13 February 2008

 

Dear Councillor,

In pursuance of the provisions of the Local Government Act, 1993 and the Regulations thereunder, notice is hereby given that a POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING of Penrith City Council is to be held in the Passadena Room, Civic Centre, 601 High Street, Penrith on Monday 18 February 2008 at 7:30PM.

Attention is directed to the statement accompanying this notice of the business proposed to be transacted at the meeting.

Yours Faithfully

 

 

Alan Travers

General Manager

 

BUSINESS

 

1.           APOLOGIES

 

2.           LEAVE OF ABSENCE

Councillor David Bradbury has requested Leave of Absence for the period 18 to 22 February 2008 inclusive.

 

3.           CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES

Policy Review Committee Meeting - 10 December 2007.

 

4.           DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

Pecuniary Interest (The Act requires Councillors who declare a pecuniary interest in an item to leave the meeting during discussion of that item)

Non-Pecuniary Interest

 

5.           ADDRESSING THE MEETING

 

6.           MAYORAL MINUTES

 

7.           NOTICES OF MOTION

 

8.           ADOPTION OF REPORTS AND RECOMMENDATION OF COMMITTEES

 

9.           MASTER PROGRAM REPORTS

 

10.         URGENT REPORTS (to be dealt with in the master program to which the item relates)

 

11.         QUESTIONS WITHOUT NOTICE

 

12.         COMMITTEE OF THE WHOLE


POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING

 

Monday 18 February 2008

 

table of contents

 

 

 

 

 

 

meeting calendar

 

 

confirmation of minutes

 

 

master program reports

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MEETING CALENDAR

February 2008 - December 2008

 

 

TIME

FEB

MAR

APRIL

MAY

JUNE

JULY

AUG

SEPT

OCT

NOV

DEC

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Ordinary Meetings

7.30 pm

4

10

7

5v

2

14

4

1ü

13^

10

1

25

 

21

 

23*

 

 

22

20

 

15

Policy Review Committee

7.30 pm

18#+

3

28

19#

16

7

18#+

15@

 

17#

8

 

31@

 

 

 

28

 

 

 

 

 

 

#    Meetings at which the Management Plan ¼ly  reviews are presented.

^     Election of Mayor/Deputy Mayor [only business]

#+  General Manager’s presentation – half year and end of year review

@   Strategic Program progress reports [only business]

v   Meeting at which the Draft Management Plan is adopted for exhibition

ü    Meeting at which the 2007/2008 Annual Statements are presented

*     Meeting at which the Management Plan for 2008/2009 is adopted

 

 

-                 Council’s Ordinary Meetings are held on a three-week cycle where practicable.

-                 Extraordinary Meetings are held as required.

-                 Policy Review Meetings are held on a three-week cycle where practicable.

-                 Members of the public are invited to observe meetings of the Council (Ordinary and Policy Review Committee).  All meetings start at 7:30pm.

-                 Should you wish to address Council, please contact the Public Officer, Glenn McCarthy on 47327649

 

 


UNCONFIRMED MINUTES

 OF THE POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING OF PENRITH CITY COUNCIL HELD IN THE PASSADENA ROOM, PENRITH

ON MONDAY 10 DECEMBER 2007 AT 7:37PM

PRESENT

His Worship the Mayor Councillor Greg Davies, Councillors Jim Aitken OAM (arrived 7:40pm), Kaylene Allison, Lexie Cettolin (arrived 7:40pm), Kevin Crameri OAM, Ross Fowler, Jackie Greenow, Garry Rumble, Pat Sheehy AM, Steve Simat (arrived 7:49pm) and John Thain.

 

APOLOGIES

PRC 129  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Jackie Greenow seconded Councillor Garry Rumble that apologies be received and accepted from Councillors David Bradbury, Mark Davies, Steve Simat, Lexie Cettolin and Jim Aitken OAM.

 

LEAVE OF ABSENCE

Leave of Absence was previously granted to Councillor Karen McKeown for the period 10 December 2007 to 11 December 2007 inclusive.

Leave of Absence was previously granted to Councillor Susan Page for the period 5 November 2007 to 17 December 2007 inclusive.

Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM left the meeting, the time being 7:38pm.

Councillor Kevin Crameri returned to the meeting the time being 7:40pm.

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES - Policy Review Committee Meeting - 19 November 2007

PRC 130  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Ross Fowler seconded Councillor Pat Sheehy AM that the minutes of the Policy Review Committee Meeting of 19 November 2007 be confirmed.

 

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

There were no declarations of interest.

 

MASTER PROGRAM REPORTS

 

The City in its Broader Context

 

Councillor Jim Aitken OAM arrived, the time being 7:40pm.

Councillor Lexie Cettolin arrived, the time being 7:40pm.

1        Proposed draft Penrith Local Environmental Plan 2008 (Stage 1A) - Land in the vicinity of Great Western Highway and Gipps Street, Claremont Meadows                                             

PRC 131  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Ross Fowler seconded Councillor Kaylene Allison

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Proposed draft Penrith Local Environmental Plan 2008 (Stage 1A) - Land in the vicinity of Great Western Highway and Gipps Street, Claremont Meadows be received

2.     Pursuant to section 54 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979, and Regulations 2000, Council prepare a draft Local Environmental Plan to rezone the land within the South Creek Corridor, Werrington and Gipps Street, Claremont Meadows.

3.     The applicants are requested to provide the information identified in this report, including a draft Development Control Plan, and information that reflects the intent of the 1997 ‘Best Practice Guidelines’ for the preparation of Local Environmental Plans.

4.     Councillors be briefed on the progress of the proposals, and comments from the public agencies, in early 2008, to enable consideration of the issues prior to advancing the preparation of the draft Local Environmental Plan.

 

2        Required Amendments to draft Penrith Local Environmental Plan 2008 (Stage 1)        

PRC 132  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Ross Fowler seconded Councillor Kaylene Allison

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Required Amendments to draft Penrith Local Environmental Plan 2008 (Stage 1) be received

2.     Council endorse the changes to draft Penrith Local Environmental Plan 2008 (Stage 1) as outlined in this report, and support continuation of the dialogue, regarding any further changes to the draft LEP, between Council officers and the Department of Planning.

 

The City as a Social Place

 

Councillor Jim Aitken OAM left the meeting, the time being 7:41pm.

 

3        Penrith City District Open Space Facilities Development Contributions Plan               

PRC 133  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Pat Sheehy AM seconded Councillor Garry Rumble

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Penrith City District Open Space Facilities Development Contributions Plan be received

2.     Council adopt the draft District Open Space Facilities Development Contributions Plan

3.     A further report be submitted to Council on the implications of the new Department of Planning circular on infrastructure contributions.

 

5        Glenmore Park Stage 1 Development Contributions Plan Review                                 

PRC 134  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Pat Sheehy AM seconded Councillor Garry Rumble

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Glenmore Park Stage 1 Development Contributions Plan Review be received

2.     Council publicly exhibit an amended draft Glenmore Park Stage 1 Development Contributions Plan incorporating allocation of available funds to the Eastern Hamlets Child and Family Precinct project as outlined in the report

3.     A further report be brought back to Council following the exhibition period.

 

7        Deferred Lands Local Environmental Plan No.188 - Glenmore Park                             

PRC 135  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Pat Sheehy AM seconded Councillor Garry Rumble

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Deferred Lands Local Environmental Plan No.188 - Glenmore Park be received

2.     That Council forward a Section 68 submission to the Department of Planning requesting the deferred lands in Glenmore Park Stage 1 release under LEP 188 be zoned 2 (Urban).

 

Councillor Jim Aitken OAM returned to the meeting, the time being 7:42pm.

 

4        Implementation of the Smoke Free Outdoor Areas Policy                                              

PRC 136  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Garry Rumble seconded Councillor Jim Aitken OAM

That

1.            The information contained in the report on Implementation of the Smoke Free Outdoor Areas Policy  be received

2.            Both playgrounds in Tench Reserve be included under the policy and officers in the Environmental Health Department determine where the signs are to be placed in the playgrounds that are covered by the policy.

 

6        Waterside Estate - Request to vary landscaped open space requirements                    

PRC 137  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM seconded Councillor Ross Fowler

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Waterside Estate - Request to vary landscaped open space requirements be received

2.     Council progress amendment of the landscaped open space requirements for single storey dwellings in Waterside via Penrith Development Control Plan 2008, as outlined in the report

3.     Council advise Stockland that pending incorporation of the amended landscaped open space requirements within Penrith Development Control Plan 2008, Council will support proposals to vary the landscaped open space requirement when considering development applications for single storey dwellings.

 

8        Affordable Housing                                                                                                            

PRC 138  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Ross Fowler seconded Councillor Pat Sheehy AM

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Affordable Housing be received

2.     Council endorse the partnership with the NSW Centre for Affordable Housing to progress affordable rental housing outcomes as outlined in this report

3.     Council endorse the additional clause to the Affordable Housing section of the Sustainability Blueprint as outlined in this report

4.     Council Officers be congratulated for the clarity of the report.

 

The City In Its Environment

 

9        South Creek Corridor Precinct Plan and the Gipps St site Master Plan                         

PRC 139  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Pat Sheehy AM seconded Councillor Kaylene Allison

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on South Creek Corridor Precinct Plan and the Gipps St site Master Plan be received

2.     Council adopt the South Creek Corridor Precinct Plan and the Gipps St site Master Plan.

 

The City Supported by Infrastructure

 

Councillor Steve Simat arrived, the time being 7:49pm.

 

10      Penrith Fire District Boundaries                                                                                        

PRC 140  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Ross Fowler seconded Councillor Kevin Crameri

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Penrith Fire District Boundaries be received

2.     The Waste & Community Protection Manager writes to both the NSW Fire Brigades and NSW Rural Fire Service advising that Council has no objections to the proposed changes, as identified on Map 086/07/1, to the Penrith Fire District

3.     A further report be provided to Council clarifying the Fire District Boundary surrounding the Penrith Whitewater Stadium area

4.     A further report be provided to Council on the progress of the Dunheved Fire Station relocation.

 

Leadership and Organisation

 

13      Preparations and Financial Settings for the 2008-2009 Management Plan                    

PRC 141  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Garry Rumble seconded Councillor Steve Simat

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Preparations and Financial Settings for the 2008-2009 Management Plan be received

2.     Council make initial identification of particular matters to be considered in the preparation of the Draft 2008-2009 Management Plan

3.     Preparation of the Draft 2008-2009 Management Plan continue in the terms discussed in this report.

 

11      Proposed Policy on 'Advertising on Council Premises'                                                    

PRC 142  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Pat Sheehy AM seconded Councillor Ross Fowler

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on the proposed policy relating to ‘Advertising on Council Premises’ be received

2.     The draft policy be supported in principle and a further report be submitted to a future Policy Review Committee meeting to allow the draft policy to be amended to make it clear that parks and road reserves are excluded from the policy.

 

12      Strategic Plan Preparations and Community Engagement                                               

PRC 143  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor John Thain seconded Councillor Garry Rumble

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Strategic Plan Preparations and Community Engagement be received

2.     Preparation of the Strategic Plan and the proposed arrangements continue in the terms discussed in this report

3.     Further reports be provided to Council at each appropriate stage of the Strategic Plan preparations

4.     A further report be provided to Council on the development of enhanced community engagement approaches outlined in the report.

 

There being no further business the Chairperson declared the meeting closed the time being 8:04pm.

    



 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

 

Leadership and Organisation

 

1        2007-2008 Management Plan - December Quarter Review

  

The City as a Social Place

 

2        Penrith Performing and Visual Arts Ltd - Annual Report and Board of Directors

 

3        Memorandum of Understanding with Sydney West Area Health 

 

4        Modification, Extension or issue of Operational Consents for Deferred Commencement Determinations of Development Consents that were determined by the Ordinary Council Meeting

 

The City In Its Environment

 

5        Biodiversity Action Plan

   

Leadership and Organisation

 

6        Proposed Policy on 'Advertising on Council Premises'

 

7        2008 Local Government Remuneration Tribunal Review

 

 


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


Leadership and Organisation

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

1        2007-2008 Management Plan - December Quarter Review

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting

18 February 2008

Leadership and Organisation

 

 

Leadership and Organisation

 

 

1

2007-2008 Management Plan - December Quarter Review   

 

Compiled by:                Ken Lim, Management Planning Co-ordinator

Vicki O’Kelly, Financial Services Manager

Authorised by:             Alan Travers, General Manager

Barry Husking, Chief Financial Officer   

Strategic Program Term Achievement: Council's operating culture is flexible, efficient, integrated and aligned to Council's strategic objectives and program delivery.

Critical Action: Prepare, implement and review management plans and processes aligned to and consistent with Council’s Strategic Plan and Program.

 

Presenters:                   Alan Travers, General Manager; Barry Husking, Chief Financial Officer - Penrith City Council - 2007-08 Management Plan December Review    

Purpose:

To present the December Quarter progress report on Council's 2007-2008 Management Plan. The report recommends that the review be adopted, including revised estimates and expenditures as detailed within the report.

 

Background

In accordance with the Local Government Act 1993, the Management Plan Progress Report for the period ending 31 December 2007 is presented tonight for Council’s consideration.

 

This is the second quarterly review of Council’s 2007-2008 Management Plan, which is the third year of Council’s Strategic Plan for the City of Penrith 2005-2009, Penrith City: the Competitive Edge.

 

Managers have provided details of progress in accordance with their assigned accountabilities. This includes delivery of the ongoing requirements of services, progress of annual tasks and projects and performance against budget. Commentary has also been provided on key achievements for the year to date, as well as issues arising that have impacted on the delivery of the annual program.

 

The General Manager’s report in the document includes comments on key results and issues arising over the first half of the year and indicates the focus of organisational efforts for the remainder of 2007-08.

 

The Financial Services Manager’s report is also contained within the review document, and includes information on budget performance, significant issues and proposed variances.

 

 

 

Financial Position

The cumulative result for the year is essentially a balanced budget. There is a small surplus of $25,000 after allowing for a number of recommended variations and revotes.  These together with minor variations and reallocations, are discussed in detail in the Financial Services Manager’s report in the summary review document.  Commentary is provided below on the more significant issues in the review.

