30 May 2007

Dear Councillor,

In pursuance of the provisions of the Local Government Act, 1993 and the Regulations thereunder, notice is hereby given that a POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING of Penrith City Council is to be held in the Passadena Room, Civic Centre, 601 High Street, Penrith on Monday 4 June 2007 at 7:30pm.

Attention is directed to the statement accompanying this notice of the business proposed to be transacted at the meeting.

Yours Faithfully

 

 

Alan Travers

General Manager

 

BUSINESS

 

1.           APOLOGIES

 

2.           LEAVE OF ABSENCE

Leave of absence has been granted to:

Councillor Lexie Cettolin - 21 May 2007 to 25 June 2007 inclusive.

Councillor Karen McKeown - 25 May 2007 to 26 June 2007 inclusive.

Councillor Kaylene Allison - 26 May 2007 to 1 July 2007 inclusive.

Councillor Ross Fowler - 2 June 2007 to 17 June 2007 inclusive.

 

3.           CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES

Policy Review Committee Meeting - 21 May 2007.

 

4.           DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

Pecuniary Interest (The Act requires Councillors who declare a pecuniary interest in an item to leave the meeting during discussion of that item)

Non-Pecuniary Interest

 

5.           ADDRESSING THE MEETING

 

6.           MAYORAL MINUTES

 

7.           NOTICES OF MOTION

 

8.           ADOPTION OF REPORTS AND RECOMMENDATION OF COMMITTEES

 

9.           MASTER PROGRAM REPORTS

 

10.         URGENT REPORTS (to be dealt with in the master program to which the item relates)

 

11.         QUESTIONS WITHOUT NOTICE

 

12.         COMMITTEE OF THE WHOLE


POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING

 

Monday 4 June 2007

 

table of contents

 

 

 

 

 

 

meeting calendar

 

 

confirmation of minutes

 

 

master program reports

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MEETING CALENDAR

February 2007 - December 2007

 

 

TIME

FEB

MAR

APRIL

MAY

JUNE

JULY

AUG

SEPT

OCT

NOV

DEC

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Ordinary Meetings

7.30 pm

12

5

 

7v

25*

2

 

3ü

 

 

 

 

26

23

28

 

23

13

24^

29

19

10

Policy Review Committee

7.30 pm

 

12

2@

 

4

9

 

10

 

 

3

19#+

 

30

21#

 

30

20#+

 

8@

5#

 

 

#    Meetings at which the Management Plan ¼ly  reviews are presented.

^     Election of Mayor/Deputy Mayor [only business]

#+  General Manager’s presentation – half year and end of year review

@   Strategic Program progress reports [only business]

v   Meeting at which the Draft Management Plan is adopted for exhibition

ü    Meeting at which the 2006/2007 Annual Statements are presented

*     Meeting at which the Management Plan for 2007/2008 is adopted

 

 

-                 Council’s Ordinary Meetings are held on a three-week cycle where practicable.

-                 Extraordinary Meetings are held as required.

-                 Policy Review Meetings are held on a three-week cycle where practicable.

-                 Members of the public are invited to observe meetings of the Council (Ordinary and Policy Review Committee).  All meetings start at 7:30pm.

-                 Should you wish to address Council, please contact the Public Officer, Glenn McCarthy on 47327649


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


UNCONFIRMED MINUTES

 OF THE POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING OF PENRITH CITY COUNCIL HELD IN THE PASSADENA ROOM, PENRITH

ON MONDAY 21 MAY 2007 AT 7:33PM

PRESENT

His Worship the Mayor Councillor Pat Sheehy AM, Councillors Jim Aitken OAM, Kaylene Allison, Kevin Crameri OAM, Mark Davies, Ross Fowler, Jackie Greenow, Karen McKeown, Garry Rumble, Steve Simat and John Thain.

 

APOLOGIES

PRC 37  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Jackie Greenow seconded Councillor Ross Fowler that apologies be accepted from Councillors David Bradbury, Greg Davies and Susan Page.

 

LEAVE OF ABSENCE                                                                                                                

His Worship the Mayor, Councillor Pat Sheehy AM advised that Councillor Lexie Cettolin requested Leave of Absence from 21 May 2007 to 25 June inclusive.

PRC 38 RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Jackie Greenow seconded Councillor Garry Rumble that the matter be brought forward and dealt with as a matter of urgency.

His Worship the Mayor, Councillor Pat Sheehy AM, ruled that the matter was urgent and should be dealt with at the meeting.

PRC 39  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Jackie Greenow seconded Councillor Garry Rumble that Leave of Absence be granted to Councillor Lexie Cettolin from 21 May 2007 to 25 June 2007 inclusive.

 

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES - Policy Review Committee Meeting - 30 April 2007

PRC 40  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Ross Fowler seconded Councillor Steve Simat that the minutes of the Policy Review Committee Meeting of 30 April 2007 be confirmed.

 

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

 There were no declarations of interest.

  

MASTER PROGRAM REPORTS

 

The City In Its Environment

 

Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM left the meeting, the time being 8:43pm.

 

3        Carbon Neutral Status of Council                                                                                      

Sustainability Unit Coorindator, Louise Petchell and Justin Sherrard of Cambiar Pty Ltd, gave presentations.

PRC 41  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Ross Fowler seconded Councillor Karen McKeown

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Carbon Neutral Status of Council be received

2.     Council continue to advance and accelerate where practicable the implementation of its adopted plans to reduce energy use and greenhouse emissions, according to the priority directions discussed in the report

3.     A Working Party comprising Councillors Karen McKeown, Mark Davies, Ross Fowler and all interested and available Councillors be established to address the further development of Council’s Sustainability strategies including Carbon Neutral and its leadership role.

 

5        ICLEI Oceania: Accelerating Now! Conference 2007                                                     

PRC 42  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Garry Rumble seconded Councillor Jackie Greenow that the information contained in the report on the  ICLEI Oceania: Accelerating Now! Conference 2007 be received.

 

Leadership and Organisation

 

Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM returned to the meeting, the time being 8:49pm.

 

1        2006-2007 Management Plan March Quarter Review                                                    

PRC 43  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Ross Fowler seconded Councillor Jim Aitken OAM

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on 2006-2007 Management Plan March Quarter Review be received

2.     The 2006-2007 Management Plan Review as at 31 March 2007, including the revised estimates identified in the recommended budget, be adopted

3.     The proposed budget reallocations detailed in the report be adopted.

 

The City as a Social Place

 

Councillor Jim Aitken OAM left the meeting, the time being 9:01pm.

 

Councillor Jim Aitken OAM returned to the meeting, the time being 9:04pm.

 

2        Community Meeting at Regentville Hall                                                                          

PRC 44  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Mark Davies seconded Councillor Steve Simat

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Community Meeting at Regentville Hall be received

2.     The Security Bonds for 18th and 21st birthdays be increased to $500.00 at all neighbourhood facilities in 2007/08

3.     The consumption of alcohol at Regentville Hall be prohibited

4.     Signs be erected in the carpark area prohibiting alcohol under s632 of the Local Government Act (acting contrary to notices)

5.     Functions at Regentville Hall are to have a 10:00pm close-down

6.       The operation of functions at Regentville Hall be monitored, and further priority measures as identified by the community be implemented if required.

 

The City as an Economy

 

4        International Links Visit to Korea and Japan, March 2007                                            

PRC 45  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Jackie Greenow seconded Councillor Garry Rumble that the information contained in the report on International Links Visit to Korea and Japan, March 2007 be received.

 

There being no further business the Chairperson declared the meeting closed the time being 9:09pm.

    



 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

 

The City in its Broader Context

 

1        Status of National Growth Area Alliance

 

The City as a Social Place

 

2        Penrith Open Space Action Plan and Penrith City Local Open Space Development Contributions Plan

 

The City In Its Environment

 

3        Review of Council's On-site Sewage Management Strategy

   

Leadership and Organisation

 

4        Council Scholarship - University of Western Sydney

 

 


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


The City in its Broader Context

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

1        Status of National Growth Area Alliance

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting

4 June 2007

The City in its Broader Context

 

 

The City in its Broader Context

 

 

1

Status of National Growth Area Alliance   

 

Compiled by:                Roger Nethercote, Environmental Planning Manager

Authorised by:             Roger Nethercote, Environmental Planning Manager   

Strategic Program Term Achievement: Agreement has been reached with State Government agencies to provide mutually agreed services and facilities to the City consistent with its growing requirements.

Critical Action: Determine and prioritise the services and facilities needed to allow the City to perform its metropolitan and regional roles.

     

Purpose:

To inform Council of the status of the National Growth Area Alliance.  The report recommends that the Mayor represent Council in discussions with the Mayors of the other National Growth Area Alliance Councils in Western Sydney to consider infrastructure priorities to support urban growth and their advocacy to Government.

 

Background

Following a report to the Policy Review Committee meeting of 19 February 2007, Council agreed to participate in the National Growth Area Alliance, and that a contribution of $10,000 be made available from existing allocated funds for the project. 

 

The National Growth Areas Alliance has been formed to represent the interests of more than thirty fast growing metropolitan fringe Councils across Australia.  The Alliance’s formation was motivated by the lack of Federal Government recognition and infrastructure funding programs to support Councils across Australia that are, or are expected to, experience high levels of population growth.  The principal role of the Growth Area Alliance is to highlight the pressing needs of growth areas and to advocate increased Federal and State Government interest and resources to these areas. 

 

The approach being pursued is to undertake national research to prepare a cornerstone advocacy document for the Alliance to take to Government.  A Growth Area Alliance task group, comprising personnel from Whittlesea Council and other Alliance members, is directing and overseeing the project.  A brief was prepared for this research, and recently awarded to a consortium of SGS Economic and Planning Consultants and Australian Social and Recreation Research Pty Ltd. 

 

The principal focus of the research program is to identify current and projected growth rates of the Alliance member council areas, to identify points of differentiation and other interest/ lobby groups, quantify the significant contribution Alliance councils make to economic growth, nation building and social and environmental well-being, and identify current and emerging infrastructure and servicing issues and appropriate best practice models from around Australian and overseas. 

