30,000

$9,1342

Sponsorship

$20,000

$15,8553

Total income

$96,500

$53,043

Cost of Sales

 

 

 

Meals

$14,000

$7,855

Raffles

$1,000

$04

Drinks

$6,000

$2,039