 

Original Surplus

$15,200

 

 

 

1st Quarter Council approved variations:

$49,700

 

 

 

December  Review variations  

($39,900)

 

 

 

Revised Surplus

$25,000

 

The more significant variations (F – favourable, U- unfavourable) for the quarter include:

                                                                                                               $’000

Salary Saving (0.75% of total employee budget)

460.0

F

Review of Bonds and Deposits

44.0

F

Contribution to NSW Fire Brigade (3.3% saving)

35.1

F

Adjustment to funding S94 Reserve

(395.6)

U

Children’s Services Co-operative

   (220.0)

U

Other minor variations 

36.6

U

 

Salary Savings

A total of $237,600 of salary savings was identified in the September quarter and this was transferred to the Employee Leave Entitlements Reserve in anticipation of the impact that the expected resignations of a number of long serving staff will have on the Reserve.  The reserve balance and the impact of employee movements continue to be monitored closely.  It is expected that the planned transfers in the 2008-09 and 2009-10 Management Plans will provide funding in the Reserve in line with adopted parameters.  Therefore it is recommended that the salary savings of $460,000 (0.75% of the total original budgeted employee costs) identified in the December review are taken to the bottom line. These savings have eventuated due to vacancies across a number of departments. Most vacant positions are in the process of being filled.  Some other identified salary savings are recommended to be retained in the individual departments to enable the engagement of consultants or temporary staff to ensure delivery of some key Management Plan tasks and projects.

Review of Bonds and Deposits

The annual review of the monies held in trust as bonds or deposits has identified amounts totalling $43,841 that can now be recognised as income.

Contribution to NSW Fire Brigade $35,160 F (3.3%)

Advice of Council’s contribution for 2007-08 has been received and is $35,160 less than the original estimate. The calculation is based on a 5 year moving average of the value of the rateable land of individual councils and is impacted by changes in land values across all councils and also the valuation cycle.

Transfer to/from s94 Reserves

Recent analysis of s94 plans has highlighted an over-funding of debt servicing for the loan in relation to the s94 Cultural Facilities Plan in both 2006-07 ($208,030) and 2007-08 ($207,873).  The incorrect treatment of the debt servicing has resulted in more monies transferred from the s94 plan than was correct.  This Reserve has now been adjusted to reflect the correct balance available.

 

In addition, this analysis also identified that the Recreation Strategy ($20,279) previously funded by general revenue should more appropriately have been funded from s94 and as such this reserve balance has also been adjusted in the Review.

Penrith City Children’s Services Co-operative

As mentioned in the September Quarterly review report, a request from the Board of the Penrith City Children’s Services Co-operative has been received for a contribution of $220,000.  This will redress the negative reserves for some centres that arose from losses for 2006-07 being offset against accumulated reserves.  This is in addition to the $69,000 allocated from general revenue in the 2006-07 Management Plan.  As previously reported disappointing utilisation levels particularly in Long Day Care and Pre schools led to a number of centres reporting a loss for the year.  The net result for the Co-operative’s operations for the year was a deficit of $413,000.  $193,000 of the losses was able to be funded from reserves centres had built up from a number of years’ profits.  The balance ($220,000) was also offset against the relevant reserve accounts however for these centres it resulted in a negative reserve balance.  It is recommended that a one-off allocation of $220,000 be made to restore the equity position for the affected centres.  It is expected that the 2007-08 result will be in line with budgeted projections and there will be no additional call on Council.

 

Revotes

There are five adjustments to planned capital works and one operating project proposed for adoption this quarter.

Penrith Valley Cultural Precinct ($1,000,000 Grant and Reserve funded)

The tender for construction work on St Marys Memorial Hall and Community Square was advertised on 11 December and assessment of the tenders is nearing completion.   A recommendation will be made to the Ordinary Meeting of 25 February to appoint a builder. The anticipated building schedule is commencement in mid to late March with a 6 month construction timeframe.

Londonderry Neighbourhood Centre Additions and Alterations ($450,000 Grant and Reserve funded)

Final documentation for the tender is nearing completion and the tender will be advertised in early March with a twenty week construction period once a tenderer has been selected by Council.

Civic Centre Extensions ($2,950,000 reserve funded)

Tenders for the construction of this project closed in December and a recommended builder will be reported to the Ordinary Meeting of 25 February 2008.  Works are expected to commence in March with completion by the end of December 2008.

Caddens Rd Upgrade ($450,000 - s94 funded) and Caddens Rd Culverts ($150,000 - s94 funded)

These projects experienced delays as there were protracted negotiations with Sydney Water to move two large water mains.  These negotiations are now complete and the works will commence in April.  It is anticipated that the re-location of the water mains will be completed in July and then the construction of the culverts and the road upgrade can commence. The anticipated completion date of the culverts and road upgrade is 4 months from commencement.

Penrith Football stadium ($2,000,000 Grant funded)

When the grant was received, the Working Party was in the process of determining how the oversight of the project and the transfer of the funding was to be handled.  As approved by Council at the Ordinary meeting on 15 October 2007, the grant funds will be transferred progressively to Penrith Rugby League Club upon completion of works, to be verified by an independent quantity surveyor.  The DA has been lodged (the exhibition period is 20 February to 5 March) and the project is scheduled for completion by October 2008 in time for the Rugby League World Cup.

Additional Item –recommended for funding

There is an urgent matter that has recently been identified as needing funding.  It is the provision of a shade structure at Emu Village Child Care Centre following removal of a hazardous tree which previously provided shade for the play area.  A quote of $27,300 has been obtained and investigations into other possible funding sources have not been successful.  It is recommended that this project be funded from the existing surplus and any additional savings identified over the next quarter.

Format of the Quarterly Review

The new reporting approach which was introduced in the September Quarter Review aims to provide greater clarity and accountability to Council and the public on the annual delivery of Council’s program through its approved services and their required goals. This reflects both the service specifications in a highly practical way and how the strategy for the City which Council has set is being delivered by the organisation.

 

The quarterly Management Plan report to Council and the community is now clearly based on performance of the specified services through which Council’s operations are conducted, together with the usual financial statements and other required information.

 

The Quarterly Review provides a comprehensive progress report on the performance of all Council’s external and internal services (with the exception of the three controlled entities which have separate reporting requirements).

 

Reporting is based on the delivery of the annual program of activities, tasks and projects which was adopted by Council for each service through the Management Plan. The report contains:

·    An ‘executive summary’ of the quarter’s progress with commentary provided by the General Manager and Financial Services Manager together with key results and identification of any service areas requiring greater focus

·    A report on the overall performance, key performance indicators and tasks deliverable for each service, together with a formal budget statement for that service

·    Capital and operating projects progress (similar to previous reports but now arranged to align with the services)

·    Detailed financial statements and summaries.

 

The new services performance report, which provides much of the basis of the review, details the progress of the ongoing and annual deliverables of that service, with the exception of the capital and operating projects which are fully reported elsewhere in the document.

 

It is important to note that the simple expenditure budget snapshot provided under services is supplemented for each service by a fully detailed budget which includes any proposed variations.

Performance Assessment

The review documents incorporate detailed reporting on the year to date performance of each of the services from several principal aspects. These form the basis of the Overall Performance assessment of that service for the year to date. To that is added a Budget Performance snapshot as explained above.

 

The normal expected overall service performance for the first half of the year is 50%. However, note that some services (such as in the Operations Directorate) are more dependent on the completion of particular projects or works programs, which will strongly influence the result. The model for service reporting is detailed in the review document.

 

The reportable elements of the Service from which its performance is assessed include:

·    Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for ongoing requirements of the Service

·    Strategic Tasks which link Services to Council’s four year Strategic Program

·    Service Improvements identified through means including ongoing Services Review

·    Capital and Operating Projects funded in the annual program

          (NB not all Services contain all of these elements)

 

In addition to the particular KPIs and annual targets which Council adopted in the Management Plan, additional measures have been added to ensure that all the important ongoing activities of service specifications are incorporated. These more generic KPIs for the service have a set target of 100% of ongoing requirements. This approach was initiated in the September review and has been further developed and refined with Managers.

 

All reporting is in terms of year to date progress to fulfil the annual requirements of Council’s program.  Where actions have a life of more than one year, the report is on the performance for 2007-08 only. Those tasks and projects scheduled to commence after the second quarter are listed in the report but are not included in the performance ratings.

Management Plan Performance

From the statements provided by the responsible Managers against the deliverables as explained above, the results for the quarter are as identified in the following table.

 

Table 1. Service Performance Summary ~ December Quarter

 

SERVICE PERFORMANCE SUMMARY

Completed

GREEN

AMBER

RED

Not Yet Due to Start

Totals

SERVICES OVERALL      (Service Profile)

 

62

-

-

-

62

Key Performance Indicators (KPIs)

 

202
(90%)

20
(9%)

2
(1%)

-

224

Strategic Tasks (ST)

-

82
(89%)

9
(10%)

1
(1%)

-

92

Service Improvements (SI)

-

42
(76%)

11
(20%)

1
(2%)

1
(2%)

55

Capital Projects

44
(22%)

122
(61%)

19
(9%)

13
(6%)

4
(2%)

202

Operating Projects

24

(20%)

94

(76%)

4

(3%)

1

(1%)

-

123

 

The progress of Council’s program is expressed through the use of percentages and ‘traffic light’ indicators. These are based on the responsible Manager’s statement of the delivery of the annual requirements for that item.

 

Council has, for a number of years, used a traffic light rating scale for reporting on the performance of Management Plan deliverables. This is supplemented in the new report format by an appropriate rating scale for the expenditure budget performance of services. This new budget scale is adapted from that used in the monthly Financial Health monitoring by the organisation. The rating scales are explained in the table below.

 

Table 2. Guidelines for ‘Traffic Light’ Status Indicators

*

[Green]

General Performance:  Progress for the Year To Date is on target for annual requirements/completion of the relevant action. Normally indicates completion of 90%+ of the scheduled requirements.

Budget Performance:   Expenditure for the Year To Date is under budget by <=15% or over budget by <=5%.

*

[Amber]

General Performance:  Progress is marginal and extra attention is needed. Normally indicates completion of 75%-89% of the scheduled requirements Year To Date.

Budget Performance:   Expenditure for the Year To Date is under budget by >15% or over budget by 6-15%.

[Red]

General Performance:  Progress is not on target and requirement may not be delivered. This should be addressed by the Manager’s commentary. Performance is normally rated as less than 75% of the scheduled requirements Year To Date.

Budget Performance:   Expenditure for the Year To Date is over budget by >=16%.

Text Box: C

Completed (usually applies to Capital & Operating Projects with defined target dates).

 

Proposed Amendments to Tasks

To deliver the annual requirements of the operational Management Plan, Council adopted as part of the service program a more detailed set of tasks and KPIs. It is normally the case that a quarterly review, with its comprehensive assessment of service performance, will identify a small number of proposed revisions to the detailed annual program. Any such proposals with a budget impact are directly addressed by the financial statements and commentary provided.

 

In the present review, a number of additions and amendments to the Strategic Tasks for 2007-08 are suggested, in order to update some annual requirements and reflect others more recently added by Council. Subject to Council’s endorsement, these changes will be incorporated in the Management Plan from 1 January and reflected in the next review. These proposed amendments are detailed in Appendix A to this report.

 

Further Service Improvements which are identified through ongoing review and alignment of services, or through the adoption of new policies or plans by Council, will continue to be brought forward for confirmation in subsequent reports.

Alignment of the Organisation

During the first quarter of the present year, Council received two reports from the General Manager on alignment of the organisation and endorsed a number of changes to accountabilities and service and departmental arrangements. As previously advised, those new arrangements were reflected in the September review as far as possible, however more settled information is included in the present report.

 

The most significant impact of these changes is in regard to the City Operations directorate. The new departments of City Works, Public Domain Amenity and Safety and Recreation, and the service responsibilities of the relevant Manager positions, are incorporated in the report.

 

A new approach being taken to the management of certain major projects, as discussed with Council in the organisational alignment reports, sees a number of projects (Penrith Valley Cultural Precinct, Londonderry Neighbourhood Centre, Penrith Football Stadium, Civic Centre Extensions) now being identified within the Project Management & Advice Service with delivery accountabilities assigned to the Design & Technical Advice Manager.

Special Initiatives

The 10-year special initiative, Asset Renewal and Established Areas (AREAS) Strategy, commenced on 1 July 2006. The AREAS funding from additional rate revenue approved by the Minister for Local Government, is for additional infrastructure renewal and public domain maintenance (which includes roads, buildings, graffiti removal and cleaning) as well as greater attention to the needs of our older neighbourhoods.

 

Council also continues to advance three 10-year special initiatives which commenced in 2002-2003, for which additional rate revenue was also approved by the Minister. These are:

·    Enhanced Environmental Program (EEP)

·    Community Safety and Neighbourhood Renewal Program

·    Economic Development and Tourism - support for Penrith Valley Economic Development Corporation (PVEDC)

 

As previously agreed by Council, specific reporting on the progress of each of these initiatives is presented to Council, the community and the Department of Local Government at six-monthly intervals, through the half-year and end-of-year Management Plan reviews and the Annual Report. In addition, more detailed reports on key aspects of the programs are provided to Council by the relevant Managers at appropriate intervals during each year.

 

A section of the review booklet accordingly details the progress of these programs and outcomes being achieved.

 

Relevant elements of the progress of these programs is also reported within the normal services and projects formats.

Conclusion

The review indicates substantial progress to meeting Council’s challenging annual program. In keeping with Council’s established practice the General Manager and Chief Financial Officer will make a presentation at this time on the performance of the Management Plan and key matters for the attention of Council. The opportunity is available for Council tonight to seek clarification or elaboration on particular matters in any section of the Progress Report.

 

The review documents will be placed, in full, on Council’s website, as well as being made available to the public in hard copy and CD versions on request, and through the Civic Centre, Queen St Centre and all libraries.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That :

1.    The information contained in the report on the 2007-2008 Management Plan - December Quarter Review be received

2.    The 2007-2008 Management Plan Review as at 31 December 2007, including revised estimates identified in the recommended budget, be adopted

3.    The proposed budget reallocations and amendments to tasks detailed in the report be adopted

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1. View

Proposed Amendments to Strategic Tasks 2007-08

1 Page

Appendix

  


Policy Review Committee Meeting

18 February 2008

Appendix 1 - Proposed Amendments to Strategic Tasks 2007-08

 

 

 

  


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


 

 

The City in its Broader Context

 

 

There were no reports under this Master Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


The City as a Social Place

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

2        Penrith Performing and Visual Arts Ltd - Annual Report and Board of Directors

 

3        Memorandum of Understanding with Sydney West Area Health 

 

4        Modification, Extension or issue of Operational Consents for Deferred Commencement Determinations of Development Consents that were determined by the Ordinary Council Meeting

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting

18 February 2008

The City as a Social Place

 

 

The City as a Social Place

 

 

2

Penrith Performing and Visual Arts Ltd - Annual Report and Board of Directors   

 

Compiled by:                Stephen Britten, Legal and Governance Manager

Diana Tuckwell, Recreation Manager's Secretary

Authorised by:             Steve Hackett, Director - City Services   

Strategic Program Term Achievement: The cultural assets of the City have been integrated to establish its reputation as a creative place.