 

The quantitative component of the SGS research is completed and a number of key results are outlined below.  The qualitative element of the research is being finalised, involving Australian Social and Recreational Research Pty Ltd (ASR) in conjunction with SGS Economics.  They are interviewing a number of General Managers from Growth Area Alliance Councils from each state to add further insight into the SGS statistics and provide further detail to the original survey. 

Key Results

 The key results of the SGS Research are:

·      Alliance participants represent 22.6% of the Australian population.  This will increase as a proportion to over 25% over the next 15 years.

·      55% of Australia’s population growth over the last 5 years has been accommodated in Alliance LGAs. 

·      50% of all future growth in population over the next 15 years will be accommodated in Alliance LGAs.

·      In 2001 Alliance participants housed 21% of the nation’s population but  had only 13.6% of the jobs.

·      A lower ratio of community service / education / health jobs per capita of 1:20 in Alliance LGAs when compared to the national average of 1:14. 

·      Lower levels of Commonwealth spending in Alliance LGAs when compared to the National average, eg, despite our current population proportion of 22.6%, Alliance LGAs receive only

- 12.3% Financial Assistance Grants funding;

- 16.9% Stronger Families and Communities Strategy funding;

- 10.9% Roads to Recovery funding; and

- 14.9% Strategic Regional Program funding.

 

It should be noted that these statistics are aggregated from the thirty Councils across Australia and may not necessarily therefore represent individual Council’s circumstances.

 

The research has also confirmed a substantial back-log of required infrastructure from the Alliance Councils around Australia.

 

A further report will be presented to the next Policy Review meeting providing more details on both the research and proposed communication strategies.

Next Steps

It is intended that a national campaign be implemented at three levels namely, Federal, State and Local.  The Alliance considers that such an integrated and coordinated approach better ensures consistency of message and at that same time, localisation will assist in generating community understanding, interest and regional awareness.  In essence, the approach is focussing on the importance of adequate infrastructure funding and delivery for all those who live in fast growth areas as well as the Councils that represent them. 

 

To this end, the Alliance is developing a campaign around the national theme of ‘Funding the Gap’.  That campaign is intended to commence in the next couple of months.

 

It has been considered that the most appropriate way for the Alliance participants to advance the issue to Government is at the subregional level and to this end it is recommended that the Mayor represent Council in discussions with the Mayors of the other Alliance Councils in Western Sydney, namely Baulkham Hills, Blacktown, Camden, Campbelltown and Liverpool, to determine the most appropriate strategic response to highlighting Western Sydney infrastructure requirements to support further growth.

 

In addition, it has been suggested that each council determine its own approach to the Federal Government and the candidates in the forthcoming Federal election to highlight individual LGA issues of relevance.  In this regard, we are advancing the development of a Penrith Regional City Infrastructure Strategy which will highlight existing backlog areas and identify major new infrastructure, including civil, social, community and environmental requirements to support Penrith’s growth as a major centre in outer Western Sydney. 

 

For example, consideration has already been given and Council has raised on a number of occasions to State Government issues such as the need for expanded swimming pool facilities, commercial and commuter carparking, Regional and State road improvements, community service assistance, children’s services support, district level recreation facilities, and environmental improvements to the Nepean River.  The future growth slated for Penrith in the State Government’s Metropolitan Strategy for the established areas including the commercial centres will place further demands on these and other facilities in the City.  

Conclusion

Clearly, the approach outlined by the National Growth Area Alliance closely aligns with Council’s current view expressed in its Strategic Program of highlighting and raising awareness of the importance of effective Government support at both State and Federal levels for funding and the delivery of critical infrastructure required to support the planned urban growth of the City.  This initiative is closely aligned with the approach being pursued by other major growth LGAs in Western Sydney, and as it appears, being pursued by many other fringe metropolitan Councils in major capital cities nationally.

 

It is important that Council continue to participate in the National Growth Area Alliance campaign and hold discussions with the other major growth Councils in Western Sydney to develop suitable regional and local strategic responses in support of the Alliance’s initiative and its submissions to Government. 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Status of National Growth Area Alliance be received

2.     The Mayor represent Council in discussions with the Mayors of the other National Growth Area Alliance Councils in Western Sydney to consider infrastructure priorities to support urban growth and their advocacy to Government

3.     A further report outlining proposed regional and local communication strategies be presented to the next available Policy Review meeting.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


The City as a Social Place

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

2        Penrith Open Space Action Plan and Penrith City Local Open Space Development Contributions Plan

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting

4 June 2007

The City as a Social Place

 

 

The City as a Social Place

 

 

2

Penrith Open Space Action Plan and Penrith City Local Open Space Development Contributions Plan   

 

Compiled by:                Grant Collins, Recreation and Cultural Facilities Planner

Authorised by:             Roger Nethercote, Environmental Planning Manager

Ruth Goldsmith, Local Planning Manager   

Strategic Program Term Achievement: The City’s recreation and leisure facilities and services meet its needs and are optimally used.

Critical Action: Ensure facilities and services reflect the City’s diverse current and future recreation and leisure needs.

     

Purpose:

To report to Council the outcomes of the public exhibition of the draft Open Space Action Plan and the draft Open Space Development Contributions Plan, and the outcomes of subsequent review of the Plans.  The report recommends that Council endorse the amended Open Space Action Plan and adopt the Penrith City Local Open Space Development Contributions Plan as attached to this report.

 

Background

The draft Open Space Action Plan (OSAP) provides the framework for the provision of local and district open space facilities throughout the City.  Mechanisms for development contributions for these facilities have been identified at local and district levels.  The draft Local Open Space Development Control Plan (Local S94 Plan) has been finalised and is presented with the report for adoption.  The District Open Space Contributions Plan (District S94 Plan) is currently being finalised and will be reported separately to Council. 

 

Public Exhibition

 

The draft Open Space Action Plan and the draft Open Space Development Contributions Plan were placed on public exhibition from Tuesday 17 January, 2006 to Tuesday 28 February 2006.  The draft Open Space Development Contributions Plan included contributions for both local and district open space facilities. 

 

A total of 10 public submissions were received following the public exhibition period.  This included submissions from the Mulgoa Progress Association, a petition from west St Clair residents, St Clair Youth and Neighbourhood Team Inc, and a number of major release area developers within Penrith City including APP on behalf of Glenmore Park Stage 2 land owners, Landcom, Delfin Lend Lease, Stockland and Penrith Lakes Development Corporation, as well as two individual submissions.

 

The major concerns identified in the submissions related to the proposed open space quantum and quality standards (ie the provision of less constrained open space), the apportionment and nexus arguments used and the proposed works and associated costs, particularly in relation to the proposed district facilities.

 

Several submissions raised a number of issues to do with the local park facilities including considering the location of playgrounds and the further embellishment of local parks.  A number of these requests are considered reasonable and have been incorporated into amended work schedules in the Plan.

 

The issues raised in the submissions, however, related mainly to the district facilities and proposed open space standards.  Therefore, a focus has been on reviewing those district facilities and related costs.  That review is currently being finalised and will be reported to Council shortly. 

 

However, in order to progress the Contributions Plan for the local facilities and enable a capital works program to be advanced for 2007-08, the district facilities component of the Plan has been excised from it.

 

Current Development Contributions Plan for Open Space in Existing Residential Areas

 

The current Development Contributions Plan for Open Space in Existing Residential Areas was adopted by Council in December 1997 and contained a large number of projects, some of which were identified as far back as 1993.  The current plan provides for a 10 year schedule of works that finishes at the end of this financial year.  It is proposed to repeal that plan with the adoption of the new Local S94 Plan and to transfer the balance of S94 funds remaining to the projects identified in the new Local S94 Plan. 

 

The Parks Construction and Maintenance Manager has advised that whilst most of the improvements program has been completed, the estimated total contribution for all of the projects was not collected over the duration of the plan.  Therefore, due to this shortfall in the contributions some projects have not been advanced.  The majority of the projects that were deleted were rated in the plan as low priority and in many cases were landscape works that would be affected by the excessive dry weather conditions.  A number of other projects were considered to be no longer relevant due to a variety of changes in and around open space areas.

 

It is proposed to transfer the estimated remaining funds of $557,000 across to the draft Local Open Space Development Contributions Plan.  A selection of projects listed in the old plan has been transferred across to the new Local S94 Plan.

Open Space Action Plan

In 2002, Council undertook the People’s Lifestyle, Aspirations and Needs Study (PLANS).  The project sought to identify the aspirations of the local community for their area in general terms as well as in relation to infrastructure, services and facilities with a focus on recreation and cultural services and facilities.

 

A key priority recommended in the PLANS Report and Strategies was the development of a City Open Space Action Plan (OSAP), based on the principle of improving the overall quality and sustainability of the City’s open space.

 

The resultant draft OSAP, which has also now been exhibited, incorporates the strategic directions from the PLANS Report and provides a framework for open space for each of the City’s 12 planning cluster areas.  The specific implementation details are contained within the S94 Plan which provides recommendations for open space embellishments and improvements to 2020, based on the PLANS recommendations.  Development of the OSAP involved categorising and mapping the City’s open space assets, conducting site visits and detailed investigations to establish priorities, and identifying opportunities for open space rationalisation. 

 

The draft OSAP also references the regional parklands proposed at Penrith Lakes, the St Marys Release Area (former ADI site), and in the Ropes and South Creek Corridors.  These areas will be important recreation and leisure resources for both the City’s communities and its visitors, and will provide spaces and facilities that support local and broader recreation needs.  The development of a Precinct Plan for the South Creek Corridor is currently underway, and the draft OSAP will provide information to help guide the recreation planning for the Penrith Lakes and the St Marys Release Area.

 

The proposed open space quantum standards for new release areas has been revised to a minimum standard of 1.4 ha / 1,000 for local active open space provision and 1.64 ha / 1,000 for local passive open space, a total minimum provision of 3.04 ha / 1,000.  This is slightly higher than the traditional planning standard for local open space of 2.83 ha / 1,000 but is still within the acceptable range as identified in the PLANS Report (ie local active open space provision between 1.21 – 1.8 ha / 1,000).  This proposed standard seeks to maintain existing local open space provision levels and recognises that the district open space contribution will be levied separately and will apply to all residential development in the City, including the new release areas.

