15 August 2007

 

Dear Councillor,

In pursuance of the provisions of the Local Government Act, 1993 and the Regulations thereunder, notice is hereby given that a POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING of Penrith City Council is to be held in the Passadena Room, Civic Centre, 601 High Street, Penrith on Monday 20 August 2007 at 7:30pm.

Attention is directed to the statement accompanying this notice of the business proposed to be transacted at the meeting.

Yours Faithfully

 

 

Alan Travers

General Manager

 

BUSINESS

 

1.           APOLOGIES

 

2.           LEAVE OF ABSENCE

 

3.           CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES

Policy Review Committee Meeting - 30 July 2007.

 

4.           DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

Pecuniary Interest (The Act requires Councillors who declare a pecuniary interest in an item to leave the meeting during discussion of that item)

Non-Pecuniary Interest

 

5.           ADDRESSING THE MEETING

 

6.           MAYORAL MINUTES

 

7.           NOTICES OF MOTION

 

8.           ADOPTION OF REPORTS AND RECOMMENDATION OF COMMITTEES

 

9.           MASTER PROGRAM REPORTS

 

10.         URGENT REPORTS (to be dealt with in the master program to which the item relates)

 

11.         QUESTIONS WITHOUT NOTICE

 

12.         CONFIDENTIAL BUSINESS


POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING

 

Monday 20 August 2007

 

table of contents

 

 

 

 

 

 

meeting calendar

 

 

confirmation of minutes

 

 

master program reports

 

 


UNCONFIRMED MINUTES

 OF THE POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING OF PENRITH CITY COUNCIL HELD IN THE PASSADENA ROOM, PENRITH

ON MONDAY 30 JULY 2007 AT 7:37PM

PRESENT

His Worship the Mayor Councillor Pat Sheehy AM, Councillors Jim Aitken OAM (arrived 7.42pm), Kaylene Allison, David Bradbury (arrived 7.42pm), Lexie Cettolin, Kevin Crameri OAM, Mark Davies, Ross Fowler, Jackie Greenow, Karen McKeown, Susan Page, Garry Rumble, Steve Simat (arrived 7.56pm) and John Thain.

 

APOLOGIES

PRC 63  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor John Thain seconded Councillor Ross Fowler that apologies be received and accepted from Councillors Jim Aitken OAM, David Bradbury, Greg Davies and Steve Simat.

 

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES - Policy Review Committee Meeting - 9 July 2007

PRC 64  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Ross Fowler seconded Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM that the minutes of the Policy Review Committee Meeting of 9 July 2007 be confirmed.

 

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

There were no declarations of interest.

 

MASTER PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Leadership and Organisation

 

Councillors Jim Aitken OAM and David Bradbury arrived, the time being 7:42pm.

 

1        Alignment of the Organisation                                                                                           

PRC 65  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Ross Fowler seconded Councillor Garry Rumble

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Alignment of the Organisation be received.

2.     The initiatives and changes to the staff establishment as outlined in the report be endorsed.

 

 

The City as a Social Place

 

Councillor Steve Simat arrived, the time being 7:56pm.

 

2        Smoke Free Outdoor Areas Policy                                                                                    

PRC 66  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Garry Rumble seconded Councillor Mark Davies

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Smoke Free Outdoor Areas Policy be received.

2.     Council adopt the proposed Smoke Free Outdoor Areas policy.

3.     The range of activities outlined within this report be undertaken through the staged delivery of an implementation plan to support this policy position.

4.     A further report be submitted to the Policy Review Committee on the location, wording and type of signs to be erected.

 

 

The City In Its Environment

 

3        Environmental and Health impact of Solid Fuel Heaters                                                 

PRC 67  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Ross Fowler seconded Councillor Garry Rumble that the information contained in the report on the Environmental and Health impact of Solid Fuel Heaters be received.

 

 

Leadership and Organisation

 

4        Presentations to recognise staff with long service                                                            

PRC 68  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Jim Aitken OAM seconded Councillor Kaylene Allison

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on recognising staff with long service be received

2.     Existing Council policies on recognising long serving staff be repealed

3.     The criteria for recognising long service be reduced from 25 and 30 years to 20 years, and that the achievement of this service milestone be recognised at an annual “Evening of Celebration”

4.     This information be documented in a Policy for inclusion in Council’s Workforce Development Policy Manual. 

 

 

5        Service Adjustment - Building Approvals                                                                         

PRC 69  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Garry Rumble seconded Councillor Jim Aitken OAM

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Service Adjustment - Building Approvals be received

2.     The service and system improvements identified in this report be implemented and reviewed on a progressive basis

3.     An additional Environmental Health and Building Surveyor (EHBS) be appointment in 2007-08 and an Senior EHBS position be upgraded to a Co-ordinators level and the departmental budgets be adjusted accordingly

4.     The appointment of an additional EHBS in 2008-09 or earlier if development activity identifies the need for an earlier appointment.

5.     A new Compliance officer be appointed in 2009-10 or earlier if the Fire Safety Program identifies the need for an earlier appointment

6.     A Review of the service be undertaken within 12 months of implementation of the modified model. The review will analyse the benefits and costs of the continuation of the “modified model” and compare these to those of a “Certification “Unit”

7.     Prior to establishment of a “Certification Unit”, a consultant be engaged to prepare a report detailing an implementation strategy for the Unit. A future report detailing the terms of reference and costs of the consultant shall be prepared and approval granted prior to appointment of a consultant

8.     Feedback be sought from stakeholders in conjunction with any of the changes

9.     A copy of the review report be circulated to participating organisations.

 

 

6        Service Specification Program                                                                                           

PRC 70  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Karen McKeown seconded Councillor Ross Fowler

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on the Service Specification Program be received

2.     The specification for the Corporate Development service be adopted.

3.     The specification for the Sustainability Planning and Coordination Service be adopted.

 

 

There being no further business the Chairperson declared the meeting closed the time being 8.34pm.

    



 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

 

Leadership and Organisation

 

1        2006-2007 Management Plan - June Quarter and End of Year Review

  

The City as a Social Place

 

2        St Marys Release Area - Public Exhibition of draft Ropes Creek Precinct Plan and Development Control Strategy

  

The City as an Economy

 

3        City and Town Centre Associations - Business Plans and funding request for the 2007-08 financial year

 

4        Penrith Valley Economic Development Corporation 2007-08 Business Plan

 

5        Rezoning Application - Penrith Homemaker Centre, Lot 10 DP 1046110 (Nos.13-23) Pattys Place Jamisontown. Applicant: Restifa and Partners. Owner: Pivpen Pty Ltd.  RZ07/0001

  

Leadership and Organisation

 

6        Draft Policy on the Payment of Expenses and Provision of Facilities to the Mayor, Deputy Mayor and Councillors

 

7        ALGA Infrastructure Ideas Register

 

8        Service Specification Program

 

 


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


Leadership and Organisation

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

1        2006-2007 Management Plan - June Quarter and End of Year Review

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting

20 August 2007

Leadership and Organisation

 

 

Leadership and Organisation

 

 

1

2006-2007 Management Plan - June Quarter and End of Year Review   

 

Compiled by:                Mark Andrews, Strategic & Management Planning Coordinator

Vicki O’Kelly, Financial Services Manager

Authorised by:             Barry Husking, Chief Financial Officer

Alan Travers, General Manager   

Strategic Program Term Achievement: Council's operating culture is flexible, efficient, integrated and aligned to Council's strategic objectives and program delivery.

Critical Action: Prepare, implement and review management plans and processes aligned to and consistent with Council’s Strategic Plan and Program.

 

Presenters:                   Alan Travers, General Manager - Penrith City Council - 2006-2007 Management Plan

                                      Barry Husking, Chief Financial Officer - Penrith City Council - 2006-2007 Management Plan    

Purpose:

To present the June Quarter and End of Year Review of Council's 2006-2007 Management Plan. The report recommends that the Review be adopted, including revised estimates and expenditures as detailed in the report.

 

Background

In accordance with the Local Government Act 1993, the 2006-07 Management Plan Performance Report, for the period ending 30 June 2007, is presented tonight for Council’s consideration.

 

A copy of the progress review document is provided under separate cover.

 

This is the fourth and final quarterly progress review of Council’s 2006-07 Management Plan, which was the second year of Council’s program for the Penrith City – The Competitive Edge Strategic Plan 2005-2009.

 

Managers have provided details of performance in accordance with their identified responsibilities. This includes the attainment of critical actions, performance against budget and identified performance indicators for services in each Master Program. Commentary has also been provided on key achievements over the year, as well as issues arising that have impacted on the delivery of the annual tasks which make up the critical actions.

 

The General Manager’s report on the 2006-07 year is included in the Management Plan review document. As the report indicates, progress in the fourth quarter completed a year of achievements across all Master Programs in the Management Plan, which constitutes a solid outcome for 2006-07, as the second instalment of Council’s 2005-2009 Strategic Program.

 

The Financial Services Manager’s report is also contained within the review document, and includes information on budget performance, significant issues and proposed variances.

Presentations by the General Manager and Chief Financial Officer

The opportunity is available for Council tonight to seek clarification or elaboration on particular matters in each Master Program.  

 

As Council has earlier agreed to receive a formal presentation at the mid-year and end of year reviews, the General Manager and the Chief Financial Officer will make a presentation at this time.

Financial Position

The 2006-07 Financial Statements are currently being completed and will be presented to Council in September and include a detailed explanation of Council’s financial position.  An overview of some of the key draft figures and indicators will be included in the presentation to tonight’s meeting.

 

The quarterly review process focuses mainly on performance against budget.  Details of significant variations are included in the review document.  The status and final cost of all 2006-07 projects is also included, as well as a list of incomplete works that are recommended for revoting to the 2007-08 Management Plan.  All actual figures are subject to end-of-year adjustment and audit.

 

During the year, as part of the quarterly review process, a number of revotes from general revenue were proposed and approved by Council.  These revotes were scrutinised as part of that review process and identified as continuing high priority tasks.  As part of the June review, these have again been reviewed, and no change in that previously identified high priority has occurred.

 

At this stage it is anticipated that the result will be a small deficit, compared to budget of $17,520 but again this is subject to year end processing and checking.  The projected deficit, made up of a number of both positives and negatives, is after allowing for works proposed for revote.  This follows a number of substantial additional allocations of funds during the year to key priorities (Penrith Valley Cultural Precinct and Ripples) and the recognition of $1.2m in additional non residential rates income.

 

This is an excellent result, considering the pressures on this budget during the year, caused by the decline in building and development activity and the additional allocations made during the year.  At the March review, Council anticipated a 2006-07 surplus of $46,000.  Further details of the savings and variations made in the June quarter are included in the review document.  A further report to Council, in conjunction with the report on the Annual Financial Statements in September, will confirm the budget position.

 


The more significant variations (F – favourable, U- unfavourable) for the quarter include:

 

                                                                                                                                         $000’s

Legal Costs recovered                                                                                                        263.0 F

Building Approvals Compliance Certificate income                                                             (143.4) U

Building Approvals Construction Certificate Income                                                             (79.5) U

Subdivision Development Applications and Certificate Income                                             102.1 F

Subdivision Construction Certificates Income                                                                       (26.4) U

Subdivision Compliance Certificate Income                                                                          (81.9) U

Workers Compensation Premium                                                                                      (445.0) U

Interest on Investments                                                                                                       120.9 F

 

These together with minor variations and reallocations, are discussed in detail in the Financial Services Manager’s report in the summary review document.  Commentary is provided below on the more significant issues in the review.

Employee Costs

Employee costs are the single biggest item of expenditure in the budget.  A comparison of the final results against budget estimates for these overall showed a $76,400 saving from a total budget of $57m.  Across any year there will also be occasions when there is a delay in filling vacancies and some savings originated from these occurrences.  This area was again impacted by the resignation/retirement of a number of long serving employees.  These payments were $1m above the budgeted amount.  Obviously this is a difficult area to accurately predict however modelling of the available data suggests that this trend will continue for the next few years.

 

Council policy is to maintain an amount of 20%, averaged over three years, of leave entitlements (excluding annual leave) in the Employee Leave Entitlements Reserve.  This reserve has accumulated over the years and was holding 20.04% of entitlements at the end of June 2006.  The financial year 2006-07 again saw major transfers from the reserve to assist in meeting the costs of the resignation of a number of long serving employees.  The reserve currently holds funds equivalent to 17.5% of entitlements.  Analysis of employee leave entitlements, known and probable retirements indicates that a strategy to bring the reserve back up to the agreed 20% over the next two to three years requires a minimum $200,000 transfer to the reserve in 2007-08 (this can be facilitated by transferring all salary savings to the reserve as they are identified during the year) and the inclusion of an annual $200,000 transfer to the reserve in the 2008-09 and 2009-10 base budgets.

 

The premium for the Workers compensation insurance also increased in total by $628,500 compared to the original budget due to a combination of a change in the factors used by WorkCover to calculate the premium and recent claims history.  Some of the additional premium increase was included in the September quarterly review.  The final notification of the additional premium was not received until the end of June and the premium was subject to review until that time.

 

Superannuation costs were $356,000 in excess of budget in spite of the continuation of the “half holiday” for members of the defined benefits scheme.  A greater percentage of employees are no longer eligible for membership of the defined benefits scheme.  As more employees are covered by the 9% superannuation guarantee levy the superannuation expense will increase.

Penrith City Children’s Services Co-operative

The Penrith City Children’s Services Co-operative had a budget for 2006-07 that had a break even result after a contribution of $69,000 from Council. The continuing trend of disappointing utilisation levels particularly in Long Day Care and Pre schools has led to a number of centres reporting a loss for the year.  The net result for the Co-operative’s operations for the year is a deficit of $413,000.  These results have been offset against the relevant Reserves accounts.  The outcome of these accumulated losses is that the Co-operative is unable to absorb any future years’ losses.  If the utilisation trend continues with a corresponding loss incurred at a number of centres then there will be a further call on general revenue funds to support the ongoing operations of the Co-operative. Further information will be provided in the September Quarterly Review about the levels of reserves and projections.