Critical Action: Further integrate the City’s principal cultural facilities to maximise community benefit.

 

Presenters:                   Mr Peter Anderson AM - Chairman, Penrith Performing & Visual Arts Ltd - Annual Report

                                      Mr John Kirkman - CEO - Penrith Performing & Visual Arts Ltd - Annual Report    

Purpose:

To provide details to Council following the second Annual General Meeting of Penrith Performing and Visual Arts Ltd.  The Chairman and Chief Executive Officer will be making a brief presentation to this meeting.  The report recommends that the information be received, that certain Directors be re-appointed, and that Council underwrite the operations of the Company for a further period of 12 months.

 

Background

For the period of July 2005 to June 2006, the Joan Sutherland Performing Arts Centre (JSPAC) and Penrith Regional Gallery and Lewers Bequest (PRG) operated as separate entities under the direction of their respective Boards and Staff Structures. Concurrently with that, Council was also working towards the integration of both of these significant cultural facilities into a single entity. That work concluded in July 2006. Council, at its meeting on 3 July 2006, adopted the Constitution of the new Company, ‘Penrith Performing and Visual Arts Ltd’, and approved the new Board members. The first meeting of that new cultural entity occurred on 9 August 2006.

 

The Board of the Penrith Performing and Visual Arts Ltd held their second Annual General Meeting over two dates on 28 November 2007 (to receive a presentation on the Civic/Arts Precinct) and 18 December 2007.

 

The Chairman of the Board and the Chief Executive Officer will be in attendance tonight to make a short presentation which will focus on:

·    The Past Year

-     Highlights

-     Financial position

-     Issues arising

·    The Year Ahead


Following are their reports extracted from the Annual Reports

 

Penrith Performing and Visual Arts Ltd

Chairman’s Report

The past year has been one of challenges as we moved towards the integration of Railway Street theatre Company into PP&VA. That integration had been expected to have been completed a year earlier and the additional delay in successfully completing the “merge” of the three cultural entities meant the benefits from that process are still to be fully realised.

 

The physical and legal integration will now permit a restructuring of both staffing and operations that will provide significant enhancements to the functioning of PP&VA.

 

All of the above is of course dependent upon the continuation and level of funding available to PP&VA from traditional sources as well as pursuing opportunities for funding from new avenues.

 

I wish to thank the CEO and staff, my Board colleagues and Council for their continued and invaluable support. In particular I wish to place on record the appreciation of all concerned to John Mullane for his tireless efforts in achieving the integration of RST with PP&VA.

 

CEO Report

2006-07 has been a year of growth, review and challenge for PP&VA. Major focus for the year included:

- Revitalisation of Joan Sutherland Performing Arts Centre cultural programs

- Expansion of JSPAC education programs

- PP&VA financial and resource management

- Completion of Penrith Regional Gallery & The Lewers Bequest capital works

- Railway Street Theatre Company integration.

 

Specifically…

 

JSPAC

Revitalisation of JSPAC cultural programs resulted in varied patterns of growth. Much focus throughout the year was given to the development of new music and theatre performance initiatives (and related education programs). Projects focusing on regional artists and ensembles proved to be successful. Similarly, the growth of education based audiences (and projects) was spectacular.

 

Of particular concern is the level of resources required to produce, present and promote the performing arts. Our audiences are selective and sophisticated, and rightly expect the best. However, the fact remains that cultural costs are high with JSPAC competing against heavily subsidised cultural institutions e.g.

-     Campbelltown City Council subsidy for the Campbelltown Arts Centre (includes regional gallery and 220 seat theatrette) is $1.3 million (plus all maintenance, cleaning, garden, postage, IT and security costs)

-     Liverpool City Council subsidy for Casula Powerhouse Arts Centre and Liverpool Museum (includes regional gallery, 330 seat theatre, museum and heritage house) is $2.5 million (plus all cleaning, heritage maintenance, phone, security and IT costs)

-     Parramatta City Council subsidy for Parramatta Riverside is $1.1 million (three theatre spaces) plus (special marketing and promotion initiatives, Festival of Sydney program and capital maintenance costs).

 

2006-07 JSPAC Performances Indicators illustrate both growth and continued challenge i.e.

- 53% increase in JSPAC education programs

- 110% increase in JSPAC education program participants

- 41% increase in JSPAC performances

- 12% increase in JSPAC Box Office sales

- 24.6% increase in JSPAC venue bookings

- 25.5% increase in JSPAC visitors.

 

Of particular note is the exceptional performance of PP&VA marketing and promotion initiatives. In particular, Penrith Regional Gallery & The Lewers Bequest (PRG&TLB) again achieved extraordinary media response to its exhibition program. Importantly, media response to JSPAC and Q produced programs was most encouraging. It is evident that strategic marketing initiatives are working and position PP&VA well for the future. 

 

Performance indicators for PP&VA marketing indicate that the ‘spend’ increased by 50.3%, with a resulting 355% increase in media editorial achieved. 

 

PP&VA Financial and Resource Management

The 2006-07 audit indicates a loss of $288,969 for the year. On first glance this indicates a very poor performance. However, the following amounts of expenditure were required. Had these not been required the financial result would have been positive i.e.

- $62,700 for PRG&TLB capital works

- $20,767 JSPAC air-conditioning repairs

- $2,000 for PRG&TLB conservation costs (capital works program)

- $28,000 towards Railway Street Theatre Company integration

- $17,264 for PCC rental waiver

- $5,250 for PCC community tickets

- $47,500 towards costs of PCC Japan exhibition and performance programs

- $7,000 for JSPAC storm damage

- $9,414 for replacement of JSPAC sound desk (RBCH)

- ($101,354 for Depreciation)

Total $301,249

 

In terms of facility maintenance and operation, 2006-07 was characterised by difficulty and concern i.e.

- Resources required to maintain PP&VA infrastructure in premium condition (particularly air-conditioning, lifts, plumbing, sound, lighting and electrics). (See above).

- Reliance on JSPAC and PRG&TLB subsidies to cover ‘landlord’ capital replacement and maintenance costs

The need for capital replacement and improvements (See above) e.g.

1.   PRG&TLB air-conditioning and heating systems

2.   Richard Bonynge Concert Hall air-conditioning system

3.   Richard Bonynge Concert Hall sound and lighting systems

4.   Richard Bonynge Concert Hall seating

5.   PRG&TLB parking amenity

6.   Richard Bonynge Concert Hall plumbing/sewage

7.   PRG&TLB plumbing/sewage

8.   Penrith Regional Gallery & The Lewers Bequest cafe.

 

Penrith Regional Gallery & The Lewers Bequest

Penrith Regional Gallery & The Lewers Bequest re-commenced operations in mid November 2006. Despite being open for only 7.5 months the Gallery’s performance for the year was excellent. In particular, the Gallery’s decision to deliver off-site exhibition and education programs during capital works paid incredible dividend e.g. PRG&TLB curated/produced exhibition programs delivered at venues in Sydney, Melbourne and Japan.

 

Of great concern was the fact that the Gallery was forced to pay for the re-instatement of essential capital items deleted from the capital works program. Paid for from operational budgets, such items included exhibition systems, security lighting, signage and garden works. This adversely affected the resourcing of the Gallery’s exhibition and conservation program, and ultimately the PP&VA end of year financial result. 

 

Penrith Regional Gallery & The Lewers Bequest Performance Indicators reveal an increase of 81% in overall Gallery visitation, plus a 79.3% increase in Penrith Regional Gallery & The Lewers Bequest education programs. However, the challenge for the forthcoming financial year will be to lift Gallery venue income to pre-capital works levels.

 

Railway Street Theatre Company

Integration of Railway Street Theatre Company has now been completed. Much time, energy and resources were required throughout 2006-07 to enable this to occur. The process was slow, careful and at times challenging. However, under a new management and creative team the theatre company (now reverting to its original name – the Q Theatre Company) is well positioned to grow and prosper.

 

2006-07 PP&VA Highlights

- Completion of Penrith Regional Gallery & The Lewers Bequest capital works.

- Completion of Railway Street Theatre Company integration.

- Expanded JSPAC education programs.

- Integrated JSPAC-PRG&TLB education programs.

- Joint JSPAC, RG&TLB and RST performance programs.

- New JSPAC marketing print materials.

- Integrated JSPAC & PRG&TLB integrated promotional print materials.

- JSPAC and PRG&TLB Disability Programs.

- Increased levels of positive print and electronic media coverage.

 

Future PP&VA Challenges  

- Facility maintenance.

- Amount of subsidy required to maintain buildings.

- Capital replacement.

- Cost of producing Penrith based cultural programs.

- Costs of presenting premiere cultural organisations.

- Levels of subsidy for regional cultural competitors.

- Uncertain ArtsNSW funding.

 

In conclusion I would very much like to thank the PP&VA staff, PP&VA Board and Penrith City Council for their continued commitment to producing and presenting cultural and educational programs of excellence for the people of Penrith and the region. Penrith remains an exemplar of national and international cultural best practice, and provides invaluable opportunity for performers, artists and audiences alike. The Arts are the core of a community’s soul – PP&VA provides a beating heart.

 

The following report outlines, in detail,  PP&VA performance for 2006-07.

 

Penrith Performing & Visual Arts Ltd     

 

2006- 07 Financial Operations 

 

In 2006-07 PP&VA financial operations focused on the following core activities:

-  Setting up integrated financial operations and reporting systems

-  Integrating JSPAC, PRG&TLB and PCoM financial systems and procedures

-  PP&VA Board and Sub committee financial reporting

-  JSPAC, PRG&TLB and Railway Street Theatre Company audits

-  Budget reports for all grant applications and acquittals

-  Overseeing Box Office and Conservatorium financial procedures.

 

Highlights

- Employment of Financial Officer Mrs. Lois Fisher

- Integration of PP&VA financial systems

- Assistance from PCC financial officers.

 

Future Challenges  

-  Integration of RST financial operation and procedures

- Need to employ clerical assistant to assist Financial Officer.

 

Joan Sutherland Performing Arts Centre

 

2006-07 was characterised by growth in the areas of program, operations and staff and. In particular, JSPAC underwent performance program revitalisation. Programs were reviewed in terms of artistic excellence, audience relevance and resonance. For the first time JSPAC delivered comprehensive and integrated performance and education programs. 

 

2006-07 saw considerable expansion of the Centre’s education programs. The employment of a specialist Education Officer (Theatre and Music), and the development of education performances, workshops and lectures reaped exceptional dividend for the Centre.

 

In 2006-07 JSPAC implemented a range of initiatives to develop new audiences. Particular focus was given to new repertoires and young people in an attempt to build the Centre's diminishing demographic of 'aging' patrons. This strategy focused on the presentation of contemporary and popular music forms.  This will be further expanded in the next financial year.

 

In 2006-07 JSPAC initiated a range of new strategic media and marketing programs. The aim of which was to enable JSPAC to compete in a heavily competitive and subsidised market. The strategy used education and community development programs as leverage and foundation for expanding JSPAC market share and profile. This proved to be very successful.

 

Focus was also given to the development of cross-artform projects offering parallel music, education and performance programs. This a unique area of operation. With a view to future resourcing of this area JSPAC prepared and submitted a comprehensive range of funding submissions. 

 

In 2006-07 the PCoM teaching program was expanded.  A highlight of the year was the collaboration with the Sydney Conservatorium of Music re the delivery of western Sydney based master class, education and concert programs.  The PCoM continues to be a major examination venue for music, speech & drama examinations including AMEB, A&NZ and Trinity College.

 

Joan Sutherland Performing Arts  

 

2006- 07 Box Office Report 

 

In 2006-07 JSPAC Box Office operations focused on the following core activities

- Research and purchase of new ticketing system

- Training of casual and relief Box Office staff

- Integration of Railway Street Theatre tickets sales 

- Organising theatre and music show ticketing and subscriptions

- Database entry and reporting.

 

Highlights

- Install of CCTV security monitoring system

- Employment of casual and relief staff.

 

Statistics

2,513 Hours open

11,804 Enquiries

$666,700 Total Box Office sales (includes JSPAC and Q Theatre Company)

 

Future Challenges

- Satisfy customer demand for technologically advanced ticketing

- Satisfy customers who are resistant technologically based ticketing

- Servicing an expanding and complex data base.

 

Joan Sutherland Performing Arts Centre 

2006-07 Performance Program

 

The JSPAC Exhibition Program aims to present performance programs of excellence across a range of repertoires, styles and arts practice.

 

Program Outline

- Fine Music Program:

Presenting performers, ensembles and orchestras of excellence including: Roger Woodward (recital and Masterclass); SSO Discovery Program; OzOpera; Aurora Festival; Australian Brandenburg Orchestra; Mad Scenes  concert; Hitler & Us' recital.

- Six Sundays In Winter:

A recital program with a western Sydney focus.

- Morning Melodies :

Monthly concerts for Seniors.   

- Community Music Programs:

Including: Seniors Choir, Penrith City Choir, Penrith Valley Concert Band, Penrith Symphony Orchestra, NSW Brass Bands Competition; San Luis Obispo Orchestra (USA); New Moon Children’s Chorus (China); Yokahama International School (Japan).

 

Highlights

- Performances by Australian Brandenburg Orchestra and Sydney Symphony Discovery  Program

- Mad Scenes concert and inaugural Aurora Festival

- Two ABC Classic FM broadcasts 

- International performance programs.

 

Statistics

112 Performances Presented

44,659 Tickets sold

1,149 Professional and Community Artists

 

Future Challenges

-  Prohibitive costs of presenting premiere orchestras e.g. Sydney Symphony  and Australian Chamber Orchestra

-  Prohibitive costs of presenting popular music and performance acts e.g. The Wiggles, John Williamson, Guy Sebastian

-  Saturated (and subsidised) regional classical music performances

-  Need to re-vamp the Richard Bonynge Concert Hall.