Penrith City Local Open Space Development Contributions Plan

The draft Local S94 Plan proposes a total of $10,048,137 worth of works throughout the City.  The proposed rate per person, to be applied to the City’s estimated infill population to 2020, is $532 per person.  The existing Open Space Development Contributions Plan for Established Residential Areas applied a rate of $570 per person, for a total of $4,548,570 worth of works.

 

Given that the new Local S94 Plan is intended to be applied across all residential development in the City (excluding the industrial and new release areas), it will relate to a higher volume of development and hence larger population base for which the recreation needs have been identified in the proposed projects.  Therefore, the rate per person is lower than the existing rate.  Also, the proposal to roll over the balance of funds from the existing Open Space S94 Plan has been calculated into the required contributions.

 

A benchmarking exercise was carried out comparing the contribution levies of other neighbouring Sydney LGAs.  The comparison found that the proposed Local S94 Plan contribution rates were reasonable, being similar or below that of other Council areas.

Current Pressures on Active Open Space

The current pressures for active open space arise from competing needs for local training and competition facilities, that team field based sporting groups can use through the week and on weekends. 

 

The PLANS Report recommended interim measures, such as maximising the use of existing facilities through coordinated management, to provide venues for local active open space needs in the short term, prior to the delivery of the proposed district open space works.  A separate report on the current status of active open space use and demand and areas that are most in need of interim measures to address the active open space needs of particular sporting groups within the City of Penrith will be brought to Council shortly.

 

The S94 Plan will contribute funding for the embellishment of existing local open space without acquiring additional land.  Proposed works include embellishing existing field surfaces in order to improve the quality of local active open space.

 

Key proposals to increase active open space capacity will be identified in the draft District Open Space Development Contributions Plan (District S94 Plan), which includes additional active open space fields at the Kingsway fields, the Gipps Street former Landfill Site, the Regional Open Space in the St Marys Release Area, and a major multi-purpose indoor sports and entertainment dome proposed at Penrith Lakes.

Basis for Contributions

This plan adopts as its basic rationale the following principles in establishing a nexus between a proposed development and the service or facility:

·    Provision of a service and/or facility via a Section 94 contribution is a measurable consequence of the proposed development

·    The service and/or facility can be physically provided within a reasonable time interval.

 

The nexus between new development and the provision of open space facilities is related to:

1.     An increase in and densification of population within the City of Penrith, which will increase the demand for open space facilities.

2.     The requirement to maintain open space facilities at the minimum standard per head to meet the community’s demands.

 

The basis on which contributions are collected in the current Open Space Development Contributions Plan for Established Residential Areas is that the existing community has contributed the vast majority of the local open space land, including the existing facilities and enhancements.  The new Local S94 Plan seeks to embellish the existing local open space and facilities without additional land acquisition costs.

 

The draft Local S94 Plan applies to all areas where residential development is permitted, excluding the new release areas and industrial land, where separate Section 94 contributions plans apply.  The plan also includes an estimated timing of when facilities will be delivered ie, High priority – within 5 years, Medium – 5 to 10 years, and Low – within 13 years.

Whole of Life Costs

Council is of course aware that as additional assets are acquired provision must be made for the recurrent costs of maintenance and replacement.  By way of example, the whole of life cost estimates for a standard $50,000 play system with rubberised soft fall is around $4,050 per annum, or about 8% of the initial establishment cost.  This includes annualised maintenance and replacement costs. 

 

Separate to the ongoing annual costs associated with the proposed facilities contained in the draft Open Space Development Contributions Plan, each of the City’s new release areas are required to provide their local open space land and facilities to meet the needs of the estimated incoming population for that release area.  The additional open space, sports fields and associated infrastructure will also require an ongoing financial commitment from Council to maintain, as per the whole of life cost estimates being developed.

 

Council’s Parks Construction and Maintenance Department is developing a long term financial model in relation to whole of life costs for open space and parks assets. 

Conclusion

The District Open Space Facilities component is being further reviewed and a report will be presented to Council on that element in the near future.  However, it is considered that this aspect should not hinder the ability for a continuing program of local open space improvements to advance.

 

Adoption of the Action Plan and the Local S94 Plan will enable the current and proposed parks improvement program to continue into the next financial year and beyond with a reviewed and more meaningful list of local open space improvement projects across the city.

 

The adoption of the new Local S94 Plan will repeal the existing Development Contributions Plan for Open Space in Existing Residential Areas (1997) and it would be appropriate for the balance of funds relating to the old Plan to be transferred to the new Local S94 Plan

 

It is therefore recommended that Council endorse the Open Space Action Plan which outlines the criteria for the provision of new open space areas, and approve the Local Open Space Development Contributions Plan. 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Penrith Open Space Action Plan and Penrith City Local Open Space Development Contributions Plan be received.

2.     Council endorse the Penrith Open Space Action Plan as attached to this report.

3.     Council approve the Penrith City Local Open Space Development Contributions Plan as attached to this report, and repeal the existing Development Contributions Plan for Open Space in Existing Residential Areas (1997).

4.     The balance of Section 94 funds at the end of the 2006/07 financial year relating to the Development Contributions Plan for Open Space in Existing Residential Areas (1997) be transferred to the Penrith City Local Open Space Development Contributions Plan.

5.     Public notice of Council’s decision be placed in a local newspaper.

6.     Those persons who made submissions be advised of Council’s decision.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.  

Penrith City Local Open Space Development Contributions Plan

43 Pages

Attachment

2.  

Open Space Action Plan

33 Pages

Attachment

 


The City In Its Environment

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

3        Review of Council's On-site Sewage Management Strategy

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting

4 June 2007

The City in its Environment

 

 

The City in its Environment

 

 

3

Review of Council's On-site Sewage Management Strategy   

 

Compiled by:                Anthony Price, Environmental Health Co-ordinator

Adrian Estreich, Senior Environmental Health Officer

Authorised by:             Wayne Mitchell, Environmental Health Manager   

Strategic Program Term Achievement: The health of the river system is being improved through the implementation of a comprehensive catchment management strategy.

Critical Action: Effectively manage sewerage impacts including the sewering of the rural villages.

     

Purpose:

To review Council's On-site Sewage Management Strategy to ensure it remains contemporary and responds to current wastewater management issues.  The report recommends that the amendments to the policy be adopted by Council.

 

Background

The impact that inappropriately managed on-site sewage management systems have on human health and the environment was highlighted when the pollution of oysters, attributed to septic tank run-off at Wallace Lakes in 1996, caused 440 cases of Hepatitis A and one death. Surveys conducted at the time by the Healthy Rivers Commission also indicated that up to 70% of systems failed to meet appropriate standards.

 

The State Government responded to the demonstrated health and environmental impacts from these systems by introducing a major package of regulatory reforms and new guidelines for the management of on-site sewage management systems (septic tanks, aerated wastewater treatment systems etc). As part of this package, the Local Government legislation was amended in 1998/99 to specify performance standards for sewage management and the requirements for Council approval for the ongoing operation of a sewage management system.

 

To meet the new requirements in the Local Government Act 1993 and the recommendations of the Department of Local Government at the time, Council adopted its On Site Sewage Management Strategy on 6 May 2002.

 

The On-site Sewage Management Program has been running for 5 years since its adoption and, with the initial inspection and registration of all 4,400 systems nearing completion, it is time to review the Strategy to ensure it remains contemporary and responds to current wastewater management issues. An additional aim of the review is to improve both on-site sewage management installation and operational approval procedures, and where possible make the process simpler for residents.

Program Achievements to Date

Council officers have inspected over 4,000 systems in the past four years. The initial round of inspections is nearing completion, with only a few hundred inspections remaining in the Mulgoa area. It is anticipated that all initial inspections will be completed this year.

 

Operational approvals have been issued with a requirement for renewal at either 1, 3 or 5 years intervals depending on an assessment of system performance and location.  Systems assessed as low risk were issued with a 5 year approval, medium risk a 3 year approval and high risk a 1 year approval. 

 

The following table provides a summary of the program to date.

 

On-Site Sewage Management Program Summary

Approximate number of OSSM systems in Penrith LGA

4400

Number of systems inspected*

4030

Percentage of systems classified as high risk

 3%

Percentage of systems classified as medium risk

34%

Percentage of systems classified as low risk

63%

*Note: All figures as of 7 May 2007.

 

The main areas of non-compliance identified during the program include failing absorption trenches, illegal connections and poor maintenance and operation of Aerated Wastewater Treatment Systems (AWTS).

 

Council established a target of 80% of systems being classified as low risk by 2012, based on the recommendation of the Hawkesbury Nepean Catchment Blueprint. Currently 63% of systems within the City are rated as low risk; however, we are steadily progressing toward this target.

 

The primary focus of the next stage of the program will be to work with system owners to achieve 5 year operational approvals (currently classified as a low risk system). If a system is located on a site that has limited area for effluent disposal and insufficient buffer distances a 2 year approval will be considered.

Educational Material

The educational program implemented under the existing Strategy will continue. The program was designed to ensure that householders, manufacturers, service providers and Council officers have the relevant knowledge and awareness of on-site sewage management issues.  Council education material includes:

 

·    Information on Council’s website

·    Letters to land owners and occupiers

·    Face to face education during inspections

·    Brochures and fact sheets

·    On-site SMS information packs

·    Proposed Aerated Wastewater Treatment System owner information packs

 

A greater focus on education will now be possible as the intensity of the inspection program is expected to decrease slightly after all systems are registered.

On-Site Sewage Management Strategy Review

The review of Council’s Strategy commenced with consultation of the relevant internal stakeholders, including representatives from the Environmental Planning, Development Services and Environmental Health Departments, and this was carried out between November 2006 and March 2007. The aim of the review is to improve approval procedures, and to include information on new topics such as ‘Reusing Greywater’ and ‘Connection to Reticulated Sewerage’. A copy of the amended policy is attached to this report.

