7 April 2008

 

Dear Councillor,

In pursuance of the provisions of the Local Government Act, 1993 and the Regulations thereunder, notice is hereby given that an ORDINARY MEETING of Penrith City Council is to be held in the Council Chambers, Civic Centre, 601 High Street, Penrith on Monday 7 April 2008 at 7:30PM.

Attention is directed to the statement accompanying this notice of the business proposed to be transacted at the meeting.

Yours Faithfully

 

Alan Travers

General Manager

BUSINESS

 

1.           APOLOGIES

 

2.           LEAVE OF ABSENCE

 

3.           CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES

Ordinary Meeting - 10 March 2008.

Extraordinary Council Meeting - 13 March 2008.

 

4.           DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

Pecuniary Interest (The Act requires Councillors who declare a pecuniary interest in an item to leave the meeting during discussion of that item)

Non-Pecuniary Interest

 

5.           ADDRESSING THE MEETING

 

6.           MAYORAL MINUTES

Cr Karen McKeown Elected as ALGWA Secretary .

Announcement of the Winner of the Name the Water Dragon Competition .

 

7.           NOTICES OF MOTION

 

8.           ADOPTION OF REPORTS AND RECOMMENDATION OF COMMITTEES

Policy Review Committee Meeting - 31 March 2008.

 

9.           MASTER PROGRAM REPORTS

 

10.         URGENT REPORTS (to be dealt with in the master program to which the item relates)

 

11.         QUESTIONS WITHOUT NOTICE

 

12.         COMMITTEE OF THE WHOLE


ORDINARY MEETING

 

Monday 7 April 2008

 

table of contents

 

 

 

 

 

seating arrangements

 

 

meeting calendar

 

 

confirmation of minutes

 

 

report and recommendations of committees

 

 

master program reports

 


Statement of Recognition of Penrith City’s

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander
Cultural Heritage

 

 

Council values the unique status of Aboriginal people as the original owners and custodians of lands and waters, including the land and waters of Penrith City.

 

Council values the unique status of Torres Strait Islander people as the original owners and custodians of the Torres Strait Islands and surrounding waters.

 

We work together for a united Australia and City that respects this land of ours, that values the diversity of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural heritage, and provides justice and equity for all.

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

PRAYER

 

 

 

“Sovereign God, tonight as we gather together as a Council we affirm that you are the giver and sustainer of life.  We come together as representatives of our community to make decisions that will benefit this city and the people within it. 

 

We come not in a spirit of competition, not as adversaries, but as colleagues.  Help us to treat each other with respect, with dignity, with interest and with honesty.  Help us not just to hear the words we say, but also to hear each others hearts.  We seek to be wise in all that we say and do.

 

As we meet, our concern is for this city.  Grant us wisdom, courage and strength.

 

Lord, help us.  We pray this in the name of Jesus Christ our Lord.  Amen.”

 

 

 

 

 


Council Chambers Seating Arrangements

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 


                                                        

 

 

Text Box: Public Gallery
Text Box: Managers
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Text Box: Press

Managers                          

 
   


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MEETING CALENDAR

February 2008 - December 2008

 

 

TIME

FEB

MAR

APRIL

MAY

JUNE

JULY

AUG

SEPT

OCT

NOV

DEC

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Ordinary Meetings

7.30 pm

4

10

7

5v

2

14

4

1ü

13^

10

1

25

13 (extra-ordinary)

21

 

23*

 

 

22

20

 

15

Policy Review Committee

7.30 pm

18#+

3

28

19#

16

7

18#+

15@

 

17#

8

 

31@

 

 

 

28

 

 

 

 

 

 

#    Meetings at which the Management Plan ¼ly  reviews are presented.

^     Election of Mayor/Deputy Mayor [only business]

#+  General Manager’s presentation – half year and end of year review

@   Strategic Program progress reports [only business]

v   Meeting at which the Draft Management Plan is adopted for exhibition

ü    Meeting at which the 2007/2008 Annual Statements are presented

*     Meeting at which the Management Plan for 2008/2009 is adopted

 

 

-                 Council’s Ordinary Meetings are held on a three-week cycle where practicable.

-                 Extraordinary Meetings are held as required.

-                 Policy Review Meetings are held on a three-week cycle where practicable.

-                 Members of the public are invited to observe meetings of the Council (Ordinary and Policy Review Committee).  All meetings start at 7:30pm.

-                Should you wish to address Council, please contact the Public Officer, Glenn McCarthy on 47327649

1.              


UNCONFIRMED MINUTES

 OF THE ORDINARY MEETING OF PENRITH CITY COUNCIL HELD IN THE

COUNCIL CHAMBERS

ON MONDAY 10 MARCH 2008 AT 7:40PM

NATIONAL ANTHEM 

The meeting opened with the National Anthem.

STATEMENT OF RECOGNITION

His Worship the Mayor, Councillor Greg Davies read a statement of recognition of Penrith City’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cultural Heritage.

PRAYER

The Council Prayer was read by the Rev Neil Checkley.

PRESENT

His Worship the Mayor Councillor Greg Davies, Councillors Jim Aitken OAM, Kaylene Allison, Lexie Cettolin, Kevin Crameri OAM, Mark Davies, Ross Fowler OAM, Jackie Greenow, Karen McKeown, Susan Page, Garry Rumble, Pat Sheehy AM, Steve Simat (arrived at 7:49 pm) and John Thain.

 

APOLOGIES

52  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Pat Sheehy AM seconded Councillor Jackie Greenow that the apology from Councillor Steve Simat be accepted.

 

LEAVE OF ABSENCE

53  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Pat Sheehy AM seconded Councillor Jackie Greenow that Leave of Absence be granted to Councillor David Bradbury for the period 10 March 2008 to 13 March 2008 inclusive and the period 17 March 2008 to 20 March 2008 inclusive.

 

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES - Ordinary Meeting - 25 February 2008

54  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Pat Sheehy AM seconded Councillor Ross Fowler OAM that the minutes of the Ordinary Meeting of 25 February 2008 be confirmed.

 

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

Councillor John Thain declared a non-pecuniary interest in Item 6 - RFT 08-07/08 Supply and Installation of Backwash Water Treatment Plants as he is a former employee of an unsuccessful candidate for this contract.

 

 

 

 

Mayoral Minutes

 

1        Council nominee named 2008 Woman of the West                                                          

55  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Jackie Greenow that the Mayoral Minute on Council nominee named 2008 Woman of the West be received.

 

Councillor Steve Simat arrived at the meeting, the time being 7:49 pm.

 

2        Local attraction Muru Mittigar wins national tourism award again                                

56  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Jackie Greenow that the Mayoral Minute on Local attraction Muru Mittigar wins national tourism award again be received.

 

Reports of Committees

 

1        Report and Recommendations of the Disability Access Committee                               

57  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor John Thain seconded Councillor Karen McKeown that the recommendations contained in the Report and Recommendations of the Disability Access Committee meeting held on 6 February, 2008 be adopted.

 

2        Report and Recommendations of the Policy Review Committee Meeting held on 3 March 2008   

58  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Ross Fowler OAM seconded Councillor Steve Simat that the recommendations contained in the Report and Recommendations of the Policy Review Committee meeting held on 3 March, 2008 be adopted.

 

3        Report and Recommendations of the Local Traffic Committee Meeting of 3 March 2008     

59  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Garry Rumble seconded Councillor Karen McKeown that the recommendations contained in the Report and Recommendations of the Local Traffic Committee meeting held on 3 March, 2008 be adopted.

 

MASTER PROGRAM REPORTS

 

The City in its Broader Context

 

1        Rezoning Proposal - Fernhill Estate, Mulgoa Valley                                                       

60  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Ross Fowler OAM seconded Councillor Pat Sheehy AM

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Rezoning Proposal - Fernhill Estate, Mulgoa Valley be received

2.     Council endorse the preparation of a formal submission on the Fernhill proposal, based on the issues outlined in this report, to the Department of Planning for its consideration

3.     A community meeting be organised in Mulgoa to enable consultation and discussion on this matter and the proposed Anglican school in St Thomas Road, Mulgoa.

 

 

The City as a Social Place

 

2        Assistance Towards Amateur Sportspersons and Representatives in the fields of Art, Music, Culture - Overseas and Interstate Travel including results gained by recipients                          

61  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Garry Rumble seconded Councillor Karen McKeown that the information contained in the report on Assistance Towards Amateur Sportspersons and Representatives in the fields of Art, Music, Culture - Overseas and Interstate Travel including results gained by recipients be received.

 

 

4        Improvement works to Panthers Training Field                                                               

62  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Garry Rumble seconded Councillor Karen McKeown

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Improvement works to Panthers Training Field be received

2.     Re-imbursement of $70,032 be provided to Panthers for the works completed to the training field.

 

 

6        RFT 08-07/08 Supply and Installation of Backwash Water Treatment Plants               

63  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Garry Rumble seconded Councillor Karen McKeown

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on RFT 08-07/08 Supply and Installation of Backwash Water Treatment Plants be received

2.     iPools Pty Ltd be engaged as the Approved contractor to undertake the Supply and Installation of Backwash Water Treatments Plants at Penrith Swimming Centre and Ripples Aquatic Leisure Centre

3.     Council reallocate $30,550 to this project from the 2007/08 Asset Renewal Program.

 

 

3        Consulting with Young People - WSROC Regional Youth Advisory Committee            

64  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Susan Page seconded Councillor Jim Aitken OAM

          That:

 

1.      The information contained in the report on Consulting with Young People - WSROC Regional Youth Advisory Committee be received

 

2.      A further report and plan be presented to Council detailing how it is proposed to establish a Youth Advisory Committee.

 

5        Update of activities undertaken by the Development Services Department - Second Quarter 2007/2008

65  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Pat Sheehy AM seconded Councillor Ross Fowler OAM

That:

1.      The information contained in the report on Update of activities undertaken       by the Development Services Department - Second Quarter 2007/2008 be    received

 

2.      A further report be presented to Council regarding fire safety at Council’s facilities

 

3.      A further report be presented to the next meeting of the Development Regulation Working Party detailing measures to improve the efficiency of the development application process, particularly in relation to internal referrals.

 

The City Supported by Infrastructure

 

7        Driver Licensing in New South Wales                                                                              

66  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Jim Aitken OAM seconded Councillor Steve Simat that the information contained in the report on Driver Licensing in New South Wales be received.

 

8        Demolition of Council Facilities                                                                                         

67  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Garry Rumble seconded Councillor Jim Aitken OAM

That:

1.       The information contained in the report on Demolition of Council Facilities be received

2.     Demolition of the YMCA St Marys and Ridge Park Scout Hall be approved.

 

 

 

 

Leadership and Organisation

 

9        2007-2008 Borrowing Program                                                                                          

68  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Ross Fowler OAM seconded Councillor Jim Aitken OAM

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on 2007-2008 Borrowing Program be received

2.     Council borrow the amount of $10,290,000 on a 10 or 15 year repayment schedule

3.     The Chief Financial Officer be given delegated authority to negotiate the loans in accordance with this resolution

4.     The Council seal be affixed to those documents that are necessary to finalise these borrowings

5.     The final terms and conditions of the borrowings be reported to Council upon completion of the contracts.

 

10      Summary of Investments & Banking for the period 1 February to 29 February 2008   

69  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Ross Fowler OAM seconded Councillor Jim Aitken OAM

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Summary of Investments & Banking for the period 1 February to 29 February 2008 be received

2.     The Certificate of the Responsible Accounting Officer and Summaries of Investments and Performance for the period 1 February 2008 to 29 February 2008  be noted and accepted

3.     The graphical investment analysis as at 29 February 2008 be noted

 

 

QUESTIONS WITHOUT NOTICE

 

QWN 1      Mamre House - Replacement Water Pump                                                            

Councillor Kaylene Allison requested that an amount of $765.05 from East Ward voted works be allocated to the provision of a replacement water pump for Mamre House.

70  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Kaylene Allison seconded Councillor Jackie Greenow that the mater be brought forward and dealt with as a matter of urgency.

 

His Worship the Mayor, Councillor Greg Davies, ruled that the matter was urgent and should be dealt with at the meeting.

 

 

71  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Kaylene Allison seconded Councillor Jackie Greenow that an amount of $765.05 from East Ward voted works be allocated to the provision of a replacement water pump for Mamre House.

 

QWN 2      Leave of Absence                                                                                                     

Councillor Karen McKeown requested leave of absence from 17 March 2008 to 28 March 2008 inclusive. 

72  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Jackie Greenow seconded Councillor John Thain that the matter be brought forward and dealt with as a matter of urgency.

 

His Worship the Mayor, Councillor Greg Davies, ruled that the matter was urgent and should be dealt with at the meeting.

 

73  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Jackie Greenow seconded Councillor John Thain that Leave of Absence be granted to Councillor Karen McKeown from 17 March 2008 to 28 March 2008 inclusive. 

 

QWN 3      Werrington Creek Park Bushland Rehabilitation                                                   

Councillor John Thain requested that the amount of $10,000 from North Ward voted works be allocated to provide bollards as a barrier to limit damage to grass cover in the Werrington Creek Park Bushland Rehabilitation area.

 

74  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor John Thain seconded Councillor Pat Sheehy AM that the matter be brought forward and dealt with as a matter of urgency.

 

His Worship the Mayor, Councillor Greg Davies, ruled that the matter was urgent and should be dealt with at the meeting.