Project Expenditure

There are a number of significant projects recommended for revote in this quarter. Further discussion on these is provided below. The funding source for the relevant project is general revenue unless otherwise indicated.

 

·    Claremont Meadows Community Centre Extension  - $192,500 s94 funded

Contracts were signed with the construction company in March 2007 with a project completion date of 31 May 2007.  The builder has been very slow and has not met the agreed timeframe.  Recent wet weather in June has exacerbated delays.  Building Services are working closely with the builder to ensure the project is completed by August 2007.  These circumstances have necessitated the revote of the balance of project funds to 2007-2008.

 

·    Penrith Valley Cultural Precinct - $124,500 loan funded

The CWA building project has practical completion as at 3 July 2007 with 90% of the project costs incurred in 2006-2007. Detailed documentation for the Memorial Hall project continued to allow preparation of construction certificate and building construction tender documents. 

 

·    Tamara CCC Extensions Construction – $226,000 s94 funded

The project was delayed pending the selection of contractors. Contractors were engaged in late June 2007 and works commenced in August 2007. Tamara Child Care Centre renovations have been delayed due to issues relating to the building contractor, inability to source building supplies, and inclement weather.  As a result of these issues the building has not been completed within the designated timeframes. 

 

·    Kerb & Guttering – Mackellar Street Emu Plains - $151,000

The Mackellar Street project is a two year program, 2006-07 and 2007-08.  Project work commenced however the progress was affected due to extensive wet weather during the month of June.

 

 

·    Roads Reconstruction – Devlin Road, Castlereagh Road to River - $121,500

The Devlin Road project work commenced and the progress was affected due to extensive wet weather during the month of June.  Road and Drainage work was substantially completed.  Embankment stabilisation work is in progress and will be completed in August 2007.  Landscape work is due to commence and will be completed by 30 September 2007.

 

·    Plant Replacement - $466,500 reserve funded

Two mowers and four trucks were ordered.  Body work and the installation of necessary attachments for the trucks are in progress and both mowers and two of the trucks have since been received.

 

·    Ripples – Roofing and Upgrade Lighting - $310,000

Extensive investigations have been carried out by several specialist consultants to originally determine the cause of the corrosion to the roof structure.  These investigations identified several areas of concern, which include the mechanical services and water treatment systems.  Further options are being explored for upgrading the services at the centre.

 

·    Rural Fire Services Equipment - $246,000 grant/asset sales funded

Grant funding provides for the receipt of fire fighting vehicles from the New South Wales Rural Fire Services.  The delivery of one fire fighting vehicle was delayed despite assurances that the vehicle would arrive before the end of the 2006-07 financial year.

 

·    Penrith Regional City Infrastructure Strategy - $125,000 grants/general revenue funded

Council continues to advocate the important role Penrith will play in its Metropolitan context and lobby the State Government to acknowledge its obligations in delivering the relevant facilities and services to underpin the City's growth.  To do that successfully a more considered response is required to identify infrastructure needs and to develop an advocacy strategy to secure agreements for infrastructure delivery to the City.  The first step in this process is to assess the growth requirements of the City and to quantify what infrastructure elements will be required over time.  Resource limitations and other competing priorities have prevented a cohesive strategy from being developed to date. To remedy this situation it is proposed that the development of a Penrith Regional City Infrastructure Strategy be prepared using consultancy services.  This project was added to the program late in the financial year. It is expected that the study and strategy development would take in the order of 9 months to compete. 

 

·    Inclusion Support Agency - $208,000 grant funded

This project runs over 3 years with funding from the Department of Families, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs. The budget figures were costed on the entire project and therefore funds need to roll over the life of the project in order to meet commitments for staff salaries and resources for the project over the remainder of the project.

 

 

 

·    Penrith Overland Flood Flow Study - $112,000 reserve/contributions funded

This project involves three separate studies that form part of 'ongoing studies' under the Flood Mitigation Program. The Overland Flow Overview study has been completed and the Nepean River Study has been put on hold pending resolution of flood levels associated with Penrith Lakes.  The South Creek study is nearing completion.  The studies are funded through a Department of Environment and Climate Change contribution and Council reserves.

 

·    Penrith CBD Traffic Study - $147,500 reserve/general revenue funded

The Study has been delayed until resolution of CBD land uses.

 

·    Workers Compensation Self Insurance - $100,000 reserve funded

The project was delayed pending the selection of contractors. Contractors were engaged in late June 2007 and works commenced in August 2007.

 

There are a number of other projects of a smaller magnitude that are nearing completion (or have been completed since 30 June) where the funds are required to be revoted.  These are detailed in the review document.

Reporting of Special Initiatives

The new 10-year special initiative, Asset Renewal and Established Areas Strategy (AREAS), commenced on 1 July 2006. The AREAS funding from additional rate revenue approved by the Minister for Local Government, is for additional infrastructure renewal and public domain maintenance (which includes roads, buildings, graffiti removal and cleaning) as well as greater attention to the needs of our older neighbourhoods.

 

Council also continues to advance three 10-year special initiatives which commenced in 2002-2003, for which additional rate revenue was also approved by the Minister. These are:

·        Enhanced Environmental Program (EEP)

·        Community Safety and Neighbourhood Renewal Program

·        Economic Development and Tourism - support for Penrith Valley Economic Development Corporation (PVEDC)

 

As previously agreed by Council, specific reporting on the progress of each of these initiatives is presented to Council, the community and the Department of Local Government at six-monthly intervals, through the half-year and end-of-year Management Plan reviews and the Annual Report. Details are provided in Part A of the review documents. In addition, more detailed reports on key aspects of the programs are provided to Council by the relevant Managers at appropriate intervals during each year.

Management Plan Performance

The review documents incorporate detailed reporting on the annual performance of each of the six Master Programs from several principal aspects. They are presented in two volumes:

 

 

 

·       ‘Part A’  ~  Summary of key information

This includes: the General Manager’s report, the Financial Services Manager’s report, a summary of each Master Program at the Issue level and Key Results/highlights of the year.

 

·       ‘Part B’  ~  Performance and Financial detail

   (i)               Managers report performance within the Master Programs against:

(a)          Critical Actions - made up of a suite of Tasks and Projects             adopted by Council for this particular year;

(b)          ongoing Services with adopted Key Performance Indicators              (KPIs);

   (ii)              Additional performance and financial detail is provided on Capital and Operating Projects which have budgets allocated by Council;

   (iii)             A Budget progress statement in normal accounting format is provided for each Issue in the Master Programs;

   (iv)             Detailed information is provided in the financial statements of budget status and variations which are proposed to Council’s adopted program.

 

All reporting is in terms of the annual requirements of Council’s program.  Where actions have a life of more than one year, the report is on the performance for 2006-07. Those Critical Actions which were scheduled in Council’s Strategic Program to commence after 2006-07 are identified in the report in Part B. These are not included in the performance ratings.

 

The report indicates that, from the statements provided by the responsible Managers:

·       150 (90%) of the Critical Actions were ‘On Target’ and completed the planned annual program as at 30 June 2007 and 11 (7%) were rated as marginal in their delivery, and 5 (3%) were not delivered as planned. Those actions not fully completed as per the requirements of Council’s annual program have been reviewed with the General Manager and relevant Directors in each case. The Manager’s commentary on the relevant action reflects responses to be taken on 2007-08.

·       26 Services with Management Plan Key Performance Indicators were reported as overall meeting their targets. Three services - Subdivision Applications,  Neighbourhood Facilities Management and Drainage Maintenance were rated as marginal in their annual performance due to factors explained Part B.

·       340 Capital and Operating Projects (86%) were completed or largely completed by the end of the year. Of the remainder, 31 projects (8%) were in progress and 23 (6%) would not be delivered. These are mainly projects included in the proposed revoted works noted above.

 

Assessment of the progress of Council’s program is assisted by the provision of percentage and ‘traffic light’ indicators in reports. These are based on the responsible Manager’s statement of the progress of the annual requirements for that Management Plan assignment.

 


Guidelines for ‘Traffic Light’ Status Indicators:

*

[Green]

Performance is satisfactory for annual requirements/completion of the relevant action. Normally indicates delivery of 90%+ of the scheduled requirements.

*

[Amber]

Performance was marginal and extra attention is needed for ongoing items.  Normally indicates completion of 75%-89% of the scheduled requirements and may be the subject of a proposed revote of works.

*

[Red]

Performance is not on target and requirement has not been delivered. This is addressed by the Manager’s commentary. Delivery is normally rated as less than 75% of the scheduled requirements or is the subject of a proposed revote of works.

Text Box: C

Completed (usually applies to Capital & Operating Projects with defined target dates).

 

Availability to the Public

The end of year review document will be placed in full on Council’s website, as well as being made available to the public in hard copy, and CD versions on request, and through the Civic Centre, Queen St Centre, and all libraries.

2005-2009 Strategic Program

The present report and performance review deals with the delivery of the second annual Management Plan instalment of Council’s Penrith City – The Competitive Edge 2005-2009 Strategic Plan and Program. A comprehensive report on the second year progress of that four year Strategic Program for the City will be presented to Council at the Policy Review Committee meeting of 29 October 2007.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on 2006-2007 Management Plan - June Quarter and End of Year Review be received

2.     The 2006-2007 Management Plan Review as at 30 June 2007 be adopted

3.     The voting of funds and estimates of income for 2006-2007 be amended to reflect the revised estimates, expenditures and revotes as detailed in the Management Plan Review

4.       Council revote the works as detailed in the Recommended Revoted Works Lists for inclusion in the 2007-2008 Management Plan.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.  


 

 

 

 

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The City in its Broader Context

 

 

There were no reports under this Master Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

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The City as a Social Place

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

2        St Marys Release Area - Public Exhibition of draft Ropes Creek Precinct Plan and Development Control Strategy

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting

20 August 2007

The City as a Social Place

 

 

The City as a Social Place

 

 

2

St Marys Release Area - Public Exhibition of draft Ropes Creek Precinct Plan and Development Control Strategy   

 

Compiled by:                Tony Crichton, Senior Environmental Planner

Authorised by:             Roger Nethercote, Environmental Planning Manager   

Strategic Program Term Achievement: Cohesive communities are formed based on sustainable, safe and satisfying living and working environments.

Critical Action: Prepare and implement plans (based on Council's Sustainability Blueprint for new Release Areas) for each new release area that deliver quality, sustainable living and working environments..

     

Purpose:

To advise Council on the exhibition of the draft Ropes Creek Precinct Plan and Development Control Strategy, located within the Blacktown Local Government Area.  The report recommends that Council advise Blacktown City Council that no objections are raised to the draft Plan.

 

Background

On 16 June 2003, the Minister for Western Sydney declared the Eastern, Dunheved North and Dunheved South Precincts to be the Stage 1 Release Areas for the St Marys Release.  The Eastern Precinct Plan was subsequently adopted by Blacktown City Council on 4 February 2004 and construction of that development is now well under way. 

 

On 29 September 2006, the Minister for Planning issued an instrument of declaration of release areas which declared the Central, Western and Ropes Creek Precincts to be release areas in accordance with the provisions of Sydney Regional Environmental Plan No 30 – St Marys (SREP 30). The location of the precincts is shown on the map attached to this report. 

 

This represented the final declaration of Stage 2 Release Areas for the St Marys Release.  The declaration requires Council to obtain written advice from the Minister that the relevant conditions of the declaration have been met prior to either approving a Precinct Plan or a DA for substantive development within the Central or Western Precincts. This will be carried out prior to the development of these precincts, as required.

 

Council, at its Ordinary meeting held on 11 December 2006, resolved to adopt the draft Dunheved Precinct Plan and endorse the St Marys Penrith Planning Agreement and proposed work schedules.  Development Applications for the Dunheved North and South Precincts have now been submitted to both Penrith and Blacktown Councils for subdivision and filling of land, for construction of roads and stormwater detention  basins and for riparian corridor rehabilitation.

 

The Ropes Creek Precinct is located in the Blacktown LGA, and immediately adjoins the Eastern Precinct on its western side.  The draft Ropes Creek Precinct Plan was publicly exhibited by Blacktown City Council from 17 July 2007 and is expected to be recommended for adoption within the next few months.  The draft Plan is discussed in detail below.

 

Delfin Lend Lease has indicated that it intends to advance the detailed planning for the Western and possibly Central Precincts within the Penrith LGA in the next month or so.

 

Exhibition of draft Ropes Creek Precinct Plan and draft Development Control Strategy

 

The draft Ropes Creek Precinct Plan and supporting plans and strategies have been prepared by the developer Delfin Lend Lease and submitted to Blacktown City Council for consideration and adoption. 

 

The documentation submitted as part of the draft Ropes Creek Precinct Plan comprises two volumes.  Volume 1 includes the draft Precinct Plan and Development Control Strategy and consists of four parts. This includes Part 1 – Introduction, Part 2 – Planning Framework, Part 3 – Site Characteristics, Part 4 - Framework Plan and Environmental Management Strategies; and Part 5 - Development Control Strategy.

 

Volume 2 includes the following series of detailed 14 Studies, Management Plans and Strategies:-

 

·           Landscape and Open Space Masterplan

·           Landscape and Open Space Handover and Maintenance Plan

·           Biodiversity Assessment

·           Weed Management Strategy

·           Feral & Domestic Animal Management Strategy

·           Bushfire Protection Assessment

·           Community Planning Report

·           Ropes Creek Precinct Heritage Assessment

·           Aechaeological Survey of the Ropes Creek Precinct

·           Contamination Management Plan

·           Stormwater Management Strategy

·           Water Soils & Infrastructure Report

·           Traffic Report

·           Tree Survey and Tree Schedule

 

Councillors were advised by memorandum in July that the draft Ropes Creek Precinct Plan and all management plans and strategies could be viewed at the Blacktown City Council website at www.blacktown.nsw.gov.au.  Submissions on all matters are to be submitted to BCC. 