 

The following information explains the proposed amendments and the reasons for them:

 

1.   Removal of the requirement for all new domestic AWTS applications to be accompanied by a Site and Soil Assessment

Under the current policy, a Site and Soil Assessment report is required to be submitted with every application for the installation of an OSSM system. These reports are estimated to cost the applicant somewhere between $600 and $1200. The purpose of the report is to identify the most suitable system for the site, including the size and location of the effluent disposal area/s.  A review of approvals over recent years has shown that in most domestic situations, the report will recommend the use of an AWTS.

 

In a significant number of cases, Council assessment of a proposed domestic AWTS is a re-assessment of the information being provided in Site and Soil Assessments reports, and often Council officers will require some changes to the report recommendations to meet the requirements of the Department of Local Government’s Environment and Health Protection Guidelines: On-site Sewage Management for Single Households”, Australian Standards 1547:2000 and Council’s current policy.

 

Council Officers have developed the skills and the information base on site and soil conditions in the Penrith area, particularly in regard to the assessment of domestic AWTS.  The revised policy proposes that, if a domestic AWTS meets specified sizing and location requirements, that a Site and Soil Assessment Report will not be required. These criteria are outlined in Section B3 of the amended policy. 

 

It is proposed that a Site and Soil Assessment will only be required for a domestic AWTS if a variation from Effluent Management and Disposal Areas in Table 2 and Table 3 of the policy is being sought. For example, a variation may be requested if a proposed AWTS is to be sited on a property with limited space for irrigation. It is anticipated that most domestic AWTS proposals, particularly those in rural areas will be able to provide the areas referred to in Table 2 and Table 3 saving the applicant money and streamlining the approval process.

 

2.   Improvement to the operational approval inspection procedure

The current policy provides for a system of operational approval inspections at either 1, 3 or 5 years intervals depending on an assessment of system performance and location.

 

The majority of the initial round of system inspections have been completed with the remainder to be completed by the end of this year.  During this process Council Officers have worked with system owners to replace or satisfactorily repair systems to minimise the number of high risk systems within the City. This has significantly reduced the need to carry out annual inspections.

 

The amended policy proposes that new or renewed operational approvals generally be issued for a 5 year period with 2 year approvals being issued for systems located on sites with significant site constraints e.g. existing systems with undersized disposal areas and insufficient buffer distances.

 

When the operational approvals for existing systems are due for renewal Council Officers will work with the owners to achieve a low risk 5 year operational approval. Inspections will then be carried out at either the 5 or 2 year renewal period.  System inspections may also be carried out in response to complaints, randomly or as part of a system auditing program at no cost to the owner.

 

3.    Fee/Charge Structure – removing inspection fees for domestic AWTS and inclusion of Greywater Treatment Systems

The inspection charge for domestic AWTS is proposed to be removed in response to resident representations that they already pay for these systems to be inspected quarterly by private service agents. These representations are considered reasonable, subject to improved monitoring and reporting standards by service agents, which is discussed further below.

 

Council will also need to cater for applications for the installation and operation of Greywater Treatment Systems. These systems are similar to AWTS and will also require quarterly service inspections by private service agents. Therefore, it is proposed to regulate and charge for their registration and inspections in the same way.

 

Minor changes to the fees and charges section of Council’s Management Plan will be need to implement this fee/charge structure.

 

The following table summarises the proposed fee/charge structure:

 

System Type

Registration Charge

Inspection Charge

Enforcement for non compliance

 

AWTS

 

 

P

 

N/A

P

Land Application System

(Trenches, etc)

P

P

P

 

Pump Out

 

P

P

P

Greywater Treatment Systems

P

N/A

P

Note: Pensioners will continue to receive a discount (i.e. not charged inspection fee).

 

The On-site Sewage Management program is currently self funded by the registration and inspection charges. The majority of systems in the City are AWTS and the removal of inspection charges for these systems would significantly impact on the revenue to fund the on-going program. It is estimated that approximately $35,000 pa would be needed to subsidise the loss of income from AWTS inspections.

 

The Sullage Reserve will have additional capacity with the recent provision of reticulated sewer to the Mulgoa and Wallacia Villages. This reserve could be used to subsidise the running of the program. This is currently being considered and might be incorporated into the draft budget for the 2007/08 Management Plan.

 

4.   Clearer requirements for the servicing and reporting on Aerated Wastewater Treatment Systems

Under NSW Department of Health accreditation requirements, all AWTS require quarterly services, with a copy of the service report to be submitted to Council. In the past, Council has experienced problems with the standard of servicing and reporting for some AWTS, in particular with the level and quality of information provided by service agents. This can lead to the system failing and in turn costing the property owner more money. It is proposed, under the revised policy, to set minimum reporting standards in relation to the servicing of AWTS. This will mean that a service agent engaged by a property owner will be required to meet a minimum standard when providing information on system maintenance, including the condition of disposal areas.

 

It is anticipated that setting these minimum maintenance and reporting standards will improve the maintenance service being received by residents, improve the performance of their systems, and will remove the need for Council officers to carry out additional system inspections at a cost to the property owner. Random inspections may still be carried out by Council officers as part the inspection program at no cost to the owner/operator.

 

Council has raised concern about the standard of AWTS servicing and the need for proper accreditation with the NSW Department of Health in the past. It is proposed to continue to raise this issue with the State Government to hopefully secure better compliance standards within the servicing industry.

 

5.   Managing Non-compliance

The Local Government Act 1993 outlines that it is the property owner’s responsibility to obtain an operational approval. If property owners/system operators fail to renew their operational approvals, and continue to operate OSSM systems without an operational approval, or in contravention of their conditions of consent, further action may need to be taken, particularly to prevent possible impacts on human health and the environment. The Local Government legislation contains provisions for on-the-spot fines, currently of $330, and prosecution would only be considered for serious breaches of the legislation. These options will only be used where an owner or operator refuses to renew their operational approval, or they continue to breach the conditions of an operational approval.

 

6.   Reusing Greywater

A section on ‘Reusing Greywater’ has been added to the policy to provide information on both Domestic Greywater Treatment Systems and Greywater Diversion Devices. It also provides clear advice to residents regarding Council’s requirements, including when approvals are required. This section is consistent with the recently released NSW Guidelines for Greywater Reuse in Sewered, Single Household Residential Premises by the Department of Energy, Utilities and Sustainability.

 

7.   Connection to a Reticulated Sewerage Scheme

Council has maintained a policy position of pursuing the provision of reticulated sewerage systems for the rural villages through Sydney Water’s Priority Sewerage Program.  Continuous lobbying has resulted in the completion of the Mulgoa Wallacia Scheme and the commencement of the planning phase for the Londonderry/Agnes Banks Scheme. 

 

In conjunction with the commencement of the scheme, Council has proactively pursued the connection of individual residences to the scheme, to realise the environmental, social and economic advantages that exist with a reticulated system.  This commitment, backed up with financial incentives to connect, has delivered a connection rate greater than 40% within the first six months of the Scheme becoming available to the Mulgoa and Wallacia villages.

 

A section on ‘Connection to a Reticulated Sewerage Scheme’ has been provided in the amended policy to outline Council’s requirements for connecting to a reticulated sewerage system in areas where this service has been made available.

 

8.   Change to Name of Policy

As discussed above the policy now addresses a broader range of wastewater management issues including commercial systems, greywater reuse and connection to reticulated sewerage. It is now considered more appropriate that the document be called Council’s “On-Site Wastewater Management” policy.

 

Conclusion

 

Council has successfully registered and inspected the majority of on-site sewage management systems within the City over the past 5 years. This program has resulted in significant improvements to the performance and maintenance of existing and new systems in accordance with the Local Government Act and the directions of the Department of Local Government.

 

Now that the initial phase of the program is close to completion the focus will be on improving Council’s assessment and inspection processes, providing guidance on emerging wastewater management issues such as greywater reuse and ensuring that properties are connected to reticulated sewer where it is available.

 

The amendments to this policy are expected to enhance Council’s response to on-site wastewater management. Approval processes will be streamlined by removing the need for Site and Soil Assessments for the majority of new systems, while at the same time providing savings for applicants.

 

Clear guidance has also been provided on greywater reuse and connection of previously unsewered sites to a reticulated sewerage scheme. This is part of a new proactive approach to wastewater management to ensure the long term sustainability of on-site wastewater management systems in the City.

 

The amendments to the inspection program will also allow the current educational programs to be enhanced so that system owners/operators can be kept informed regarding the sustainable management of their systems. The intention of the legislation is to make owners more responsible, but there is a clear need for ongoing education, particularly for new residents in rural areas.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on the Review of Council's On-site Sewage Management Strategy be received.

2.     The amended “On-site Wastewater Management Policy” be adopted by Council.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.  

Amended On-site Sewage Management Strategy - "On-site Wastewater Management"

37 Pages

Attachment

 


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


 

 

The City as an Economy

 

 

There were no reports under this Master Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


 

 

The City Supported by Infrastructure

 

 

There were no reports under this Master Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


Leadership and Organisation

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

4        Council Scholarship - University of Western Sydney

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting

4 June 2007

Leadership and Organisation

 

 

Leadership and Organisation

 

 

4

Council Scholarship - University of Western Sydney   

 

Compiled by:                Glenn McCarthy, Executive Officer

Danielle Welsh, Personnel Services Manager

Authorised by:             Steve Hackett, Director - City Services   

Strategic Program Term Achievement: Council’s workforce is appropriately planned and skilled and Council is an attractive employment choice for talented people.

Critical Action: Policies, procedures and practices are developed to make Council a leading employer in the region.

     

Purpose:

To advise Council that the recipient of Council's 2007 University of Western Sydney (UWS) Scholarship is Miss Alicia Parata of Cranebrook. The report also provides details of a review of the scholarships offered by Council through UWS resulting in draft new criteria. The report recommends that Council approve the revised scholarship criteria.

 

Background

In December 1989, Council resolved to provide scholarships for students enrolled in certain undergraduate courses at the University of Western Sydney (Nepean), as follows:

 

1.   A cultural scholarship for students enrolled in the Faculty of Visual and Performing Arts;

2.   An Engineering scholarship for students enrolled in the Faculty of Science and Technology.

 

A further scholarship in Teaching – Early Childhood was added in 1997. Also in 1997, UWS advised that a restructure of its academic units had resulted in faculties being abolished and schools put in place. Council’s scholarships were aligned to the new schools structure, but otherwise remained the same as originally determined by Council.