 

75  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor John Thain seconded Councillor Pat Sheehy AM that the amount of $10,000 from North Ward voted works be allocated to provide bollards as a barrier to limit damage to grass cover in the Werrington Creek Park Bushland Rehabilitation area.

 

QWN 4      Universal Play Equipment                                                                                        

Councillor John Thain requested a report to Council providing a review of the People’s Lifestyles Aspirations and Needs (PLANS) Study of Universal play equipment in the Wards, and detailing the most appropriate location for a Liberty Swing to be included as part of the play equipment.

 

QWN 5      Tench Avenue - Lighting                                                                                          

Councillor Jim Aitken OAM requested that the total amount of $4,951, made up of equal contributions from each of North, South and East Ward voted works, be allocated to the provision of lighting at Tench Avenue.

 

 

76  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Jim Aitken OAM seconded Councillor Pat Sheehy AM that the matter be brought forward and dealt with as a matter of urgency.

 

His Worship the Mayor, Councillor Greg Davies, ruled that the matter was urgent and should be dealt with at the meeting.

 

77  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Jim Aitken OAM seconded Councillor Pat Sheehy AM that the total amount of $4,951, made up of equal contributions from each of North, South and East Ward voted works, be allocated to the provision of lighting at Tench Avenue.

 

QWN 6      Leave of Absence                                                                                                     

Councillor Steve Simat requested leave of absence from 11 March 2008 to 1 April 2008 inclusive. 

 

78  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Ross Fowler OAM seconded Councillor Jim Aitken OAM that the matter be brought forward and dealt with as a matter of urgency.

 

His Worship the Mayor, Councillor Greg Davies, ruled that the matter was urgent and should be dealt with at the meeting.

 

79  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Ross Fowler OAM seconded Councillor Jim Aitken OAM that Leave of Absence be granted to Councillor Steve Simat from 11 March 2008 to 1 April 2008 inclusive. 

 

QWN 7      Skate parks - user safety                                                                                         

Councillor Garry Rumble requested a report to Council addressing user safety at Council’s skate parks, with the Youth Development Officer, in conjunction with the community safety committee and Council Rangers, to prepare an education program, to be in place for the opening of the new skate parks in Glenmore Park and St Clair.

 

QWN 8      Werrington Overpass - Provision of Trees                                                              

Councillor Lexie Cettolin requested that the amount of $800 from North Ward voted works be allocated to the provision of appropriate trees to screen the face of the embankment near the Werrington Overpass.

 

80  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Lexie Cettolin seconded Councillor John Thain that the matter be brought forward and dealt with as a matter of urgency.

 

His Worship the Mayor, Councillor Greg Davies, ruled that the matter was urgent and should be dealt with at the meeting.

 

81  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Lexie Cettolin seconded Councillor John Thain that the amount of $800 from North Ward voted works be allocated to the provision of appropriate trees to screen the face of the embankment near the Werrington Overpass.

 

QWN 9      Development Application for ADI Site, Penrith                                                      

Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM requested a memo reply detailing the type of filling permitted to be used for the floodplain at the ADI site, Penrith.

 

QWN 10    Provision of Adequate Parking areas in Penrith                                                     

Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM requested a report to Council regarding the concerns of residents that there is insufficient parking in Penrith, and considering the implications for the Regional City of Penrith if visitors and workers are unable to find adequate parking spaces in the Penrith CBD, with the report to include reference to the shortage of parking spaces available to employees working in Penrith as these are often not provided by employers.

 

QWN 11    Traffic Issues - Xavier College, Llandilo                                                                 

Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM requested that the matter of traffic congestion around Xavier College, Llandilo be referred to the Local Traffic Committee for investigation.

 

QWN 12    Penrith Lakes Scheme - Riding of bicycles                                                             

Councillor Jim Aitken OAM requested a memo reply concerning the conflicting uses of the pedestrian/cycle paths in the Penrith Lakes Scheme area.

 

 

 

There being no further business the Chairperson declared the meeting closed the time being 8:25 pm.

 

 

 


UNCONFIRMED MINUTES

 OF THE EXTRAORDINARY COUNCIL MEETING OF PENRITH CITY COUNCIL HELD IN THE PASSADENA ROOM

ON THURSDAY 13 MARCH 2008 AT 7:30PM

 

STATEMENT OF RECOGNITION

His Worship the Mayor, Councillor Greg Davies read a statement of recognition of Penrith City’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cultural Heritage.

PRESENT

His Worship the Mayor Councillor Greg Davies, Councillors Jim Aitken OAM, Kaylene Allison, Lexie Cettolin, Kevin Crameri OAM, Mark Davies, Ross Fowler OAM, Jackie Greenow, Karen McKeown, Susan Page, Garry Rumble, Pat Sheehy AM and John Thain.

 

APOLOGIES

There were no apologies.

 

LEAVE OF ABSENCE

Leave of Absence was previously granted to Councillor David Bradbury for the period 10 March 2008 to 13 March 2008 inclusive.

Leave of Absence was previously granted to Councillor Steve Simat for the period 11 March 2008 to 1 April 2008 inclusive.

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

Nil.

 

Committee of the Whole

 

82 RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor John Thain seconded Councillor Kaylene Allison that the meeting adjourn to the Committee of the Whole to deal with the following matters, the time being 7:33 pm.

 

1        Presence of the Public

 

CW1 RESOLVED on the motion of Councillor John Thain seconded Councillor Kaylene Allison that the press and public be excluded from Committee of the Whole to deal with the following matters:

 

Leadership and Organisation

 

2        Personnel Matter                                                                                                               

 

This item has been referred to Committee of the Whole as the report refers to personnel matters concerning particular individuals and discussion of the matter in open meeting would be, on balance, contrary to the public interest.

 

 

The meeting resumed at 9:15 pm and the General Manager reported that the Committee of the Whole met at 7:33 pm on 13 March 2008, the following being present

 

His Worship the Mayor Councillor Greg Davies, Councillors Jim Aitken OAM, Kaylene Allison, Lexie Cettolin, Kevin Crameri OAM, Mark Davies, Ross Fowler OAM, Jackie Greenow, Karen McKeown, Susan Page, Garry Rumble, Pat Sheehy AM and John Thain

 

and the Committee of the Whole excluded the press and public from the meeting for the reasons set out in CW1 and that the Committee of the Whole submitted the following recommendations to Council.

 

CONFIDENTIAL BUSINESS

 

2        Personnel Matter                                                                                                               

RECOMMENDED on the MOTION of Councillor Ross Fowler OAM  seconded Councillor Pat Sheehy AM

CW2 That:

1.      Subject to appropriate recruitment processes the preferred applicant, Mr Alan Stoneham, as chosen in the Committee of the Whole on 13 March 2008 be appointed to the position of General Manager of the Council.

2.      The Mayor and General Manager be authorised to negotiate an Employment Contract on behalf of the Council.

3.      The details be reported as an information item to the Ordinary Meeting of Council on 7 April 2008.

4.      The Mayor and General Manager be authorised to issue appropriate press releases on the successful applicant following completion of Employment Contract negotiations.

 

ADOPTION OF Committee of the Whole

 

83  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor John Thain seconded Councillor Jackie Greenow that the recommendation contained in the Committee of the Whole and shown as CW2 be adopted.

 

There being no further business the Chairperson declared the meeting closed the time being 9:20 pm.

 

 



PENRITH CITY COUNCIL

 

Procedure for Addressing Meetings

 

Anyone can request permission to address a meeting, providing that the number of speakers is limited to three in support of any proposal and three against.

 

Any request about an issue or matter on the Agenda for the meeting can be lodged with the General Manager or Public Officer up until 12 noon on the day of the meeting.

 

Prior to the meeting the person who has requested permission to address the meeting will need to provide the Public Officer with a written statement of the points to be covered during the address in sufficient detail so as to inform the Councillors of the substance of the address and a written copy of any questions to be asked of the Council in order that responses to those questions can be provided in due course.

 

In addition, prior to addressing the meeting a person addressing Council or Committee will be informed that they do not enjoy any privilege and that permission to speak may be withdrawn should they make inappropriate comments.

 

It should be noted that speakers at meetings of the Council or Committee do not have absolute privilege (parliamentary privilege).  A speaker who makes any potentially offensive or defamatory remarks about any other person may render themselves open to legal action.

 

Prior to addressing the meeting the person will be required to sign the following statement:

 

“I (name) understand that the meeting I intend to address on (date) is a public meeting.  I also understand that should I say or present any material that is inappropriate, I may be subject to legal action.  I also acknowledge that I have been informed to obtain my own legal advice about the appropriateness of the material that I intend to present at the above mentioned meeting”.

 

Should a person fail to sign the above statement then permission to address either the Council or Committee will not be granted.

 

The Public Officer or Minute Clerk will speak to those people who have requested permission to address the meeting, prior to the meeting at 7.15pm.

 

It is up to the Council or Committee to decide if the request to address the meeting will be granted.

 

Where permission is to be granted the Council or Committee, at the appropriate time, will suspend only so much of the Standing Orders to allow the address to occur.

 

The Chairperson will then call the person up to the lectern or speaking area.

 

The person addressing the meeting needs to clearly indicate:

 

·     Their name;

 

·     Organisation or group they are representing (if applicable);

 

·     Details of the issue to be addressed and the item number of the report in the Business Paper;

 

·     Whether they are opposing or supporting the issue or matter (if applicable) and the action they would like the meeting to take;

 

·           The interest of the speaker (e.g. affected person, neighbour, applicant,        applicants spokesperson, interested citizen etc).

 

Each person then has five minutes to make their address.  Those addressing Council will be required to speak to the written statement they have submitted.  Permission to address Council is not to be taken as an opportunity to refute or otherwise the points made by previous speakers on the same issue. 

 

The Council or Committee can extend this time if they consider if appropriate, however, everyone needs to work on the basis that the address will be for five minutes only.

 

Councillors may have questions about the address so people are asked to remain at the lectern or in the speaking area until the Chairperson has thanked them.

 

When this occurs, they should then return to their seat.

 

 

Glenn McCarthy

Public Officer

02 4732 7649                                                       

   


Mayoral Minutes

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

1        Cr Karen McKeown Elected as ALGWA Secretary 

 

2        Announcement of the Winner of the Name the Water Dragon Competition 

 

 



Ordinary Meeting

7 April 2008

Leadership and Organisation

 

Mayoral Minute

Cr Karen McKeown Elected as ALGWA Secretary 

Strategic Program Term Achievement: Council has reviewed its own role and operations and has adopted contemporary practices to best discharge its charter.

         

 

On Saturday, Councillor Karen McKeown was elected unopposed as Secretary of the Australian Local Government Women’s Association’s New South Wales Branch. Councillor Jackie Greenow was also re-elected to the Executive Committee and Council staff member Bev Spearpoint was elected to the Executive Committee – a first for a council officer.

 

The Australian Local Government Women's Association (ALGWA) is the peak body representing the interests of women in local government – either as officers or elected members.

 

Council has a proud tradition of supporting ALGWA and currently Councillor Susan Page is serving on the State Executive as immediate past President, together with Councillors McKeown and Greenow. Cr Greenow was also made a life member in 2006 in recognition of her support for the organisation, particularly in the role of Secretary.

 

Last week ALGWA held its State Conference which incorporated the body’s Board Meeting, where Cr McKeown was elected as Secretary. This is a tremendous honour, not only for Councillor McKeown, but by reflection, Penrith City Council, which has for many years financially supported Councillors and officers in attending such state and national conferences.  Councillor McKeown’s appointment is also evidence of this Council’s commitment to women in Local Government as well as our philosophy of equal opportunity for both councillors and staff at all levels.

 

I think it is very worthwhile that our City’s elected representatives are able to expand their knowledge, experience and networks through such forums and I’m aware that not all councils offer their representatives the same support. Attending these conferences and taking on these voluntary roles demands a lot of the individual’s time.

 

Over time, our involvement with ALGWA has been very beneficial to Penrith and I am sure our residents and staff, particularly women, appreciate such an obvious commitment to equal opportunity.

 

I would like to congratulate Councillor McKeown on her appointment and reiterate this Council’s support for ALGWA.

 

Greg Davies

Mayor

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the Mayoral Minute on Cr Karen McKeown Elected as ALGWA Secretary  be received.

 


Ordinary Meeting

7 April 2008

The City in its Environment

 

Mayoral Minute

Announcement of the Winner of the Name the Water Dragon Competition 

Strategic Program Term Achievement: Council leads our City by example and through advocacy by implementing sustainability initiatives.

         

 

Council recently held a competition to name its mascot for sustainability, the Eastern Water Dragon. The water dragon has been chosen as a symbol of Council’s Sustainable Penrith program because it lives along the banks of local waterways and represents Penrith City’s social, environmental and economic health.

 

More than 200 entries were received with many creative and innovative names suggested for our friendly lizard, making the job of judging a difficult one for our panel.

 

It is my pleasure to announce that the winning name for the competition is ‘Echo’ the Eastern Water Dragon. The name ‘Echo’ was suggested by local resident, Karen Silversides of Glenmore Park. Karen put a lot of thought into the name and felt that the name was a perfect match for our mascot because how we treat the environment now will continue to echo down through generations to come. The name also has connections to the words ‘ecological’ and ‘ecosystems’ which are important within the sustainability context of our City.