 

Joan Sutherland Performing Arts Centre

2006-07 Education Program

 

The JSPAC Education Program aims to enrich and enhance the JSPAC and Q Theatre Company performance programs.

 

Schools Programs:

The 2006-07 Program

-     Provided focus for school students across a range of areas, including: music appreciation, choral music, Australian theatre practice, Shakespearean theatre, musical theatre, literacy development, and world history.

-     Offered special matinee performances, education enrichment workshops and lectures, work experience opportunities, photographic exhibitions, tours and syllabus specific study materials.

-     Assisted teachers through the production and hosting of Professional Development Days and education kits, including English, Dance, Drama and Music.

-     Produced music and drama festivals to enable the development of choral and theatrical skills, tied to syllabus outcomes.

 

Seniors Programs:

The 2006-07 Program

-     Developed the Penrith Seniors Choir.

-     Provided regular performances through the ‘Morning Melodies’ program.

-     Hosted Seniors’ Day.

Disability Programs:

The 2006-07 Program

-     Hosted International Day for People with a Disability.

-     Provided opportunities for tours of the Joan for disability groups.

-     Provided additional access facilities for people living with disabilities.

 

Youth Programs:

The 2006-07 Program

-     Provided performance opportunities, as well as weekly music and theatre skill development courses.

-     Provided school holiday workshop programs, particularly in the development of instrumental skills.

 

Highlights:

-     Inaugural International Battle of the Choirs.

-     Teacher development workshop for 2007 International Battle of the Choirs.

-     The Song Room free performances for 2,000 disadvantaged students.

-     Founding of Penrith Seniors’ Choir.

-     High Schools Drama Festival and Hatched Festival performances.

 

2006-07Statistics:

Education Programs

8,445 Participants

14 Programs

40 Secondary Schools

32 Primary Schools

 

Performances

20 Performances

50 Performers (professional)

1,045 Performers (community)

 

Workshops

1,940 Participants

249 Workshops

31 Tutors Employed

 

Seniors

2 Programs

900 Participants

 

Disability

2 Programs Delivered

150 Participants

 

Youth

120 Sessions 

160 Participants

 

 

Festivals

4 Music and Drama Festivals

1,200 Tickets Sold.

 

Future Challenges:

-     Uncertain ArtsNSW funding.

-     Expanding school holiday programs.

-     Expanding opportunities for seniors and people living with disabilities.

-     Further strengthening relationships with leading institutions e.g. NIDA.

-     Securing funding for outreach programs.

-     Providing opportunities for our region’s emerging writers, actors and directors.

 

Joan Sutherland Performing Arts  

 

2006- 07 Venue Report

 

In 2006-07 JSPAC venue operations focused on the following core activities:

- Establishing new venue fees and charges

- Review of FOH cost centres and charges

- Development of function and conference packages

- Security

- Managing performances, function and events.

 

2006-07 Venue and Visitation Highlights

         

- 2006 Blue Mountains Nepean Dance Festival

- 2007 Senior’s Day event

- Western Sydney Industry Awards

- 2007 Nepean TAFE Graduations

- 2007 Western Sydney Regional Music Festival

- New venue brochure

 

Venue Statistics

2,451 Venue Enquiries

1,448 Venue bookings

26 Civic Events

$225,725 Venue Revenue

$190,107 Community Rental Subsidy

182,822 Visitors

 

Future Challenges  

- Limited staff levels.

- Hosting corporate clients after 4pm.

- Lack of specialist technical equipment for conferences.

- Regional competition for events, functions and conferences.

 

Joan Sutherland Performing Arts  

2006- 07 Facilities Report

 

In 2006-07 JSPAC Facilities operation focused on the following core activities

- Air-conditioning maintenance and repairs

- Plumbing maintenance and repairs

- Cleaning

- Security

- Q Theatre handrails

- Richard Bonynge Concert Hall sound system

- Electrical repairs and replacement.

 

2006-07 Facilities Highlights

- Installation of CCTV security system

- Renovation of JSPAC bars

- Renovation of Allan Mullins Hall

- Replacement of RBCH stage floor.

 

2006-07 Facilities Spend

- $47,959 Cleaning  

- $47,367 Air-conditioning

- $2,772 Plumbing

- $47,965 Electricity 

- $2,963 Security

- $29,432 Maintenance

- $5,499 Painting

- $4,125 Signage

- $6,693 Storm Damage

- $44,096 Insurance

- $20,361 Phone

- $4,320 Information Technology

- $11,137 Equipment Replacement

57.07% Subsidy spent on Facility Maintenance and Operations.

 

Future Challenges for Facilities Operations 

- Poor plumbing sewage systems

- Ad hoc maintenance

- Need to replace RBCH air-conditioning and seating systems

- Leaking roofs

- Need to re-paint RBCH, and replace seating.

 

Joan Sutherland Performing Arts Centre 

2006-07 Penrith Conservatorium of Music Report

 

The Penrith Conservatorium of Music aims to provide a first class teaching venue with fully accredited teachers.

 

Throughout 2006-07 the Penrith Conservatorium of Music focused on the following key areas of activity:

-  PCoM teaching sessions

-  Extending PCoM teaching programs (particularly Early Childhood music programs)

-  Developing teaching and performance partnerships

-  Development of PCoM percussion programs

-  Establishment of off-site performances for PCoM students and tutors.

Highlights

-  Performance in Hakusan City

-  Establishing collaborative programs with Sydney Conservatorium of Music

-  Establishing Penrith Conservatorium Seniors and Youth Choirs

-  PCoM Disability and Early Childhood Music programs

-  PCoM students concerts

-  Increased use of JSPAC as HSC, AMEB and ANZCA exam centre.

 

Statistics

16,800 Teaching sessions 

400 Students

28 Tutors

$89,675 Revenue

28 Student Concerts

1,680 Attending

19 Staff Performances

19 Master Classes    

36 Seniors Classes   

48 Disability Classes 

384 Early Childhood Music Sessions

3,783 Attending Regional Exams.

 

Future Challenges

-  Limited staff and financial resources to enable increased teaching and performance programs

-  No percussion studio in JSPAC

-  No digital teaching facilities and program at JSPAC

-  Limited advertising and promotions budget

-  Increased regional competition.

 

Joan Sutherland Performing Arts Centre 

2006-7 Marketing and Promotion Programs

 

In 20006-07 JSPAC marketing and promotion programs focused on the following core activities:

-  Marketing and promotion of JSPAC performance and education program

-  Design and production of performance and education marketing collateral

-  Development of regional media advertising

-  Commenced re-construction of website.

 

Highlights

-  Development and distribution of PP&VA music and education program collateral

-  Development and distribution of JSPAC concert program collateral

-  Development and distribution of early childhood music collateral

-  Increased editorial in Penrith and regional print media

-  Sydney Morning herald stories for For Matthew & Others concert program and exhibitions

-  ABC TV stories on For Matthew & Others concert program and exhibitions.

-  ABC National feature on For Matthew & Others project.

 

 

Statistics

$79,946 Marketing and promotion spend

$1,174,000 Editorial received. 

 

Future Challenges 

- Cost of quality print material design and printing

- Need to initiate and integrate on-line and digital marketing programs and systems

- Regular editorial in regional press dependant on buying ads

- Quality of regional press arts coverage

- Building and maintaining efficient database

- Inconsistent branding by JSPAC hirers.

 

Penrith Regional Gallery & The Lewers Bequest

 

PRG&TLB closed for capital works in March 2006 and re-opened in late November of that year. Whilst closed PRG&TLB continued to develop and deliver exhibition and education programs.

 

Completed capital works delivered a revitalised facility - new entry canopy and walkways; covered courtyard function area; kitchen servery facility; improved public amenities; renovation of all four exhibition areas; conservation of heritage structures, gardens and artworks (including sculptures, mosaics, fountains and design features).  Justifiably the exceptional architectural work of Andrew Andersons has been rewarded with peer, industry and visitor praise.

 

It should be noted that the Gallery was forced to cover, from its operational budget, a range of essential capital items deleted from the capital works budget. These included exhibition systems, signage, garden works and security lighting.

 

The Gallery now delivers a superb cultural facility for Penrith and the region. The challenge is to maintain it. Similarly, following implementation of the Heritage Garden Conservation and Maintenance Report the Galleries committed and talented gardening team have restored the gardens to pristine heritage condition. The gardens are exquisite.

 

In 2006/07 exhibitions and project partnerships delivered exceptional visitor and promotional results for the Gallery. Indeed, the Gallery continued to maintain its exceptional reputation for imaginative and innovative exhibition and education programs. The Penrith Regional Gallery & The Lewers Bequest is rightly considered one of Australia’s finest regional galleries and leaders in curatorial best practice.

 

The Gallery also continued its commitment to delivering quality international exhibition programs on behalf of Penrith City Council by presenting the Tracksuits of St Marys exhibition in Japan. 

 

Penrith Regional Gallery & The Lewers Bequest

 

2006-07 Exhibition Program

PRG&TLB exhibition programs aim to present engaging innovative, high quality exhibitions and programs for the people of Penrith and the region.

 

2006-07 Exhibitions: 

-     Operation Art (22 June - 20 August 2006)

-     For Matthew & Others: Journeys with Schizophrenia (22 Sept – 21 Oct 06) (NB venue: Joan Sutherland Performing Arts Centre)

-     Yours, Mine and Ours: 50 years of ABC TV (25 Nov 06 – 29 Jan 07)

-     Tracksuits of St Marys (10 Feb – 8 Apr 07) - Penrith

-     Knockout! and Ricky Emmerton (10 Feb – 8 Apr 07)

-     Tracksuits of St Marys (Mar – May) – Japan

-     Highlights from the Collection (14 Apr – 14 May 07)

-     Vivienne Binns (19 May – 24 Jun 07)

-     Pearls of Arts Project Australia: Stuart Purves Collection (19 May – 24 Jun 07)

-     Mothers’ Cookbooks (19 May – 24 Jun 07)

-     Operation Art (30 June -12 August 2007)

 

Program Highlights:

All exhibitions have been praised for their attractiveness and relevance. Highlights include:

-     Operation Art.

-     For Matthew & Others: Journeys with Schizophrenia raised community awareness of a very debilitating condition.

-     Tracksuits of St Marys which received phenomenal levels of local, national and international press coverage. Japan visitation excellent.

-     Ricky Emmerton showcased a local Indigenous artist of extraordinary ability.

-     Vivienne Binns and Pearls of Arts Projects attracted Sydney Morning Herald art review.

-     Partnerships with ABC TV 

-     For Matthew and Others: Journeys with Schizophrenia education kit (awarded Museums Australia Publication and Design Award for best education kit (category b)

-     Yours, Mine and Ours: 50 years of ABC TV (website) (awarded Museums Australia Publication and Design Award for best website (category b).

 

Exhibition Statistics:

-     16  Exhibitions presented

-     30,416 Visitors to Gallery programs (Penrith)

-     29,853 Visitors to For Matthew & Others travelling exhibition (Australia)

-     17,500 Visitors to Gallery programs (Japan)

-     100 Artists exhibited  

-     3 Collection based exhibitions.

 

Future Challenges:

-     Poor signage.  

-     Poorly maintained air-conditioning systems.

-     Ad hoc maintenance.

-     Gallery Café facility required to service visitor expectation.

-     Impacts on heritage site and facility from increased growth.

-     Poor parking amenity.

 

Penrith Regional Gallery & The Lewers Bequest

2006-07 Education Program

The Education Program aims to enrich the exhibition program to diverse gallery audiences; these include school students, youth and family audiences, Seniors groups, disability organisations, tertiary students and the general public.

School Programs: 

The 2006-7 Program

-     Provided focus for school students across a range of program areas: art appreciation, art criticism, art making and art history

-     Offered study days, curator led exhibition tours, forums and syllabus specific study packs.

-     Assisted teachers in the classroom with syllabus specific education kits and exhibition notes across a range of syllabi including: Visual Arts, PDHPE, Legal studies and English.

-     Offered practical art making opportunities linked to the exhibition program

-     Offered media specific studio days with contemporary artists.

 

Seniors Programs:

The 2006-7 Program

-     Developed community based projects as part of the exhibition program

-     Offered Seniors Gallery tours, morning teas and slide shows.

 

Disability Programs: 

The 2006-7 Program

-     Welcomed Visitors with disabilities by providing wheelchair accessible, disabilities parking and helpful visitors’ services staff

-     Offered art making workshops for visitors with a disability working with contemporary artists e.g. Sensory painting workshop for International Day for People With a Disability 

-     Offered sensory tours to all exhibitions (including interpretative strategies that use the sense of touch, smell and sound as well as sight)

-     Presented song and sound making workshop for people with a disability. 

 

Youth and Family Programs:

The 2006-7 Program included

-     School holiday workshop programs and creative arts workshops for the under 5s, infants and  primary school children and teenagers

-     Family Performance days. e.g. Playschool Crafts and Storytelling day with Angela Moore presenter from ABC playschool

-     Playgroup mornings which include art making and garden activities.

 

2006-07 Education Program Highlights

2006-07 Statistics

 

Education Programs:

4,980 Participants

72 Programs delivered

 

Workshops:

2,036 Participants

24 Primary schools participating 

6 Secondary schools participating

128 Tutors employed

 

Seniors:

52 Seniors Programs delivered

923 Participants

Disability:

80 Disability Programs

2,407 Disability Visitors 

 

Youth & Family Programs:

41 Programs  

2,036 Participants

 

12,382 Total Participants

244 Total Programs.

 

Future Challenges:

-     Limited funds for school excursions

-     Poor public transport links.

-     Expanding opportunities for seniors and people living with disabilities.

-     Securing funding for outreach programs.

 

Penrith Regional Gallery & The Lewers Bequest

2006-07 Conservation & Collection Program

 

The Program aims to care for and conserve the Gallery’s Collection.

 

2006-07 Conservation & Collection Programs

-     During Gallery closure the Collection was only accessible for routine assessment of climatic conditions.

-     Art works in the garden were protected for the duration of the renovation. Large works were wrapped and fenced off to prevent damage, while smaller works were stored within the Collection area. These works were restored to exhibition condition.

-     Artworks conserved include:

1.   Darani Lewers, Untitled 1964, (copper down pipe, located on the Ancher House verandah).

2.   Margo Lewers, Untitled (no date) (cork board cupboard) was relocated to the opposite end of the main room in Ancher House, following structural changes designed to accommodate direct access to the room as a gallery space.