 

The scholarships are $1,000 for the first year and $500 per semester in subsequent years, up to a maximum of three years. The annual budget allocation to conduct the scholarship program is $7,000. The selection criteria are based on academic results and the recipient’s continued residence in the Penrith LGA. The selection criteria and amount of the scholarships have remained unchanged since the scholarships were first introduced.

 

Late last year UWS advised that no applications under Council’s scholarship program for 2007 had been received. UWS further advised that the reason for the lack of applications appeared to be the value of the scholarships offered, compared with similar scholarships.

 

Current Situation

A review of the scholarship program was commenced, following discussions held between representatives of the UWS Development Office and Council’s Executive Officer and Partnerships Officer, in consultation with the Mayor. A comparison of the Penrith City Council scholarship, and the scholarships offered by Baulkham Hills, Blacktown, Campbelltown and Hawkesbury Councils, was undertaken as a benchmarking exercise to guide the review.

 

It was felt after the benchmarking exercise that in order to provide Council with a clear and well-reasoned guide to the future conduct of the scholarship program, some indication of the likely interest of students in any revised scholarship criteria was needed. With the close of the 2007 UWS scholarship program approaching, revised criteria were developed in consultation with the UWS Development Office. The revised criteria were discussed with the Mayor who authorised the testing of the revised criteria in the market for the 2007 scholarship.

 

In order to provide greater incentive for students to apply for Council’s scholarship, UWS recommended that one scholarship of $5,000 be offered (rather than three scholarships of $1,000) with preference given to students enrolling in courses offered by the Schools of Engineering, Communication Arts or Education (Early Childhood Studies). The other criteria include:

·      Applicants must be Australian citizens or permanent residents

·      Applicants must have completed the HSC not more than two years prior to commencement of study at UWS

·      Applicants must demonstrate academic potential through a UAI score of 85 or above and be able to demonstrate a strong commitment to community service

·      Applicants must have been residents of Penrith local government area for at least twelve months prior to applying for this scholarship

·      In recognition of the relationship that exists between Penrith City and Lachlan Shire, applicants who have either lived for the past three years or completed the final two years of schooling in Lachlan Shire are also invited to apply for this scholarship

The response to the test of the revised criteria was very positive with 20 applications received, of which 13 met the required UAI of 85 and also provided evidence of community service. Five students that also met the requirement of being enrolled in one of the Council’s preferred courses were then shortlisted for interview. The interview panel consisted of His Worship the Mayor, Councillor Pat Sheehy AM, Associate Professor Paul Wormell (UWS), Ms Jennifer Hodgson and Ms Rosemary Turner (UWS), and Council’s Executive Officer.

 

Following the interview process, the panel unanimously agreed that the 2007 Penrith City Council Scholarship be awarded to Miss Alicia Parata of Cranebrook. Alicia, who is enrolled to study for her Bachelor of Arts (Early Childhood Studies), impressed the panel with her passion for education and desire to see young people from all backgrounds achieve their potential through life-long learning. Alicia attributes her own aspiration to become a teacher to the influence of her own teachers, particularly in primary school. A former student of Kingswood Public School, Claremont Meadows Public School and Penrith Anglican College, Alicia has first hand experience in both the public and private school systems. The selection panel observed that this experience, together with having been a school prefect in her senior year, make Alicia an ideal role model for other young leaders in the community. The opportunity has therefore been taken to invite Alicia to address the City’s senior school captains at the Civic Reception to be held on 19 June 2007 in the Nepean Room. Alicia has enthusiastically accepted the invitation.

Future Administration of the Scholarship

Our recent experience with the UWS Scholarship indicates that the selection criteria and amount need to be revised for the program to succeed into the future. The revised criteria, with preference given to students enrolling in courses offered by the schools of Engineering, Communication Arts and Education (Early Childhood), are attached as Appendix 1. In view of Penrith’s relationship with Lachlan Shire, applicants from Lachlan Shire have been included in the revised criteria.

Financial Implications

The 2007 Scholarship is covered by the current annual budget allocation of $7,000. If Council accepts the recommendation of this report, there will need to be a progressive increase made to the budget allocation to $15,000 for courses of study up to three years.

 

For example, assuming each year the scholarship recipients from the previous year continue to retain their scholarship and a new scholarship is awarded, in 2008 two scholarships will be awarded for a total of $10,000 and in 2009 three scholarships will be awarded for a total of $15,000.

Financial Services Manager’s comment

The Draft 2007-08 Management Plan includes an increased funding allocation pending a review of corporate training requirements.  It is recommended that any additional funding required for the successful operation of the scholarship be considered as part of that review. Additional funding for the scholarship in future years (up to the maximum of $15,000) can be considered as part of the normal budget process.

Personnel Services Manager’s comment

We have recently been successful in applying to the Department of Local Government (DLG) for seed funding to set up a Planning Scholarship.  This seed funding was offered as part of the DLG’s skills shortage program.  A report on this scholarship was provided to the Ordinary Meeting on 5 March 2007.  The Scholarship will be offered by the University of New England (UNE) for the Bachelor of Urban and Regional Planning course, and provides a cash component of $5,000 per year for the 4 year duration of the course (it should be noted that UNE does not establish any scholarships at less than $5,000 per year).  It was intended that the scholarship would commence in the 2007 university year, however there were no first or second year students who satisfied the selection criteria.  Council and UNE will jointly promote the scholarship this year to encourage a field of applicants for the scholarship in 2008.  It is hoped that this will be the first of several scholarships Council establishes to help address the current skill shortages being experienced in the areas of Planning, Engineering and Childcare.

 

Future administration of the UWS scholarship program will also be conducted by Workforce Development to align this function more closely with our other workforce development initiatives. This will enable the scholarship program and criteria to be kept under review and directed toward areas of skill shortage over time.

Conclusion

The proposed changes to the future operation of the UWS scholarship, including the revised scholarship criteria, present Council with an opportunity to continue its partnership with UWS while addressing areas of identified skill shortage in local government over time. The 2007 scholarship has been successful in attracting interest from students enrolling in Council’s preferred courses and the future administration of the scholarship by Workforce Development will provide the opportunity to align the scholarship with Council’s other workforce development initiatives.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Council Scholarship - University of Western Sydney be received.

2.     The revised selection criteria and amount of the scholarship offered through the University of Western Sydney be endorsed.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1. View

UWS Council Scholarship Selection Criteria

2 Pages

Appendix

 


Policy Review Committee Meeting

4 June 2007

Appendix 1 - UWS Council Scholarship Selection Criteria

 

 

 

Penrith City Council Scholarship

The City of Penrith has been recognised as a Regional City under the NSW State Government's Metropolitan Strategy helping to ensure Penrith will enjoy the benefits of Sydney's growth during the next 25 years.

Under this Regional City status there will be a greater diversity and range of quality jobs, commercial, retail, health, cultural, recreation, entertainment and lifestyle opportunities for the residents of Penrith City. This strong local economy, one that is able to provide for and attract quality jobs, is a key part of the City of Penrith's sustainability and investment in education is seen as integral to this.

One of Council’s strategic objectives states “Policies, procedures and practices are developed to make Council a leading employer in the region”. The scholarship provides a student from Penrith City or Lachlan Shire with an opportunity to gain funding support to study locally.

Amount and Duration:
$5,000 per year for three years

Courses:
Any full-time UWS undergraduate degree program

Criteria:

·      Applicants must complete the appropriate Application Form and this must be received by the Scholarships and Alumni Services Unit by the closing date.

·      Applicants must be Australian citizens or permanent residents.

·      Applicants must be a commencing student enrolled to study a full-time undergraduate degree at UWS and must have applied to study at UWS through UAC.

·      Applicants must have completed the HSC not more than two years prior to commencement of study at UWS.

·      Applicants must demonstrate academic potential through a UAI score of 85 or above and be able to demonstrate a strong commitment to community service. 

·      Applicants must have been residents of Penrith local government area for at least twelve months prior to applying for this scholarship.

·      In recognition of the relationship that exists between Penrith City and Lachlan Shire, applicants who have either lived for the past three years or completed the final two years of schooling in Lachlan Shire are also invited to apply for this scholarship.

Selection:

·      Selection of the successful applicants will be based on their written application and if short listed, in an interview before a selection panel consisting of a representative of Penrith City Council, a representative or nominee of the UWS Foundation and a representative or nominee of the chair of the UWS Academic Senate Committee.

·      In a situation where 2 or more applicants are of equal standing, preference will be given to a student if they are enrolling in a degree offered by the Schools of Engineering, Communication Arts or Education (Early Childhood Studies), or the equivalent subject to University course changes.

Conditions:

·      Retention of the scholarship after the first year is subject to a minimum credit average being maintained and reported to Council. 

·      Recipients must continue to be a resident of Penrith for the duration of the scholarship. In the case of extenuating circumstances including but not limited to forced relocation by eviction, repossession, emergency or domestic violence this condition may be waived.