 

By suggesting the winning name Karen not only wins the right to officially name our Eastern Water Dragon, she also receives tickets for 2 adults and 2 children to attend Taronga Zoo’s ‘Roar and Snore’ adventure, which includes overnight accommodation, meals and special behind the scenes access and tours through the Zoo.

 

Congratulations Karen and thank you for the thought you put into naming ‘Echo’. Naming our Mascot will help Council further promote awareness of the values for which he stands.

 

I would now like to invite Council’s Sustainability Champion, Cr. Karen McKeown, to join me in presenting Karen with a certificate of appreciation.

 

 

 

Greg Davies

Mayor

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the Mayoral Minute on Announcement of the Winner of the Name the Water Dragon Competition  be received.

 

 

  


 

 

 

 

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Reports of Committees

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

1        Report and Recommendations of the Policy Review Committee Meeting held on 31 March 2008

 

 



Ordinary Meeting

7 April 2008

Leadership and Organisation

 

REPORT AND RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE
 Policy Review Committee MEETING

HELD ON 31 March, 2008

 

 

 

PRESENT

His Worship the Mayor Councillor Greg Davies, Councillors Jim Aitken OAM, Kaylene Allison, David Bradbury, Lexie Cettolin, Kevin Crameri OAM, Ross Fowler OAM, Jackie Greenow, Karen McKeown, Susan Page, Garry Rumble, Pat Sheehy AM, and John Thain.

 

APOLOGIES

RECOMMENDED that apologies be received and accepted from Councillor Mark Davies.

 

LEAVE OF ABSENCE

Leave of Absence was previously granted to Councillor Steve Simat for the period 11 March 2008 to 1 April 2008 inclusive.

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES - Policy Review Committee Meeting - 3 March 2008

RECOMMENDED that the minutes of the Policy Review Committee Meeting of 3 March 2008 be confirmed subject to the Declaration of Interest declared by Councillor Jackie Greenow being amended to read as follows:

 

“Councillor Jackie Greenow declared a Pecuniary Interest in Item 3 – Heritage Incentive Fund as she owns property that has the potential to be Heritage Listed. Councillor Greenow declared her intention to leave the meeting during debate and voting on this matter.”

 

 

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

There were no declarations of interest.

 

 

WELCOME TO GUESTS

At this stage, His Worship the Mayor, Councillor Greg Davies extended a welcome to Communication students from the University of Western Sydney who were in attendance to observe the meeting.

 

MASTER PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Leadership and Organisation

 

The General Manager, Mr Alan Travers, gave a brief overview of the progress of the 2005-2009 Strategic Program – 30 Month Review, including Key Themes of the Strategy; Progress towards outcomes; Performance of Council’s Program and Summary of Term Achievements.

 

Presentations were then made by Directors and the Chief Financial Officer as follows:

 

Director – City Strategy: Mr Alan Stoneham

Context; Key Challenges Outside Council’s Direct Control; Key Challenges Within Council’s Direct Control; Confirming the Key Challenges; Regional City Recognition; Regional City Infrastructure and Services.

 

Councillor Garry Rumble left the meeting, the time being 8:29 pm.

 

Councillor Garry Rumble returned to the meeting, the time being 8:32 pm.

 

Director – City Planning: Mr Craig Butler

Regional City Transport; Regional City Environment.

 

The meeting adjourned at 8:55 pm.

 

The meeting resumed at 9:09 pm.

 

Chief Financial Officer: Mr Barry Husking

City Centres; Penrith CBD Improvement Projects.

 

Councillor Lexie Cettolin left the meeting, the time being 9:08 pm.

 

Councillor Lexie Cettolin returned to the meeting, the time being 9:09 pm.

 

Director – City Services: Mr Steve Hackett

Magnetic Places.

 

Councillor Susan Page left the meeting at 9:28 pm and did not return.

 

Director City Operations: Mr David Burns

Recreation and Open Spaces.

 

Director – City Planning: Mr Craig Butler

Rural Lands and Catchment Health; Urban Strategy; Look of the City.

 

Director – City Strategy: Mr Alan Stoneham

Our Staff, Our Community.

 

The General Manager, Mr Alan Travers, gave concluding comments and addressed the question of Where to from Here?

 

1        2005-2009 Strategic Program - Review of Progress to December 2007                         

RECOMMENDED that the information contained in the report on the 2005-2009 Strategic Program - Review of Progress to December 2007 be received.

 

2        2005-2009 Strategic Program Progress Review - Key Challenges                                 

RECOMMENDED that the information contained in the report on the 2005-2009 Strategic Program Progress Review - Key Challenges be received.

 

 

There being no further business the Chairperson declared the meeting closed the time being 10:17pm.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the recommendations contained in the Report and Recommendations of the Policy Review Committee meeting held on 31 March, 2008 be adopted.

 

 

  



 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

 

The City in its Broader Context

 

1        2009 Ulysses Motor Cycle Club Annual General Meeting

 

The City as a Social Place

 

2        Southern Sudanese Settlement in the Penrith LGA

 

3        Community and Cultural Development Department - Projects and Key Achievements - 1 July to 30 December 2007

 

4        Establishment of the Penrith Community Filipino School

 

5        The Healthy Penrith Program

 

6        Status of Victoria Park Landscaping

 

7        Erskine Business Park (Section 94) Development Contributions Plan

 

8        The Australian Chapter of the Alliance for Healthy Cities - National Forum and Meeting 7 - 9 May 2008

 

The City In Its Environment

 

9        Tender 10-07/08 Ropes & South Creek Rehabilitation Works

 

The City as an Economy

 

10      Young Achievement Australia Business Skills Program

 

11      CLAIR Forum 2008

  

Leadership and Organisation

 

12      Best Practice Grants Management Conference

 

13      Personnel Matter 909/91 Pt9

 

 


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


The City in its Broader Context

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

1        2009 Ulysses Motor Cycle Club Annual General Meeting

 

 



Ordinary Meeting

7 April 2008

The City in its Broader Context

 

 

The City in its Broader Context

 

 

1

2009 Ulysses Motor Cycle Club Annual General Meeting   

 

Compiled by:                Paul Page, City Marketing Supervisor

Authorised by:             Geoff Shuttleworth, Economic Development and City Marketing Manager   

Strategic Program Term Achievement: Penrith is recognised locally and throughout Sydney as vibrant, innovative and attractive, distinguished from the rest of Sydney, with a range of services and experiences, complemented by those available in the Blue Mountains and Hawkesbury.

Critical Action: Maintain a marketing program that presents Penrith Valley as the attractive, vibrant centre of outer northwest Sydney, designed to distinguish it from other parts of Sydney and attract visitors.

     

Purpose:

To advise Council of this very major event which will attract over 5,000 Ulysses Club Members to Penrith Valley and of the plans in place for its facilitation.  The report recommends that assistance be provided to the organisers and that the Mayor attend the 2008 AGM in Townsville to promote visitation to Penrith in 2009.

 

Background

The Ulysses Motorcycle Club was formed in 1983 for older motor cyclists.  In that time, it has grown into a very successful and reputable group with 28,000 members nationally. 

 

Membership is available to anyone over the age of 40 who holds or is the partner of a holder of a current motorcycle licence.  A member under the age of 50 is classed as a “Junior Member”. 

 

The aim of the Club is to provide the opportunity for older motorcylists to get together for companionship and mutual support, to show how motorcycling can be an enjoyable and practical activity for riders of all ages and to draw the attention of public and private institutions to the needs and views of older riders. 

 

Each year, club members from all around Australia travel to a designated location for the Annual General Meeting.  In the early days, this was a “campover” and meal.  It is now a major event spanning a week.  It attracts involvement by the major motorcycle manufacturers and suppliers who put on trade displays and test rides of the latest machinery.  There is a Grand Parade through the town or city hosting the meeting, several nights of various forms of entertainment, Friday and Saturday night social events, a church service and the official meetings and ceremonies. 

 

Nationally, the Club has over 120 local branches which compete for the right to host the AGM.  Successful destinations are announced at the meeting three years in advance. 

Council, Panthers and Penrith Paceway were supporting partners with the Nepean Branch in bidding for the right to hold the 2009 AGM in Penrith Valley.  The announcement that Penrith Valley was to host the 2009 meeting took place at the 2006 meeting in Ulverstone Tasmania. 

 

The event will take place from Monday 16 to Sunday 22 March 2009.  At least 5,000 members are expected to come to the event which promises to be one of the most unique and memorable events Penrith Valley has ever hosted. 

 

The economic benefit of such a large number of visitors will also be significant.  The Ulysses Club has indicated that the event will bring in excess of $10 million into the community and be of great benefit to the tourism and retail sectors. 

Grand Parade

The Grand Parade will be held on Saturday 21 March.  It marks the end of the event and is seen by Ulysses as a thank you gesture to local residents for sharing their city or town.  The Grand Parade is always one of the high points of the event. 

 

The Grand Parade will proceed from Jamison Park, along Jamison Road and Evan Street to High Street, then Station Street, finishing at the Showground.  The parade will take two hours to move through High Street. 

 

There has been good co-operation between the Ulysses organisers and the City Centre Association which has recognised the potential economic benefit of the event.  The City Centre Association will commence its annual Penrith City Festival in High Street, as the last of the motorcycles move through, taking advantage of the presence of spectators present for the parade. 

 

The organisers have worked closely with Council’s City Works and Design and Technical Advice Departments, the Police and the RTA to ensure that all requirements for safe traffic management are being met.  The proposal was considered at the Local Traffic Committee meeting in October 2007. 

 

Jamison Road will be closed between Racecourse Road and the York Road roundabout with a detour via Racecourse Road, Batt Street and York Road. 

 

The organisation of the parade is quite complex and Mr Gary Lawson of the City Works Department attended the 2007 meeting in Coffs Harbour to observe how it was managed. 

 

Signs and barricades are being provided as in-kind assistance. 

Event Site

Panthers will be the venue for most activities related to the AGM other than the Grand Parade. 

 

Due to the scale of the proposed activities and the way that some areas are proposed to be used differently from their normal licensed uses, it is necessary for the organisers to submit a Development Application.  Ulysses has engaged a planning consultant to prepare the Development Application and it is understood that it will be submitted this week. 

 

Registration for the event will take place in the retail area of the former Cables Ski Park with temporary access available directly from Jamison Road.  Trade displays will take place at the Panther Pavillion and the adjacent area.  The AGM itself will take place at a temporary hoecker which will be erected adjacent to Adventure Golf. 

 

It is proposed that there be temporary access into the site from High Street between Mulgoa Road and Memorial Avenue and that camping take place on the Carpenter site which will link to the Panthers site by way of a temporary culvert across Peachtree Creek. 

 

Assistance with opening up the temporary access, developing the temporary creek crossing and marking out the temporary camping area will be provided by Council as in-kind support.

 

The use of the Carpenter site will be governed by a written licence agreement between Council and Ulysses.  This agreement has been drafted and is currently being negotiated and should be finalised in the next few weeks.  A condition of the agreement will be that Ulysses comply with the conditions of the Development Application. 

 

Council’s legal staff have provided assistance in preparing a similar agreement between Panthers and Ulysses. 

 

The potential for this temporary use to have an impact on residents of the Mountainview Retirement Village has been recognised.  The organisers recently organised a meeting to brief residents about the event and they indicate that the response from the residents was positive. 

 

Residents of Mountainview will also be contacted as part of the Development Application approval process. 

City Marketing

City Marketing staff have been involved with this event since the Nepean Chapter lodged its bid to hold the AGM in Penrith Valley several years ago. 

 

City Marketing staff supported the Nepean Branch in promoting Penrith Valley as the 2009 venue at the 2007 AGM in Coffs Harbour and will do so again at the 2008 AGM in Townsville.  This has been achieved through the provision of promotional materials and visitor information. 

 

The Mayor has been invited to attend the Townsville event to promote the 2009 Penrith event.  It is recommended that the Mayor accept this invitation. 

 

Links between the 2009 AGM web site and the Penrith Valley web site have been established.  There has also been extensive liaison between our visitor information centre and tourism officers in Hawkesbury and Blue Mountains in developing touring information which will be provided on the web sites, in packs distributed before the event and at the visitor information centre while the event is in progress. 

 

Nearer to the time of the event, a marketing program involving local advertising, banners and discount vouchers will be implemented in co-operation with the organisers.  A shuttle bus linking the camping area with the CBD will also be provided from the marketing budget. 

Supporting Program

City Marketing staff will facilitate discussions between Ulysses and various cultural, entertainment and dining providers to ensure that these operators are aware of the potential to provide special products and deals targeted to this group.  There is great potential to increase the expenditure of these visitors with appropriate products and services effectively packaged. 

Tourism Award

The 2007 Ulysses AGM at Coffs Harbour won the Major Event category in the NSW Tourism Awards and went on to achieve a Highly Commended ranking in the National Awards.  It is proposed that an entry be submitted for the 2009 event in the NSW Tourism Awards. 

Financial Support

The Organisers have requested a cash payment from Council of $35,000 to contribute to the cost of staging the event.  Given the economic benefit to the City of the event, and the flow on benefits for business, this request is supported. 

 

The draft budget for 2008-9 provides an allocation for supporting major events which benefit the city and this request could be met from this allocation. 

Conclusion

The Ulysses AGM is a unique and exciting event which will showcase Penrith Valley to a very large group of mature affluent visitors who can be expected to spend generously while here and who have a strong potential to return in the future. 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on 2009 Ulysses Motor Cycle Club Annual General Meeting be received.