 

Content of the draft Ropes Creek Precinct Plan and Development Control Strategy

 

The various parts of the draft Plan are:

 

Part 1 of the draft Precinct Plan provides procedural information and an outline of the vision, purpose of draft Plan, land to which the draft Plan applies and the land ownership.

 

The Ropes Creek Precinct has an area of approximately 33 ha and is zoned ‘Urban’ (22.2 ha) at its northern end and ‘Employment’ (10.8 ha) at its southern end.  The majority of this precinct is in the ownership of St Marys Land Ltd (Delfin Lend Lease) (29.2 ha), however 3.8 ha in the southern part of the precinct is the subject of a long-standing lease and purchase option  to a separate company and will not be re-developed at this time.  A plan showing the location of the Ropes Creek Precinct and an extract of the Zoning Plan is attached.

 

The vision for the Ropes Creek Precinct is to provide development that integrates with the adjoining Eastern Precinct (Ropes Crossing development) and provides a high quality built environment that will foster economic development and jobs.  The purpose of the Precinct Plan is to establish common planning strategies, development principles and development controls to guide the future development of the land within the Ropes Creek Precinct in an integrated manner.

 

Part 2 of the draft Precinct Plan provides an outline of the statutory planning framework that applies to the site and the Employment Development Strategy (EDS) that is to be implemented for the whole of the St Marys Release Area, including the Ropes Creek Precinct. 

 

The EDS was prepared to identify actions and initiatives to be implemented to meet the employment and business development performance objectives set out in SREP30 and the St Marys Environmental Planning Strategy (EPS).  The key objective of the Strategy is to ensure the total number of jobs generated by the development is to approximate the number of workers who will reside on the site.  The St Marys EDS includes strategies and an action plan for the creation of a targeted 5,300 ongoing new jobs (both on site and offsite).  A second key objective of the EDS is to identify the appropriate types of target industries and jobs to be created.

 

Suggested employment target uses for the Ropes Creek Precinct include light manufacturing, wholesale trade, environmental and agribusiness and construction industries.

 

Part 3 of the draft Precinct Plan examines the site characteristics and key opportunities and constraints of the Ropes Creek Precinct and outlines the studies, management plans and strategies carried out for this precinct.

 

The main site constraints can be summarised as follows:-

 

·           an Asset Protection Zone around the perimeter of the site adjacent to the Regional Park;

·           5 detention basins;

·           4 aboriginal archaeological sites;

·           2 SREP 30 Heritage Items; and

·           Future Integral Energy substation site.

 

Part 4 of the draft Precinct Plan outlines the Framework Plan and Environmental Management Strategies which provide the principles for the development and long term management of the site.

 

The Framework Plan  comprises the following key elements:-

 

·           urban (residential) and employment development as the principal land uses;

·           a seamless transition between urban and employment land uses;

·           a seamless transition with the Eastern Precinct, particularly in relation to traffic and open space networks;

·           a collector road to the main east-west access road across the site and Regional Park;

·           a well connected street system integrated with the Eastern Precinct;

·           an asset protection zone (20m wide) around the perimeter of the site to provide some protection for residential and industrial properties from potential fires in the bushland within the Regional Park;

·           incorporates Water Sensitive Urban Design principles;

·           allows for future subdivision within the precinct to create varying block sizes to accommodate a variety of residential and employment generating land uses;

·           a target net residential density for Ropes Creek precinct of 15 dwellings per hectare;

·           5 character areas being Urban, Employment, Potential Village Centre Extension,  Urban/Employment Interface; and Employment- Existing Development;

·           Subdivision Layout Principles, Street Hierarchy and Landscape and Open Space Network  consistent with the Eastern Precinct.

 

A copy of the Framework Plan is attached to this report.

 

Part 5 of the draft Precinct Plan contains the specific objectives and development controls for urban design, built form and environmental management.  This is the Development Control Strategy component of the draft Precinct Plan.  These objectives and controls are designed to ensure that the development principles and key elements of the framework plan and environmental management strategies identified in preceding sections of the Precinct Plan are implemented.

 

Urban Structure

 

Key elements of the Urban Structure are as follows:-   

 

·           A clearly defined street hierarchy including pedestrian and cycle paths;

·           Planning and design principles for each of the 5 character areas;

·           Design criteria for frontage development and public domain.

 

Built Form Controls

 

Key Built Form Controls are as follows:-

 

·           A broad mix of housing types will be developed through the provision of a range of lot sizes and some higher density housing types;

·           Provision of a mixture of dwelling types including detached dwellings, semi-detached dwellings, warehouse dwellings, attached dwellings, apartments, urban sleeve dwellings, live/work dwellings, zipper lot dwellings, shop-top dwellings and double fronted dwellings;

·           Mixed use and higher density dwellings such as apartments and shop-top dwellings are to be generally located within the Urban/Employment Interface character area to provide a transition between Urban and Employment area;

·           Specific controls for each of 10 different dwelling types;

·           Siting and Design Controls for residential buildings address streetscape, external materials, landscaping, privacy, fences and walls and other elements;

·           The Employment character of the Ropes Creek Precinct will be created by the provision of building types for Live/Work dwellings, Showroom units, Warehouses/workshops and Strata units;

·           Siting and Design Controls for employment buildings address design principles, building envelope and design, minimum lot size and dimensions, articulation of facades, building height control, setbacks, site access and other activities/issues.

 

Environmental Management

 

Environmental Management Controls have been provided for:-

 

·           Bushfire protection measures;

·           Servicing;

·           Domestic and Feral Animal Management;

·           Weed Management;

·           Water Cycle Management; and

·           Soil Management.

 

The draft Plan includes Road Typology Figures showing typical street cross-sections for an Access Street,  Local Street and Collector Street for both Urban and Employment zoned land.  The draft Plan also includes Dwelling Typology Figures showing typical lot layouts for the 10 different dwelling types.

 

Proposed Development Contributions

 

Delfin Lend Lease entered into the St. Marys Development Agreement with Blacktown City Council (BCC) in 2004 in relation to the provision of open space, drainage, transport and human services for the Eastern Precinct.  The Eastern Precinct Plan was adopted by BCC on 4 February 2004 and the Outline Development Agreement was endorsed by BCC a few months later.  It is intended that Delfin Lend Lease will enter into a Deed of Variation with BCC to vary the Outline Development Agreement in order to expand on the provision of appropriate services and infrastructure for the Ropes Creek Precinct. 

 

Assessment of Key Issues

 

The following commentary discusses the key issues which have emerged from our assessment of the draft Ropes Creek Precinct Plan. 

 

Stormwater Management Strategy

 

The issues of filling of land and flood management have previously been considered in some detail and satisfactorily resolved when the Eastern Creek Precinct Plan and the Dunheved Precinct Plan were assessed and adopted by the respective Councils on 4 February 2004 and 11 December 2006.

 

It has not been necessary to carry out any filling for the Ropes Creek Precinct as land within that Precinct is located out of the floodplain and is not affected by mainstream flooding including a Probable Maximum Flood (PMF) from Ropes Creek.  The ‘South Creek Floodplain Management Study’ (DWR 1991) also demonstrated that land within the Ropes Creek Precinct is not affected by flooding from Ropes Creek or Stony Creek.

 

A total of five detention basins are proposed to manage peak stormwater flows off the site for all flows up to and including the 1:100 year storm event.

 

The stormwater treatment strategy for the development has been designed to ensure that that there is no net increase in the annual pollutant load exported from the site for storms up to the 2 year Annual Recurrence Interval (ARI) event.  In addition, the stormwater management strategy aims to achieve the objectives of water sensitive urban design by providing for stormwater reuse and stormwater treatment by biological systems.

 

The draft Plan is consistent with existing flood studies.  There are no significant flood management or stormwater management issues arising out of our consideration of the draft Plan.

 

Transport

 

Our concerns over traffic impacts of the development of the Eastern Precinct on our road system were, unfortunately, not incorporated in the related Planning Agreement at the time.  We therefore dealt with these impacts during our consideration of the Dunheved Precinct Plan.  It is also worth noting that traffic impacts have been considered on a whole-of-ADI site basis. 

 

Previous St Marys Eastern Precinct studies produced traffic forecasts which took into account an indicative development mix and road pattern for the Ropes Creek Precinct. 

 

The extent of development proposed and forecasts regarding traffic generation are consistent with assumptions made in the traffic assessment of the Eastern Precinct.  Therefore, no new traffic issues arise as a result this more recent examination of the Ropes Creek Precinct.

 

Biodiversity

 

Development within the Ropes Creek Precinct is likely to result in the removal of patches of disturbed native vegetation representative of three endangered ecological communities.  It will also entail clearing of some threatened plants and will remove foraging habitat for some native woodland fauna. These impacts, however, are not significant when viewed within the context of the preservation of the adjoining 900 ha Regional Park.

 

Macrofauna, including kangaroos and emus, will be managed throughout the development areas such as detailed within the approved Macrofauna Management Plan. 

 

The development of the Ropes Creek Precinct is not predicted to have a significant impact upon any threatened flora or fauna species on the subject site or the Regional Park in the long term.

 

Development Control Strategy and Built Form Controls

 

The built form controls outlined within the Development Control Strategy for the Ropes Creek Precinct are consistent with the controls adopted by the respective Councils for urban and employment development within the Eastern and Dunheved Precincts. 

 

There are no significant planning issues arising out of our consideration of the Ropes Creek Precinct Plan. 

 

Conclusion

 

As the Ropes Creek Precinct is located entirely within the Blacktown LGA, the draft Ropes Creek Precinct Plan and Development Control Strategy will be assessed and adopted by Blacktown City Council (BCC).  Blacktown City Council has accordingly invited Council to make a submission on the draft Plan.

 

The approach taken with the Ropes Creek Precinct Plan is a reasonable response to the key planning objectives in SREP 30 and the Environmental Planning Strategy. 

 

The draft Plan appears to have satisfactorily addressed all relevant environmental, planning and infrastructure issues relating to the Ropes Creek Precinct.  The draft Plan has also addressed the site-wide issues relating to the Regional Park, macrofauna, biodiversity, residual contamination, stormwater management, traffic impacts, employment and heritage.

 

Urban design, subdivision and built form issues have been treated in a manner designed to produce a seamless transition between urban and employment land uses and a seamless integration with the adjoining Eastern Precinct. 

 

Accordingly, it is recommended that Council advise Blacktown City Council that no objections are raised to the draft Ropes Creek Precinct Plan and Development Control Strategy.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on St Marys Release Area - Public Exhibition of draft Ropes Creek Precinct Plan and Development Control Strategy be received

2.     Council advise Blacktown City Council that no objections are raised to the draft Ropes Creek Precinct Plan and Development Control Strategy.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1. View

Precincts Map & Zoning Plan

1 Page

Appendix

2. View

Framework Plan

1 Page

Appendix

  


Policy Review Committee Meeting

20 August 2007

Appendix 1 - Precincts Map & Zoning Plan

 

 

 

 



 


Policy Review Committee Meeting

20 August 2007

Appendix 2 - Framework Plan

 

 

 

 


 

 

The City In Its Environment

 

 

There were no reports under this Master Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


The City as an Economy

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

3        City and Town Centre Associations - Business Plans and funding request for the 2007-08 financial year

 

4        Penrith Valley Economic Development Corporation 2007-08 Business Plan

 

5        Rezoning Application - Penrith Homemaker Centre, Lot 10 DP 1046110 (Nos.13-23) Pattys Place Jamisontown. Applicant: Restifa and Partners. Owner: Pivpen Pty Ltd.  RZ07/0001

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting

20 August 2007

The City as an Economy

 

 

The City as an Economy

 

 

3

City and Town Centre Associations - Business Plans and funding request for the 2007-08 financial year   

 

Compiled by:                Bijai Kumar, Local Economic Development Program Manager

Authorised by:             Bijai Kumar, Local Economic Development Program Manager   

Strategic Program Term Achievement: The City’s business community, learning institutions and training institutions are working in an integrated way to strengthen and develop the City’s local economic base.

Critical Action: Work with appropriate economic partners on developing mutual understanding and support for a common agenda for action.

 

Presenters:                   Centre Managers - City and Town Centre Associations - 2007-08 Business Plans    

Purpose:

To seek Council endorsement for funding the activities of the Town and City Centre Associations.  The report recommends that funding be endorsed for the Penrith City Centre Association and the St Marys Town Centre Associations in the amounts of $277,844 and $208,439 respectivley.

 

Background

The Business Plans for the Penrith City Centre Association and the St Marys Town Centre Association are endorsed by Council at the beginning of each financial year. In considering the Business Plans for the 2006-07 financial year Council had requested that the plans for future years also incorporate a set of key performance indicators. This was welcomed by the Centre Associations and the business plans presented to Council include a range of key performance indicators covering such areas as vacancy rates; business networking; promotional campaigns; newsletters; board meetings and governance; liaison with property owners, retailers and Council.

 

Copies of the Business Plans for both Centre Associations are attached to the rear of this business paper.

Business Plan for the Penrith City Centre Association [PCCA]

The PCCA has adopted a new format for its 2007-08 Business Plan which is based on Council’s own service based management program. The services underpinning each key Program in the Business Plan is clearly described together with the objectives; associated activities; staffing resources; budget; and the key performance indicators associated with the Program. Given the clarity and comprehensiveness of the format it would be desirable that both Associations adopt this as the standard for future Business Plans.

 

The Business Plan provides details of the key activities for 2006-07; the representatives on the PCCA Committee; and the key programs proposed for 2007-08.