 

 


 

ATTACHMENTS   

 

 

Date of Meeting:          Monday 4 June 2007

Master Program:          The City as a Social Place

Issue:                            Recreation and Leisure

Report Title:                Penrith Open Space Action Plan and Penrith City Local Open Space Development Contributions Plan

Attachments:                Penrith City Local Open Space Development Contributions Plan

                                      Open Space Action Plan



Policy Review Committee Meeting

4 June 2007

Attachment 1 - Penrith City Local Open Space Development Contributions Plan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DRAFT

 

 

 

Penrith City Local Open Space

Development Contributions Plan

(under Section 94 of the Environmental Planning and

Assessment Act, 1979 as amended)

 

 

 

 

 

 

                         Adopted by Council:     

 

                        Effective from:     


Policy Review Committee Meeting

4 June 2007

Attachment 1 - Penrith City Local Open Space Development Contributions Plan

 

 

 

CONTENTS

 

CONTENTS. i

Part A:  SUMMARY SCHEDULES. 1

1.1       Summary local open space works program... 1

1.2       Cost of Council’s open space embellishment works. 1

1.3       Contribution Rate for local open space embellishment works. 1

1.3.1        Occupancy Rates. 2

1.3.2        How to Calculate the Total Contribution for New Development 2

Part B:  ADMINISTRATION & OPERATION OF THE PLAN.. 3

2.1       What is the name of this Development Contributions Plan ?. 3

2.2       Area the Plan applies. 3

2.3       Purpose of this Development Contributions Plan.. 3

2.4       Commencement of the Plan.. 3

2.5       Relationship to other Plans. 4

2.6       Definitions. 5

2.7       When is the contribution payable?. 6

2.8       Construction certificates and the obligation of accredited certifiers  6

2.9       Complying development and the obligation of accredited certifiers  7

2.10     Deferred / periodic payments. 7

2.11     Can the contribution be settled “in kind” or through a material public benefit?. 8

2.12     Review of Contributions Rates. 9

2.12.1      Setting and Indexation of Contribution Rates. 9

2.12.2      General Contribution Rates. 9

2.12.3      Contribution Rate Loan Funded. 10

2.12.4      Amended Contribution Rates. 10

2.13     How are Contributions Rates adjusted at the time of payment?. 10

2.14     Are there allowances for existing development?. 11

2.15     Pooling of contributions. 11

2.16     Savings and transitional arrangements. 11

PART C: STRATEGY PLANS. 12

3.1       Introduction.. 12

3.2       Nexus. 12

3.2.1        Open Space Facilities Nexus. 12

3.3       Basis for Contribution.. 12

3.4       Anticipated development. 13

3.5       Anticipated Future Demand.. 14

3.6 Local Open Space Facilities. 14

3.6.1        Contribution rate per person. 14

Appendix A: Schedule of Works. 15

A1.1 Open Space Embellishment Works. 15

A1.1.2      Local Facility Open Space Embellishments. 15

APPENDIX B: AREA THE PLAN APPLIES. 28

APPENDIX C:  OPEN SPACE NETWORK MAPS INDICATING LOCATION OF WORKS. 29

REFERENCES. 42


Policy Review Committee Meeting

4 June 2007

Attachment 1 - Penrith City Local Open Space Development Contributions Plan

 

 

 

Part A:  SUMMARY SCHEDULES

 

 

The Local Open Space embellishment costs will be applied to all residential development within the City other than the new release areas, as local open space land and facilities will be provided as part of those developments. Contributions for both District (details to be provided in a separate Development Contributions Plan) and Local Open Space embellishments therefore apply to all residential development (excluding the City’s new release areas).

 

 

Local Open Space Facilities

$8,651,000

 

 

Local Open Space Facilities

$8,651,000

Cost of Design and Supervision (15% of above sub total)

$1,297,650

Sub Total

$9,948,650

Administration (1%)

$99,487

TOTAL COST

$10,048,137

 

WORKS / FACILITY TYPE

CATCHMENT

CONTRIBUTION RATE PER PERSON

Local Open Space Facilities
includes 15% for design and supervision

All residential development excluding new release areas

$527

Plan Administration
1% of total Works and Facilities

 

$5

TOTAL

 

$532

 

 

 

1.3.1       Occupancy Rates

For the purposes of calculating the total local open space contribution, the following occupancy rates for different types of new development have been determined:

 

 

Development Type

Occupancy Rate

Multi-unit and Shop-Top Housing

2 persons for each new dwelling

Dual Occupancies and Subdivision

3.1 persons for each new dwelling or new lot

Housing for older people

1.5 persons for each new dwelling

 

The above occupancy rates are based on ABS 2001 Census figures for Penrith.

 

1.3.2       How to Calculate the Total Contribution for New Development

The total open space contribution for new development is calculated as follows:

 

Total Contribution =    Contribution Rate (Table 1.3)  x Occupancy Rate (Table 1.3.1) x Number of new dwellings or new lots

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Part B:  ADMINISTRATION & OPERATION OF THE PLAN

 

This Development Contributions Plan is called the Penrith City Local Open Space Development Contributions Plan 2007.

 

In relation to the ‘Local Open Space Embellishment Works’, this Plan applies anywhere residential development is permitted within the City of Penrith, excluding industrial areas and the eight identified release areas (refer to Appendix B).

 

 

The purpose of the Development Contributions Plan is to:

 

(a)   provide an administrative framework under which specific public facilities strategies may be implemented and coordinated

(b)   ensure that adequate public facilities are provided for as part of any new development

(c)   to authorise the council to impose conditions under section 94 (s94) of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 when granting consent to development on land to which this plan applies

(d)   provide a comprehensive strategy for the assessment, collection, expenditure accounting and review of development contributions on an equitable basis

(e)   ensure that the existing community is not burdened by the provision of public amenities and public services required as a result of future development

(f)    enable the council to be both publicly and financially accountable in its assessment and administration of the development contributions plan.

 

This Development Contributions Plan has been prepared pursuant to the provisions of S94 of EP&A Regulation and takes effect from ######, 2007, pursuant to clause 31(4) of the EP&A Regulation.

 

 

This Plan enables the levying of developer contributions where residential development (including subdivision) is permissible in the City of Penrith.

 

A range of environmental planning instruments, which set down zoning provisions and development standards for the targeted areas, apply.  In the urban areas, the principal planning instrument is Penrith Local Environmental Plan 1998 Urban Land.  In the rural areas, the main planning instrument is Penrith Local Environmental Plan No. 201 – Rural Lands, which sets out land use and subdivision controls for these areas.  Other planning instruments are applicable to certain residential areas of the City affected by this Plan, including:

 

§ the Penrith Planning Scheme

§ IDO 93 (as amended) (Rural Lands)

§ LEP 188 (as amended) (Glenmore Park)

§ LEP 1997 (Penrith City Centre)

§ LEP 1998 (Lakes Environs), and

§ Other minor planning instruments and amendments.

 

Council has produced a number of Developer Contribution Plans under s94 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act.  Multiple plans apply in many areas as they provide for the different components of the new facilities required by new development.  Development levied under this Open Space Plan, for example, is also expected to pay a contribution towards Cultural Facilities under a separate Contribution Plan, and other facilities under other plans.  In future, Council is likely to produce additional Plans that cover the same area.  Only by examining all plans can the total cost be determined.

 

In the event that the relationship between plans is unclear, the following principles will be applied by Council in determining the required contributions:

1.    In the case of multiple plans made under s94:  If the plans are silent or unclear on whether the newer plan is in addition to the old plan or applies instead of the old plan, it shall be taken to apply in addition to the old plan.

2.    In the case of plans made under s94 and s94A:  The s94A levies do not apply in addition to the s94 levies.  The s94 plans apply instead of s94A plans unless the contribution required to be paid under the s94 plans is less than 1% of the value of the works in the Development Application (in which case the s94A plan applies).

3.    If the plans are contradictory on how they relate to each other, the most recently adopted plan shall take precedence.

 

S94 Plans current at the time of publishing this plan include:

§ Claremont Meadows

§ Cultural Facilities

§ Erskine Park Employment Area

§ Erskine Park Residential Release Area

§ Footpath Construction in Established Residential Areas

§ Glenmore Park Release Area Map 1 Map 2  http://www.penrithcity.nsw.gov.au/uploadedFiles/Random_images/Internal_pages/GlenmoreParkS94PlanMarch2004Figure3(1).pdfMap 3  http://www.penrithcity.nsw.gov.au/uploadedFiles/Random_images/Internal_pages/GlenmoreParkS94PlanMarch2004Figure4(1).pdfMap 4

§ Kingswood Neighbourhood Centre

§ Lakes Environs (Waterside)

§ Lambridge Industrial Estate North Penrith

§ Library Facilities (Amendment No.1)

§ Mount Vernon Estate

§ North Cranebrook Release Area

§ Open Space in Existing Residential Areas

§ Penrith City Centre

§ St Marys Town Centre

 

This Development Contributions Plan repeals the ‘Open Space in Existing Residential Areas’ Plan 1997.

 

In this Plan, the following words and phrases have the following meanings:

 

Contribution means the dedication of land, or the making of a monetary contribution, as referred to in section 94 of the EPA Act.

 

Contributions Plan means a contributions plan referred to in Part 4, Division 6 of the EPA Act.

 

Council means the Council of the City of Penrith.

 

EPA Act means the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979.

 

EPA Regulation means the Environmental Planning and Assessment Regulation

2000.

 

Incoming population means the population that it is anticipated will occupy

development to be approved under this Plan.

 

LGA means local government area.

 

Market value has the same meaning as defined in section 56 of the Land Acquisition (Just Terms Compensation Act) 1991.

 

Works in kind means the undertaking of a work or provision of a facility by an

applicant which is already nominated in the works schedule of a contributions plan.

 

Works schedule means the schedule of the specific public facilities for which

contributions may be required, and the general likely timing of provision of those public facilities based on projected rates of development, the collection of development contributions and the availability of funds from supplementary sources.

 

Council will collect contributions (in cash, land or material public benefit) for all leviable land where development occurs which gives rise to the need for facilities or works to be funded from this plan. Council will normally levy the contribution at the first opportunity to do so, but its right to collect is not extinguished if by error, non-payment, or any other reason, the contribution is not received at this time. Council will impose as a condition of consent, a requirement for the payment of a Section 94 contribution in respect of an application for development on the subject land.

 

A contribution must be paid to the Council on every parcel of land to which a

Development Application applies. If a contribution has already been paid under this

plan, then no contribution is payable on that portion of the land already levied and

paid.

 

Development Applications involving Subdivision works

 

§ Payment to be made prior to release of a Subdivision Certificate (linen

plan).

 

Development Applications involving Building Works

 

§ Payment to be made prior to the release of a Construction Certificate.

 

Complying Development Works

 

§ Payment to be made prior to the issue of a Complying Development

Certificate.

 

Payment may be made by any means acceptable to Council provided that if the

payment is not cash or bank cheque then:

 

§ Any costs or commission payable by Council on the transaction or its collection must also be paid; and

 

§ The payment shall not be deemed to be received until Council’s bankers

acknowledge that the funds are cleared.

 

In the event that this plan is reviewed and new contribution rates are established, any payments not already due will become due on the day prior to the new rates being adopted. The developer may alternately request the contribution be recalculated under the new rates.