2.     Council approve the attendance of the Mayor at the Ulysses AGM in Townsville 30 May to 1 June 2008 to promote the 2009 event in Penrith Valley.

3.     On adoption of the 2008-9 budget, a payment of $35,000 from funds allocated to supporting events be made to the organisers of the Ulysses 2009 AGM, be approved. 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.  


The City as a Social Place

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

2        Southern Sudanese Settlement in the Penrith LGA

 

3        Community and Cultural Development Department - Projects and Key Achievements - 1 July to 30 December 2007

 

4        Establishment of the Penrith Community Filipino School

 

5        The Healthy Penrith Program

 

6        Status of Victoria Park Landscaping

 

7        Erskine Business Park (Section 94) Development Contributions Plan

 

8        The Australian Chapter of the Alliance for Healthy Cities - National Forum and Meeting 7 - 9 May 2008

 

 



Ordinary Meeting

7 April 2008

The City as a Social Place

 

 

The City as a Social Place

 

 

2

Southern Sudanese Settlement in the Penrith LGA   

 

Compiled by:                Rosie Smith, Multicultural Access Officer

Authorised by:             Erich Weller, Community and Cultural Development Manager  

Requested By:             Councillor Greg Davies

Strategic Program Term Achievement: Access has increased for communities that face barriers to using social services and facilities.

Critical Action:  Support and encourage fairness of access to Council and other social facilities and services.

     

Purpose:

To provide information to Council on the settlement of Southern Sudanese people in the Penrith Local Government Area.  The report also provides some comparative information from other Western Sydney LGAs.  This information will assist Council to understand the settlement needs of this community and further develop targeted responses.  The report recommends the information be received.

 

Introduction

A group of young Sudanese people from the TWICH EAST Youth Association for Development (TEYAD) met with the Mayor in November 2007 to speak to Council on how Council can assist young Southern Sudanese settling in the Penrith area.  The Association is enthusiastic about building networks and capacity within the Southern Sudanese Community in the Penrith LGA and integrating into the Australian way of life.

 

The Mayor requested a report detailing the settlement patterns of the Sudanese Community in the Penrith LGA and their priorities in resettlement.

 

This report first gives some background information on the situation in Sudan, the length of time people spend in refugee camps and the conditions in these camps.  To gain the full picture it is important to explain the circumstances in which people leave Sudan and arrive in Australia.  The report then summarises the current issues facing the community.  The support provided by Council and other community partners to the Sudanese Community has also been included in the report.

Background on Southern Sudan

Sudan is located in North Africa and is geographically the largest country in Africa.  Sudan shares borders with eight countries, namely Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Uganda, the Central African Republic, Chad, Libya and Egypt.

Sudan is the largest and one of the most diverse countries in Africa, home to deserts, mountain ranges, swamps and rain forests.  It has emerged from a 21-year civil war between the mainly Muslim north and the Animist and Christian south which is said to have cost the lives of 1.5 million people. Southern rebels said they were battling oppression and marginalisation. After two years of bargaining the government and rebels signed a comprehensive peace deal in January 2005. Sudan is a country in extreme refugee and humanitarian need, as reflected in the population of concern to the United Nations High Commission for Refugees (UNHCR) in June 2007 was 2,124,513.

 

The UN says more than two million people have fled their homes and more than 200,000 have been killed. Pro-government Arab militias are accused of carrying out a campaign of ethnic cleansing against non-Arab groups in the region.

 

Sudan's name comes from the Arabic "bilad al-sudan", or land of the blacks.

 

Arabic is the official language and Islam is the religion of the state, but the country has a large non-Arabic speaking and non-Muslim population which has rejected attempts by the government in Khartoum to impose Islamic Sharia law on the country as a whole.’

Source:  Wishes to Wisdom Report SWAHS Multicultural Health 2007

 

The vast majority of Sudanese humanitarian entrants to Australia come from the country’s southern and predominantly Christian region.  The situation in Darfur in Sudan is a current humanitarian crisis.  The map below illustrates the Sudan with its capital, Khartoum, the Darfur region is to the west and south with a common border with Chad.

 

Map of Sudan

 

 

Almost all Sudanese people that come to Australia are from the south and west of the country.  They enter Australia under the humanitarian component of Australia’s migration program.  They are also predominantly from village communities, and from the Dinka tribe.

 

The Humanitarian Program in Australia includes people who have been granted residency in the following categories or visa subclasses.

·    Refugees

·    Special Humanitarian

·    Women at risk

·    Special assistance

·    Onshore

·    Other visa subclasses

 

Table 1 below indicates the numbers of all migrants by migration stream who settled in the Penrith LGA as their first place of settlement in Australia between 2002 and 2007.  The table illustrates the numbers of humanitarian entrants compared to family and skilled migrants who settle in the Penrith LGA.

 

Table 1  Settlers by Migration Stream - Penrith LGA 2002-2007

 

Calendar Year of Arrival

Migration Stream

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

Total

Family

220

211

253

217

223

193

1317

Humanitarian

38

77

67

80

61

41

364

Other

8

1

0

0

0

0

9

Skilled

234

243

257

249

192

160

1335

Unknown

0

0

0

1

3

0

4

Total

500

532

577

547

479

394

3029

Source – Department of Immigration and Citizenship 

 

The 364 humanitarian entrants who settled in Penrith between 2002 and 2007 come from a number of different countries. Table 4 on page 6 of this report provides further information on the country of origins of these humanitarian entrants.

 

For the purposes of this report the terms humanitarian entrant and refugee are used interchangeably.

 

Defining a Refugee

The key international instruments pertaining to refugees are the 1951 Geneva Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees and its 1967 Protocol.  The 1951 Convention relating to the Status of Refugees to which Australia is a signatory, defines a refugee as:

 

“Any person who owing to a well founded fear of being persecuted for reasons of race, religion, nationality, membership of a particular social group or political opinion, is outside the country of his/her nationality and is unable, or owing to such fear, is unwilling to avail himself/herself of the protection of that country.”

 

The important parts of this definition are:

 

that the person has to be outside their country of origin

the reason for their flight has to be a fear of persecution

this fear of persecution has to be well founded (i.e. they have to have experienced it or be likely to experience it if they return)

the persecution has to result from one or more of the 5 grounds listed in the definition

they have to be unwilling or unable to seek the protection of their country

Source: Refugee Council of Australia Website – www.refugeecouncil.org.au

 

Refugees and Displaced People

The displaced people of Sudan moved to refugee camps in Kenya, Uganda and Zaire, to cities in neighbouring countries such as Cairo in Egypt, or became displaced within Sudan itself. According to the Centre for Refugee Research at the University of NSW, refugee camps themselves are places of danger rather than protection.  Refugees are often in camps for many years.  Refugees in camps often experience extreme hardship.  This includes:

·    Poor physical security and lack of privacy

·    Armed attacks, which often involved rape and sexual violence against women and children

·    Physical hardship

·    Physical illness and psychological stress

·    Lack of food and medical treatment

·    Scarcity of water, particularly clean water, which is difficult to obtain

·    Lack of secure shelter

·    Abuse by officials and members of the local population.

Source:  Centre for Refugee Research – E. Pittaway 2005.

 

Settlement in Australia

Between 2004 and 2006, a significant percentage of Australia’s refugee intake was from African countries. Refugees from African countries tend to have large families, many of which are headed by women.  Refugees may have spent long periods (over five years) in refugee camps and as summarised above have often experienced significant hardship.  It is not unusual for refugees to have lost many family members and to have only the few possessions they fled their homes with.

 

Women who have lived in refugee camps for many years may have limited knowledge and experience of nutrition and food preparation, particularly in the Australian context.  This includes the purchase, preparation and storage of food.

 

Newly arrived refugees will need assistance to access services, manage torture and trauma issues, finding appropriate accommodation, parenting in the Australian context, and budgeting and money management skills.  Becoming familiar with the Australian education system is also important.

 

Meeting the needs of refugees can be resource intensive for services due to complex needs, large numbers of children requiring childcare, and interpreter costs.  According to the Refugee Report completed by the University of NSW in 2001 refugee populations demonstrate a unique set of health needs that arise from their previous experiences of prolonged deprivation, torture and trauma, sexual violence and reduced access to health care. Once resettled in their new countries they continue to carry this unique set of health needs. Added to those are the stresses and strains of resettlement in a new country and culture and it is often at this point that post-traumatic stress disorders will arise.

 

There is also a great deal of pressure on refugee communities in Australia to sponsor friends and family members that are still overseas as soon as possible.  Those migrating as humanitarian entrants are often dependent on their families in Australia for airfares, pre-departure medical examination costs and housing and other settlement assistance once they reach Australia.  In addition to this, money is often sent to family members in the Sudan and in refugee camps.  These factors place significant stress on limited finances, housing and family life for the newly settled refugee community.

It is vital that services have a good understanding of the needs, culture and experiences of people from refugee backgrounds in order to enable a resettlement that supports the well-being of the Sudanese community.

 

Profile of Humanitarian Settlement in NSW

Australia has an intake of 13,000 refugees per year.  In 2006, the African component of this was 50%. In 2005, it was 75% African. In 2007, it was reduced to 30%.  NSW continues to be the major settlement destination point for new humanitarian arrivals, currently receiving 35% of all humanitarian entrants to Australia.

 

Table 2 below shows the African born humanitarian arrivals in NSW by LGA of Settlement between 1 July 2001 and 30 June 2006 – a five year period.

 

Table 2 – African Born Humanitarian Arrivals in NSW by Select LGA – 2001-2006

 

Local Government  Area

Number of Settlers

% of Total

Blacktown

1526

25.1%

 

Auburn

969

16.0%

 

Holroyd

586

9.4%

 

Parramatta

 

466

7.7%

Canterbury

 

436

7.2%

Newcastle

 

388

6.4%

Fairfield

 

378

6.2%

Liverpool

 

261

4.3%

Bankstown

 

188

3.1%

Penrith

 

154

2.5%

Others

 

725

11.9%

Total

 

6077

100%

Source: DIAC Settlement Database

 

 

 

Humanitarian Entrants in Penrith

Many refugees, including the Sudanese community, form part of what are described as new and emerging communities.  They are usually smaller communities and newly arrived.  They often lack established family networks, support systems, community structures and resources, relative to the more established communities.  Individuals from these communities therefore also tend to be more unaware of mainstream government services available in Australia.

 

Table 3 below provides the total number of humanitarian entrants (including refugees) by visa sub-class and whose first place of settlement was the Penrith LGA between 2002 and 2007. Please note that in the different settlement planning data tabulations provided by the Department of Immigration and Citizenship the totals will not always be equivalent (eg in Table 1 there are 364 humanitarian entrants, in Table 3 below there are 355).

 

Table 3 - Settlers by Visa Sub-Class Humanitarian Migration Stream - Penrith LGA 2002-2007

 

Calendar Year of Arrival

Visa Sub-Class (Name)

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

Total

Global Special Humanitarian

22

57

49

61

45

24

258

Protection Visa-Permanent Residence

8

2

15

19

9

6

59

Refugee

0

12

1

1

7

5

26

Women at Risk

6

5

1

0

0

0

12

Total

36

76

66

81

61

35

355

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source: Department of Immigration and Citizenship - Settlement Planning

 

Humanitarian entrants from other parts of Sydney or NSW may also settle in Penrith.  At the same time, some humanitarian entrants who first settle in Penrith may move to another part of Sydney or further afield.  Thus the numbers provided are a guide until they can be cross-referenced with Census data.

 

As noted in Table 3, 355 humanitarian entrants had their first point of settlement in the Penrith LGA between 2002 and 2007.

 

Table 4 below provides the countries of origin of the humanitarian entrants summarised in Table 3.

 

Table 4 - Humanitarian Entrants by Country of Origin - Penrith LGA – 2002 - 2007

Original Table

 

Calendar Year of Arrival

Country of Birth

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

Total

Sudan

6

38

43

50

23

14

174

Afghanistan

12

10

0

0

7

0

29

Egypt Arabi Rep of

2

5

7

7

2

0

23

Iraq

0

7

4

0

6

6

23

Pakistan

6

0

8

4

4

0

22

Sri Lanka

0

0

0

13

4

3

20

Iran

0

7

2

0

6

3

18

Lebanon

6

1

0

0

0

0

7

Sierra Leone

0

0

0

0

7

0

7

Kenya

0

0

0

1

0

5

6

Others

6

8

4

6

5

6

35

Total

38

76

68

81

64

37

364

Source: Department of Immigration and Citizenship – Settlement planning

 

Sudanese Humanitarian Entrants Settling in Penrith

As can be seen from Table 4 above, the largest number of humanitarian entrants settling in the Penrith LGA are from the Sudan, in particular the Southern Sudan.  The Southern Sudanese refugee community within this area is relatively small in numbers, dispersed and generally isolated.  Women may be particularly isolated.  The community is isolated due to lack of transport, geographical distance and lack of bilingual services.  They are further isolated by their lack of English language, and by the many barriers they experience in obtaining employment.

 

Southern Sudanese refugees from the Dinka tribe began settling in the Penrith area in about 2002, and now this group is the largest emerging community in the Penrith LGA. Initially, most of the Southern Sudanese community members that were accessing the support services of the Mamre project (services located in the grounds of Mamre House) were married and both partners were in Australia.  There is, however, a growing group of single mothers that are settling in Penrith. 