 

The key achievements listed for 2006-07 include the following:

·        CBD physical environment-

-        68 bollards and 111 garbage bins painted and polished and 36 planter troughs placed in the CBD

-        Major CBD graffiti clean up prior to commencement of Council’s program

-        Outsourcing of public domain cleaning- Association was instrumental in lobbying for this to occur following a visit by Councillors to Gosford to view and assess the outsourced program there

-        Free paint and colour consultations provided to 12 owners in the CBD

 

·        CBD promotions and business improvements

-        Penrith City Festival 2007

-        Eater Bunny program

-        A mystery shopping program conducted by business consultants which attracted 82 businesses

-        A selling skills training program for staff identified in the above program

-        A major Christmas promotion program including $5000 shopper give-aways

-        Free shuttle bus during the Christmas period and submission to Council which resulted in the provision of a second bus with disabled access funded by Council.

 

The 2007-08 business sub-category rate allocation for the PCCA is $277,844 and the key areas of expenditure include the following:

 

·        Promotions and Marketing

$82,000

·        Business Development

$28,000

·        City Centre physical environment and services

$40,000

·        Service Operation such as employee costs

$128,381

TOTAL

$277,844

 

The Association has a further $59,000 committed to seven projects commenced in 2006-07 as well as a portfolio cash amount management account of $90,000 which provides for a range of strategic project initiatives and a financial buffer for the Association. The details of the projects and special initiatives is provided in the attached copy of the Business Plan.

 

Ms Glays Reed, City Centre Manager will make a presentation to Council covering key achievements for 2006-07 and activities planned for 2007-08.

Business Plan for St Marys Town Centre Association [STMCA]

The STMCA Business Plan provides details of the key achievements of the Association for 2006-07; representatives on the Committee; and key programs and activities for 2007-08.

 

The key activities listed for 2006-07 include the following:

 

·        Surveys conducted to determine shopping and spending habits of people visiting the Centre

·        Working with property owners to maintain a low vacancy of less than 5%

·        Liaising with leasing agents and property owners to inform them of developments in St Marys

·        “Shop locally’ campaigns, including spin n wins, Easter bunny, Country Music weekend and a major promotional campaign at Christmas

·        Provide support and assistance to the Spring Festival

·        Support Council and the Office of the Minister of Western Sydney in identifying shop owners participate in the air brush arts project to fight graffiti

·        Liaise with Council in town centre maintenance programs and provide input in the development of the Town Centre plans

·        Participate in Council’s business partnership program with other business organisations.

 

The 2007-08 business sub-category rate allocation for the SMTCA is $208,439 and together with a retailers contribution of $23,561, collected for specific promotions conducted by the Association, the total income for the Association is $225,000. The key areas of expenditure proposed by the Association for 2007-08 include the following:

 

·        Management services such as salaries

$90,000

·        Promotion and Marketing        

$90,000

·        Workshops and seminars        

$20,000

·        Queen Street Enhancement      

$27,000

·        General Maintenance

$5,000

TOTAL

$232,000

 

Mr Peter Jackson Callaway, Town Centre Manager will make a presentation to Council covering key achievements for 2006-07 and activities planned for 2007-08.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on City and Town Centre Associations - Business Plans and funding request for the 2007-08 financial year be received

2.     That funding for the Penrith City Centre Association and the St Marys Town Centre Association in the amounts of $277,844 and $208,439 respectively be endorsed.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1. View

Penrith City Centre Association Draft Business Plan 2007-08

13 Pages

Attachment

2. View

St Marys Town Centre Business Plan 2007-08

11 Pages

Attachment

  


Policy Review Committee Meeting

20 August 2007

The City as an Economy

 

 

The City as an Economy

 

 

4

Penrith Valley Economic Development Corporation 2007-08 Business Plan   

 

Compiled by:                Bijai Kumar, Local Economic Development Program Manager

Authorised by:             Bijai Kumar, Local Economic Development Program Manager   

Strategic Program Term Achievement: The City’s business community, learning institutions and training institutions are working in an integrated way to strengthen and develop the City’s local economic base.

Critical Action: Support PVEDC in the development of the City's enterprises.

 

Presenters:                   Chairman/CEO - Penrith Valley Economic Development Corporation - 2007-08 Business Plan    

Purpose:

To inform Council of the activities of the Corporation and seek endorsement for funding for the 2007-08 financial year.  The report recommends that funding in the amount of $361,056 be endorsed.

 

Background

The Penrith Valley Economic Development Corporation has submitted its 2007-08 Business Plan and has requested funding in the amount $361,056 for its projects and activities for the next financial year. This amount requested represents the special citywide rate to be collected by Council in the current financial year to fund the activities of the PVEDC [$271,056] plus an additional $90,000 approved by Council, as part of its 2007-08 Management Plan, for the Corporation to undertake a range of projects.

 

As of 30 June 2006 the PVEDC had 18 members with 12 members, listed below, represented on the Board of the Corporation:

 

·        John Bateman –  Bateman Battersby Lawyers, Chair

·        Steve Welsh –  IMS Installations, vice-Chair

·        Steve Willingale – Secretary and Acting CEO

·        John Mullane – Mullane Planning Consultants

·        Dr Paul WakefieldWakefield and Associates

·        Peter Onus – Astinacorp Pty Ltd

·        Clr Ross Fowler – representing Council

·        Alan Stoneham – representing Council

·        Dennis Rice – representing TAFE

·        Dr Glenn Close – representing Sydney West Area Health Service

·        Dr Kevin Daly – representing UWS

·        John Todd – representing the BEC

 

The Corporation is assisted by the following three Task Groups in planning its projects and activities:

 

·        Business growth and marketing

·        International Business

·        IT, Education and Training

Current Status

For the 2006-07 financial year the PVEDC has listed the following as its key achievements:

 

·        Continuation of a contract with the Department of State and Regional Development to deliver the Western Sydney Innovation Advisory Centre services

·        Three fully sponsored CEO dinners and the 2007 federal breakfast were organised

·        Preliminary work commenced on the 2007 Export and Business survey as a follow up on the 2005 survey to be conducted by UWS students

·        Facilitation of the Smart City Transport project which aims to set up a dedicated local transport information website

·        Development of a move business online program jointly with UWS. Some 30 small and medium sized businesses have been identified to participate in the project.

 

The CEO of the Corporation, Jane Holdsworth left the organisation in June and was replaced by Steve Willingale [Board member and Secretary] in an acting capacity pending the outcome of the review on how Council will deliver its economic and employment development services in the future. The PVEDC, together with the Centre Associations will be represented in an advisory capacity on a Councillor working party set up to conduct the review. It is expected that the working party will present its findings and recommendations to Council before the end of this calendar year.

 

The Corporation has proposed a operating budget of $575,766 [including GST collected] comprising Council funding of $361,056 and other sources of income [functions, interest, membership fees etc] amounting to $162,654.

 

Funds allocated to projects, outlined in the document “Projects of the PVEDC 2007-08” amounts to $115,000 and include the following initiatives:

 

·        Moving business online

$10,000

·        2007 Export and Business Survey

$22,000

·        25 year recognition dinner

$11,000

·        Energy Conference

$52,000

·        Buy Penrith Campaign

$20,000

 

A copy of the Business Plan and further details of the projects to be undertaken are attached with the report.

 

Steve Willingale, Acting CEO of the PVEDC will be making a presentation to Council.

Comments by the Development Assessment Manager

In receiving the Corporation’s six monthly report to December 2007, Council had requested that information on major commercial development approvals be provided to the Corporation to enable the PVEDC to promote its services to such businesses establishing in the City.

 

Council's Development Services Department is currently investigating options for the online delivery of planning services to interested stakeholders. Included in the delivery of this service, will be the ability for the general public to view online details of all consents issued by Council. This access would also be available to PVEDC.

 

Until such time as the online planning services are implemented, the Development Services Department will continue to regularly provide the Local Economic Development Department [LEDD] with a general list of consents that have been issued.

 

In the interim the attached information sheet prepared by LEDD which lists all business organisations in the City, including the PVEDC, and the services they provide is now attached to such development approvals. This will enable businesses establishing in Penrith to both have a record as well as determine and seek the type of support they require from business organisations operating in the City.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Penrith Valley Economic Development Corporation 2007-08 Business Plan be received.

2.     Council endorse funding in the amount of $361,056 for the activities of the Corporation for the 2007-08 financial year to be paid in two equal six-monthly instalments.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1. View

PVEDC report to Council

5 Pages

Attachment

2. View

PVEDC Budget 2007-2008

1 Page

Attachment

3. View

PVEDC Budget and actual 2006-2007

1 Page

Attachment

4. View

PVEDC project proposals

2 Pages

Attachment

5. View

Business organisational assistance

1 Page

Attachment

  


Policy Review Committee Meeting

20 August 2007

The City as an Economy

 

 

The City as an Economy

 

 

5

Rezoning Application - Penrith Homemaker Centre, Lot 10 DP 1046110 (Nos.13-23) Pattys Place Jamisontown. Applicant: Restifa and Partners. Owner: Pivpen Pty Ltd.    

RZ07/0001

Compiled by:                Brad Roeleven, Contract Planner

Authorised by:             Ruth Goldsmith, Local Planning Manager   

Strategic Program Term Achievement: The City is recognised as an attractive business and investment location based on its regional and metropolitan roles and businesses are being encouraged to locate to the City or nearby.

Critical Action: Promote the opportunities to attract investment in the City and surrounding regions to investment decision makers, planning agencies and industrial and commercial agents in partnership with regional partners.

     

Purpose:

To seek Council's endorsement to proceed with an amendment to Penrith Local Environmental Plan 1996 - Industrial Lands.  The report recommends that LEP 1996 be amended to enable shops trading principally in bulky goods having a floor space exceeding 1000m2 to be permissible on the subject site.

 

Background

Council previously considered a report on this rezoning proposal at its meeting on 5 March 2007 and resolved that:

1.       The information in the report on the Rezoning Application – Penrith Homemaker Centre, Lot 10 DP 1046110 (Nos.13-23) Pattys Place Jamisontown. Applicant: Restifa and Partners. Owner: Pivpen Pty Ltd, be received.

2.       Pursuant to Section 54 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979, and Regulation, Council prepare and exhibit an amendment to Penrith Local Environmental Plan 1996 – Industrial Lands.

3.       Council seek a ‘Written Authorisation to Exercise Delegation’, from the Director-General of the Department of Planning, to exhibit the draft amendment pursuant to Section 65 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 and Regulation.

The site

This matter relates to a bulky goods retail development known as the Penrith Homemaker Centre, located at Nos. 13-23 Pattys Place, Jamisontown.

 

This land is zoned 4(b) Special Industry under Penrith Local Environmental Plan 1996 - Industrial Land (LEP 1996).  This zone also applies to land north and east of the site along Pattys Place and into Blaikie Road, as well the adjacent Harvey Norman Homemaker Centre and Bunnings development to the south.  Land to the west of the site is zoned rural under Interim Development Order 93.

The proposal

A rezoning application has been lodged seeking to amend the provisions of clause 9 of LEP 1996, as it applies to land zoned 4(b) Special Industrial, by removing the maximum 1000m2 floorspace limitation for shops principally trading in bulky goods.  The amendment, specific to this subject site, would not apply to other land within the same 4(b) Special Industry zone under that instrument.

Amendment to Penrith Local Environmental Plan 1996 - Industrial Land

Following Council’s decision of 5 March 2007, the draft amendment to the LEP was prepared, a copy of which is attached to this report.  The form of the amendment is to create an additional site specific clause that would be inserted into the LEP, enabling Council to grant development consent to shops principally trading in bulky goods having a gross floor area exceeding 1,000 square metres.

Notification to the Department of Planning and LEP Review Panel

As required by Section 54 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 (the Act) the Department of Planning was advised, by submission dated 15 March 2007, of Council’s decision to prepare the draft LEP and was also provided with relevant details necessary to enable the proposal to be considered by the Department’s LEP Review Panel.

 

Council subsequently received advice from the Department confirming that it could continue with the preparation of the draft LEP.  The Department also issued a ‘Written Authorisation to Exercise Delegation’ enabling Council to complete certain statutory functions [under Section 65(1) and Section 69(1) of the Act} and within the overall draft LEP process.

 

In proceeding to exhibition of the draft plan, compliance has been achieved with the conditions applied by the Department of Planning to Council’s authorisation to exercise delegation including:

 

·        Consistency with Ministerial Directions under Section 117 of the Act

·        There being no unresolved objections, from public authorities, to the draft plan

·        No provisions in the draft plan that suspend laws pursuant to Section 28 of the Act.

 

The Department also required Council to exhibit the draft plan in accordance with the ‘Best Practice Guidelines’ for LEPs that involve Council-owned or controlled land.   In this regard, the draft plan does not affect land owned by Council, and the Guidelines therefore do not apply.  The Section 69 report will be prepared in accordance with instructions issued by the Director General.

Consultation with public authorities

Section 62 of the Act requires that Council is to consult with public authorities or bodies that might be affected by a draft local environmental plan. The following authorities/bodies were consulted about this matter:

 

·        Roads and Traffic Authority

·        Greater Western Sydney Economic Development Board

·        Integral Energy

·        Optus

·        Telstra

·        Sydney Water

 

One submission was received, from the Roads and Traffic Authority, raising no objection to the proposed amendment to LEP 1996.

Public notification

Section 66 of the Act requires Council to publicly notify a draft LEP.  The procedural requirements for such notification are set out in the Act and the accompanying Regulation.  Consistent with these provisions the draft LEP was publicly notified from 19 June 2007 until 16 July 2007, involving:

 

·        Placement of two advertisements in the local newspaper.

·        Display of all required documentation at Council’s Civic Centre, and St Marys office, for the duration of the exhibition period.

·        Written notification to the owners of adjacent and neighbouring properties.

·        Written notification to the owner of the subject site.