3.   Gerald Lewers, Untitled 1956 (copper down pipe, located on the lounge verandah)

4.   Margo Lewers, Various Colours 1971, in preparation for Highlights from the Collection 14 April – 14 May 2007.

5.   Margo Lewers Untitled 1956 (hanging mosaic) was relocated to a prominent position in the newly renovated courtyard.

6.   Gerald Lewers, Firebird (no date) was conserved for installation in the Gallery grounds.

7.   Gerald Lewers, Coca Cola fountain

8.   Gerald Lewers, Fountain.

Collection – Exhibition Highlights

-     Highlights from the Collection exhibition 14 April – 14 May 2007.

-     An untitled exhibition selected from the Gallery Collection displayed at the Joan Sutherland Performing Arts Centre September – November 2006.

 

Future Challenges

-     To facilitate greater access to the Collection.

-     To progress the update of the electronic cataloguing system.

Conservation & Collection Statistics:

-     8 works conserved

-     2 Collection exhibitions

-     205 works exhibited.

 

Penrith Regional Gallery & The Lewers Bequest

2006- 07 Venue Report

 

In 2006-07 the Gallery’s venue operations focused on the following core activities

-     Re-establishing the venue following re-opening after renovations

-     Setting up the new function kitchen to professional standard

-        Re-establishing venue profile post renovation.

 

2006-07 Venue Highlights

-     Gallery received Heritage Award in Penrith Excellence in Design Awards 

-     Design and print of new venue brochure

-     Launch of Gallery capital works

-     The Acting Factory’s production of Alice in Wonderland

-        Hosted PCC Penrith Excellence in Design Awards.

 

2006-07 Venue Statistics

90 Venue enquiries

31 Venue bookings

$22,484 Venue revenue.

 

Future Challenges for Venue Operations 

- Impact of large scale venue bookings on the site

- Regional competition for venue bookings

- Facilities maintenance e.g. the impacts on parking and toilets for medium to large scale bookings

- Need for venue specific staff.

 

Penrith Regional Gallery & The Lewers Bequest

2006-7 Marketing and Promotion

 

In 2006-07 the Gallery’s marketing and promotion programs focused on:

-        Increasing audience awareness and attendance following capital works closure

-         Both re-establishing and forging new direct and personal relationships with the media after capital works closure

-        Establishing regular advertising presence in the Blue Mountains and Penrith media

-        Maximising digital technologies for cost effective marketing. 

 2006-07 Marketing and Promotion Highlights

-         7 ABC Television productions featuring Yours Mine and Ours. 50 Years of ABC TV, Tracksuits of St Marys, and For Matthew and Others exhibitions.

-         Television coverage across news and current affairs as well as arts featuring the 7.30 Report and Sunday Arts for Tracksuits of St Marys, and For Matthew and Others.

-        1 Channel 9 production for the Today Show for Tracksuits of St Marys.

-        Television publicity evaluation $3,417,000

-        8 radio interviews featuring Tracksuits of St Marys publicity value $648,000

-        Average 2 radio features per month

-        Average 7 local press articles per month

-         2 Sydney Morning Herald art reviews in April and June featuring Tracksuits St Marys and Pearls of Arts Project exhibitions

-         Viral Marketing successes such as the Tracksuits of St Marys face book blog. Viral marketing facilitates and encourages people to pass along a marketing message voluntarily in various formats such as word of month, video clips, websites or text messages.

 

Marketing and Promotion Statistics

-        2006-07 Marketing Spend @ $58,678

-        2006-07 Publicity valuation @ $6,318,583 

 

Future Challenges for Marketing and Promotion

-        Establishing successful guerrilla marketing initiatives.

-        Developing further audience evaluation methods.

-         Further development in Viral Marketing targeting key individual and networks to filter information.

 

Penrith Regional Gallery & The Lewers Bequest

2006- 07 Heritage Garden Program

 

In 2006-07 the Gallery’s Heritage Garden Program focused on the following core activities:

-   Maintaining and incorporating the Gardens ongoing diversity and character

-   Rebuilding pathways (both foot and car)

-   Reintroducing specific annual gardens

-   Promoting the gardens general health so to combat harsh summer and winter

    climate with good organic garden foundations.

 

2006-07 Garden Highlights

-     Witnessing the health and vigour of the garden come to fruition.

-     New driveway installed (paid from Gallery operations budget).

-     Grading and re-turfing of Gallery lawns (paid from Gallery operations budget).

-     Drainage rectified in forecourt garden (paid from Gallery operations budget).

-     New garden established in Regional Gallery courtyard (paid from Gallery operations budget).

-     Garden security lighting system installed

-     Seeing out the establishment of re-introduced plants.

-     Noticing the positive reactions of the general public and artists alike.

-     Increased functions and events in the garden.

-     Building working relationships with other significant gardens e.g. Royal Botanic Gardens, Historic Houses Trust.

2006-07 Garden Statistics

2,584 Gardening staff hours

28 Garden events/functions

2 Fountains conserved

4 Outdoor artworks conserved.

 

Future Challenges for the Heritage Garden

-        Impact of internal car parks on health of trees.

-        OH&S resulting from dying trees (see previous point).

-        To maintain optimum health of the plants and trees relative to the environment

and climate.

 

Penrith Regional Gallery & The Lewers Bequest   

 

2006- 07 Facilities Report

 

In 2006-07 PRG&TLB Facilities operation focused on the following core activities

-         Completion of capital works

-        Catch up maintenance

-        Garden conservation

-        Re-commencement of facilities operation following capital works

-        Installation of security lighting system

-        Air conditioning maintenance

-        Lighting maintenance

-        Plumbing maintenance

-        Rectification of incomplete capital works

 

2006-07 Facilities Highlights

-     Completion of capital works

-    Garden conservation.

-    Gallery re-opening.

 

2006-07 Facilities Statistics

$14,157 Cleaning  

$1,249 Air-conditioning

$18,565 Exhibition Systems

$929 Plumbing

$22,546 Electricity

$2,845 Lighting 

$6,643 Security Lighting

$6,918 Maintenance

$5,655 Painting

$14,056 Signage

$22,357 Insurance

$8,385 Phone

$3,375 Information Technology

$1,607 Equipment Replacement

$10,521 Garden Maintenance

21% Subsidy spent on Facility Maintenance and Operations

NB: Gallery open for 7.5 months only

Future Challenges for Facilities Operations 

-  Limited budget allocations for maintenance

-  Poor and ad hoc maintenance

-  Malfunctioning plumbing and drainage systems

-  Substandard air conditioning systems

-  Poor office accommodation (including heating and air conditioning).

 

 

 

Penrith Regional Gallery & The Lewers Bequest

2006-07 Margaret Farm Program

 

The Margaret Farm Program aims to contribute to arts practice in Western Sydney by hosting a range of national and international artist residency programs.

 

2006-07 Margaret Farm Residencies 

-        Brook Andrew (Australia/Indigenous/Visual arts)

-        Vivienne Binns (Australia/Visual arts)

-        Sylvie Blocher (France/Visual arts)

-        Charles Cooper (Australia/Visual arts)

-        Graham Doyle, Sandy Jeffs and Geoff Prince  (Australia/Visual artist and poet)

-        Melinda Harper (Australia/Visual arts)

-        Jeanne van Heeswijk (Netherlands/Visual arts)

-        Toni Lamond (Australia/Performer)

-        Richard MacLean (Australia/Visual artist and author)

-        Jock McQueenie (Australia/Visual arts)

-        Tyran Parke (Australia/Performer)

-        Matthew Prest (Australia/Performer/ theatre maker)

-        Papunya artists (Australia/Indigenous/Visual arts)

-        Javier Tellez (Venezuela/Visual arts)

-        The Song Room Company (Australia/Performers)

-        Craig Walsh (Australia/Visual arts)

-        Warburton Community artists (Australia/Indigenous/Visual arts)

 

Program Highlights

-     The use of Margaret Farm by prominent international artists.

-     Facilitating the opportunity for local artists to meet international artists.

-     Collaboration with Museum of Contemporary Art, College of Fine Arts, Panthers World of Entertainment, Casula Powerhouse Arts Centre, ABC TV, Blacktown Arts Centre, College of Fine Arts, Campbelltown Arts Centre, Ivan Dougherty Gallery, National Arts School, University of Western Sydney.

 

Margaret Farm Statistics:

19 Residency projects

38 Australian artists

3 International artists

12 Project partners.

 

Future Challenges

-     Uncertain funding from ArtsNSW.

-     To further develop the momentum and number of residencies.

-     To increase artist and community awareness of the residency program, both local and international.

-     To further develop website information and records of residency outcomes.

 

Q Theatre Company

 

Throughout 2006/07 the Q continued to present and produce quality theatre entertainment for Penrith and the region. Particular highlights include Carmen (OzOpera), The Merchant of Venice (Bell Shakespeare) and Six Dance Lessons in Six Weeks (Ensemble Theatre) and Sunday in the Park with George..

 

A major area of focus was the continued development of Q Theatre education performances. Highlights include For Matthew & Others, When Vegetables Attack (Water Closet Productions), Six Dance Lessons in Six Weeks and The Warbles Go To The Opera.

 

The Q also presented a range of performance related workshop programs. Particular emphasis was given to the Sunday in the Park with George and Six Dance Lessons in Six Weeks productions.

 

In 2006-07 the Q continued to produce new theatre work of excellence. The highlight of the year was the Australian premier production of Sunday in the Park with George which received exceptional critical and promotional acclaim. The Q continued its work to increase skills and standards, and provide employment opportunities, in the region, for professional writers and performers. This area of activity included projects with local writers and performers from the Acting Factory, Green Room, and Weatherboard Theatre.

 

In 2006-07 PP&VA assisted the Q with substantial financial and staff resources to market and promote its program (particularly Sunday in the Park with George). This assistance was intended to enable the Q to effectively compete in a heavily competitive and subsidised market.

 

Finally, a major focus of 2006/07 was completing the integration of the Railway Street Theatre Company in to the PP&VA structure. This proved to be a slow, careful and at times challenging process. However, this process has now been completed with the Q positioned for a productive and rejuvenated future.

 

It should be noted that the ArtsNSW Theatre Committee indicated its wish to reduce funding for the Q. This situation is of great concern, and is against the spirit and substance of previous agreements between PCC, the NSW Ministry for the Arts and Premier Bob Carr. This situation will need to be monitored carefully. 

 

Q Theatre Company  

2006-07 Program and Operations

 

The Q aims to

-        Be a ‘flagship’ for professional performing arts in Penrith and western Sydney

-        Entertain through the presentation and creation of outstanding performing arts activity

-        Facilitate performing arts education programs

-        Nurture cultural exchange

-        Facilitate creative endeavour – accessible, resonant, vibrant, innovating, stimulating

-        Engage with and celebrate our local and regional communities.

 

The 2006-07 Program

 

Subscription Season:

-        Carmen. OzOpera, 22 August 06

-        The Merchant of Venice. Bell Shakespeare production, 26-30 September 06

-        Sunday in the Park with George. RSTC production, March 8-31 07

-        Times of My Life. Christine Dunstan Productions, 2-5 May 07

-        Six Dance Lessons in Six Weeks. Ensemble Theatre production, May 30-2 June

 

Education Performances:

-         For Matthew & Others. Performance for secondary students, 22 Sept 06 

-         The Merchant of Venice Workshop, 27 Sept 06

-         When Vegetables Attack. Water Closet Productions, 10 May 07

-         Six Dance Lessons in Six Weeks. Schools performance, 31 May 07

-         The Warbles Go To The Opera.  Free performances, 24 May 07.

 

Education Workshops:

-         Sunday in the Park with George. Workshops in production, art criticism and pointillist painting, 13 March 07.

-         Six Dance Lessons in Six Weeks. Teachers Workshop, 31 May 07

-         Six Dance Lessons in Six Weeks. Students Workshop with Todd McKenney and Nancye Hayes, 31 May 07.

 

Program Highlights

-         Establishment of integrated performance and education programs involving RST, JSPAC and PRG&TLB

-        Completion of RST – PP&VA integration process

-        Establishment of new (interim) management, administration and programming structure

-        Establishment of new creative development structure and processes

-        Completion of RST review for ArtsNSW

 

Statistics

45 Performances 

70 Performers

6,427 Tickets Sold

1,614 Subsidised Tickets

821 Subscribers

 

4 Youth Drama Festivals 

1,200 Tickets Sold 

 

249 Drama Workshops

1,940 Kids

31 Tutors Employed

 

$67,591 Spent on Marketing and Promotion

$882,000 Editorial Received 

 

40% Audience from Penrith

40% Audience from Blue Mountains

6% Audience from Hawkesbury

2% Audience from Sydney Metro.

 

Future Challenges

-     Uncertain ArtsNSW funding

-     Strong local and regional entertainment competition.