 

As with all groups of refugees, the Southern Sudanese face numerous challenges as they settle into Australian society.  Most refugees from Africa have experienced a high degree of trauma and many years in refugee camps.  They may experience delayed successful settlement while they recover, but this does not mean the refugee will not have a successful settlement outcome.  The Sudanese have lower levels of education than some other refugee groups – typically year 3 or 4 at Primary Level with some also having no written literacy in their own language (Dinka).  Women in particular, because of childrearing and the overall responsibility for the family’s health, tend to experience greater isolation and find it difficult to access necessary services in education and health.

 

Newly arrived refugees will require assistance to learn about services, finding appropriate accommodation, information and support around parenting in the Australian context, budgeting and money management skills and support with torture and trauma issues.  It is important to also be aware of the significant life and role changes that new migrants experience by becoming part of a new society.  Information and support need to be provided to assist the community in this adjustment.

 

A more detailed overview of the issues facing the Southern Sudanese Refugee community in Penrith is provided in the next sections of this report.

 

Settlement Issues

 

A number of research projects have been completed on identifying the particular issues facing refugees from the Sudan in NSW, including in the Nepean region.  The overview of issues provided below is taken from some of this research, the experience of Council’s Multicultural Access Officer in working with agencies providing direct services to the Sudanese community, and this Officer’s ongoing liaison with this community.

 

Education/English

 

Educational opportunities available in the Southern Sudan were minimal and many refugees lack English language skills.  For some refugees, English acquisition is taking considerably longer due to having little written literacy in their own language prior to arrival in Australia. 

 

Transport

 

Many of the community are dependent on public transport, yet are not close to train stations. The Mamre project provides four vehicles (three mini buses and a 4WD) twice a day, four days per week to collect and drop off the community for English classes.  The Mamre project requires volunteer drivers to provide this support.  Mamre is pursuing ongoing funding to continue to provide this level of service as the cost is prohibitive.

 

Childcare

 

Affordable and accessible childcare is needed for Sudanese families to attend English classes. This need will continue as families pursue work opportunities.  Families have more children than the Australian average with four to six children being the norm in Southern Sudanese families.  Child care services need to be aware of the trauma and torture experiences many of the parents will have suffered, including long periods in refugee camps.

 

Currently, around thirty 0-5 years old children spend over 20 hours per week in a crèche at the Mamre Project.  This crèche is staffed mainly by volunteers with a trained supervisor.  Parents are also on site.  The Mamre project is not funded for running this child care support.

 

Mental Health

 

Mental health and suicide risk is an issue for concern as there have been a number of attempted suicides by African women and men in the area.  Nepean Migrant Access has requested that the Service for the Treatment and Rehabilitation of Torture and Trauma Survivors (STARTTS) have a female counsellor provide a sessional support service for the African community settling in the area.

 

Health

 

The number of Africans identified as HIV positive is high.  There are concerns regarding how best to educate the community about the seriousness of HIV and AIDS.  Addressing this matter requires a focussed partnership between Sydney West Area Health Service, other service providers and the Sudanese community.

 

 

Young Women’s Health

 

A small number of young Sudanese women are currently pregnant and are facing challenges being accepted by their family and community.  Currently, there is a sub-committee of the local Refugee Coalition investigating this issue and developing support options.

 

Men’s Health

 

In Sudanese culture, men are usually the bread winners and therefore a lack of employment can lead to reduced confidence and wellbeing.  Many men are unemployed while some are attending computer courses to become familiar with contemporary information technology. As a consequence of the war in Sudan, some men experience Post Traumatic Stress Syndrome (PTSS) which can effect concentration, ability to maintain employment, alcohol usage and unhealthy family dynamics.

 

Family Structure and Size

 

Families in Southern Sudan are traditionally large.  Children are seen as a sign of wealth.  The family structure in Sudan is traditionally patriarchal with the men having the ultimate say in family decisions.  Conflict in families may arise between the traditional Sudanese gender based roles and new roles in Australia.  There is a need for sensitive education strategies to familiarise Sudanese families with the potentially very high costs of raising children in Australia.

 

Domestic Violence

 

There is some domestic violence in the community.  There is a need for more community education on this issue and how it is dealt with in Australia. Culturally, the women are not allowed to talk about this issue as they believe it is a family issue and others cannot interfere unless they are invited.  Services are raising awareness of this issue and the avenues available to the community by including women in relevant Health Information sessions.

 

Racism and Discrimination

 

Some Sudanese community members have experienced racism and discrimination.  Many of the initiatives developed by local services aim to support and emphasise community inclusion and understanding.

 

Employment

 

As many of the community are still in the settlement stages and attending English language classes they are not in a position to be seeking employment.  Some who have been in Australia longer are looking for employment with limited English.  Any opportunities for work experience are worthwhile. TAFE is providing some training and skill development courses on an outreach basis from Mamre.

 

Funding

 

There is no dedicated funding for the work of the Mamre project or the Refugee Coalition.  (See later section of this report headed Penrith Refugee Coalition for details on this Coalition).

 

 

 

Research

The Penrith Emerging Refugee Community Report (PERC 2004) highlighted the need for effective community and health service planning to provide short and long term programs, including educational and recreational activities.  The Southern Sudanese Women’s Group at the Mamre Project was developed as a direct result of that report.  From this, the Refugee Coalition was later formed which supports women, men and children at the Mamre Project through a variety of initiatives.

 

Capacity Building in the Southern Sudanese Community

The Sudanese, like many other refugee communities, face many challenges in regard to settling in Australia.  The community is taking proactive steps to build community capacity.  The recent development of the Southern Sudanese Strategic Plan by the NSW Southern Sudanese and other Marginalised Areas group is an example of this.

 

One of the strengths of this community, particularly the young people, is that they have taken the initiative of making contact with the Mayor around the issues facing their own community.  They have also met with Council officers who have provided advice and support with their applications for Community Assistance Program funding and Youth Week Funding.  These young people have organised two community activities in December 2007 and January 2008.  The Mayor and Council officers have attended these activities.

 

Current Council Support for the Southern Sudanese Community

Over a number of years, Council has provided support to the Sudanese and other refugee communities residing in Penrith City.  Examples of this support are provided below:

 

·    African Communities meet Local Government Forum – held on 3 November 2007

·    Participation in monthly Penrith Refugee Coalition meetings

·    Support Refugee Week activities each year that contribute to building broader community understanding of the needs of refugees

·    Tour of Penrith Library  – information for Sudanese women re use of Library cards

·    Community Assistance Program grant to Young Sudanese Writers Group

·    Community Assistance Program grant to Sudanese Youth Group for Leadership Conference

·    Youth Week funding for establishment of a Website for Young Sudanese

·    In-kind support for Sudanese Community Awareness Night – 10 March 2008 in Blacktown

·    Community Assistance Program grant to Mamre project for Pathway to playground

·    Community Assistance Program grant to Angels of Mercy Welfare Services, a voluntary mobile service, to assist with purchase of a data projector to provide information sessions for Sudanese women

 

Further details on some of the major activities listed above are provided in the next sub-sections of this report.

 

 

 

 

African Communities meet Local Government Forum November 2007

Through a partnership between Blacktown City Council, Penrith City Council, community members on the Blacktown-Nepean Regional Advisory Council, and the Community Relations Commission, a forum on local government was held for African communities living in the Nepean-Blacktown region.  Approximately 100 people from six different African communities (Sudanese, Congolese, Ghanaian, Sierra Leonean, Burundian, Liberian) living in the Nepean region attended the Forum.

 

Councillor Jackie Greenow represented the Mayor, Councillor Greg Davies, at this forum.

Councillor Jackie Greenow is also a community member of the Community Relations Commission Blacktown-Nepean Regional Advisory Council.

 

Feedback from participants was that the forum was informative and contributed to a better understanding of the role of local government and the support it can provide African residents in the two LGAs.

 

Penrith Refugee Coalition

The aim of the Penrith Refugee Coalition is to support the harmonious resettlement of refugee communities in the Penrith LGA by:

 

·    Providing  English classes and a crèche for childcare

·    Parenting skills, health, fitness and settlement support

·    Vocational training and employment related skills

·    Computer classes

·    Transport to and from Mamre

·    Transition to school

·    Referral for casework to Nepean Migrant Access

 

Organisations participating in the Coalition include:

 

·    Nepean Migrant Access

·    Sydney West Area Health Service

·    Penrith Women's Health Centre

·    Nepean Community College

·    Penrith City Council

·    TAFE 

·    Mission Australia – Families NSW

·    Anglicare

·    Mamre Project 

·    NSW Service for the Treatment and Rehabilitation of Torture and Trauma (STARTTS)

·    Global Skills – Job network provider

·    Centrelink

 

The pooling of skills and resources in the Coalition to implement the various programs has maintained three years of service without receiving consistent dedicated funding from any one source.  Regular meetings are held to maintain a planned approach with open communication channels between all the organisations involved.

 

Summary

There has been significant growth in the number of Southern Sudanese refugees resident in the Penrith LGA since 2002.  This growth is expected to continue.

 

The Sudanese, like many other small refugee communities, face many challenges in regard to settling in Australia including obtaining secure housing, learning English, undertaking education and obtaining employment.  Importantly, the community is taking proactive steps to build capacity and support structures.

 

The successful settlement of migrants and refugees is dependant on the quality and level of support they receive as they begin their new life as Australians.

 

The Refugee Coalition, which includes Council, a number of agency partners and based at the Mamre project, provides a co-ordinated service planning and delivery framework to continue to respond to the priority concerns and needs of the Sudanese refugee community.

 

Council will also continue to work closely with the Sudanese community associations and groups to identify constructive ways to contribute to community cohesion and inclusion.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the information contained in the report on Southern Sudanese Settlement in the Penrith LGA be received.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Ordinary Meeting

7 April 2008

The City as a Social Place

 

 

The City as a Social Place

 

 

3

Community and Cultural Development Department - Projects and Key Achievements - 1 July to 30 December 2007   

 

Compiled by:                Jeni Pollard, Neighbourhood Renewal Program Coordinator

Joe Ibbitson, Community Program Coordinator

Tracy Leahy, Community Program Coordinator

Teresa Luk-Leung, Senior Social Planner

Authorised by:             Erich Weller, Community and Cultural Development Manager   

Strategic Program Term Achievement: Strategies are in place to respond to the social and health needs of the community.

Critical Action: Support community organisations to address the differing needs and issues of the various age groups through Council's policy responses, program initiatives and advocacy.

     

Purpose:

To provide Council with an update on the work undertaken by the Community and Cultural Development Department.  This report highlights projects and activities undertaken in the six months from July to December 2007.  The report recommends the information be received.

 

Background

The Community and Cultural Development Department is responsible for a range of term achievements, strategic tasks as well as service objectives as outlined in Council’s Management Plan.  The Department reports to the Director-City Services and Director-City Planning.

 

Key responsibility areas of the Department’s work are included in Issue 5 (Access to and Equity of Services), Issue 7 (Community Well-being and Social Justice), Issue 8 (Cultural Development), Issue 12 (Magnetic Places), Issue 13 (Established Neighbourhoods), Issue 14 (Managing Redevelopment) and Issue 15 (New Release Areas).  In some cases, the Department’s work is mainly reported to Council through the reports of other Managers.  A good example of this is where social planning advice to the new release area program is through Environmental Planning Manager reports. 

 

This report is one of a series of regular reports on the Department’s projects and activities that are generally not reported separately to Council.  All professional staff in the Department have contributed to the report.  The purpose of the regular reports will be to provide Council with additional detail on many of the activities of the Department that are only briefly reported on through the Outcome Manager system.  These reports are provided to Council approximately every six months.

 

The majority of activities and achievements included in the report were undertaken between July 2007 and the end of December 2007.  In some cases, major projects require a longer timeframe for completion.

Community and Cultural Development Department Projects and Activities

This summary of projects and activities is grouped under a number of headings.  These headings are:

 

·        Major projects including Neighbourhood Renewal

·        Social Needs Identification and Planning

·        Community Development, Planning and Advocacy

·        Youth Program Development and Planning

·        Liaison with Aboriginal Communities

·        Multicultural Community Development and Access

·        Disability Access Policy and Planning

·        Aged Services Development and Planning

·        Lemongrove Gardens Retirement Village

 

Major Projects

This section provides brief updates on Neighbourhood Renewal, Cultural Planning and Development, the South Penrith Community Facilities Precinct, Glenmore Park Child and Family Precinct and the Social Services and Community Organisation Accommodation Needs Study. 

 

Neighbourhood Renewal

The Neighbourhood Renewal program over the period July to December 2007 has undertaken a number of activities across established areas of the LGA. The primary focus has been on an extensive engagement process with residents in the Kingswood Park locality. There has been a range of activities, events and programs developed to engage with different parts of the community in Kingswood Park including young people, families, older residents, local business at the shopping centre and service providers.

 

Small group discussion at the Kingswood Park Community Planning session

 

The focus of the engagement processes has been to work with residents to identify community strengths as well as identifying issues for further action. A Community Planning session was held in November at the North Penrith Community Centre to provide information back to residents and ask them to prioritise actions and future activities for Council and its community partners. A comprehensive report will be presented to Council in the current management plan year detailing the Neighbourhood Action Plan for Kingswood Park.

 

Cultural development activities proved to be an effective tool for engaging with residents in Kingswood Park. A Neighbourhood Renewal Program initiative titled Neighbourhood Stories (a working title) has been developed to incorporate a series of micro cultural projects across established areas of the City. This initiative will work with local communities in telling their stories through community cultural development processes.