 

 

In accordance with section 94EC of the EP&A Act and Clause 146 of the EP&A Regulation, a certifying authority must not issue a construction certificate for building work or subdivision work under a development consent unless it has verified that each condition requiring the payment of monetary contributions has been satisfied.

 

In particular, the certifier must ensure that the applicant provides a receipt(s) confirming that contributions have been fully paid and copies of such receipts must be included with copies of the certified plans provided to the Council in accordance with clause 142(2) of the EP&A Regulation. Failure to follow this procedure may render such a certificate invalid.

 

The only exceptions to the requirement are where a works in kind, material public benefit, dedication of land or deferred payment arrangement has been agreed by the Council. In such cases, Council will issue a letter confirming that an alternative payment method has been agreed with the applicant.

 

In accordance with s94EC(1) of the EP&A Act, accredited certifiers must impose a condition requiring monetary contributions in accordance with this development contributions plan.

 

The conditions imposed must be consistent with council's standard section 94 consent conditions and be strictly in accordance with this development contributions plan.  It is the professional responsibility of accredited certifiers to accurately calculate the contribution and to apply the section 94 condition correctly.

 

Deferred or periodic payments may be permitted in the following circumstances:

 

(a) compliance with the provisions of Clause 2.7 is unreasonable or    unnecessary in the circumstances of the case,

(b) deferred or periodic payment of the contribution will not prejudice the timing or the manner of the provision of public facilities included in the works program,

(c) where the applicant intends to make a contribution by way of a planning agreement, works-in-kind or land dedication in lieu of a cash contribution and council and the applicant have a legally binding agreement for the provision of the works or land dedication,

(d) there are circumstances justifying the deferred or periodic payment of the contribution.

 

If council does decide to accept deferred or periodic payment, council may require the applicant to provide a bank guarantee by a bank for the full amount of the contribution or the outstanding balance on condition that:

 

·     the bank guarantee be by a bank for the amount of the total contribution, or the amount of the outstanding contribution, plus an amount equal to thirteen (13) months interest plus any charges associated with establishing or operating the bank security

·     the bank unconditionally pays the guaranteed sum to the council if the council so demands in writing not earlier than 12 months from the provision of the guarantee or completion of the work

·     the bank must pay the guaranteed sum without reference to the applicant or landowner or other person who provided the guarantee, and without regard to any dispute, controversy, issue or other matter relating to the development consent or the carrying out of development

·     the bank's obligations are discharged when payment to the council is made in accordance with this guarantee or when council notifies the bank in writing that the guarantee is no longer required

·     where a bank guarantee has been deposited with council, the guarantee shall not be cancelled until such time as the original contribution and accrued interest are paid.

 

The council may accept an offer by the applicant to provide an “in-kind” contribution (ie the applicant completes part or all of work/s identified in the plan) or through provision of another material public benefit in lieu of the applicant satisfying its obligations under this plan.

 

Council may accept such alternatives in the following circumstances:

 

(a)   the value of the works to be undertaken is at least equal to the value of the contribution that would otherwise be required under this plan; and

(b)   the standard of the works is to council’s full satisfaction; and

(c)   the provision of the material public benefit will not prejudice the timing or the manner of the provision of public facilities included in the works program.

 

The value of the works to be substituted must be provided by the applicant at the time of the request and must be independently certified by a Quantity Surveyor who is registered with the Australian Institute of Quantity Surveyors or a person who can demonstrate equivalent qualifications.

 

Council will require the applicant to enter into a written agreement for the provision of the works.

 

Acceptance of any such alternative is at the sole discretion of the council.  Council may review the valuation of works or land to be dedicated, and may seek the services of an independent person to verify their value.  In these cases, all costs and expenses borne by the council in determining the value of the works or land will be paid for by the applicant.

2.12.1    Setting and Indexation of Contribution Rates

In order to provide sufficient funding to cover price rises between writing the plan and paying for the items to be delivered by the plan, it is necessary to index the amounts that will be contributed.  Indexing applies from date of adoption until issue of consent.  Clause 2.13 provides for the indexation of contributions after the issue of development consent.

 

The Section 94 contribution rates will be indexed based on:

(i)    the Consumer Price Index (All Groups Sydney) or equivalent index system or a projection thereof, and

(ii)    the appropriate interest rate for that portion of the plan that is loan funded, and

(iii)   the land value index for that proportion of the plan that relates to land acquisition or equivalent index system or a projection thereof.

 

The indexation will be in accordance with this plan and the rates will be published in Council’s Annual Management Plan in July each year listing the rates for the next 12-month period.  The formulas automatically adjust in the first quarter of each management plan for any prior estimation errors.  The method of establishing the contribution rate to be published in the Management Plan shall be to estimate the result that would be achieved by applying the following formulas on a quarterly basis.

 

In addition, Council may review the whole Contributions Plan, and subject to the regulations could adopt new contributions rates.

 

There will also be periodic review of the plan and the construction costs of all items.  At the time of these reviews the revised contribution rate will not apply to developments that have already been approved or completed.

2.12.2    General Contribution Rates

Except for those contribution rates that are required by section 2.12.3 to be adjusted by the methods specified in those sections, all contribution rates found in section 1.3 will be adjusted pursuant to clause 32(3)(b) of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Regulation 2000 as follows:

 

RC = AC x CPI/ACPI

 

Where:

RC is the amended contribution rate

AC is the contribution rate at the adoption of the plan

CPI is the latest Consumer Price Index (All Groups Sydney)

ACPI is the Consumer Price Index (All Groups Sydney), which applied at the date of adoption of the plan

2.12.3    Contribution Rate Loan Funded

Where loan funds have been applied in the provision of works and services or land have been provided, the contribution rates in respect of the works, services or land will be reviewed pursuant to clause 32(3)(b) of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Regulation 2000 in accordance with the following formula from the date the loan funds are drawn down and every quarter thereafter:

 

RC = PC x (1+r)

 

Where:

RC is the amended contribution rate

PC is the contribution rate at the previous quarter

r is the interest rate applicable on the last day of the quarter of the 90-day bank bill swap rate plus 1% rate and then converting the annual rate to a quarterly rate by dividing by 4

2.12.4    Amended Contribution Rates

The amended contribution rates shall replace the contribution rates as found in Section A.

 

The contributions stated in a consent are calculated on the basis of the s94 contribution rates determined in accordance with this plan.  If the contributions are not paid within the quarter in which consent is granted, the contributions payable will be adjusted and the amount payable will be calculated on the basis of the contribution rates that are applicable at time of payment in the following manner:

 

CP          =             CDC  + [ CDC  x ( CQ - CC)]

                                           CC

 

Where

 

 CP is the amount of the contribution calculated at the time of payment

 

 CDC is the amount of the original contribution as set out in the development consent

 

 CQ      is the contribution rate applicable at the time of payment

 

 CC is the contribution rate applicable at the time of the original consent

 

 

The current contributions are published by council and are available from council offices.  Should the council not validly publish the applicable contribution rates, the rate applicable will be calculated in accordance with the rate prevailing in the previous quarter.

 

 

Contributions will be levied according to the estimated increase in demand. An amount equivalent to the contribution attributable to any existing (or approved) development on the site of a proposed new development will be allowed for in the calculation of contributions. In assessing the contribution of existing development the occupancy rates in Table 1.3.1 will be used.

 

 

Where a development does not fall within any of the items in Table 1.3.1, Council will determine the credit on the basis of the likely demand that the existing development would create.

 

This plan expressly authorises monetary s94 contributions paid for different purposes to be pooled and applied (progressively or otherwise) for those purposes.  The priorities for the expenditure of the levies are shown in the works schedule.

 

A development application which has been submitted prior to the adoption of this plan but not determined shall be determined in accordance with the provisions of the plan which applied at the date of determination of the application. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This section of the Contributions Plan determines the anticipated development in the City’s infill areas and then provides the rationale to demonstrate that the contributions are reasonable in meeting the demands for additional public local open space facilities.

 

This plan adopts as its basic rationale the following principles in establishing a nexus between a proposed development and the service or facility:

 

§ provision of a service and/or facility via a Section 94 contribution is a measurable consequence of the proposed development

§ the service and/or facility can be physically provided within a reasonable time interval.

3.2.1       Open Space Facilities Nexus

The nexus between new development and the provision of open space facilities is related to:

a)    An increase in and densification of population within the City of Penrith, which will increase the demand for open space facilities.

b)    The requirement to maintain open space facilities at the minimum standard per head to meet the community’s demands.

 

This plan sets the contribution for open space for the current phase of the City’s growth. Existing landowners have previously contributed through various contribution schemes and via general rate revenue. As the cost of land rises significantly with development, efficient planning requires land acquisition to be completed in the early phases. The existing local open space within the City of Penrith of 539.945 hectares is currently valued at $1,079,890,000 (assuming a range of constrained to unconstrained land at an average of $2,000,000 per hectare) or approximately $6,082,037 per person based on an existing population of 177,554 (June 2004 ABS). The current phase of this Local Open Space Development Contributions Plan is the further embellishment of existing local open space, without acquiring additional local open space.

 

The costs associated with the City’s Neighbourhood, Local, Pocket, Linear, and Natural Park facility embellishments are calculated separately, and applied to the incoming residents in the City’s infill areas only, excluding the City’s new urban release areas as they will provide their own localised open space land and embellishments, as a requirement of the development approval process.