Consideration of submissions

Four submissions were received, two in support of the amendment to LEP 1996, one raising objection, and one requesting that the LEP provisions be extended to also apply to an adjacent site.  None of the submissions called for a public hearing on the proposal and none of the issues raised are considered to be of such significance as to warrant a public hearing.

 

Having considered the issues in the submissions no circumstances have been identified that necessitate alterations to the draft local environmental plan.  This conclusion is explained in the commentary provided below which summarises and responds to the submissions.

Submissions in support of the amendment

1.      Pivpen Pty Ltd

·        Pleased that Council is supportive of their submission to remove the current floorspace limitation which is a significant encumbrance to the commercial viability of the centre.

·        The LEP will enable the revitalisation of the centre.

·        Major tenants are keen to locate to the centre subject to rezoning and DA approval.

2.      Planning Workshop (on behalf of Pivpen Pty Ltd)

·        Major tenants will be able to locate to the centre increasing employment opportunities.

·        The economic viability of the centre will improve.

·        The loss of existing tenants will cease, stemming the loss of direct and indirect employment.

·        The owner will have confidence to make significant investment decision to improve/expand the centre. This will have flow-on broader economic and social benefits from improvements to the retail sector and the creation of jobs.

·        The proposal is consistent with Council’s Employment Lands Strategy.

·        The proposal is consistent with the NSW Government’s vision for Penrith as a ‘regional city’ within the Metropolitan Strategy.

·        It is justified in terms of the Department of Planning’s criteria for spot rezoning.

Comment:

The submissions in support of the proposed amendment to LEP 1996 repeat the contentions contained within the detailed submission lodged with the formal rezoning application.

Submission raising objection to, and seeking inclusion in, the amendment

3.      Reimer Winter Williamson (on behalf of Levadetes Property Group)

·        The submission is on behalf of the owner of adjacent land to the north of the site, being Nos. 121-133 Blaikie Road Jamisontown.

·        Part of the land the subject of this rezoning application was once part of Nos. 121-133 Blaikie Road.

·        The large access driveway along the northern boundary of the subject land has been designed to also provide access to adjoining Nos. 121-133 Blaikie Road.

·        The owners of Nos. 121-133 Blaikie Road assert that they are unable to proceed with developing their land purely because of the current floorspace limitation for shops trading in bulky goods contained in Penrith LEP 1996.  Given that Council recognises that the subject land would be more economically viable with the removal of this floorspace control, they request that the same proposition should equally apply to Nos. 121-133 Blaikie Road.

·        The proposed amendment to LEP 1996 should also apply to Nos. 121-133 Blaikie Road.  They argue that there are advantages in allowing larger bulky goods retailers to locate in an area already served by the successful Harvey Norman and Domain franchise.  Such retailing activities could form the nucleus of a ‘super centre’ that would be ideally located adjacent to the M4 Motorway.

·        They contend that it is short sighted to apply the proposed amendment to only one allotment.  Applying the changes to adjacent No.121-133 Blaikie Road might mean significant extra tourist and retail dollars for Penrith.  It is suggested that smaller bulky goods retailers could operate in the same locality and trade off the significant traffic flows from the development of the centre.

·        The owners of Nos. 121-133 Blaikie Road object to the rezoning of the subject land unless their land is also included in the rezoning.

·        The owners of Nos. 121-133 Blaikie Road have been a trader/property developer in the Penrith Council area for many years.  They have promoted commerce in the area, and are committed to the area.

4.      Cityscape Planning and Projects (on behalf of Mr L Toressan)

·        The submission is on behalf of the owner of adjacent land to the east of the site, being No. 2227 Wolseley Street Jamisontown.

·        The land was zoned Special Business 3(d) Highway Service Centre under IDO 28 but was changed to Industrial 4(b) under LEP 1996 in 2003.  The 4(b) zone matches that of the adjacent Pattys Place site.  By changing the zone Council was recognising that the highest and best use of No. 2227 Wolseley Street was for bulky goods retailing.

·        The limitation for bulky goods premises is equally as problematic for No. 2227 Wolseley Street as it is for the land the subject of the proposed rezoning, and for this reason No. 2227 Wolseley Street remains vacant.

·        Given that No. 2227 Wolseley Street has the same statutory framework as the adjacent Pattys Place land, and also operates in the same development market, there is a clear and significant case to be made for No. 2227 Wolseley Street to be included in the current draft amendment to LEP 1996.

·        There are no natural or servicing constraints affecting No. 2227 Wolseley Street that would prevent it from being developed for bulky goods premises with a floorspace exceeding 1000m2.

·        The vacant and unkempt appearance of the site is inconsistent with an image that should be ideally represented in a key ‘gateway’ area.

·        Development of the site for bulky goods retailing would present an appropriate built form outcome compatible with the setting and context of the site.

·        Bulky goods retailing would represent orderly economic development of an otherwise unused resource, and would have a positive economic impact upon the local economy by attracting additional development and employment opportunities.

·        There is sufficient demand in the local market to accommodate additional bulky goods outlets without impacting upon the viability of other uses in the area, including the Penrith CBD.

Comment:

The general focus of these submissions is that the proposed amendment should not proceed in isolation of adjacent lands.  While this amendment is site specific, the surrounding similarly zoned lands will not be excluded – the distinction is simply one of timing and process, as explained below.

 

The imposition of a maximum floorspace limitation was relevant at the time LEP 1996 was introduced, when bulky goods retailing was an emerging retail format.  The Hill PDA Analysis of Bulky Goods, prepared for Council in 2001, recommended that floorspace provisions for specific bulky goods uses should be applied as a minimum, rather than a maximum standard.  Stage 2 of the Penrith LGA Employment Lands Study, prepared by Leyshon Consulting in April 2004, also recognised the need for appropriately located bulky goods zones to meet future demand.

 

Council’s Employment Planning Discussion Paper, dated June 2006, confirmed that the current controls were inserted into the industrial LEP as an interim measure, and needed to updated as the nature of bulky goods retailing had changed over time.  The Discussion Paper further noted that Council intended to strengthen the Mulgoa Road and Jamisontown areas as the City’s pre-eminent bulky goods retailing location, and would focus on accommodating the projected additional land needs in those locations.

 

Stage 1 of the new Penrith Local Plan, which is currently being prepared, will introduce controls to achieve the outcomes for bulky goods retailing identified by these prior studies.  The Local Plan must also adopt the land use definitions contained with the Standard Instrument – Principal Local Environmental Plan, prepared by the Department of Planning.  The mandatory definition of ‘bulky goods premises’ in the Standard Instrument does not include any limitation on floorspace.

 

Following the gazettal of Stage 1 of the Penrith Local Plan, all land that permits ‘bulky goods premises’, including the vacant land at Nos. 121-133 Blaikie Road adjacent to the subject site, will not be affected by the current maximum floorspace restriction.  It is anticipated that Stage 1 of the Local Plan will be submitted to the Department of Planning for gazettal in March 2008.

 

The land the subject of this amendment is being dealt with separately from, and ahead of, the Local Plan process as it supports an existing bulky goods centre.  In supporting the proposed rezoning, Council recognised that the economic viability of the existing centre was significantly affected by the current planning controls.  The two adjacent sites are both vacant, although a proposal for No. 2227 Wolseley Street Jamisontown has been discussed with Council officers.

 

The existing bulky goods centre is experiencing trading problems due to the current 1000m2 floor space limit.  It is important that this matter is dealt with expeditiously to maintain the centre’s viability, the employment it provides and its general contribution to the local economy.  Including the two adjacent sites in the rezoning would require the re-exhibition of the draft plan, and delay the progress of the plan to gazettal.  The two undeveloped adjacent sites will ultimately receive the same zoning status as the subject site, upon the gazettal of Stage 1 of the new Local Plan later next year.

The next steps

The draft LEP has been sent to Parliamentary Counsel for review and comment.  It is anticipated that Parliamentary Counsel will only make minor changes to the draft plan, if any, that will not change the overall intent of the plan.

 

Should Council resolve to proceed with this matter, the draft plan (as amended by Parliamentary Counsel) will be submitted to the Director-General of the Department of Planning, together with a copy of this report and other relevant information.  The Director-General will consider the matter and make a recommendation to the Minister for Planning as to whether the plan should be gazetted.

Conclusion

As previously advised to Council in the report considered at its meeting on 5 March 2007, removal of the current 1000m2 maximum floorspace control in LEP 1996 for the subject site would be consistent with the position established by the Employment Lands Study and Employment Planning Strategy, and the mandatory definition for ‘bulky goods premises’ under the Standard Instrument – Principal Local Environmental Plan, which must ultimately be adopted by Council.

 

Completion of the consultation and notification process has not identified any circumstances to indicate that this matter should not proceed.  It is therefore recommended that Council support the proposed amendment to Penrith Local Environmental Plan 1996 – Industrial Lands.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Rezoning Application - Penrith Homemaker Centre, Lot 10 DP 1046110 (Nos.13-23) Pattys Place Jamisontown. Applicant: Restifa and Partners. Owner: Pivpen Pty Ltd. be received

2.     Pursuant to Section 68 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 and Regulation , the draft amendment to Penrith Local Environmental Plan 1996 (Industrial Land), as may be amended by Parliamentary Counsel, be forwarded to the Director –General of the Department of Planning, for the plan to be made.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1. View

Draft LEP - Penrith Homemaker Centre

3 Pages

Appendix

  


Policy Review Committee Meeting

20 August 2007

Appendix 1 - Draft LEP - Penrith Homemaker Centre

 

 

 



 


 

 

The City Supported by Infrastructure

 

 

There were no reports under this Master Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

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Leadership and Organisation

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

6        Draft Policy on the Payment of Expenses and Provision of Facilities to the Mayor, Deputy Mayor and Councillors

 

7        ALGA Infrastructure Ideas Register

 

8        Service Specification Program

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting

20 August 2007

Leadership and Organisation

 

 

Leadership and Organisation

 

 

6

Draft Policy on the Payment of Expenses and Provision of Facilities to the Mayor, Deputy Mayor and Councillors   

 

Compiled by:                Cristy Stevens, Administration Officer - Policy and Council Support

Authorised by:             Glenn McCarthy, Executive Officer   

Strategic Program Term Achievement: Council has implemented leading practice ethical and corporate governance standards.

Critical Action: Review and apply leading practice ethical and corporate governance standards.

     

Purpose:

To adopt a Draft Policy on the Payment of Expenses and Provision of Facilities to the Mayor, Deputy Mayor and Councillors as required by Sections 252 and 253 of the Local Government Act 1993.  The report recommends that Council exhibit the draft policy for public comment.

 

Background

Section 252 of the Local Government Act 1993 (the Act) requires Council to adopt a policy on the payment of expenses and provision of facilities to the Mayor, Deputy Mayor and Councillors, within 5 months of the end of each financial year.  Section 253 of the Act requires that Council must give at least 28 days’ public notice of its intention to adopt or amend the policy, unless it is of the opinion that the proposed amendment is not substantial.  Council must comply with these provisions of the Act each year, even if it proposes to adopt a policy that is the same as its existing policy.

 

This report recommends that Council’s current policy be amended to ensure consistency with the Guidelines issued by the Department of Local Government. The opportunity has also been taken to revise the maximum allowance in relation to Councillors’ mobile devices.

Current Situation

Council adopted its current policy at the Ordinary Meeting of 5 March 2007, upon a recommendation of the meeting of the Policy Review Committee held on 19 February 2007. 

 

The Act provides that the Director General of the Department of Local Government (DLG) may issue Guidelines in relation to the review and adoption of councils’ Section 252 policies.  Guidelines to assist in the review and preparation of policies on the payment of expenses and provision of facilities to mayors and councillors were received by way of DLG Circular 07-22 dated 28 May 2007.  The Circular states that Councils are required to submit a policy that complies with the Guidelines, by 30 November each year.

 

The Guidelines have been examined to identify how they may affect Council’s current policy.  A draft policy that complies with the Guidelines can be found in the attachments to tonight’s business paper.  The provisions of Council’s existing policy are largely consistent with the Guidelines and are in normal text, proposed amendments have the original text struck-through followed by the replacement text, and proposed additions are underlined. The proposed changes (pages 6, 8, 11 and 14) are not seen to be major additions to the existing policy. Councillors will recall that the development of the current policy was the result of extensive consultation with Councillors.

 

As part of the review, a benchmarking exercise was undertaken in relation to the maximum allowance in relation to Councillor’s mobile devices. Blacktown City Council, Campbelltown City Council, Fairfield City Council, Parramatta City Council and Wollongong City Council were contacted to compare the monthly allowance in relation to mobile devices. The range was from $175 to $350 per month with an average of $235 per month. Council’s current maximum for mobile phone calls and other charges is $100 per month.

 

It is recommended that the maximum allowance be increased to $200 per month and be subject to an annual adjustment in line with inflation.

 

Once Council approves the draft policy, a 28-day public exhibition period will commence from the date of the first public notice. A further report, detailing any submissions received within the 28-day public exhibition period, will then be submitted for adoption by Council. As mentioned above, this process must be completed by the 30 November 2007.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Draft Policy on the Payment of Expenses and Provision of Facilities to the Mayor, Deputy Mayor and Councillors be received

2.     The Draft Policy on the Payment of Expenses and Provision of Facilities to the Mayor, Deputy Mayor and Councillors be placed on public exhibition for 28 days as required by Section 253 of the Local Government Act 1993.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1. View

Draft Policy on the Payment of Expenses and Provision of Facilities to the Mayor, Deputy Mayor and Councillors

17 Pages

Attachment

  


Policy Review Committee Meeting

20 August 2007

Leadership and Organisation

 

 

Leadership and Organisation

 

 

7

ALGA Infrastructure Ideas Register   

 

Compiled by:                Ray Richardson, Grants Support Officer

Authorised by:             Vicki O’Kelly, Financial Services Manager   

Strategic Program Term Achievement: Council provides adequate resources to deliver its program and has introduced measures to increase its capacity.