 

Ali Kadhim, Parkour Artist-in-Resident based at ICE (Information and Cultural Exchange in Parramatta) led an introductory workshop in October 2007, imparting skills and techniques to safely engage in Parkour for local young residents of Kingswood Park. Parkour is based on a philosophy of overcoming obstacles and is an urban street physical movement activity.

 

Following the success of this introductory workshop in Parkour, a summer series of workshops in Parkour and Urban dance has been developed in partnership with Kingswood Park Primary School and ICE. These workshops were delivered in Kingswood Park in January 2008 with over 40 young participants.

 

Other Micro-project Activities

The Community Engagement Officer participated in the working group to organise the annual Werrington festival and coordinated the participation of other Council services at the event. A range of Council services participated in a Penrith City Council Stall at the festival which attracted around 2,000 residents.

Officers from the Neighbourhood Renewal Program team participated in the St Marys Families Network and the subsequent development of a resource for families with young children which aims to promote family support services in the area. The resource, a growth chart and directory, will be released in early 2008.

The Community Engagement role has continued to support the implementation of Council’s Community Participation Policy through convening the Community Participation Reference Group, providing support to staff in utilising Council’s Community Participation Manual and providing orientation presentations to new staff regarding the reference group, policy and manual.

A highly successful event was held at North Penrith Community Centre to celebrate the Community Christmas in Kingswood Park. This event was held as part of a new strategy to support the Centre through promotion and continued advocacy for the delivery of services from the Centre. The event was attended by around 80 residents of varied ages and was a true celebration of the neighbourhood.

 

The Seniors Choir entertains residents from the Kingswood Park locality at the Community Christmas Celebration held at North Penrith Community Centre

 

Staff from the Neighbourhood Renewal team continued to support Cranebrook Family Fun Day events through participating in and contributing to activities. An event was held during the school holidays in September 2007 which was well attended by local children and their families.

Staff from the Neighbourhood Renewal Program participating in the Cranebrook Family Fun Day

The Community Engagement Officer also supported a program at Oxley Park Primary School in early December for the Pacific Islander community.  A number of Council’s community partners also participated in this program.

 

Cultural Planning and Development

The Cultural Planning Framework and Cultural Development Action Plan were endorsed by Council on 15 October 2007.  The Framework and the Action Plan establish a firm foundation for a comprehensive and integrated approach to Cultural Planning and Development across the City and region.  This integrated approach also supports the evolving role of Penrith as a regional city.

 

Scheduled for implementation over four years, the Cultural Development Action Plan lists the specific actions required to be undertaken over the term of the current Strategic Plan (2005-2009), and up to 2011, to work towards the aspirational goals articulated in the Framework.

 

The endorsement of the Cultural Action Plan has been followed by an integrated approach to implementation, facilitating the scoping and early development of high quality and inclusive community and cultural initiatives, commencing with a number of projects planned for the first half of 2008 under Issue 8: Cultural Development, Issue 12: Magnetic Places; and Issue 13: Established Neighbourhoods.  The resources available under the Neighbourhood Renewal Program will drive these initiatives.

 

In the process of developing the Cultural Development Action Plan, the City’s libraries were recognised as one of the key resources for community cultural development. Cultural Development has actively contributed to the process of developing the Library’s Directions Plan, in the scoping of innovative cultural programs and initiatives. This has included identifying models and conducting research to identify best practice examples where libraries have become community cultural hubs offering initiatives such as youth artists’ networks.  These initiatives build on existing cultural initiatives in Penrith Library such as Sculpture by the Sea and the Embroiderers’ Group.

 

Magnetic Places

The Magnetic Places Community Cultural Grants program was reported to Council in December 2007. The Grants Program is a pilot project that aims to seed activation projects and events in established areas across the City. The program links cultural development outcomes with the established areas program and has resulted in eight projects that will be delivered in local places in the period January to June 2008.  Each funded project involves residents in local communities.

 

The Magnetic Places Community Cultural Grants program has resulted in a number of innovative project ideas and new partnerships between community and cultural groups. A ‘Best Practice’ session for successful applicants is planned for January 2008 that will cover areas such as risk management and assessment, financial considerations and professional capacity building in Community Cultural Development.

 

A report evaluating the Magnetic Places Community Cultural Grants program will be presented to Council early in the first quarter of the 2008-09 year.

 

A detailed status report on Magnetic Places will be presented to Council later in the 2007/08 year.

 

South Penrith Community Facilities Precinct

Following a review of the precinct, the South Penrith Community Facilities site has the potential to be developed as a community hub and ‘magnetic place’. These places have been described in Council’s Management Plan as vibrant and attractive local/town centres and community meeting places.

 

The release of the State Government’s Metropolitan Strategy, and the proposed redevelopment of the adjacent Southlands Shopping Centre, have provided additional support for consideration of a ‘leading edge’ solution for the site which could incorporate some residential development, as well as reconfiguration of the community facilities and possible shared-use options.

 

During 2005/06, Council commissioned architectural and urban design advice on the South Penrith precinct. A set of design principles and objectives, as well as preliminary concept design options for the site, were developed.  These design principles and objectives are being reviewed within the context of the NSW State Government’s Metropolitan Strategy centres hierarchy and the nomination of the Southlands community facilities precinct as a “small village”.

 

In February 2007, Council approved a new Development Application by the owners of the adjacent Southlands Shopping Centre. Council officers worked closely with the owners and their representatives to emphasise the importance of the whole village centre as a ‘community hub’ that can deliver integrated retail, recreation and community facilities. Through this collaborative approach, it is anticipated that Council can bring about maximum benefit to the local community and achieve a safer and more vibrant community precinct.  The latest advice from the owners of Southlands is that the redevelopment is likely to commence in late 2008 or early 2009.

 

A key priority up to this stage of the project has been the temporary relocation of the Youth Services from the old cottage on Maxwell Street in South Penrith. A temporary location for the youth workers has been finalised with SPYNS, the auspice organisation for the youth services, and the relocation of the services to the Youth and Community Centre in the Glenmore Park Town Centre took place over the Christmas 2007 period. The demolition of the rundown cottage in South Penrith will be undertaken in early 2008.

 

Further work has also been undertaken on the feasibility of progressing a ‘leading edge’ option for the precinct in association with the development of the new Local Plan. A report on these matters, including the development of a concept Masterplan for the site was considered by Council at the Ordinary Meeting on 3 December 2007.

 

Social Service and Community Organisation Accommodation Needs Study

Further work has progressed on the accommodation matters canvassed in the Study.  Issues and data on community and cultural organisation accommodation needs relevant to the Penrith Valley Cultural Precinct at St Marys have been considered and, where appropriate, incorporated in the planning for the redevelopment of the Precinct.

 

In relation to the Penrith City Centre, additional analysis of floorspace requirements for a new regional multipurpose community services facility in the City Centre is being completed.  A further analysis of site opportunities is also underway.  Initial priority is being given to those social service organisations currently accommodated in the old Council Chambers.

 

The Penrith City Centre Plan estimates the cost of community service facility provision at $15 million.  An allocation of $7.5 million towards this provision is from development contributions in the City Centre.  Council has also progressed representations to the State and Federal governments for financial contributions towards the facility, given that a number of the community and social service organisations proposed to be accommodated are funded by other levels of government.

 

 

Glenmore Park Child and Family Precinct

Planning for the Glenmore Park Child and Family Precinct (GPFCP) program has progressed considerably over the past few months.  Until August 2007, this program and budget was the responsibility of the Children’s Services Manager. This responsibility has now been moved to the Community and Cultural Development Manager’s portfolio.

 

The GPFCP program consists of a number of inter-related projects that are being progressed concurrently.  Given the complexity of the program, a Program Support Team has been established and a Program Plan developed. The Program Plan includes a ‘whole of program’ cost estimate to deliver all of the inter-related projects required for the precinct. 

 

The capital cost of designing, constructing and establishing the GPCFP will be funded mainly through Section 94 contributions from the Glenmore Park S94 Development Contributions Plan (existing estate). This plan has recently been revised and is currently on public exhibition.  Glenmore Park Stage 2 development will also make a contribution to the precinct.

 

The DA for the GPCFP was approved in late November 2007.  The assessment process was extensive and included an independent assessment as well as input from Council’s Disability Access Committee.  The Conditions of Consent for the DA are currently being incorporated into the final Construction Certificate documentation.

 

The tender process for construction of the precinct commenced with an Expression of Interest in December.  A shortlist of preferred contractors was identified through this process and reported to Council in late February 2008.

 

Council officers will continue to keep the community informed of the development of the GPCFP through regular updates on Council’s website and including at the commencement of and throughout the construction period.

 

Social Needs Identification and Planning

The social planning function supports new release area planning, and monitors and assesses demographic and urban change across the City.

New Release Area Program

The Social Planning Team continues to effectively resource the social planning requirements of the extensive new release area program.  Particular emphasis in the last six months was on providing advice to the planning processes for the WELL precinct, Glenmore Park Stage 2 Release Area, the Penrith Lakes Development, Waterside, and the St Marys Delfin Lendlease Human Services Consortium.

 

Work was also completed on a number of social impact assessments for the proposed establishment of child care centres, retirement villages and rezoning applications.  Advice was also provided to the State Government review of its Seniors Living policy.

 

Affordable Housing

 

The Department continues to work in partnership with the Environmental Planning Team to progress affordable housing outcomes for Penrith City.  Continued discussions have been held with the landowners of Glenmore Park Stage 2 and Landcom (Caddens Release Area) to work on the delivery of affordable rental housing through voluntary planning agreements. 

 

Will Roden, Acting Director, NSW Centre for Affordable Housing gave a presentation to a Councillor briefing in November to explore the opportunities for partnership between the Centre, Council, community housing providers and other partners to deliver the affordable housing outcomes for Penrith.

 

In December 2007, Council endorsed the partnership with the NSW Centre for Affordable Housing as the most efficient and effective mechanism to deliver affordable rental housing outcomes in Penrith City.  Further work will be undertaken in the next six months to advance Council’s agenda.

 

ABS Census of Population and Housing 2006

The Census of Population and Housing is the Australian Bureau of Statistics’ largest data collection activity and is carried out once every 5 years. The Census provides vital information to assist planning for all levels of government as well as the private sector. It aims to accurately measure the number of people in Australia on Census Night, their key characteristics, and the dwellings in which they live. 

 

Council has contracted Id to maintain a comprehensive range of Census data on Council’s website.

 

Since the initial release of the 2006 Census, the Social Planning team has given a number of presentations in relation to the census data and population forecasts to our external community partners to support their service planning, needs analysis and funding applications.

 

Memorandum of Understanding with Housing NSW

The MOU identifies the establishment of a Services Agreement for Operational Issues between Housing NSW and Penrith City Council.  This agreement was drafted in partnership with Housing NSW during 2007.

 

In August 2007, a joint planning meeting was held with key staff from both organisations to ‘fine tune’ the draft agreement and ensure that the operational procedures identified in the agreement were appropriate and relevant.  The meeting also provided an opportunity for the officers from both organisations (who will be responsible for implementing the agreement) to meet with each other and develop a better understanding of the structure of each organisation and how decisions and referrals are made.

 

The recommendations put forward at the meeting have now been incorporated into the Services Agreement which is currently being finalised.  It is anticipated that the Services Agreement will be signed at the next joint MOU meeting that is being planned for May or June 2008.

 

Claremont Meadows Community Centre Extensions

With the completion of the Claremont Meadows Community Facilities Need Analysis in mid-2003, Council approved the use of the Section 94 community facility contributions to extend the Claremont Meadows Community Centre to meet the priority needs of the Claremont Meadows community and future residents of the Claremont Meadows Stage 2 release area. 

 

The extensions to the Claremont Meadows Community Centre were completed in November 2007.  To celebrate the completion of the extensions, an Open Day was organised, and a community consultation was held to inform and gather community feedback on a number of local planning matters.  This included the WELL Precinct, the rehabilitation of the Gipps Street site, the Werrington Arterial Project and the new City Wide Plan.  The event was a success and received very positive feedback from the residents of Claremont Meadows.

 

The extensions to Claremont Meadows Community Centre were officially opened by the Mayor
Councillor Greg Davies, on 3 November 2007

 

Community Development, Planning and Advocacy

This function includes a range of community development tasks focussed on the broader community as well as target groups not covered by portfolio specific staff.  It also includes a number of funding programs co-ordinated by Council.

 

Western Sydney Area Assistance Scheme

The Area Assistance Scheme (AAS) is a regional community development program administered by the NSW Department of Community Services. This funding program provides grants to local councils and non-government organisations for projects that improve community wellbeing and how communities function. The AAS works within a whole-of-government framework to deliver its outcomes.  These include connecting communities through partnerships, building community leadership and capacity, and promoting safe communities.

 

Council’s Community Projects Officer is responsible for managing this funding program in the Penrith LGA.  This includes supporting community organisations to develop projects, and assisting organisations in the application process.  Council’s Social Planning staff provide research and data on local priority needs.

 

The 2007-2008 AAS funding round opened on 4 August and closed on 5 September 2007. Significant preparation and promotion was undertaken to ensure that local community organisations have access to this funding opportunity.  This included an information session which was held at the Civic Centre in late July 2007.