 

Penrith LGA

 

 

 

14 year Forecast of Dwelling and Population Potential

as at December 2006

 

 

 

 

 

category

Location

total dwellings

pop.

new urban areas (ha)

Urban
Release
Areas

St Marys Release Area (former ADI site)

3,068

7,830

380

Caddens Release Area

1,300

3,900

100

Claremont Meadows Stage 2

500

1,500

50

 

Glenmore Park Stage 2

1,750

4,700

125

 

Waterside (Lakes Evirons)

694

2,150

95

 

North Penrith Urban Area

850

2,000

50

 

Werrington Mixed Use Area

190

520

22

 

South Werrington Urban Village

380

1,000

48

 

Penrith Lakes

4,900

14,000

400

 

 

13,632

37,600

1,270

Infill

Rural Areas

460

1,380

 

 

Multi unit housing

2,700

6,480

 

 

Dual occupancies (fringe)

2,270

6,810

 

 

Shop top housing

1,400

3,360

 

 

UWS (student housing)

350

840

 

 

Infill total

7,180

18,870

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL Potential

 

20,812

56,470

 

 

 

 

 

 

Existing Urban/Rural

Penrith LGA (June 2004 ABS population for Penrith)

59,000

177,554

 

TOTAL LGA

 

79,812

234,024

 

 

 

 

 

A community needs analysis was initiated by Penrith City Council in 2002. Refer to the People’s Lifestyle Aspirations and Needs Study (PLANS) Report by Urbis JHD and Stratcorp Consulting adopted by Council in March 2004. This report provided an independent assessment of the recreation and cultural facilities needs and the established residential areas infrastructure, facilities and services needs for the City of Penrith. The report includes a Recreation and Cultural Facilities Strategy and an Established Residential Areas Infrastructure, Facilities and Services Strategy and can be accessed via Council’s website at www.penrithcity.nsw.gov.au under the Planning and Development tab, Planning Studies and Strategies.

 

The draft Open Space Action Plan details the planning principles, standards and process that applies to open space provision within the City of Penrith. This document also includes information that supports the apportionment and nexus arguments used in the Open Space Development Contributions Plans.

 

3.6.1       Contribution rate per person

 

The following formula is used to calculate the contribution rate for the Neighbourhood, Local, Pocket, Linear / Drainage and Natural Area parks.

 

Contribution Rate ($/person) = C (includes 15% design and supervision) / P

 

9,948,650

------------ + any indexed increases (Section 12.12)

   18,870

 

=             $527 per person

 

Where:        C =        $9,948,650 being the projected expenditure by Council for works relating to the Local open space embellishments (which includes the cost of design and supervision being 15% of the cost of works). Refer to Appendix A: Schedule of Works.

 

                   P =       18,870 which is the estimated additional population within the

                                City’s infill areas to 2020 (excludes incoming new urban release area population). Refer to 3.4 Anticipated Development.

 

 

 

 

 

 

This schedule indicates proposed works to the year 2020.  The prioritisation of the works will be determined through Council’s annual Management Plan processes.  Where Council receives other monies towards the cost of these works (eg through the sale of land identified as surplus to the open space network, or grant funding) this Plan will be amended to incorporate those funds accordingly.

 

This plan updates and replaces Councils previous Open Space Development Contributions Plan which was adopted 15 December 1997.  The revised works list replaces the works list in that plan as of the date of adoption, and any funds held at that time will be utilised for the revised works list.

A1.1.2    Local Facility Open Space Embellishments

Suburb and Name of Park Location

Council Asset Number

Proposed Work

Estimated Costs $ / Priority (High, Medium, Low)

BERKSHIRE PARK

 

 

 

Berkshire Park

L4110

Provide landscaping, fencing and park furniture

$40,000

High

CAMBRIDGE GARDENS

 

 

 

Coronation Grove

L3460

Provide playground equipment and park furniture

$50,000

Medium

CAMBRIDGE PARK

 

 

 

Hollier St Reserve

L3500

Provide park furniture

$5,000

Low

William Street / Twickenham Avenue

L3540

Provide playground equipment and pathway

$50,000

High

Lincoln Park

L3550

Provide a path within the park and park surface embellishment

$60,000

Medium

Conway Ave. Reserve

L3600

Provide playground equipment and landscaping

$50,000 

Medium

CASTLEREAGH

 

 

 

Smith Park

L4090

Provide park furniture and shelter adjacent to playground. Provide landscaping

$30,000

 Medium

CLAREMONT MEADOWS

 

 

 

Caddens Rd / Sunflower Drive Myrtle Rd Fields

L1490

Provide soccer and cricket facility embellishments, provide fencing, landscaping and park furniture

$130,000

High

Myrtle Rd Reserve

L1510

Provide playground equipment

$50,000

High

Egret Place

L1520

Provide landscaping

$20,000

Medium

COLYTON

 

 

 

Roper Road Fields

L4390

Provide landscaping, signage, park furniture and tree planting. Conduct site rehabilitation and construct additional field. Provide field lighting and irrigation

$300,000

High

Lennox St

L4510

Provide playground equipment and park furniture

$50,000

Medium

Chelsea Place

L4540

Provide playground equipment and park furniture

$50,000

Medium

Kevin Maley Park

L4570

Provide playground equipment and park furniture

$50,000

Medium

Mick Martin Park

L4600

Provide park furniture and a memorial plaque

$5,000

Low

Shepherd St Park

L4640

Provide irrigation system

$25,000

Medium

 

CRANEBROOK

 

 

 

Andromeda Drive Reserve

L3710

Provide landscaping

$15,000

High

Greygums Oval

L3830

Provide field surface embellishment, storage facility, drainage, landscaping and lighting

$260,000

High

 

Sherringham Road Reserve

L3870

Provide skate park facility and park furniture

$330,000

High

Callisto and Borrowdale Way

L3890

Develop an area for community events and provide park furniture

$100,000

Medium

Iron Bark Drive Reserve

L6140

Provide landscaping

$20,000

High

EMU HEIGHTS

 

 

 

Clissold Reserve

L1640

Provide park furniture and landscaping

$10,000

High

Alma/ Russell/ Wedmore

L1720

Provide picnic tables, shelters and seating.  Construct a compacted gravel pathway and implement stage 1 of concept plan

$120,000

Medium

EMU PLAINS

 

 

 

Dukes Oval

L0060

Provide pathway and cricket net fencing

$150,000

High

Emu Park

L0070

Provide park furniture, fencing and landscaping

$50,000

High

Bunyarra Reserve

L0140

Provide pathway from Bunyarra Drive to Russell St, provide playground equipment, landscaping and park furniture

$70,000

High

Barina Crescent

L0340

Develop bush trail

$5,000

Low

 

ERSKINE PARK

 

 

 

11A Canopus Close

L0400

Provide pathway from Capella St to Canopus Close

$20,000

High

Chameleon Drive Reserve

L0440

Provide landscaping and park furniture

 

$20,000

Medium

Kestrel Crescent

L0480

Provide playground equipment and landscaping

$50,000

Medium

Peppertree Reserve

L0510

Provide storage facility. Provide playground equipment, pathway access around sports fields, landscaping and fencing

$350,000

High

Phoenix Crescent

L0520

Provide playground equipment and park furniture

$50,000

Medium

85 Swallow Drive / Spica Place

L1190

Provide playground equipment and park furniture

$50,000

High

GLENMORE PARK

 

 

 

Ched Towns Reserve William Howell Drive

L1310

Provide field surface embellishments and fencing. Seal area between amenities building and landscape amenities area

$150,000

High

Muru Drive

L1350

Provide playground equipment and landscaping

$50,000

Medium

JAMISONTOWN

 

 

 

Willoring and Harris St Reserve

L2520

Provide park furniture and landscaping

$10,000

Medium

Robinson Park

L2540

Provide park furniture and landscaping

$15,000

Medium

KINGSWOOD

 

 

 

Kanangra Reserve

L3170

Provide fencing. Construct compacted gravel pathway network

$50,000

High

 

246 Algie Crescent

L3220

Provide footbridge near the channel and landscaping

$60,000

High

Chapman Gardens

L3230

Provide amenities and security lighting

 

$200,000

Medium

Kingswood Park

L3240

Provide irrigation system to fields and shade structure

$50,000

High

First Ave and Bringelly Rd

L3250

Provide pathway

$6,000

Low

Orth Street

L3270

Provide bollards and pathway access

$25,000

Medium

Red Cross Anniversary Park 254 GW Highway

L3280

Provide memorial and landscaping

$10,000

High

Derby Street

L3290

Provide pathway access and bollards

$40,000

High

Jamison Road

L3310

Provide pathway access and bollards

$40,000

High

Stapley Cres.

L3330

Provide fencing, park furniture and landscaping

$30,000

Medium

Jean Street

L3340

Provide landscaping and park furniture

$12,000

Low

Peppermint Reserve

L3380

Provide playground equipment and fencing to protect the natural area.

$100,000

High

LEONAY

 

 

 

57A Deloraine Drive

L0220

Provide playground equipment and park furniture

$50,000

Low

16A Deloraine Drive

L0230

Provide landscaping along Deloraine Drive

$30,000

High

Leonay Oval

L0260

Provide shade structures and seating.  Provide fencing and seal internal road and irrigation to junior fields

$150,000

High

5 Orion Place

L0280

Re classify to ‘natural area’ and provide signage

$2,000

Low

1418 Pamela Parade

L0290

Provide playground, park furniture and landscaping

$50,000

Medium


 

LLANDILO

 

 

 

Wilson Park

L4240

Provide all season sporting field, pathway to the playground and landscaping

$50,000

 Medium

LONDONDERRY

 

 

 

Londonderry Park

L4120

Provide lights for tennis courts, netball and soccer facilities embellishment including underground water supply

$110,000

High

LUDDENHAM

 

 

 

Sales Park

L4250

Provide playground equipment, cricket nets and seating.  Provide landscaping to formalise car park and traffic access. 

$70,000

Medium

MULGOA

 

 

 

Mulgoa Park

L4220

Provide fencing, playground equipment, picnic shed, amenities, landscaping and bollards.

$200,000

High

Gow Park

L4230

Provide field surface embellishment, water bore and irrigation system

$70,000

High

NORTH ST MARYS

 

 

 

Maple and Sycamore Streets (Robin Wiles Park)

L4830

Provide park furniture and landscaping. Construct sports field, amenities, lighting and parking

$400,000

Medium

Tobruk St

L5190

Provide playground equipment and park furniture

$50,000

Medium

 

Park Lawn Place

L5210

Provide playground equipment and landscaping

$50,000

High

Boronia Park

L5340

Provide amenities building embellishments. Provide shade structure and store room for cricket facilities, picnic seating, shelter and table facilities. Provide access road, car park and irrigation system

$500,000

High

Poplar Park

L5350

Provide playground equipment, park furniture  and landscaping

$50,000

High

ORCHARD HILLS

 

 

 

Samuel Marsden Reserve

L4690

Provide sealed car park and landscaping

$120,000

Medium

OXLEY PARK