Critical Action: Maximise funding opportunities to deliver Council’s program.

     

Purpose:

To inform Council of the proposal from the Australian Local Government Association (ALGA) to lobby the Federal Government to establish a Local Community Infrastructure Renewals Fund and to recommend a response to the ALGA's invitation to contribute to this advocacy program.

The report also informs Council of a request received from Senator Kate Lundy, Shadow Minister for Local Government, who is "keen to hear of some examples of projects in your local government area that could be supported under this sort of fund as part of our ongoing policy consultations."

The report recommends that the three examples highlighted in this report are posted to the ALGA Website in response to AGLA's request and a copy of the schedule of outstanding infrastructure renewal contained in the table in this report be forwarded to ALGA for its information and to Senator Kate Lundy in response to the Senator's request.

 

Background

The Australian Local Government Association (ALGA) commissioned PricewaterhouseCoopers National Financial Sustainability of Local Government Report (PwC Report), which was published in December 2006. The conclusion of the PwC Report is that the Local Government sector has approximately a $2.16 billion deficit per annum in income required to deliver all its services and maintain community assets.

ALGA is proposing to lobby the Federal Government to establish a Local Community Infrastructure Renewals Fund (LCIRF) to provide a new capital infrastructure resource. ALGA will also lobby Government to maintain the Roads to Recovery fund (currently $300 million annually).

To complement its advocacy program, ALGA has established a Community Infrastructure Ideas Register on its website. Councils are invited to post to the Register examples of projects that might be eligible for funding under the LCIRF.

Should Government agree to establish an LCIRF, the range of projects that would be eligible to benefit from such funding would need to be defined.

Local Community Infrastructure Renewals Fund (LCIRF)

The PwC Report estimates a national infrastructure backlog in renewal work of $14.5 billion. The Report asserts that this backlog has resulted from the growing gap in many councils between their revenue base and the funding required to deliver a broader range of services as well as maintain and renew the infrastructure which supports these services.

A major recommendation of the report is the establishment by the Australian Government of a Local Community Infrastructure Renewals Fund (LCIRF), with additional support from state/territory governments to assist local councils with meeting sustainability challenges and the needs of their communities.

The PwC Report’s recommendations for reforms to inter-government transfers are:

·           Establish a new Local Community Infrastructure Renewals Fund: this fund would support councils in the more timely funding of renewals work for over $12 billion in building assets covering a range of existing community infrastructure including community centres, aged care facilities, libraries, health clinics and sport and recreation facilities. The fund could be distributed based on relative need and use the R2R or Financial Assistance Grants (FAGs) General Purpose distribution methods, or perhaps through a new or hybrid approach. It is suggested that the size of LCIRF could be set so as to provide a similar level of renewals support as provided by R2R, which is around $200-$250 million pa.

·           Revise the escalation methodology for FAGs from a mix of population growth and CPI to a new escalation formula tailored to local government cost movements (e.g. a combination of the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) Wage Cost Index and Construction Cost Index coupled with population growth).

·           Make funding for R2R permanent: this program has delivered substantial benefits and there would be significant merit in extending its duration and further augmenting the funding levels (including escalating the program size by the ABS Construction Cost Index).

·           State governments to provide funding support to encourage the local council efficiency and asset management reforms: a significant proportion of councils have inadequate in-house skills to improve efficiency and to establish robust asset management and financial plans. Hence, there appears to be merit in state governments providing partial funding to aid the development of tailored state-based reform programs along the lines of the support provided by the Queensland Government ($25m over five years) in the Size, Shape and Sustainability Program, and the Step Program developed by MAV.

ALGA is lobbying for a Local Community Infrastructure Renewals Fund (LCIRF) of $250m per annum over 4 years and ALGA is presenting a strong case for the need for a LCIRF to both major parties in the lead-up to the federal election.

The Report identifies projects that the fund would support:

 

How the LCIRF would enhance local communities

If a LCIRF was established, it would quickly be drawn upon by individual councils to rectify a range of community infrastructure deficiencies.

The fund would focus on the renewal and replacement of existing assets rather than the development of new facilities. The ability to access such a fund should enable some councils to avoid developing backlogs, and in some cases bring forward some projects to reduce whole-of-life costs.

The study consulted a number of councillors and local government managers to develop a list of the types of projects which could be completed with the support of an LCIRF:

 

·           Renewal and refurbishment of community centres and public halls

·           Renewal of facilities providing a base depot for home and community care activities

·           Upgrading of senior citizen centres

·           Renewal and refurbishment of theatres, galleries and museums

·           Enhancement of main streets and public squares

·           Upgrading of boat ramps, jetties and wharves

·           Upgrading of recreational facilities, including swimming pools and playing fields

·           Improvement of park equipment, such as playgrounds, benches and BBQs

·           Renewal of foreshore paths, seawalls, walking trails, board walks

·           Upgrading and major periodic maintenance of airports, aerodromes and air strips

·           Refurbishment of tourism information centres

·           Up-grading of libraries and information centres

·           Refurbishment of kitchen and council facilities which provide Meals on Wheels.

 

The LCIRF would in general not be used to support the development of new facilities. However, under some circumstances, new facilities may be warranted - for example it may be financially more appropriate to establish a new multi-purpose social hub providing childcare, maternal and child health as well as a kindergarten to replace a series of older single-purpose facilities.

 

Better Funding, Better Communities

Additional funding would assist local government to meet its obligations to flexibly gauge and respond to changing community demands. This would:

 

·           Strengthen local communities by ensuring an adequate standard of key facilities for the ongoing provision of a range of significant social and recreational services.

·           Encourage more participation in community activities through greater choice and consultation, thus promoting increased community cohesion and safety, particularly in rural areas.

·           Enable the implementation of local programs to accommodate cultural diversity, access and equity and equal opportunity, and involve minority groups.

·           Support a sustainable environmental strategy for each community.

·           Enhance business and community links with regional areas to promote regional equity and development.

·           Promote further economic development and the generation of employment benefits through links with the business community.

·           Improve the quality of life of local residents through the support and alignment of health and welfare agencies within the area.

·           Support local recreation, arts and culture and an appreciation of heritage in order to promote vibrant and active communities.

Community Infrastructure Ideas Register

ALGA has requested that councils submit ideas for projects to its Community Infrastructure Ideas Register.

A letter dated 13 June from ALGA states in part:

“The criteria for submissions on the register is that the Fund would renew existing ageing infrastructure and that it has a community purpose. The Fund of $250 million over 4 years was recommended by the PricewaterhouseCoopers report into local government financing, commissioned by ALGA and released in December 2006. Neither water and sewerage infrastructure nor roads will be covered by such a fund and we would particularly appreciate examples of smaller projects involving modest expenditures (perhaps up to $50,000) to illustrate examples of what could be achieved by such a fund. Of course councils may have examples of much larger projects and we want to hear about them too.

“ALGA is using the information submitted on the register to lobby both major parties to include an LCIRF in their election platforms in the lead-up to the federal election later this year.

“I also ask that you contact your local federal MPs and Senators and draw to their attention the significant benefits of establishing a Local Community Infrastructure Renewals Fund which we envisage would be established along the lines of the highly successful Roads to recovery Program. Local government has a good story to tell on delivering outcomes and benefits for our communities and we must ensure that we continue to spread the word.”

Information has been gathered on the range of asset renewal programs from various departments of Penrith City Council for the years from 2007-08 to 2016-17, which could benefit from additional government funding.

Data reviewed included:

·        Building Asset Renewal Program (funded by Council: $15 million to 2015-16).

·        Asset Renewal and Established Areas Strategy (funded via Special Rate Rise).

·        Parks Asset Renewal Program.

·        Neighbourhood Renewal Program.

·        Project Evaluation bids for 2007-08.

·        Ripples Pool improvements.

·        Penrith Swim Centre improvements.

·        Great River Walk Penrith section.

·        Other asset renewal proposals not included above, including drainage, footpaths, street furniture, car parks, pedestrian bridges, cemeteries, recreational and sporting facilities, public toilets and heritage items.

The information reviewed by PwC to identify the $14.5 billion backlog in infrastructure renewal included Special Schedule 7 of the Annual Financial Statements.  This schedule provides information about the condition of public works including an estimated cost to bring these to a “satisfactory” standard.  Penrith’s estimated costs in this schedule as at 30 June 2007 are $15.1m.  This figure will not correlate exactly with the amounts provided in the schedule below as the estimated costs in Special Schedule 7 may not include the costs of renewal but only those costs to bring the asset to what has been deemed a satisfactory standard.  For example Special Schedule 7 will include the cost to bring a public amenity building to a satisfactory standard (replacement of doors and cisterns) and the schedule below includes an amount to replace the amenity building with a contemporary facility incorporating the latest sustainability and accessibility initiatives.

The total amount of expenditure identified, but not resourced, is $56 million. These projects are listed in the table below.  ALGA have indicated that they would be very pleased to receive the full schedule of proposed asset renewal projects and it is proposed that a copy of this Report and the attached schedule be provided to them to support their submission to Government.

Senator Kate Lundy, Shadow Minister for Local Government has also requested information on projects in Penrith that could benefit from the establishment of such a fund as the LCIRF

Three examples of specific projects have been identified as examples to post on to the ALGA web-based Infrastructure Ideas Register, together with an image for each.

 

Indicative Community Asset Renewal Schedule

Namatjira Neighbourhood Centre

$118,000

Werrington Downs Neighbourhood Centre air conditioning

$15,000

Neighbourhood and Community Centres

~ Furniture Replacement

~ External upgrades

~ Bathroom upgrades

 

$500,000

$5,300,000

$750,000

Ripples water treatment, air and roof replacement

$5,418,000

Penrith Swimming Centre

$8,500,000

Penrith Cemetery drainage, paths and roads

$865,000

Civil drainage renewal ($1 m pa x 10 years)

$10,000,000

Street furniture replacement

~seating

~ bins

 

$400,000

$675,000

Footpaths

~ asphalt

~ concrete

 

$700,000

$2,000,000

Pedestrian bridges

$100,000

Judges Place car park CPTED/compliance improvements

$1,895,000

Judges Place Multi-storey car park

$700,000

Public Toilet replacement

$1,500,000

Penrith Valley Cultural Precinct

~ Conversion of building to community arts centre

~ Conversion of building for community purposes

~ Replacement of Children’s Services facilities

 

$600,000

$600,000

$5,000,000

Parks Asset Renewal Program 2007-2008

$575,000

Parks Asset Renewal Program 2008-2009

$992,000

Parks Asset Renewal Program 2009-2010

$955,000

Parks Asset Renewal Program 2010-2011

$1,008,000

Parks Asset Renewal Program 2011-2012

$995,000

Parks Asset Renewal Program 2012-2013

$823,000

Parks Asset Renewal Program 2013-2014

$751,000

Parks Asset Renewal Program 2014-2015

$764,000

Parks Asset Renewal Program 2015-2016

$778,000

Parks Asset Renewal Program 2016-2017

$792,000

Great River Walk footpath replacement M4 to railway section

$2,000,000

Total Estimated Community Asset Renewal Program 2007-08 to 2016-17

$56,069,000

 

Current Situation

Extensive consultation has been held with Parks Construction and Maintenance, Building Services, Asset Management, Facilities Operations and others to prepare a schedule of community asset renewals that did not have pre-determined funding sources (such as the Building Asset Renewal Program, the Asset Renewal and Established Areas Strategy, or other Special Rate Rise or established fund.

This is a contemporary list which will change over time to reflect shifts in Council and community priorities.

The ALGA proposal for the renewal of existing, but ageing, infrastructure is different, but complementary to the National Growth Areas Alliance advocacy for additional resources to bridge the gap between existing infrastructure and community services and the level of new infrastructure and community services that is required to meet present and future needs; a campaign for which the Mayor is NSW Spokesperson.

Examples

To provide examples for the ALGA Register, the following three projects are proposed for posting to that site, as representing one smaller (less than $50,000 as requested in the 13 June letter from ALGA quoted above) and two larger projects.

The ALGA Register permits a maximum of 250 characters for the description for each example and a maximum size of 330Kb for each jpg or gif formatted image to accompany each entry.

Penrith Valley Cultural Precinct Arts Incubator: $600,000

The upgrading of ageing facilities in St Marys is designed to house arts and community organisations. The existing building will be upgraded to accommodate an arts centre for the community.

Penrith Swimming Centre: $400,000

Penrith Swimming Centre opened in 1961. Dressing rooms, the amenities and the entryway need to be replaced to bring them to a state commensurate with contemporary standards.

Werrington Downs Neighbourhood Centre: $15,000

This building has no heating and is subject to extremes of temperature and installation of air conditioning is a high priority. This project will revitalise a 1988 facility, making it a more attractive, vibrant and user friendly community resource.

Summary

Council has been presented with an opportunity to assess its community infrastructure renewal needs that are currently unfunded through Council programs, the most recent Special Rate Rise for Asset Renewal and Established Areas, or secured grants.

A review of the existing assets shows that over $56 million dollars in additional funding would be required over the next eight to ten years to renew ageing and inadequate infrastructure to a standard fit for contemporary use.

With each passing year and with every change in Council and community priorities, additional assets may be identified for inclusion in the schedule for renewal. Similarly, the priority for scheduling of asset renewal within the schedule will change with community needs and available resources.

With ALGA targeting an annual fund of some $250 million across all Councils, all the works identified in the table above will not be resourced through Penrith Council’s share. However, as in the case of the Roads to Recovery Fund, substantial projects will be able to be delivered for the benefit of the community above and beyond what Council would otherwise be able to afford.