 

A significant number of funding applications were received from community organisations that were then assessed and prioritised by the Local Ranking Committee (LRC) which is comprised of Councillors and community representatives. The highly ranked applications will progress to the Regional Advisory Committee (RAC) for the second stage of ranking that occurs within the framework of a Western Sydney regional perspective.  This will occur in the next quarter.

 

Community Development Support Expenditure Scheme

The Community Development and Support Expenditure (CDSE) Scheme is a state-wide funding program that supports larger registered clubs to contribute to the wellbeing of the local community. This program is carried out in partnership with the NSW State Government, local Registered Clubs, and the NSW Council of Social Services. Council convenes the local committee, provides information and promotion on the Scheme to the broader community, and undertakes administration to support the scheme.

 

In 2007, 11 local registered clubs participated in the Scheme, and in July/August 2007 $417,414 was allocated to community organisations for a variety of projects and programs targeting community welfare and social services, community development, community health services, and employment assistance activities. Projects funded will help to meet the needs of diverse sections of the community, including children, youth, families, people with disabilities, older people, Aboriginal people, people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds as well as the broader community.  A number of place-based initiatives were also funded.

 

The 2008 Penrith CDSE round will open on 3 March and close on 4 April.

 

Development of the Advocacy Strategy for the Women’s Services Sector

Council’s Management Plan 2006 – 2007 identified that women residing in Penrith experience barriers to accessing services. This item has been prioritised and acknowledged as an action, which is to ‘finalise an advocacy strategy with the Women’s Services Sector to address service equity’ (Issue 5).

 

At this stage, the Women’s Services Sector Advocacy Strategy is currently being finalised with the identification of responsibilities and timeframes for the implementation of actions.  Internal consultation has been completed and a follow up session with external stakeholders will occur in April 2008.  It is expected the final draft Strategy will be presented to Council in the fourth quarter.

 

Community Assistance Program

Council’s Community Assistance Program (CAP) provides small grants to non–profit organisations and community based groups to meet local community needs.

 

In the 2007-08 CAP Planned Component Funding Round, Council received 65 applications, of which 43 projects were successful in receiving either full or part funding. The total amount of funds provided in the 2007-08 funding round was over $39,000.

 

As a result of the projects funded, local residents from across the city will benefit from a wide range of program activities and community events, including:

 

·        A series of community service Expos at the Community Connections facility

·        Professional development programs for young people

·        Contribution towards equipment purchases for a community kitchen program

·        International Day of People with a Disability – a local event

·        Family Fun Day events

 

The CAP cheques were presented to representatives of successful organisations by the Mayor at a function on Tuesday, 12 February 2008.

 

Recipients of Community Assistance Program funds at the

cheque presentation in February 2008

 

International Women’s Day 2008

In 2008 IWD will mark its 100th year of celebrating the International Women’s Day. A working committee has already begun planning for a series of micro events and also a main event that will be held during the IWD week in March 2008.

 

Penrith City Council’s support for this annual celebration, through partnerships with local community based and other government agencies, demonstrates the importance of this occasion to recognise the achievements of women and their contribution to society, and more specifically to Penrith City. Council once again received a grant of $1,000 from the Office for Women to support local events.

 

For the 2008 IWD event, the community partners are Penrith Women’s Health Centre, Aboriginal Catholic Ministry, North St Marys Neighbourhood Centre, SPYNS, Neighbourhood Development Team Erskine Park, and the Violence Against Women Strategy NSW.

 

Council officers have also been supporting the Aboriginal Catholic Ministry to organise a tree planting ceremony to celebrate the day.

 

International Women’s Day 100th Anniversary Celebration –
 St Marys Community Centre, March 2008

 

Community Services Directory

The Penrith Community Services Directory was first produced in June 2002 and lists more than 300 local organisations that provide a community service to the Penrith LGA.  The Community Directory is produced primarily for local community organisations and provides information about what services and programs are available to residents living in the Penrith LGA. The Directory was updated in May 2007 and a hard copy can be purchased at Council on a cost recovery basis. Requests can be made for a free CD Rom from Council’s Community and Cultural Development Department. Alternatively, the information can also be accessed through Council’s website at www.penrithcity.nsw.gov.au.  A further update of the Directory occurred in late 2007.

 

In December 2007, Council’s Systems Expert Group and Procedure and Systems Team approved a one-off allocation of $10,000 towards the implementation of an integrated community services directory database that will be linked with the LINCS (Local Information Network for Community Services) database system which is currently in use by 37 other councils throughout NSW.  Work is now progressing on this enhanced system.

 

Family Fun Day - Nepean Domestic Violence Network

In support of Stop Domestic Violence Day, the Nepean Domestic Violence Network held a family fun day to educate the community about the issues of Domestic Violence. The event was held in October 2007 in the public space between the Joan Sutherland Performing Arts Centre, Council and Westfields.  The day was attended by a diverse cross section of the community involving approximately 500 people.

 

The event catered for young families with activities including a pet farm, face painting, badge making and a jumping castle. There were also activities for young people including temporary tattoos.  A group of Sudanese Refugee women braided hair. The police band played a number of pieces and had people singing along and tapping their feet. A number of services, including government and non government agencies, held stalls to inform and educate the community about the issues of Domestic Violence and the support services available. Many white ribbons to show support were distributed on the day as well as other information resources.

 

The Network held an art competition in the lead up to the day with Year 6 Penrith students. The theme was ‘Safe and Happy Families’, the artwork was displayed on the day, and prizes were presented to the winners. The art work of all the participants was then displayed in the Penrith Library.

 

The event provided an important opportunity to communicate to the broader public that we can all make a contribution to “stop domestic violence”.

 

Families participating in the Stop Domestic Violence Event
adjacent to the JSPAC – October 2007

 

Volunteer Management Committee Network

Council officers coordinate and resource the activities of the Network which provides support and information to the voluntary management committee members of local Neighbourhood Centres. The Management Committee Network was established as a partnership between Council, local Neighbourhood Centres and volunteer committee members.

 

Over the past 6 months, the Network has been working closely with local neighbourhood centres to explore collaborative governance management models as options for improving the long term sustainability of centres. In July 2007, Network members participated in a workshop with the WINC (Workers in Neighbourhood Centres) network which involved discussions about current issues for management committees and options for future collaborative management structures. The overall aim of the workshop and subsequent discussions is to build capacity and strengthen Neighbourhood Centres.

 

Council officers have also been working with the Network on a Volunteers’ Stories Project. The project is still in the early stages and a professional story teller has been engaged to facilitate the documentation of the personal experiences of volunteers in neighbourhood, youth and seniors centres. The aim of the project is to celebrate and promote the important work of volunteers in Council’s Neighbourhood Centres.

 

In December 2007, the Network hosted a Christmas function for the management committee members and staff of neighbourhood centres. The function was a celebration of the contributions and achievements of the Network, its members and local neighbourhood centres in 2007.

 

                           

Network members and Neighbourhood Centre community workers celebrating the year’s achievements at a Christmas function held in December 2007

 

Youth Program Development and Planning

A number of initiatives were completed or progressed during the period.  A number of consultations with young people were held to ensure that the concerns and aspirations of young people were considered.  Consultations undertaken with young people included:

 

·        In July 2007, young people from a couple of local youth services were involved and contributed to the “Out and About” project led by the University of Western Sydney to canvass young people’s views on the use of different open space areas and to which extent these meet diverse local needs.

 

·        During September and October 2007 a series of consultations were held with children and young people in Kingswood Park to gain their views on what they like about their neighbourhood and what they might like to change (these views are being included as part of Council’s Kingswood Park Neighbourhood Action Plan).

·        In November 2007, the Penrith Police Command, Council and youth services together consulted with young people who were frequenting the Plaza and surrounds on Thursday nights.  This information assisted the workers and police to assess the safety of young people using this space. The consultation also contributed to further development of plans for the public domain area between the Westfield Plaza and the Joan Sutherland Performing Arts Centre and Council.

 

·        As part of the development of the Cranebrook Skate Park, considerable support has been provided by Council’s Youth Development Officer, Community Programs Co-ordinator and local community partners to involving young people in the design and final location selection for the skate park.

 

Penrith Youth Interagency (PYI)

This Interagency continues to be supported by the Youth Development Officer. A very successful planning day was held in December 2007. The day was well attended by over 35 youth workers. A plan was developed that will inform the Interagency’s direction and work for the coming year. A number of sub groups were identified to discuss and work on projects in specialist areas.

 

The Youth Development Officer has worked closely with the interagency to produce an orientation kit for new youth workers. This kit will include information regarding PYI, such as the terms of reference and information on the various sub groups, other youth services, the code of conduct and other useful information.

 

The very successful Youth Services Card is also being updated.  Over 10,000 of the first card have been distributed to young people across the City. This card has been a very useful resource for young people in the Penrith LGA to inform them of the services available in the local area.

Plans are currently underway to launch the new Youth Card and Orientation Kit in the first quarter of 2008. 

Youth Week Planning

The Youth Development Officer co-ordinates the administration and publicity for Youth Week grants. Council received a grant of $2,500 from the Department of Community Services. Council matched this funding amount by $2,500. The closing date for applications was December 2007. Applicants had to once again demonstrate how young people would be involved in planning the events. The theme for Youth Week 2008 is Shout, Share, Live, Unite.

 

A full report on the proposed Youth Week activities was presented to the Ordinary Meeting of Council on 4 February 2008.

 

WSROC Young Women’s Leadership Program (YWLP)

Council has supported the WSROC YWLP since its inception in 2005.  Council participates on the Program Steering Committee as well as providing significant in-kind support.

 

In August 2007, Council hosted the graduation of approximately 25 young women who had completed the program in the first half of 2007.  A number of these graduands were from Penrith and the surrounding region.  Council also resolved to make a financial contribution of $5,000 to the YWLP.

 

Council is also providing support to WSROC’s advocacy for ongoing funding for the program from other levels of government.

 

Liaison with Aboriginal Communities

Council continues to work closely with its Aboriginal partner organisations, as well as providing support to other mainstream service providers who deliver services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander residents in Penrith City.

 

NAIDOC Week 2007 – Looking Forward-Looking Blak

NAIDOC week 2007, as in previous years, provides Council with an opportunity to demonstrate its commitment to local Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander constituents on an occasion of major importance to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and organisations.  Looking Forward-Looking Blak celebrated 50 years of NAIDOC and was held in July 2007.

 

The 2007 NAIDOC Week Civic reception was a success with guests including the NSW Minister for Aboriginal Affairs, the Hon Paul Lynch, MP, the Chairperson of the NSW Aboriginal Land Council, Councillor Bev Manton, and Councillor Roy Ah-See, NSW ALC representative for the Sydney/Newcastle region.

 

Over 2,000 residents also attended the Jamison Oval NAIDOC Gathering.

 

A full report on 2007 NAIDOC Week celebrations was presented to Council in October last year.

 

Aboriginal Observers 2007 NSW LGSA Conference

 

Council once again supported two Aboriginal observers to attend the Local Government Conference in Coffs Harbour. This gives the observers an opportunity to learn more about local government decision making and communicate directly with Councillors and Council officers. The Councillors benefit from the advice and suggestions the observers are able to offer.  This activity contributes to Council showing leadership in working with the Aboriginal community and organisations.

 

Council’s Aboriginal Liaison Officer also plays a role in facilitating networking between Aboriginal local government Councillors from other LGAs, and various LGSA policy proposals that are relevant to Aboriginal people in Penrith City.

 

Indigenous Homelessness Action Research Project

 

The Indigenous Homelessness Action Research Project was completed in mid-2007.  Work continues with community partners on progressing responses to priority issues identified in the research project.

 

In the 2007/08 year, and with the remaining WSAAS funds from the project, a local women’s refuge is implementing an enhanced initiative that provides secure private rental accommodation for Aboriginal women and their children who have experienced significant disruption in their lives and are at risk of homelessness.  This initiative has been so successful that further funding from the State Government may be available.

 

Employment Compact

The Department of Aboriginal Affairs approached Penrith Council to develop a Job Compact in partnership with Blacktown City Council and the construction industry. Council officers have attended a number of meetings more recently to progress this compact.

 

Discussions continue with potential partners to progress this initiative in the first half of 2008.  A forum is also being planned to build stakeholder support for this initiative.

 

Council’s Statement of Recognition

In December 2007, Council reconfirmed its existing Statement of Recognition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cultural Heritage.  As part of a comprehensive report on this and related matters, Council has adopted an inclusive statement that demonstrates Council’s commitment to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander residents and partnerships with key Aboriginal community-controlled organisations.

 

Multicultural Community Development and Access

This section summarises the major activities undertaken in this portfolio.

 

Access and Equity Services Review

During 2007, Penrith Council conducted a review of seven key areas of services operation.  A key part of this review was that each Council service was required to complete a service review questionnaire covering seven areas of operation.  One of the seven areas was Access and Equity.  This process of review was led by Corporate Development with the Multicultural Access Officer leading the Access and Equity component. 

 

Through the careful analysis of the over 60 service review questionnaires a number of identified service improvements were identified and recommendations made.  A comprehensive report, highlighting the legislative requirements for local government in the area of Access and Equity and services for people with a disability, was completed. The report highlights areas for improvement including enhanced internal Access and Equity training, Website and Information systems, and customer service enhancements to Library and Children’s services. This report was presented to CMT in September with the implementation of recommendations to take place progressively in the next two years.