 

PP&VA PERFORMANCE STATISTICS

 

PP&VA CULTURAL PROGRAMS

 

 

05/06

06/07

07/08 Target

JSPAC Performances

79

112

125

JSPAC Artists

810

1,149

1,387

JSPAC Tickets Sold

36,272

44,659

50,000

PRG & TLB Exhibitions

22

19

21

PRG & TLB Artists

126

141

150

PRG & TLB Visitors (Penrith)

30,515

30,416

42,000

PRG & TLB Visitors (Traveling)

12,360

47,353

N/A

Q Performances

135

145

155

Q Performers

75

70

80

 


 

PP&VA EDUCATION PROGRAMS

 

 

 

05/06

06/07

07/08 Target

JSPAC Programs

185

391

400

JSPAC Participants

6,000

12,640

13,000

JSPAC Schools

45

72

75

JSPAC Tutors

18

31

32

PRG & TLB Programs

410

244

260

PRG & TLB Participants

6,907

12,382

15,000

PRG & TLB Schools

24

30

36,000

Q Programs

321

353

380

Q Participants

1,860

1,940

2,100

Q Tutors

27

31

34

 

 

PP&VA - PENRITH CONSERVATORIUM of MUSIC

 

 

 

05/06

06/07

07/08 Target

Teaching Sessions

14,663

17,251

18,000

Tutors

28

28

30

Students

340

400

440

Concerts

45

47

50

Attending Regional Exams

3,405

3,783

4,000

 

 

 

PP&VA MARKETING & PROMOTIONS

 

 

 

05/06

06/07

07/08 Target

JSPAC Spend

$36,380.00

$79,946

80,000

JSPAC Result

$469,590

$1,174,000

$1,310,000

PRG & TLB Spend

$53,500

$58,678

$58,000

PRG & TLB Result

$1,062,975

$6,318,538

$6,000,000

Q Spend

$47,321

$67,591

$75,000

Q Result

$342,800

$882,000

$1,000,000

 

 

 

PP&VA VENUE & VISITATIONS

 

 

 

05/06

06/07

07/08 Target

JSPAC Venue Bookings

1,162

1,448

1,610

JSPAC Civic Events

11

26

30

JSPAC Visitors

145,655

182,822

210,000

PRG & TLB Venue Bookings

30

31

45

PRG & TLB Civic Events

4

5

10

PRG & TLB Visitors

31,000

30,416

42,000

 

 

 


PP&VA INCOME

 

 

 

05/06

06/07

07/08 Target

Penrith City Council - JSPAC

$500,000

$700,000

$721,000

Penrith City Council – PRG & TLB (+ other)

$835,876

$674,955

$695,200

JSPAC – Box Office

$591,319

$663,317

$737.018

JSPAC - Venue

$222,780

$225,725

$250,805

JSPAC – Education Programs

N/A

$100,395

$110,000

Penrith Conservatorium of Music

$80,333

$89,675

$104,423

PRG & TLB - Venue

N/A

$22,484

$50,000

PRG & TLB – Education Programs

N/A

$15,846

$25,000

Q – Education Programs

$25,419

$30,515

$33,000

Community Subsidy

$113,157

$190,107

$205,000

                           

 

PP&VA OPERATIONS

 

05/06

06/07

07/08 Target

Salaries

$466,232*

$993,244

$1,566,871

Cleaning

$48,411*

$62,116

90,000

Air Conditioning

$21,055*

$48,616

63,700

Electricity

$75,628*

$70,511

$88,150

Repairs & Maintenance

$98,116*

$62,764

$60,000

Phone

$21,230*

$28,746

$36,000

Insurance

$34,173*

$66,453

$68,500

Information Technology

$4,383*

$7,695

$10,000

Capital Equipment and Replacement

$55,367*

$58,978

$45,000

NB: *JSPAC only

 

Financial Accountant – Entities Comment

 

2006/07 saw the amalgamation of the Joan Sutherland Performing Arts Centre (JSPAC), Q Theatre and The Penrith Regional Gallery and Lewers Bequest (PRG) under the control of a single company structure, Penrith Performing and Visual Arts Limited (PPVA).

 

This new structure achieved an operational loss for 2006-07 of $288,969 after receiving a $1.3m contribution from Council. This compared to a combined loss of $179,881 (JSPAC (197,472) and PRG 17,591) after a Council contribution of $1.15m for the separate companies for the 2005-06 financial year. The 2006-07 loss has reduced the Net Assets (Equity) for the PPVA to $141,145. A similar loss for 2007-08 would place the company into a negative Net Assets position. The operation of the centre for the 2007-08 financial year to December 2007 has not met their year to date budget expectations. Council’s Financial Services staff will continue to work closely with the PPVA to ensure that the most effective financial management practices are in place.

 

The Chief Executive Officer in his report identifies a number of items which have contributed to this seemingly poor result, these items generally relate to minor capital works and maintenance issues for the centres, he also identifies these as an ongoing threat to the centres operations. The operations of the new company were also impacted by the renovation works at the Regional Gallery which was closed for part of the year and reopened in November 2006.

 

Provision of quality cultural facilities to a city the size of Penrith entails a commitment from Council for continued financial support.  The Chief Executive Officer also identifies by way of comparison a number of similar cultural facilities in Campbelltown, Liverpool and Parramatta which receive subsidies similar to, or in excess of, those provided to PPVA.

 

The finance staffing structure of the new company, now that the integration of both the Gallery and the Railway Street Theatre Company (RSTC (2007-08)) has been completed, is extremely important for the decision making process of the PPVA Board to ensure that quality relevant and timely financial information is available. The Board has recently made temporary appointments to address this issue and an evaluation of these positions and finalisation of a permanent solution should be a high priority.

 

 

Penrith Performing and Visual Arts Ltd – Board of Directors

 

The ­­ Articles of Association of the above Company provide, in part, that

 

1.   To provide continuity the members of the Board of Directors, except for the General Manager or his/her nominee, shall retire on a rotating basis. At the first Annual General Meeting after 1 July 2006, five (5) directors shall retire (including one (1) Councillor). At the second Annual General Meeting after 1 July 2006 five (5) Directors shall retire (including one (1) Councillor).  At the third Annual General Meeting after 1 July 2006 five (5) Directors shall retire. Thereafter the members of the Board of Directors, shall retire after they have served on the Board of Directors for three (3) years after appointment or re-appointment to the Board of Directors.

2.   All retiring Directors shall be eligible for re-appointment.

 

Council should note that, as per the Articles of Association, Councillors Jackie Greenow and Karen McKeown, John Mullane, Dennis Rice and Fiona Steel  resigned at the second Annual General Meeting of Penrith Performing and Visual Arts Ltd held on 18 December 2007 and nominated for re-appointment.  It was resolved, at the second Annual General Meeting of Penrith Performing and Visual Arts Ltd, that Penrith City Council be requested to endorse the appointment of Councillors Jackie Greenow and Karen McKeown, John Mullane, Dennis Rice and Fiona Steel as Directors of Penrith Performing and Visual Arts Ltd.

 

Council’s Director-City Services, Mr Steve Hackett, is the General Manager’s representative and Company Secretary.

 

Peter Anderson was re-appointed Chairman and John Mullane as Deputy Chairman.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Penrith Performing and Visual Arts Ltd - Annual Report and Board of Directors be received

2.     Councillors Jackie Greenow and Karen McKeown, John Mullane, Dennis Rice and Fiona Steel be appointed to fill vacancies that occurred at the second Annual General Meeting of the Penrith Performing and Visual Arts Ltd.

3.     Council agree to underwrite the operation of Penrith Performing and Visual Arts Ltd until the presentation to Council of the Penrith Performing and Visual Arts Ltd Annual Report for 2007/08.

4.     Council congratulate the Board of Penrith Performing and Visual Arts Ltd on their success and achievements over the twelve months to the end of June 2007.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Policy Review Committee Meeting

18 February 2008

The City as a Social Place

 

 

The City as a Social Place

 

 

3

Memorandum of Understanding with Sydney West Area Health    

 

Compiled by:                Wayne Mitchell, Environmental Health Manager

Authorised by:             Wayne Mitchell, Environmental Health Manager   

Strategic Program Term Achievement: Effective responses are made to the social impacts of growth, redevelopment and change.

Critical Action: Assess the social impacts of urban change in both new release areas, established areas and rural areas..

     

Purpose:

To inform Council of a proposal to enter into a formal Memorandum of Understanding with the Sydney West Area Health Service (Centre for Population Health, Primary Care and Community Health Services).  This Memorandum enhances the existing partnership between our organisations and provides a formal framework within which existing and new projects can be further developed and progressed.  The report recommends that Council endorse the Memorandum of Understanding.

 

Background

Council has worked closely with the Sydney West Area Health Service (SWAHS) and its predecessor, the Wentworth Area Health Service for many years on joint projects and programs.  A primary example has been the Penrith Food Project which evolved into the current Healthy People Partnership Project.  We share many common objectives around improving the health of our communities through health promotion and intervention programs.

 

Examples of current partnership programs include strategies to reduce smoking of tobacco and education about healthy weight.  Council’s Healthy People Partnership Officer works closely with SWAHS Population Health team and receives extensive support and advice.

The Memorandum of Understanding

The Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) for the Strategic Partnership Agreement between Sydney West Area Health Service and Council is attached.  The purpose of the MOU is to formalise the existing collaborative arrangements between Council and SWAHS, and provide a basis for agreement and implementation of projects of common interest.  This formality is consistent with our approach with other key strategic partners in the City such as the NSW Department of Housing.

 

The objectives of the MOU include:

 

1.       Develop joint understanding of health needs in communities in the Penrith LGA. 

 

2.       Develop the capacity within both organisations to make the MOU effective by setting up the structure and roles for coordinating and implementing projects of the partnership.

 

3.       Develop joint plans and policies that contribute to the improved health and wellbeing  of the local community that strengthen the positive influences on good health and minimise the negative influences.

 

4.       Prioritise partnership projects according to the strategic priorities of both organisations

 

5.       Establish operational agreements between SWAHS, Council, other agencies and local communities that make prevention everybody’s business by supporting communities and organisations to protect, promote and maintain health and reduce health inequities.

 

6.       Collaborate on community participation strategies to strengthen the consultative relationship between the community, Council and SWAHS.

 

7.       Engage other State Government Departments and identified Non Government Organisations as required to address priority health issues

 

The Memorandum defines health as a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity.  Health is also a resource for everyday life, a positive concept emphasising social and personal resources as well as physical capabilities.  The fundamental conditions and resources for health are peace, shelter, education, food, income, a stable eco-system, sustainable resources, social justice and equity.  Improvement in health requires a secure foundation in these basic prerequisites (WHO 1986).

The Partnership

The Partnership will be based on a two tiered structure made up of a Steering Group and the Partnership Team.  All meetings will be co-convened by officers of both organisations.

 

The Steering Group may establish teams to deliver specific benefits on behalf of the Partnership. 

 

A review will be conducted over 24 months to evaluate the achievement of objectives in the MOU and the effectiveness of the working relationship.

 

The principles of the Partnership include:

 

(i)      Sponsorship by the executive leadership in Population Health and Council;

(ii)      A long term view built upon a shared understanding of issues;

(iii)     Interdependence that recognises the interests, rights and responsibilities of both parties in addressing the needs of their stakeholders;

(iv)     Openness that keeps each other informed of the other’s intentions, direction and way of working to maximise health outcomes and avoid missed opportunities;

(v)     Development of trust through support mechanisms and adherence to agreed decisions;

(vi)     Flexibility to adapt to changes through dialogue and respond to the requirements of elected representatives and to changes in policies.

Initial Projects

Potential projects that have been identified for consideration by the Steering Group include:

 

·        Development of health indicators and health data for the Penrith Local Government Area

·        Development of health impact assessment policies and procedures used in Strategic Planning for new Urban areas

·        A project related to healthy weight objectives

·        A project related to tobacco control objectives

Signatories to the Agreement

It is proposed that the Executive Director Population Health and Strategic Direction sign the agreement on behalf of Sydney West Area Health Service and the Mayor and General Manager on behalf of Penrith City Council.

Conclusion

The proposed Memorandum of Understanding between Sydney West Area Health Service (Centre for Population Health and Primary Care and Community Health Services) provides an important opportunity to better formalise our long-standing partnership.  The MOU establishes ways for working in partnership on joint ventures in the City.  The MOU recognises that there are significant benefits to be gained through the development of a collaborative approach to protecting and promoting the health of people and to prevent illness, injury and disability.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Memorandum of Understanding with Sydney West Area Health  be received

2.     Council endorse the Memorandum of Understanding for the Strategic Partnership Agreement between Sydney West Area Health Service and Penrith City Council.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1. View

Draft Memorandum of Understanding

4 Pages

Appendix

  


Policy Review Committee Meeting

18 February 2008

Appendix 1 - Draft Memorandum of Understanding

 

 

 

 

 

DRAFT  

Memorandum of Understanding

Between Penrith City Council and Sydney West Area Health Service Centre for Population Health & Primary Care & Community Health Services ( based in Penrith LGA)

 

FORMAL AGREEMENT

 

Rationale for MOU

Penrith City Council and the Sydney West Area Health Service (SWAHS) recognise that there are significant benefits to be gained through the development of a collaborative approach to protecting and promoting the health of people and to prevent illness, injury and disability. The Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) establishes ways for working in partnership on joint ventures in the Penrith LGA and outlines the principles and priorities that together form the basis of a strategic partnership agreement

 

Partners for the MOU

The MOU is between Penrith City Council and SWAHS Population Health and Primary Care Community Health Services as they pertain to the Penrith Local Government Area (LGA).

..

 

Strategic Intent

Both partners bring to this MOU their long term plans and aspirations for the future that make up their strategic intent as set out within  SWAHS HEALTHFIRST, HEALTHY PEOPLE, PLACES AND COMMUNITIES“Sydney West Area Healthcare Services Plan 2005 - 2010” and Penrith City Council Strategic Plan 2005-2009 “The Competitive Edge” sets out draft destinations for the city and residents of the Local Government Area. Both organisations recognise that collaboration provides greater opportunities to achieve these strategic results.

 

Definition of Terms in MOU

For the purpose of the MOU, health is defined as a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity. Health is also a resource for everyday life, a positive concept emphasising social and personal resources as well as physical capabilities. The fundamental conditions and resources for health are peace, shelter, education, food, income, a stable eco-system, sustainable resources, social justice and equity. Improvement in health requires a secure foundation in these basic prerequisites (WHO 1986).

 

Partnership Agreement

The Strategic Partnership Agreement sets out the aim, objectives, principles and governance of the strategic partnership.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

AIM OF THE MOU

 

The aim of the Strategic Partnership is to improve the health of the population, create healthy environments, enable individuals and communities to make healthy choices and reduce differences in the health status that exists between groups. The MOU establishes effective ways for both organisations to work together.

 

The partners aim to share knowledge of the environmental, behavioural, and social factors that have an effect on the community’s health, address health issues by joint planning and to coordinate services to achieve better health outcomes.

 

OBJECTIVES

 

1.   Develop joint understanding of health needs in communities in the Penrith LGA.. 

 

2.   Develop the capacity within both organisations to make the MOU effective by setting up the structure and roles for coordinating and implementing projects of the partnership.

 

3.   Develop joint plans and policies that contribute to the improved health and wellbeing  of the local community that strengthen the positive influences on good health and minimise the negative influences.

 

4.   Prioritise partnership projects according to the strategic priorities of both organisations

 

5.   Establish operational agreements between SWAHS, Council, other agencies and local communities that make prevention everybody’s business by supporting communities and organisations to protect, promote and maintain health and reduce health inequities.

 

6.   Collaborate on community participation strategies to strengthen the consultative relationship between the community, Council and SWAHS.

 

7.   Engage other State Government Departments and identified Non Government Organisations as required to address priority health issues

STATUS OF THIS DOCUMENT

 

This document is a statement of intent only and not intended to operate as a binding legal document on the parties or to create legal relationships between them.

 

The statutory and consent requirements of either organisation are not affected by this MOU.