It would be in Council’s interest that a Local Community Infrastructure Renewals Fund were established and it is also in Council’s interest to support the efforts of the Australian Local Government Association to lobby the Federal Government to secure resources that would deliver tangible benefits to the Penrith community, by enabling Council to replace a broad spectrum of ageing infrastructure.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on ALGA Infrastructure Ideas Register be received

2.     The three examples highlighted in this report are posted to the ALGA Website in response to ALGA’s request

3.     A copy of the schedule of outstanding infrastructure renewal included in the table in this report be forwarded to ALGA for its information and to Senator Kate Lundy in response to the Senator’s request.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Policy Review Committee Meeting

20 August 2007

Leadership and Organisation

 

 

Leadership and Organisation

 

 

8

Service Specification Program   

 

Compiled by:                Michael Rudd, Services Development Officer

Authorised by:             Ross Kingsley, Corporate Development Manager   

Strategic Program Term Achievement: Services and programs that Council provides are determined based on equity, customer requirements, community benefits and best value.

Critical Action: All services are provided to adopted service levels.

     

Purpose:

To provide Council with the draft Corporate Governance (LO), Neighbourhood Renewal (CDM), Project Management (DTAM) and Catchment Management (DTAM) Service Specifications  for consideration. The report recommends that these service specifications be adopted.

Given the size of these documents, copies have been provided separately to Councillors. Additional copies of  these documents can be obtained on request.

 

Background

Council established the Service Specification Program in 2002-03 in order to:

1.       Comprehensively analyse and document all services and the present level of service provided (stage 1 of the Program)

2.       Enable Council in a fully informed manner to review and where appropriate adjust service levels to better meet the needs of the community and align to Council’s strategy (stage 2).

 

Documentation of Council’s external and internal services began four years ago, with significant benefits to the efficient and effective management of the organisation. To date, 57 consolidated Service Specifications have been formally adopted, with four additional specifications presented tonight for Council’s consideration. The remaining four draft specifications will be reported to Council in the near future in order to complete the stage 1 program.

 

Council has approved the inclusion of key information from the service specifications, including a profile and budget of each service, in its 2007-08 Management Plan.

A more comprehensive review of all service levels has now commenced, with the initial results being brought to Council in the context of the 2007-08 Management Plan and budget development. The service review process also identifies areas of service improvement which should be made within existing means and a range of such improvements has been included in the 2007-08 Management Plan.

Assessment of Draft Service Specifications

Prior to their reporting to Council, all draft specifications undergo a rigorous process of validation and assessment, leading to approval by the Corporate Management Team. The aim is to ensure that each specification accurately communicates the existing levels of service and activities that the service provides, in terms of quantity, quality and cost to Council.  Once adopted by Council, this specification will be used as the basis for testing service performance and for service review, including any changes to services levels, calls for additional resourcing, or for changes in priority setting within an existing service.

 

The four draft specifications submitted for Council’s consideration tonight are for the following Services:

·    Corporate Governance (led by the Legal Officer, including other Managers)

·    Neighbourhood Renewal (Community Development Manager)

·    Project Management (Design and Technical Advice Manager)

·    Catchment Management (Design and Technical Advice Manager)

 

Neighbourhood Renewal is a key component of the Asset Renewal and Established Areas Strategy (AREAS) special initiative which commenced in 2006-07. The draft Service Specification for Neighbourhood Renewal includes an important part of that strategy. It reflects the objective set by Council to raise, where appropriate, the delivery of services for residents in established areas to a level commensurate with Penrith’s status of a regional city.

 

The draft Service Specifications for Corporate Governance and Project Management reflect current service levels and approaches. They will provide a base line for the review of the Governance and Project Management areas, as discussed with Council through the General Manager’s report on Alignment of the Organisation to the most recent Policy Review Committee meeting. As further service adjustments are identified, they will be reported back to Council for consideration as part of the Service Review process.

Summary of Key Information

Service Specifications are very detailed documents. By policy, full documentation is provided, under separate cover, to all Councillors, and is available to the public on request.

As previously agreed, it is intended to make the specifications for all services in Council’s 2007-08 Management Plan available for the public through Council’s website as linked documents. This approach is currently being developed.

To assist in Council’s consideration of the draft specifications submitted tonight, executive summaries are provided as part of this report.

These summaries contain:

1.   Service Description

2.   Link to Strategic Program

3.   Service Objectives

4.   Scope of Work

5.   Key Performance Indicators

6.   Service Funding

7.   Service Summary Chart

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on the Service Specification Program be received

2.     The Service Specification for Corporate Governance be adopted

3.     The Service Specification for Neighbourhood Renewal be adopted

4.     The Service Specification for Project Management be adopted

5.     The Service Specification for Catchment Management be adopted.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1. View

Executive Summary - Corporate Governance Service

3 Pages

Attachment

2. View

Executive Summary - Neighbourhood Renewal Service

4 Pages

Attachment

3. View

Executive Summary - Project Management Service

2 Pages

Attachment

4. View

Executive Summary - Catchment Management Service

3 Pages

Attachment

   


CONFIDENTIAL BUSINESS

 

MASTER PROGRAM REPORTS

 

CONTENTS

 

Pecuniary Interests

 

Other Interests

 

Monday August 20 2007

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

1        Presence of the Public                                                                                                          1

 

2        Personnel Matter - Workforce Issue

 

 


Policy Review Committee

20 August 2007

Leadership and Organisation

 

 

 

 1       Presence of the Public

 

Everyone is entitled to attend a meeting of the Council and those of its Committees of which all members are Councillors, except as provided by Section 10 of the Local Government Act, 1993.

A Council, or a Committee of the Council of which all the members are Councillors, may close to the public so much of its meeting as comprises:

 

(a)                the discussion of any of the matters listed below; or

(b)               the receipt or discussion of any of the information so listed.

The matters and information are the following:

 

(a)                personnel matters concerning particular individuals;

(b)               the personal hardship of any resident or ratepayers;

(c)                information that would, if disclosed, confer a commercial advantage on a person with whom the council is conducting (or proposes to conduct) business;

(d)               commercial information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed:

·                         prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied it; or

 

·                         confer a commercial advantage on a competitor of the Council; or

 

·                         reveal a trade secret.

 

(e)                information that would, if disclosed, prejudice the maintenance of the law;

(f)                 matters affecting the security of the Council, Councillors, Council staff or Council property;

(g)        advice concerning litigation, or advice that would otherwise be privileged from production in legal proceedings on the ground of legal professional privilege.

The grounds on which part of a meeting is closed must be stated in the decision to close that part of the meeting and must be recorded in the minutes of the meeting.

The grounds must specify the following:

(a)                the relevant provision of section 10A(2);

(b)               the matter that is to be discussed during the closed part of the meeting;

(c)                the reasons why the part of the meeting is being closed, including (if the matter concerned is a matter other than a personnel matter concerning particular individuals, the personal hardship of a resident or ratepayer or a trade secret) an explanation of the way in which discussion of the matter in open meeting would be, on balance, contrary to the public interest.

Members of the public may make representations at a Council or Committee Meeting as to whether a part of a meeting should be closed to the public

The process which should be followed is:

 

·        a motion, based on the recommendation below, is moved and seconded

·        the Chairperson then asks if any member/s of the public would like to make representations as to whether a part of the meeting is closed to the public

·        if a member/s of the public wish to make representations, the Chairperson invites them to speak before the Committee makes its decision on whether to close the part of the meeting or not to the public.

·        if no member/s of the public wish to make representations the Chairperson can then put the motion to close the meeting to the public.

The first action is for a motion to be moved and seconded based on the recommendation below.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That:

 

Leadership and Organisation

 

2        Personnel Matter - Workforce Issue

This item has been referred to Confidential Business as the report refers to personnel matters concerning particular individuals and discussion of the matter in open meeting would be, on balance, contrary to the public interest.

 

 

 


 

ATTACHMENTS   

 

 

Date of Meeting:          Monday 20 August 2007

Master Program:          The City as an Economy

Issue:                            Partnering for Economic Growth

Report Title:                City and Town Centre Associations - Business Plans and funding request for the 2007-08 financial year

Attachments:                Penrith City Centre Association Draft Business Plan 2007-08

                                      St Marys Town Centre Business Plan 2007-08



Policy Review Committee Meeting

20 August 2007

Attachment 1 - Penrith City Centre Association Draft Business Plan 2007-08

 

 

 














Policy Review Committee Meeting

20 August 2007

Attachment 2 - St Marys Town Centre Business Plan 2007-08

 

 

 












 

ATTACHMENTS   

 

 

Date of Meeting:          Monday 20 August 2007

Master Program:          The City as an Economy

Issue:                            Partnering for Economic Growth

Report Title:                Penrith Valley Economic Development Corporation 2007-08 Business Plan

Attachments:                PVEDC report to Council

                                      PVEDC Budget 2007-2008

                                      PVEDC Budget and actual 2006-2007

                                      PVEDC project proposals

                                      Business organisational assistance



Policy Review Committee Meeting

20 August 2007

Attachment 1 - PVEDC report to Council

 

 

 






Policy Review Committee Meeting

20 August 2007

Attachment 2 - PVEDC Budget 2007-2008

 

 

 


Policy Review Committee Meeting

20 August 2007

Attachment 3 - PVEDC Budget and actual 2006-2007

 

 

 


Policy Review Committee Meeting

20 August 2007

Attachment 4 - PVEDC project proposals

 

 

 




Policy Review Committee Meeting

20 August 2007

Attachment 5 - Business organisational assistance

 

 

 



 

ATTACHMENTS   

 

 

Date of Meeting:          Monday 20 August 2007

Master Program:          Leadership and Organisation

Issue:                            Governance

Report Title:                Draft Policy on the Payment of Expenses and Provision of Facilities to the Mayor, Deputy Mayor and Councillors

Attachments:                Draft Policy on the Payment of Expenses and Provision of Facilities to the Mayor, Deputy Mayor and Councillors



Policy Review Committee Meeting

20 August 2007

Attachment 1 - Draft Policy on the Payment of Expenses and Provision of Facilities to the Mayor, Deputy Mayor and Councillors

 

 

 



















 

ATTACHMENTS   

 

 

Date of Meeting:          Monday 20 August 2007

Master Program:          Leadership and Organisation

Issue:                            Program Selection and Delivery

Report Title:                Service Specification Program

Attachments:                Executive Summary - Corporate Governance Service

                                      Executive Summary - Neighbourhood Renewal Service

                                      Executive Summary - Project Management Service

                                      Executive Summary - Catchment Management Service



Policy Review Committee Meeting

20 August 2007

Attachment 1 - Executive Summary - Corporate Governance Service

 

 

 

 

Attachment 1 - Executive Summary ~ Corporate Governance Service

 

Summary of the Corporate Governance Service Specification

1. Service Description

 

The Corporate Governance Service provides the organisation with processes and systems that ensure that the governance standards both internal and from external sources are met and complied with and that those processes and systems are best practice.

 

 

Issues

Term Achievements

Critical Actions

2. Link to Strategic Program

Issue 30

Governance

TA 30.1 - Council has implemented leading practice ethical and corporate governance standards

CA 30.1A - Review and apply leading practice ethical and corporate governance standards

TA 30.2 - Council has reviewed its own role and operations and has adopted contemporary practices to best discharge its charter

CA 30.2A - Review current structures and procedures supporting Council and Councillors’ responsibilities

TA 30.3 - A contemporary system of risk management and internal control is operating

CA 30.3A - Develop and implement an internal audit program that reviews the effectiveness of Council’s risk management, compliance and internal control systems.

TA 30.4 - The organisation is managing its statutory requirements and the needs of a participatory community in a transparent and balance way

CA 30.4A - Review and monitor policies and procedures to enable the organisation to engage more effectively with the community while meeting its statutory and public interest obligations

3. Service Objectives

The service provider is to lead the organisation in ensuring that:

·      Council has implemented leading practice ethical and corporate governance standards

·      Council has reviewed its own role and operations and has adopted contemporary practices to best discharge its charter

·      Contemporary risk management and internal control systems support Corporate Governance.

·      The organisation is managing its statutory requirements and the needs of a participatory community in a transparent and balanced way

·      The culture is ethical, does not tolerate corruption and promotes effectiveness and efficient practices by providing a range of support services to the General Manager, Councillors and staff in the provision of advice in relation to governance issues.

·      The organisation continues to develop, advocate, inform and provide training for Elected Representatives and Council staff in a range of policy practices and procedures that when taken as a whole, represent best practice governance.

 

4. Scope of Work

 

Corporate Governance

§ Council maintains compliance with the legislative requirements of contemporary practice and procedure, with all issues resolved to the satisfaction of relevant Council staff and the General Manager. Council undertakes the relevant reporting in this area in the order of 5-6 reports a year.

§ A comprehensive training program is in place to maintain staff training for Code of Conduct, Ethics and Probity with all staff trained.

§ The Business Continuity Plan was tested in 2006 and found to be effective.

 

Public Access

§ Approximately 50 requests for Council information processed annually in compliance with the Freedom of Information (FOI) Act.

 

5.  Key Performance Indicators (KPI’s)

Key Performance Indicators

2007/08 Target

Number of breaches identified in relation to Council's compliance with the legislative requirements of external bodies (ie: The Ombudsman, Independent Commission Against Corruption, Department of Local Government) (Nil Breaches)

Nil

Number of complaints received regarding access to Council information compliant with FOI legislation. (Less than 3 – 5 complaints per year)

Nil

% Customer satisfaction regarding the resolution of complaints received regarding access to Council information compliant with FOI legislation.

100%

% of staff who have received training on the Code of Conduct, Ethics and Probity within program timeframes

100%

% effectiveness of the current Business Continuity Plan, (BCP) maintained, being both current and effective. (BCP effectiveness  tested every two years)

100%

 


 

6. Service Funding

 

The annual budget for the Corporate Governance Service is $204,416 per annum. This amount includes all operating costs and does not include capital costs unless otherwise noted.