 

 

 


PRINCIPLES OF PARTNERSHIP

 

The underlying principles that sustain the strategic partnership between the partners include:

 

(i)         Sponsorship by the executive leadership in Population Health and Council;

(ii)   A long term view built upon a shared understanding of issues;

(iii)       Interdependence that recognises the interests, rights and responsibilities of both parties in addressing the needs of their stakeholders;

(iv)       Openness that keeps each other informed of the other’s intentions, direction and way of working to maximise health outcomes and avoid missed opportunities;

(v)        Development of trust through support mechanisms and adherence to agreed decisions;

(vi)       Flexibility to adapt to changes through dialogue and respond to the requirements of elected representatives and to changes in policies.

 

STRUCTURE OF THE STRATEGIC PARTNERSHIP

 

The Partnership will be based on a two tiered structure made up of a Steering Group and the Partnership Team. All meetings of these groups will be co-convened by officers of XYZ City Council and the SWAHS.

 

The Steering Group may establish Teams to deliver specific benefits on behalf of the Partnership.

 

Information shared at the Steering Group shall be considered confidential unless released by the owner of the information for public distribution.

 

A separate document will outline the terms of reference for the operation of the Steering Group and Partnership Team.

 

A review will be conducted after 24 months to evaluate the achievement of objectives in the MOU and the effectiveness of the working relationships.

 

 

STEERING GROUP

 

The Steering Group, made up of Executive and Managers from both organisations, will:

 

§ Establish the strategic context and provide policy direction;

§ Support the achievement of the health outcomes of both parties;

§ Support the delivery of projects and address any constraints;

§ Respond in a timely manner to address any problems around issue management.

 

The Steering Group will meet at least twice a year.  Other meetings can be held as needed or requested by the Director / Deputy Centre for Population Health SWAHS or the Director City Planning at Penrith Council 

 

Steering Group Membership:

 

SWAHS

§ Executive Director Population Health & Strategic Direction

§ Manager Health Promotion

§ Group Manager Penrith LGA Primary Care and Community Health Services

§ Manager Healthier Environment Program

 

XYZ City Council

§ General Manager

§ Director City Planning

§ Manager Environment and Health

§ Manager Community and Cultural Development

 

 

PARTNERSHIP TEAM

 

The Partnership Team:

§ Puts forward strategic issues for consideration and direction by the Steering Group;

§ Proposes strategies for health improvements through programs and projects with measurable indicators for approval by the Steering Committee;

§ Coordinates the implementation of decisions by the Steering Committee;

§ Reports on progress and measurable indicators for programs and projects.

 

The Partnership Team is made up of two officers from both organisations and will meet quarterly or as required.  To facilitate continuity some core members of the Partnership Team are part of the Steering group.

 

 

SCOPE OF THE WORK

 

The draft scope of the work to be undertaken by the partnership is outlined in a separate document. The Steering Committee will consider the draft scope of work at their initial meeting and decide on priorities and resources for the body of work to be done.

 

 

 

 

Reference

 

WHO Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion.1986

 

 

 

 


Policy Review Committee Meeting

18 February 2008

The City as a Social Place

 

 

The City as a Social Place

 

 

4

Modification, Extension or issue of Operational Consents for Deferred Commencement Determinations of Development Consents that were determined by the Ordinary Council Meeting   

 

Compiled by:                Peter Wood, Development Assessment Coordinator - North

Authorised by:             Paul Lemm, Development Services Manager   

Strategic Program Term Achievement: Redevelopment of existing areas contributes to safe, sustainable, affordable and satisfying living environments and cohesive communities.

Critical Action:  Formulate and implement social and cultural strategies for redeveloping established areas that support cohesive communities.

     

Purpose:

To seek Council's endorsement of proposed procedures for determination of applications for proposals previously reported to Council. This report is further to the Development Regulation Working Party report of 11 December 2007.  The report recommends that the proposed procedures be endorsed by Council.

 

Background

At Council’s meeting of 3 December 2007, Councillor Thain brought to Councillors’ attention the issue of some applications for modification or extension of consent, where the original application was determined by full Council, being determined under delegation without Councillors being made aware of the proposal. As reported to the Development Regulation Working Party (DRWP) on 11 December 2007, the Development Services Manager has reviewed the current procedure, agreed that it needs to change and proposes new procedures to address current inconsistencies.

 

Current Procedure

The Development Services Department’s Procedures Manual contains a Development Approvals Practice Note for applications considered under Delegated Authority (G1 attached to this report). This  provides that all applications for extension of consent are reported for peer review to Council’s delegated Assessment Team which consists of an area Co-ordinator, a Senior Building surveyor and a senior Development Engineer. All applications for modification of consent are to be reported to the previous level of delegation under this procedure. Practice Note G2 outlines procedures for preparing reports for Council, this is not relevant to the new procedure proposed (see attached copy).

 

Clause B18A of Penrith Development Control Plan 2006 – Section 2.7 “Notification and Advertising (DCP),” provides however that Councillors shall be notified of an application for modification if the original development application was determined at a Council meeting or the application has been lodged under Section 96AA of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act, 1979, where the original consent was issued by the Land and Environment Court.

 

There have been some recent examples of applications for modification or extension of consents which have not followed one or more of the above procedures. This is also the case for some applications where a “deferred commencement” consent has been determined by full Council yet the “operational consent” has been issued under delegation where the deferred items have been satisfied. Although this does not cast any doubt on the legitimacy of legal process followed, it does raise issues in terms of Council’s accepted process for taking decisions on matters which were previously in the public arena.

 

New Procedures

As advised in the DRWP report of 11 December 2007, the Manager of Development Services proposes the following new procedures for applications for modification or extension of development consent where the original application was determined by full Council:

 

·    The Manager of Development Services will determine what these applications will be reported to Council based on the extent of public interest surrounding the development application and the nature of the development proposal; and

 

·    All applications for modification of development consent, extension of development consent and issue of an operational consent for deferred commencement determinations will be reported to Councillors via memorandum when an application is received.

 

A new Practice Note (G3 see attached copy) has been prepared which provides a background to existing procedures and outlines the above procedures for reference for any relevant future applications.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Modification, Extension or issue of Operational Consents for Deferred Commencement Determinations of Development Consents that were determined by the Ordinary Council Meeting be received.

2.     The new procedures outlined commence immediately, as reflected in the new practice note and incorporated into the community consultation section of the draft City Wide DCP 2008.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1. View

New Development Approvals Practice Note - G3

1 Page

Appendix

2. View

Development Approvals Practice Note - G1

2 Pages

Appendix

3. View

Development Approvals Practice Note - G2

2 Pages

Appendix

  


Policy Review Committee Meeting

18 February 2008

Appendix 1 - New Development Approvals Practice Note - G3

 

 

 

 

 

Development Approvals Practice Note                                           G3

Date: 11 February 2008        Compiled: Peter Wood          Authorised: Paul Lemm

 

 

Subject: Determination of Applications for Modification, Extension or Operation of Deferred Commencement Development Consents where the Development Application was determined by Full Council.

 

 

Development Approvals Practice Notes G1 & G2 detail procedures for determining applications under Delegated Authority or preparing reports to Council. G1 provides that all applications for extension of consent are reported for peer review to Council’s delegated Assessment Team which consists of an area Co-ordinator, a Senior Building surveyor and a senior Development Engineer. All applications for modification of consent are to be reported to the previous level of delegation under this procedure. A procedure has not been established for the issue of operational consents where an original “deferred commencement” consent has been determined by full Council.

 

Clause B18A of Penrith Development Control Plan 2006 – Section 2.7 “Notification and Advertising (DCP),” provides however that Councillors shall be notified of an application for modification if the original development application was determined at a Council meeting or the application has been lodged under Section 96AA of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act, 1979, where the original consent was issued by the Land and Environment Court.

 

In order to clarify the above requirements as they relate to all subsequent applications where the original determination is made by full Council the following procedure is to be followed:

 

 

·    The Manager of Development Services will determine what applications should be reported to Council based on the extent of public interest that was generated by the development application and the nature of the development; and

 

·    All applications for modification of development consent, extension of development consent and issue of an operational consent for deferred commencement determinations will be reported to Councillors via memorandum when an application is received.

 

 


Policy Review Committee Meeting

18 February 2008

Appendix 2 - Development Approvals Practice Note - G1

 

 

 


 


Policy Review Committee Meeting

18 February 2008

Appendix 3 - Development Approvals Practice Note - G2

 

 

 


  


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


The City In Its Environment

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

5        Biodiversity Action Plan

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting

18 February 2008

The City in its Environment

 

 

The City in its Environment

 

 

5

Biodiversity Action Plan   

 

Compiled by:                Hamish Robertson, Natural Resources Management Officer

Anthony Price, Environmental Health Co-ordinator

Authorised by:             Wayne Mitchell, Environmental Health Manager   

Strategic Program Term Achievement: The City’s biological diversity is being protected and conserved through the implementation of a biodiversity conservation and bushland management strategy.

Critical Action: Undertake biodiversity conservation and protection and pursue the effective management of natural areas.

     

Purpose:

To provide Council with information on the Biodiversity Action Plan that has been developed to progress the implementation of the Penrith Biodiversity Strategy.  The report recommends that the information be received.

 

Introduction

The conservation of biodiversity is a major challenge and Penrith City Council has a fundamental role to play. Penrith has a diverse range of native species and ecological communities many of which are listed for protection under the Threatened Species Conservation Act 1995 and the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999. The majority of these rare species are primarily confined to remnant patches of native vegetation occurring on private land outside conservation reserves.

 

In response to this challenge the Penrith Biodiversity Strategy was adopted by Council in May 2004. The Strategy outlines the Council’s commitment to conserving and maintaining biological diversity. It is aligned with The National Strategy for the Conservation of Australia’s Biological Diversity, NSW Biodiversity Strategy, and the Hawkesbury Nepean Catchment Action Plan providing overarching direction for biodiversity conservation and management in Penrith. This strategic planning document gives policy direction for the sustainable preservation of our unique natural landscapes, management of our protected areas, native wildlife and its habitats.

Biodiversity Action Plan

The Penrith Biodiversity Strategy was recently reviewed with the aim of determining the most suitable method of conserving Penrith’s Biodiversity and progressing the good work that has already commenced in this area.

 

An internal working group that includes members from variety of Council departments with an interest in biodiversity conservation outcomes has been established to progress the implementation of the Strategy. This group played an important role in the development of the Biodiversity Action Plan and will also be involved in monitoring the plans implementation.

The Plan builds on the objectives of the Strategy with specific actions assigned to address the Strategy goals for Biodiversity Conservation and Protection, Integrating Biodiversity Conservation and Natural Resource management, Managing Threatening Processes, Improving Our Knowledge and Community Involvement.

 

The Biodiversity Action Plan will also focus and build on core vegetation and habitat linkages identified by National Parks and Wildlife mapping in 2002, Flora and Fauna Corridor Study 1997, Conservation Significance Assessment 2005, and 100m Connectivity Analysis 2005. 

 

The Plan provides for a “priority system” to manage actions and to ensure that maximum benefit can be achieved with the resources allocated for its implementation. It is also an intention of the Plan for higher priority actions to be incorporated into Council Management Plan. Performance will be reviewed throughout the year with a more detailed annual assessment of the actions. This review will allow flexibility to modify the Plan to adapt to changing priorities and organisational needs. Council’s established reporting processes will be utilised to report on the performance and progress of the Action Plan.

 

The following table provides some examples of the higher priority items that are recommended for action in the next management plan year. Further details are provided on these actions in the attached Biodiversity Action Plan. It is important to note that some of the more significant actions will require more than a 12 month period to complete and others will be ongoing.

 

Actions

Comments

Develop a biodiversity GIS layer based on existing information (public & private).

Upgrade existing GIS maps by developing mapping layers showing vegetation corridors, riparian corridors, surrounding land uses & stormwater treatment systems. Overlay layers with aerials and zones to identify gaps, key threatening processes and prioritise management actions to protect and enhance biodiversity assets.

Collect data from local surveys, Flora & Fauna Reports and integrate DBMS with GIS.

Investigate systems for biodiversity data capture, storage and display. Data from local surveys, Flora & Fauna Reports (DA’s) and sighting will be stored in an Access database and displayed on GIS.

Support State government actions to monitor and evaluate listed Threatened Species and Ecological Communities.

Review and if appropriate implement the recommendations of Threat Abatement Plans for species and communities listed under the Threatened Species Conservation Act 1995 and the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999.

Secure biodiversity outcomes through the Release Area planning process.

Explore opportunities to conserve biodiversity through the release Area planning process, including the implementation of the Sustainability Blueprint for Urban Release Areas.

Asset Management projects and maintenance practices to consider biodiversity.

Review Asset Management procedures for environmentally sensitive areas including the completion of a REF for all activity types.

Ensure development assessment procedures consider biodiversity conservation.

Review development assessment practice notes to ensure they are up to date and consistent with relevant legislation and current best practice.

Assist relevant authorities to control noxious weeds.

Identify the priority weed threats and work with Hawkesbury River County Council and other relevant authorities to control those outbreaks.

Monitor the impacts of pollutants on biodiversity in particular on aquatic systems.

Develop and implement a Water Health Strategy that monitors impacts on biodiversity and in particular aquatic environments.

Promote community participation via the internet and local newspaper.

Biodiversity represented in the Council network news paper and website. Publish regular article outlining biodiversity issues & actions.

Create a community resource on Penrith’s biodiversity.

Liaise with the library to establish a biodiversity resource section in the technical library and ensure the Council website has resources for community use.

Identify and support businesses, Landcare or similar Community groups by providing equipment, materials and knowledge to promote and conserve biodiversity.

 

Identify and list active community organisations and inform them of funding opportunities by way of the PCC website, email shots, and offering assistance. Work with the HNCMA to encourage the formation of community groups for areas high in biodiversity or resilience.

Prepare and distribute educational material at various public events.

Create a calendar of events to target education and awareness efforts throughout the year such as: Threatened Species Day, Biodiversity Month, National Tree Day, Council Open Day etc.

Continue Council Parks Construction & Maintenance staff training in bushland maintenance.

Create procedure for establishing 'no mow' zones to protect regeneration work and to allow for recruitment of native species in parkland. Procedure for ‘no mow’ zones to be reinforced with a bushland friendly maintenance manual. Rotate Parks Construction & Maintenance staff with bushland regeneration team.

 

Biodiversity Working Group to facilitate internal training and awareness programs. 

Biodiversity Working Group will be used to initiate training ideas and programs for greater awareness of biodiversity issues and biodiversity knowledge.

 

The Biodiversity Action Plan has been developed using a nationally recognised framework called Benchmarking Biodiversity Conservation. The benchmarking system allows for the comparison of progress across local governments throughout Australia and gives essential support and guidance throughout the implementation process. The model is designed to guide Councils through five broadly defined benchmarks:

·    Commit to Change

·    Establish a Baseline Position

·    Develop a Strategic Approach

·    Implement and Monitor, and

·    Review and Evaluate.

 

Penrith has addressed the “Commit to Change” and “Develop a Strategic Approach” benchmark steps through developing the Penrith Biodiversity Strategy and now the accompanying Biodiversity Action Plan. Utilising the management plan process to monitor and report on action progress, reviewing internal policies and practices, facilitating access and distributing educational material and exploring funding opportunities will all assist progress toward addressing the remaining benchmark steps in the model.

Conclusion

The Penrith Biodiversity Action Plan provides practical actions developed to meet the objectives of the Penrith Biodiversity Strategy. The Plan provides a system of prioritising actions to ensure that maximum benefit can be achieved with the resources allocated for its implementation. It is intended that higher priority actions will be incorporated into Council’s Management Plan and the established monitoring and reporting processes will be utilised to assess the Plans progress. The performance of the Plan will also be reviewed annually. This review will allow flexibility to modify the Plan if needed to adapt to changing priorities and organisational needs.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the information contained in the report on the Biodiversity Action Plan be received.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.  

Biodiversity Action Plan

11 Pages

Attachment

   


 

 

The City as an Economy

 

 

There were no reports under this Master Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


 

 

The City Supported by Infrastructure

 

 

There were no reports under this Master Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


Leadership and Organisation

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

6        Proposed Policy on 'Advertising on Council Premises'

 

7        2008 Local Government Remuneration Tribunal Review

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting

18 February 2008

Leadership and Organisation

 

 

Leadership and Organisation

 

 

6

Proposed Policy on 'Advertising on Council Premises'   

 

Compiled by:                Stephen Pearson, Executive Services Officer

Authorised by:             Glenn McCarthy, Executive Officer  

Requested By:             Councillor Ross Fowler OAM

Strategic Program Term Achievement: Council has reviewed its own role and operations and has adopted contemporary practices to best discharge its charter.

Critical Action: Review current structures and procedures supporting Council and Councillors responsibilities.

     

Purpose:

To gain Council approval for a policy on political and general advertising on Council premises. The report recommends that the proposed Policy relating to 'Advertising on Council Premises' be adopted.

 

Background

In Questions Without Notice at the Ordinary Council Meeting held on 13 August 2007, Councillor Ross Fowler requested a report on the formulation of a policy covering political, and other, advertising on Council premises.

 

Councillor Fowler has indicated that the reason for requesting this policy is that there have been occasional instances in the past of unauthorised political advertising on Council premises. He considers that there is a need for Council to adopt an appropriate policy so that it can control this sort of advertising, so that Council is seen as being impartial and not seen as promoting any political ideology or commercial product.

 

A draft policy was submitted to the Policy Review Committee on 10 December 2007. The Committee’s recommendation to receive the report and to re-submit it to a future Policy Review Committee Meeting to allow the draft policy to be amended to exclude parks and road reserves from the policy, was adopted by Council on 17 December 2007.

 

Proposed Amended Draft Policy

 

The draft policy has now been amended to exclude parks and road reserves by altering the definition of ‘Council premises’ to read as follows (the added words appear in bold):

 

‘Council premises’ includes the public areas of all Council owned buildings and buildings of which the Council is the lessee, and the land on which those buildings are located. This Policy does not extend to Council owned and controlled open space, recreation and public road reserves, nor to buildings and land which Council has leased to a third party.

 

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on the proposed policy relating to ‘Advertising on Council Premises’ be received

2.     The proposed policy relating to ‘Advertising on Council Premises’, as shown in the Amended Draft Policy Document appended to this report, be adopted

3.     The managers of all Council controlled premises, including section 377 Committees, be informed of Council’s policy relating to ‘Advertising on Council Premises’

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1. View

Draft Policy relating to 'Advertising on Council Premises'

1 Page

Appendix

  


Policy Review Committee Meeting

18 February 2008

Appendix 1 - Draft Policy relating to 'Advertising on Council Premises'

 

 

 

            POLICY DOCUMENT

 

POLICY NAME:

ADVERTISING ON COUNCIL PREMISES

Policy No:       

Adopted by Council:

    

Minute No:         

Review:

    

File No:              

Relevant Legislation: (if applicable)      

    

Responsible Department:

Legal & Governance

 Policy Statement: 

That Council premises not be used for Political Advertising and other General Advertising, nor for the handing out of Political Advertising and General Advertising material.

Why this policy is required

Council should be seen within its community to be impartial and not acting in the interests of any particular individual or organisation.

Definitions  

‘Council premises’ includes the public areas of all Council owned buildings and buildings of which the Council is the lessee, and the land on which those buildings are located. This Policy does not extend to Council owned and controlled open space recreation and public road reserves, nor to buildings and land which Council has leased to a third party.

 

‘General Advertising’ includes advertisements, posters, photographs, notices, signs, structures, banners, leaflets, pamphlets, handbills, cards, balloons, public address or use of loud speakers, used or intended to influence the public to buy a product or use a service.

 

‘Political Advertising’ includes how to vote material, advertisements, posters, photographs, notices, signs, structures, banners, leaflets, pamphlets, handbills, cards, balloons, public address or use of loud speakers, used or intended to promote a particular candidate, political party or non-political party or political cause.

Exceptions to Policy

This Policy applies, with the exception that Political and other General Advertising is permitted in the following circumstances:

 

1.     where the General Advertising comprises a product that is part of a display on Council premises to educate and inform the public;

2.     where the Council premises is a Council hall or similar venue which has been hired to the general public for a private social activity, event, conference or meeting and the advertising cannot be viewed from a public place;

3.     where the Council premises is being used for electoral purposes for Commonwealth, State or local elections on polling day or for pre-poll voting and the advertising is in accordance with the relevant NSW or Commonwealth electoral legislation;

4.     where the Council has specifically resolved that the advertising be allowed;

5.     where the General Manager has sanctioned the General Advertising.

 


Policy Review Committee Meeting

18 February 2008

Leadership and Organisation

 

 

Leadership and Organisation

 

 

7

2008 Local Government Remuneration Tribunal Review   

 

Compiled by:                Stephen Pearson, Executive Services Officer

Authorised by:             Glenn McCarthy, Executive Officer   

Strategic Program Term Achievement: Council has reviewed its own role and operations and has adopted contemporary practices to best discharge its charter.

Critical Action: Review current structures and procedures supporting Council and Councillors responsibilities.

     

Purpose:

To advise Council of the current review into the fees payable to Councillors and Mayors for the 2008 Determination, to take effect from 1 July 2008. The report recommends that Council support the submission made by the Local Government and Shires Associations of NSW.

 

Background

The Local Government Remuneration Tribunal (the Tribunal) was established under the Local Government Act, 1993 (the Act) to make an annual determination of the minimum and maximum fees payable to councillors and mayors for each category of council. The determination must be made by 30 April each year.

Current Review

The Tribunal has commenced its review for the 2008 determination and any increase in fees applied will take effect from 1 July 2008.

 

The Tribunal has written to Council seeking submissions for the review. It would welcome a submission in regard to the quantum and/or structure of fees.

 

In accordance with Section 239 of the Act, the Tribunal is required to determine the categories of councils at least every three years. Categories of councils were last determined by the Tribunal in 2006. As outlined in the report and determination of 19 April 2006, the Tribunal determined that Category 5 councils should be merged with Category 4 councils and that Category 5 would be abolished. The Tribunal found that the remaining existing categories were still appropriate and determined no further changes.

 

The Tribunal has advised that it does not intend to undertake a further review of categories during the 2008 review. The Tribunal will review the categories of councils again as part of the 2009 review. Until then the Tribunal would not expect to move councils within categories unless there is a significant change in the role and responsibilities of individual councils.

Local Government and Shires Associations of New South Wales 2008 Submission to the NSW Local Government Remuneration Tribunal

A copy of the Local Government and Shires Association’s 2008 submission to the NSW Local Government Remuneration Tribunal is appended to this report.

 

The Associations are asking the Tribunal to consider:

 

·        their previous 2007 submission which was based on the findings of the Independent Inquiry into the Financial Sustainability of NSW Local Government and Mastertek Consultants, both of which considered the roles and responsibilities of councillors and concluded that councillors’ remuneration levels should be increased

 

·        the changing nature of the role and responsibilities of councillors and mayors in regard to:

-          Governance

-          Environment and Natural Resource Management, including Water Management and Ecologically Sustainable Development and Climate Change

-          Social Policy Matters, including:

~      Planning for population ageing

~      Cultural Planning Guidelines

~      Maintaining Local Government Child Care

~      Protecting Aboriginal Heritage

~      The New Food Safety Regime

~      Planning for a New Public Health Threat: Influenza Pandemic

~      Managing Alcohol and other Community Drug Problems

~      Negotiating Government and Non-Government demands on tobacco smoking

~      Water and Sewerage issues for Discrete Aboriginal Communities

 

-          Local Government Finances

 

·        the comparison of Councillors with Members of Parliament and still advocating the mayor and councillor remuneration rates suggested in their submission of 1 February 2007, namely:

 

-          a benchmark rate of 80% of a State Members of Parliament salary for mayors of category 1A (Blacktown & Penrith) and S2 (Newcastle, Parramatta & Wollongong) councils

-          councillors fee for these councils set at 50% of the mayoral fee, or 40% of a State Members of Parliament salary

-          fees for mayors and councillors in other categories would then be established against these benchmarks.

Penrith City Council’s Current Situation

Council successfully argued in 2001 and 2002 for the establishment of a new Category – Category 1A – to distinguish those particular aspects of large, mainly urban councils, located at the fringe of urban areas. The Tribunal concluded that Penrith warranted inclusion in Category 1A because of its regional significance in outer western Sydney in addition to its Category 1 functions.

 

The current Tribunal approved remuneration for 2007 for Categories S1 (Sydney City), S2 (Newcastle, Parramatta and Wollongong) and 1A (Blacktown and Penrith) are shown in the following table.

Current Fees for Councillors and Mayors for Category S1, S2 and 1A Councils

 

Councillor/Member

2007 Annual Fee

Mayor/Chairperson

2007 Additional Fee*

 

Minimum

Maximum

Minimum

Maximum

S1

19,830

29,080

121,305

159,620

S2

13,215

21,805

28,090

63,560

Category 1A

13,215

21,805

28,090

63,560

* This fee must be paid in addition to the fee paid to the Mayor/Chairperson as a Councillor/Member (s.249(2)).

 

Penrith City Council has adopted the maximum annual fee and its current fees paid to the Mayor and Councillors for the financial year ending 30 June 2008 are structured as follows:

 

1.   Councillors $21,805

2.   Mayor – $21,805 + $50,848 (which is 80% of max Mayoral allowance) = $72,653

3.   Deputy Mayor - $21,805 + $12,712 (which is 20% of max Mayoral allowance) = $34,517

 

If the recommendations in the Local Government and Shires Association’s 2008 submission were agreed to by the NSW Local Government Remuneration Tribunal:

 

1.   the fees payable for a Category 1A Council (Blacktown and Penrith) would be: 

 

 

Councillor/Member

Annual Fee

Mayor/Chairperson

(including Councillor fee)

 

Minimum

Maximum

Minimum

Maximum

Category 1A

30,418

50,696*1

60,836

101,393*2

*1 Maximum based on 40% of State MP

*2 Maximum based on 80% of State MP

 

2.   In keeping with Council’s established practice of providing an additional fee to recognise of the role of the Deputy Mayor, the difference between the Mayoral Fee and Councillor Fee could be split 80/20.  The maximum fees payable to the Mayor, Deputy Mayor and Councillors would become:

·      Councillors $50,696

·      Mayor – $50,696 + $40,557.60 (80% of difference to Mayoral Fee) = $91,253.60

·      Deputy Mayor - $50,696 + $ 10,139.40 (20% of difference to Mayoral Fee) = $60,835.40

Financial Services Manager’s Comment

Council’s current practice is to remunerate the Mayor and Councillors at the maximum fee level as determined by the Tribunal.  While the above proposed fee allocation differs from the proposed allocation by the LGSA, which does not recognise the role of the Deputy Mayor, the overall costs of the two structures is the same.  If the LGSA proposal is adopted by the Tribunal, and Penrith Council continues to pay fees at the maximum level, it would represent a total annual increase in expenditure to Council of $420,502.  As this additional amount is not included in the 2008-09 Management Plan currently being compiled the impact of the potential increase would then need to be assessed against the effect on other adopted policies and programs.

Conclusion

Council’s regional role has been officially recognised by the State Government as a Regional City under its 'City of Cities' plan. This announcement, made with the release of the Metropolitan Strategy for Sydney (Metro Strategy) on 5 December 2005, is evidence of Penrith's role in shaping the future of Sydney in the global economy. Most of the points made by the LGA on the changing nature of the role and responsibilities of councillors and mayors are applicable to Penrith City.

 

On this basis, it is suggested that the Local Government Remuneration Tribunal be informed that Penrith City Council supports the Local Government and Shires Associations of New South Wales submission to the Tribunal for the 2008 Review on remuneration levels of mayors and councillors.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on 2008 Local Government Remuneration Tribunal Review be received

2.     A submission be made to the Local Government Remuneration Tribunal supporting the Local Government and Shires Association of NSW submission on the 2008 review of fees payable to mayors and councillors.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.  

LGA submission to Remuneration Tribunal 2008

8 Pages

Attachment

   



 

ATTACHMENTS   

 

 

Date of Meeting:          Monday 18 February 2008

Master Program:          The City in its Environment

Issue:                            Natural Catchment Assets

Report Title:                Biodiversity Action Plan

Attachments:                Biodiversity Action Plan



Policy Review Committee Meeting

18 February 2008

Attachment 1 - Biodiversity Action Plan

 

 

 











 



 

ATTACHMENTS   

 

 

Date of Meeting:          Monday 18 February 2008

Master Program:          Leadership and Organisation

Issue:                            Governance

Report Title:                2008 Local Government Remuneration Tribunal Review

Attachments:                LGA submission to Remuneration Tribunal 2008



Policy Review Committee Meeting

18 February 2008

Attachment 1 - LGA submission to Remuneration Tribunal 2008