Service

2007-08 Allocation

Compliance and Advocacy

$   85,949

Public Access (FOI)

$     6,737

Internal Audit

$  111,730

Net Cost of Service

$ 204,416

 

7. Service Summary Chart

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Policy Review Committee Meeting

20 August 2007

Attachment 2 - Executive Summary - Neighbourhood Renewal Service

 

 

 

Attachment 2 - Executive Summary - Neighbourhood Renewal Service

 

Summary of the Neighbourhood Renewal Service Specification

1. Service Description

 

The Neighbourhood Renewal service supports increased levels of service provision from Council as well as enhancing coordination of partner organisations and is focused on established areas within the Penrith LGA, particularly those areas that are considered relatively disadvantaged.

 

The Neighbourhood Renewal Service is an initiative within the Asset Renewal and Established Areas Strategy (AREAS) special rates initiative.

 

The Established Areas Strategy (EAS) component is provided within The Neighbourhood Renewal service specification and includes the following elements:

 

·     Neighbourhood Renewal Coordination

·     Cultural Development

·     Community Engagement

 

The Asset Renewal components of the AREAS strategy are focused on increased investment in infrastructure renewal and public domain maintenance and programs addressing the needs of the City’s older areas. Other service specifications incorporate program elements as appropriate including:

 

·     Public Domain Maintenance

·     Graffiti Management and Removal

·     Local Employment and Enterprise Programs

·     Urban Design Enhancement

 

 

The Neighbourhood Renewal Service will enhance, expand and build on the success of the other elements of the AREAS program to ensure delivery in areas of most need within the LGA.

 

 

Issue

Term Achievement

Critical Action

2. Links to Strategic Program

Issue 7:

Community Well Being and Social Justice

TA 7.1- Effective responses are made to the social impacts of growth, redevelopment and change.

CA 7.1A – Assess the social impacts of urban change in both new release and established areas and develop planned responses.

CA 7.1B Lead social planning partnerships with others to effectively respond to the social needs of the City’s diverse communities.

TA 7.2 – Strategies are in place to respond to the social and health needs of the community.

CA 7.2B Implement social planning, health planning and Neighbourhood Renewal  strategies through the Social Planning Framework.

CA 7.2C Support community organisations and programs to meet identified community needs.

CA 7.2D Address the differing needs and preferences of the various age groups through Council’s policy responses, programs and advocacy.

TA 7.3 – Council continues to offer leadership in developing a better understanding of and cooperation with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations and people.

CA 7.3A Undertake joint initiatives with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations and people to increase understanding and cooperation.

TA 7.4 – Access has increased for communities that face barriers to using social services and facilities.

CA 7.4A Support and encourage fairness of access to Council and other social facilities and services.

CA 7.4B Coordinate and implement strategies across all areas of Council’s responsibility to improve access for people with a disability.

Issue 8:

Cultural Development

TA 8.1 - The City is widely recognised as a centre of cultural diversity, excellence and access.

CA 8.1A - Integrate and implement the strategies of the City-wide cultural planning framework.

CA 8.1B -Build on and develop partnerships and projects with cultural organisations and connect where appropriate with the cultural plans and cultural development of other Councils and WSROC, to enhance the cultural vitality of the City.

Issue 12:

Magnetic Places

TA 12.2 - Local centres, community meeting places and prominent meeting places are increasingly valued and recognised by communities as a focus of their neighbourhoods, or as a feature of the City.

CA 12.2A - Engage the City’s communities in identifying and creating community places that are valued and used.

Issue 13:

Established Neighbourhoods

TA 13.1 - A program of renewal for selected neighbourhoods that contributes to a sense of community identity and cohesiveness is being implemented

CA 13.1A - Develop a policy framework that delivers an agreed set of priorities for implementing Neighbourhood Renewal

CA 13.2 - Implement strategies for the delivery of facilities, services and infrastructure

Issue 14:

Managing Redevelopment

TA 14.2 - Redevelopment of existing areas contributes to safe, sustainable, affordable and satisfying living environments and cohesive communities.

CA 14.2B - Formulate and implement social and cultural strategies for redeveloping established areas that support cohesive communities.

3. Service Objectives

 

The overall aim of this initiative is to raise, where appropriate, the delivery of services, facilities and infrastructure for residents in established areas to a level commensurate with Penrith’s status of a regional city. Specifically the Neighbourhood Renewal service will:

 

·     Provide enhanced coordination of the delivery of Council services to address equity issues in disadvantaged communities.

·     Work with residents to create and revitalise places and spaces to reflect their local identity, making public spaces more appealing for use by a broad range of community members.

·     Increase civic engagement and participation of residents at a local level, informing Council of issues and solutions identified by communities.

·     Assess the social impacts of urban change in established areas and develop planned responses.

·     Lead social planning partnerships with others to effectively respond to the social needs of the City’s diverse communities.

·     Implement social planning, health planning and Neighbourhood Renewal  strategies through the Social Planning Framework.

 

4. Scope of Work

Neighbourhood Renewal Coordination     

To increase the capacity of the Neighbourhood Renewal Program to identify and address equity issues in disadvantaged communities, adding new areas and partnerships and enhancing coordination of Council services

Cultural Development

To work with residents to create and revitalise places and spaces to reflect their local identity, making public spaces more appealing

Community Engagement

To consult with the community at a local level, increasing civic engagement and participation, informing Council of issues and solutions identified by communities.

Current key projects:

§ 11 geographical areas identified and researched

§ 2 consultancy projects managed

§ 6 Micro Projects across 3 geographical areas

§ Establishment and recruitment of 3 new positions

§ 2 significant community engagement activities undertaken

§ Contribution to 1 master plan

§ Up to 15 presentations to community meetings

 

 

Key Performance Indicators

Target 2007-2008

5. Key Performance Indicators (KPI’s)

Community participants satisfied with the implementation of their Neighbourhood Action Plan.

100%

Number of Neighbourhood Action Plans delivered each year.

3

 

 

6.      Service Funding

 

The annual budget for the Neighbourhood Renewal service is $ 346,348 for 2007-2008.  This amount includes all operating costs.  This amount does not include capital costs unless otherwise noted.

Service

2007-2008 Allocation

Employee costs*

$  230,636

Operational costs

$  115,712

Net Cost of the Neighbourhood Renewal Service

$346,348

 

Components

2007-2008 Allocation

Cultural Development

$    97,475

Neighbourhood Renewal Coordination

$  135,843

Community Engagement

$  113,030

Net Cost of the Neighbourhood Renewal Service

$346,348

* Employee and Operational costs are projected at this time, 3 FTE are planned.

 

 

7.   Service Summary Chart

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting

20 August 2007

Attachment 3 - Executive Summary - Project Management Service

 

 

 

Attachment 3 – Executive Summary – Project Management Service

 

 


Summary of the Project Management Service Specification

 

1. Service Description

The Catchment Management (Floodplain and Drainage) Service works to reduce flood impacts in the Hawkesbury / Nepean River catchment area.

Identifying Floodplain Management and Drainage issues and with its government partners develops strategies, to respond to these issues, according to Council’s and Government guidelines and plans.

Note: These projects are from Council’s capital works program, Section 94 projects and may include developer constructed projects.

 

2. Link to Strategic Program

The Project Management Service contributes to Council’s Strategic Plan “2005-2009” Competitive Edge” and Management Plan by delivering selected major Council building and/or civil work projects.

 

3. Service Objectives

Provide to the satisfaction of Council and the internal clients, professional project management for the delivery of nominated building and/or civil works identified with Council’s capital works program.

Professionally manage building and/or civil work projects which meet the set quality and specification requirements.

 

4. Scope of Work

Service projects have included:

-     Continuation of the Lenore Drive project (Project value $12 M)

-     Completion of the Penrith Plaza roadworks and stormwater project       (Project value $3.5 M)

Design and Approval Coordination

-     Continuation of the Lambridge Estate roadworks and drainage project   (Project value $5M)

-     Continuation of works associated with the Erskine Park   Road/Mamre Road intersection (Project value $3.5 M)

Client Control

-     Tamara Childcare Centre Refurbishment (Project value $1 M)

-     Erskine Park Childcare Centre Refurbishment (Project value $0.6 M)

Project Coordination

-     Penrith Valley Precinct Development & Refurbishment     (Project value $6 M)

-     Glenmore Park Eastern Hamlets project (Project value $5 M)

 

 

5. Key
Performance Indicators (KPI’s)

Key Performance Indicator

2005-06
Actuals

2007-08
Targets

% of projects on budget

95%

100%

% of projects on time

95%

100%

% of projects that comply with project briefs, codes and standards

90%

100%

 

 

 

 

6       Service Funding

 

The 2007-2008 budget for the Project Management Service is $122,634, as shown in the table below. The value of the projects to be constructed is an additional budget component that will vary each year the due to the size and nature of projects undertaken.

 

Service Components

2007-2008 Budget

Salaries

$108,479

Plant

$10,635

Materials

$3,520

Net Cost of Service

$ 122,634

In 2007-2008 a cost recovery component of the service will be introduced to recover $100,000 or 2% of the value of the projects constructed.

 

7.      Service Summary Chart

 

 

Project

Management

Service

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1. Project

Planning

 

 

2. Project Brief

Development

 

 

3. Site Assessment and Evaluation

Co-ordination

 

 

4. Design and Documentation Co-ordination

 

 

5. Construction

and Budget Administration

 

 

6. Project Completion Management

 

1.1.Review Client’s Project Requirements

1.2 Reports to Project Review Group, as required

1.3.Input to Project Requirements by other relevant sections of Council

1.4.Develop and obtain agreement of Project Program

 

 

 

 

2.1.Scope of Project

2.2.Project Brief Preparation

2.3.Project Brief Approval

 

 

3.1.Assist in Site Selection

3.2.Prepare Site Usage Schedule

3.3.Co-ordinate Survey of Services and Geotech Reports

3.4.Co-ordinate and develop Siting Option(s) and Cost Comparisons

3.5.Provide Site Report

 

 

 

4.1.Engage Council’s Design Section and/or design consultant(s)

4.2.Arrange Schematic/ Preliminary Design

4.3.Co-ordinate Detailed Design

4.4.Review Detailed Design, prepare documentation for D.A. submission and obtain approval

4.5.Prepare Tender Documentation incorporating the Design Detail

 

 

5.1 Professional advice and input into the tender process

5.2 Tender Evaluation Process

5.3 Regularly report progress to Project Review Group/ Client

5.4.Project Construction Supervision

5.5  Project Finalisation

 

 

6.1Manage Practical Completion Stage of Project – Asset handover and review

6.2.Manage Defects   Liability Period

 

 

 

 


Policy Review Committee Meeting

20 August 2007

Attachment 4 - Executive Summary - Catchment Management Service

 

 

 

Attachment 4 - Executive Summary – Catchment Management Service

 

Summary of the Catchment Management Service Specification

 

1. Service Description

 

The Catchment Management (Floodplain and Drainage) Service works to reduce flood impacts in the Hawkesbury / Nepean River catchment area.

Identifying Floodplain Management and Drainage issues and with its government partners develops strategies, to respond to these issues, according to Council’s and Government guidelines and plans.

 

Activities include:  Regional flood studies, stormwater drainage catchment analyses and overland flood flow studies and the development of mitigation options to reduce flood impacts upon existing residential, commercial, industrial and rural areas. Provision of advice and sustainable design options and landuse management plans for future areas of development within the Penrith LGA.

 

The service extends to the design of the Council’s major stormwater drainage structures and provides a flood and drainage advisory service to both internal and external clients.

 

This service excludes the design and investigation of small drainage pipelines, supervision of stormwater drainage construction and maintenance work, as well as the water quality of the stormwater as these issues are the responsibility of other service units and are covered by other Service Specifications.

 

 

 

Issue

Term Achievement

Critical Action

 

2. Links to Strategic Program

Issue 18:

Built Environment

T.A. 18.3 A floodplain management policy to protect the built environment is being implemented by Council consistent with Government guidelines

C.A. 18.3A Council’s Floodplain Management Policy is contemporary and is being implemented

 

3. Service Objectives

 

Develop and implement a floodplain management policy to protect the existing built environment as well as the future developing areas of Councils’ area.

 

Maintain a floodplain management policy that is consistent with Government guidelines.

 

Strategic analysis of Council’s existing stormwater drainage system identifying flood mitigation options.

 

Maximise grant funding for flood studies and other relevant drainage related investigation projects.

 

Maintain contemporary Floodplain and Drainage data.

 

 

4. Scope of Work

 

§ Flood Studies

§ Currently reviewing Main Stream flood models including:

o  Nepean River

o  South Creek

o  Ropes Creek

§ Completed LGA overland flow studies

§ Catchment Analysis

§ Overland Flow Studies

o  Citywide overview study completed.

o  Five Urban catchment studies per year – subject to funding.

§ Design Major Drainage Structures

§ Design Briefs, 2 major drainage structural designs prepared:

o  Caddens Road

o  Erskine Park Road

§ Policy Development

·      Approx 20 Urban Design meetings attended per year.

§ Flood and Drainage assessments

o  20 to 30  DA referrals per year.

o  New Release area Flood Drainage assessments approx 5 per year

 

 

 

 

Key Performance Indicators

Actual 2006-2007

Target 2007-2008

5. Key Performance Indicators (KPI’s)

Satisfaction rating of provision of urban and rural planning (medium to high satisfaction)

From Citywide Customer Survey.

 

72%

100%

 

 

% of new assets designed and constructed following the principles of ecologically sustainable design.

 

100%

100%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6.      Service Funding

 

The 2007-2008 budget for the Catchment Management (Floodplain & Drainage) Service allocation is $375,622, this amount includes all operating costs and does not include capital costs unless otherwise stated.

 

 

Service Components

 

2007– 2008 Budget

Salaries

$  315,628

Vehicles

$      9,994

Contract~ Catchment Management Floodplain Drainage Project (DT03400)

$  150,000

Subtotal

$475,622

Less Income (Grant funds for Projects)

($100,000)

Net Service Cost

$ 375,622

 

 

7.   Service Summary Chart