 

Support to Chinese Market Growers

Through a continued partnership with the Chinese Market growers in the rural areas of Penrith, programs such a Tai chi demonstration , a visit to the Penrith Women’s Health Centre, and an Environmental Health education session have been organised to better inform the community of the of the support available.  Sessions focussed on testing soil for the level of pesticides, a tour of the City Library, and women’s health education.

 

These programs are offered through a partnership between Council, Nepean Migrant Access and Penrith Women’s Health Centre.  These initiatives utilise empowering strategies to support better health and environmental outcomes for the Chinese community and their families.

 

USAP TAYO KABAKAN (A Filipino Gathering)

With the Philippines being the birthplace of the largest non English speaking group in the Penrith LGA, Penrith City Council, in partnership with community and government organisations, organised a Filipino information and consultation session in June 2007. Topics covered included Migration, Health, Centrelink services, Early Childhood Services and Healthy Ageing. The community response was positive and feedback via surveys requested regular sessions on a variety of topics.  A second session was held in August 2007, reaching a wider group of men and women.

 

Both information sessions linked participants to a range of services they may not otherwise have known about while also building capacity within the Filipino community. Further sessions are planned in response to the initial consultation and survey feedback.

 

Participants at Filipino Information Session – Penrith Women’s Health Centre

 

Penrith Refugee Coalition  

This project is a partnership which involves local community organisations and government agencies including Penrith City Council who have formed a coalition to assist the harmonious resettlement of refugee people in the Penrith LGA. The Coalition is a working group whose aim is to provide locally based English classes, health and settlement support and information for the Southern Sudanese community settling in the Penrith Area. As the project has continued, additional needs have been identified such as developing parenting skills, vocational training and employment related skill acquisition.  As a result, additional service providers have joined the Coalition with a wider choice of support and courses offered to the refugee community from one location at the Mamre Project.

 

Currently, English and computer classes, a supported playgroup, parenting skills, walking for fitness, and craft skills are among the courses offered to the humanitarian entrants in the Penrith area. For these programs to be accessible, it has been necessary to provide transport and childcare at a crèche on the grounds. Transition to school is another aspect of the project for the children moving into Kindergarten to gain access to the school experience before they actually begin the following year.

 

Critical to the success of this project has been the formation of the Refugee Coalition multi service partnership.  The pooling of skills and resources to implement the various programs run at Mamre has maintained three years of service delivery without receiving consistent dedicated funding from any one source.  Council for example has provided CAP funding as well as significant in-kind support.  Regular meetings are held to maintain a planned approach with open communication channels between all the organisations involved.

 

The Southern Sudanese community has been introduced to a wide range of workers and services through this partnership approach to service provision. Building capacity and leadership within the community have been part of the development process utilised, along with the learning opportunities provided by the structured programs and activities.

 

A more comprehensive report on the Southern Sudanese Refugee Community in Penrith City is also in tonight’s Business Paper.

 

African Communities meet Local Government Forum November 2007

The African Communities meet Local Government Forum took place at Blacktown Council on 3 November 2007, as a partnership project between both Penrith and Blacktown Councils, community members of the Blacktown-Nepean Regional Advisory Council and the Community Relations Commission.  The Deputy Mayor, Councillor Jackie Greenow, is a community member of the Advisory Council. 

 

The Forum aimed to increase the access and participation of people from African communities in programs, activities and services offered by local government. Approximately 100 people from six different African communities (Sudanese, Congolese, Ghanaian, Sierra Leonean, Burundian and Liberian) living in the Nepean region attended the Forum.

 

Attendees learnt about the role of local government and about the range of services provided by Council. They had the opportunity to ask questions about the responsibilities of the various levels of government and about community consultation. Attendees interacted with Council staff and Councillors during the lunch break and visited the service exposition at the end of the presentations to gather further information about specific Council services.

 

Overall, the event was an empowering experience for African members of the community. For a number of participants, the Forum was their first opportunity to be at a Council event and this broke down potential barriers between themselves and local government.  Feedback provided by the participants was that the Forum was informative and would support enhanced inclusion of African communities in the broader community.

 

African Community Leaders at the Forum - 3 November 2007

 

Disability Access Policy and Planning

This section provides a summary of the major activities and projects undertaken in this portfolio in the period.

 

Disability Action Plan Stage 2

Council adopted its first Disability Action Plan in March 2003.  The three-year plan provided a framework to make City services and facilities more accessible for all residents.

In the second half of 2006, a review and evaluation of the first plan was undertaken, prior to the development of the next Disability Action Plan referred to as Stage 2.

 

Two community consultations were held with people with a disability, their carers, and representatives of disability organisations and government departments in early June 2007, to identify priority community concerns to be addressed in the new Disability Action Plan Stage 2.

 

In July 2007, Council officers, with the assistance of Urbis Consultants, undertook a series of internal staff workshops to formulate strategies and actions for inclusion in Council’s Disability Action Plan Stage 2. This was in response to the priorities identified during the community consultations held earlier in the year and a review of the first Disability Action Plan 2003-2006.

 

The following five priority areas provided the basis for the workshop sessions:

 

·  Environmental, Local and Transport Planning

·  Development, Design and the Built Environment

·  Access to Information

·  Human Resources, EEO and Training

·  City Leadership, Promotion and Strategic Partnerships

 

The workshops were well received with a high level of participation by key staff at all levels in the organisation. The sessions generated valuable discussion about practical strategies and actions which have now been used by the consultants to form the basis of a draft Stage 2 Plan. The draft Plan was received by Council officers in late 2007.  A series of meetings with Council managers were held in the first quarter of 2008 to define internal responsibilities and resourcing for the actions in the draft Plan.

 

Disability Access Improvement Program

In 1993, Council established the Disability Access Improvement Program to improve access for people with a disability to Council owned buildings, facilities and services.

 

In the first half of the 2007-08 financial year, allocations and contributions were made to the following projects and activities:

 

·    Contribution toward accessible features in the new State Emergency Service Centre at Claremont Meadows

·    A reprint of the Penrith City Centre Access map

·    Planning for Disability Awareness and Customer Service Training for Council staff

·    Contribution toward the installation of automatic doors at the St Clair library

·    Membership fees for Australian Employers Network on Disability.

 

Detailed planning has been undertaken in relation to the staff training which will involve both Council’s Children’s Services staff and customer service personnel. The focus of this training is to build the confidence of Council staff in serving customers with a disability and parents of children with a disability. It is anticipated that the training courses will be run early in 2008.

 

International Day for People with Disabilities 2007 (IDPWD) 

In 2007, Council partnered with the Penrith Disabilities Resource Centre Inc (PDRC), the Nepean Area Disabilities Organisation Inc (NADO), and the Australian Foundation for Disability (AFFORD) to celebrate IDPWD.

 

On Tuesday 4 December, in the Joan Sutherland Centre, the Mayor unveiled a collaborative artwork which was the culmination of a series of workshops with people with a disability from the various participating local partner organisations. The event featured a puppetry and visual theatre performance by the ‘Out and About’ group from NADO. The event also showcased a memorable singing performance by one of the participants.  Well over 100 people attended the celebration which proved very successful and much appreciated by the broader disability community. The artwork will be permanently displayed in Council’s main library. This project was an exciting example of what can be achieved through local collaboration and partnerships.

The Awakening – Performers at the 2007 International Day for People with a Disability –

4 December at the Joan Sutherland Performing Arts Centre

 

Disability Access Committee

Three meetings of the Disability Access Committee were held during the period.  Issues considered included disability access to toilets on planes, public transport accessibility standards, the development of the City’s Local Plan, and an update on the development of the Disability Action Plan Stage 2.

 

Advice was also provided to Council on a number of major developments including the Penrith Valley Cultural Precinct, the Glenmore Park Child and Family Precinct, as well as a number of private developments.

 

Aged Services Development and Planning

This section provides a summary of major activities in this portfolio during the period.

Planning for an Ageing Community

In common with many other areas, the Penrith community will experience a rapid ageing of the community in coming years.  Following the completion of a scoping study in 2006, Council officers commenced in the second half of 2007, the development of a strategy to plan for the future ageing of the community.

 

Elton Consulting has been commissioned to assist with the development of the strategy and the first phase of the project was completed by the end of 2007. This initial stage has involved a literature review of relevant reports and a ‘trawl’ of similar studies and strategies that have been developed by other councils. This has also included a detailed review and analysis of the most recent 2006 Census data and forecasts about the ageing of the Penrith community.

 

The next stage of the project involves a series of community consultations to be held early in the first quarter of 2008.  It is expected progress on the Strategy will be reported to Council in the fourth quarter.

 

Aged and Disability Sector Service Planning

Council’s Aged and Disability Services Officer actively participated on a number of planning working parties with representatives from the Blue Mountains and Hawkesbury Councils to identify service gaps and issues in the Nepean Area. This information will be used to assist the Department of Disability Ageing and Home Care (DADHC) in service planning and funding over the next three years. 

 

Additionally, the Penrith Community Care Forum which includes over 40 service providers has undertaken regular planning sessions and issues discussions to provide feedback into the planning working group meetings with DADHC.

 

During 2007, Council’s Aged and Disability Services Officer has assisted a number of local projects with consultations directed at carers of culturally and linguistically diverse communities. A series of ‘open days’ are currently being planned for 2008 which are targeted at making those services in Council’s Community Connections facility more accessible for people from cultural and linguistically diverse backgrounds.

 

Support to Aged Groups

Council’s Aged and Disability Services Officer has also provided extensive support to a number of aged groups in the period.

 

Training sessions were organised for the many groups meeting at the Penrith Senior Citizens Centre on how to manage a group, maintain minutes and other records, meeting procedures, the roles of volunteers and the importance of effective communication.

 

Support was also provided to the Olympus Greek Seniors Group to find suitable premises, organise public liability insurance and assist with group planning.  Further discussions are now being held with the group to access more affordable premises.

 

Lemongrove Gardens Retirement Village

The Lemongrove Gardens Retirement Village has been fully occupied for most of the second half of 2007. One unit was vacated and has had some refurbishments. Minor improvements have been made to the double access doors on the Community Hall to ensure ease of access.  Some of the porches of a number of units have also had the floor tiles replaced.

 

A successful Annual General Meeting was held in August 2007 and regular support is provided by Council’s Lemongrove Administrator to the monthly resident meetings.

Summary

This report provides a summary of activities undertaken by the Community and Cultural Development Department in the period 1 July 2007 to 30 December 2007.

 

The range of projects, events and activities is extensive and delivers both target group and place-based responses.  The range of initiatives also demonstrates that Council’s work with government and community partners as well as residents continues to be productive and results in many successful outcomes.  These outcomes contribute to community capacity building and cohesive and inclusive local communities.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the information contained in the report on Community and Cultural Development Department - Projects and Key Achievements - 1 July to 30 December 2007 be received.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Ordinary Meeting

7 April 2008

The City as a Social Place

 

 

The City as a Social Place

 

 

4

Establishment of the Penrith Community Filipino School   

 

Compiled by:                Yvonne Perkins, Public Domain Amenity and Safety Manager

Authorised by:             Yvonne Perkins, Public Domain Amenity and Safety Manager   

Strategic Program Term Achievement: Local centres, community meeting places and prominent meeting places are increasingly valued and recognised by communities as a focus of their neighbourhoods, or as a feature of the City.

Critical Action: Engage the City’s communities in identifying and creating community places that are valued and used.

     

Purpose:

To advise Council of a request from the Philippine Language and Cultural Association of Australia, Inc for support in the establishment of the Penrith Community Filipino School.  The report recommends that the information be received.

 

Background

The Philippine Language and Cultural Association of Australia, Inc (PLCAA) has recently made representations to Council to propose a project with Council for the establishment of the Penrith Community Filipino School.  The PLCAA advise that the school will be an interactive learning environment where students can develop skills in the Filipino language and an awareness of Filipino heritage and culture. They also advise that the Filipino school will be the only Filipino language school in NSW and it will serve as a focal point for the Australian-Filipinos in Penrith as one means of promoting events related to the Read Philippines Project. This project is a joint undertaking between the Philippine Consulate General, Sydney and Penrith City Council.

The PLCAA is seeking Council support to assist with the housing of the proposed school.  Investigations and discussions have taken place with members of the Association to identify a suitable location for the school activities to take place.

Current situation

Following an onsite visit, it was agreed that two (2) available rooms at the St Marys Senior Citizens Centre, within the Penrith Valley Cultural Precinct at St Marys, would be suitable to meet the needs of the establishing school.  The location was also deemed suitable for students required to utilise public transport. 

The school representatives were very satisfied with this location, given the cultural nature of the precinct and the potential opportunities to interact with other cultural organisations in the future.

The language school has been booked as a regular user group of the venue, commencing on 3rd May 2008.  The venue will also be used by the school for other sessions such as parent/ teacher information meetings and teachers’ meetings. 

The cost of the two rooms at the non-profit rate for the hours required is $45.50 per week.  To support a twelve (12) month establishment period for the school, an amount of $2,366.00 would be required.  This is for a full year, and given that there would be some school holiday periods, this amount would adequately cover parent/teacher sessions, orientation and school presentation days that would occur during this establishment period.

Comment from the Community and Cultural Development Manager

The Philippine Language and Cultural Association of Australia, Inc has applied to Council, under the Community Assistance Program (CAP), for a grant of $600.00 to assist in covering costs associated with the establishment of the school. The requested amount of $600 will be provided through the General Manager’s delegation as a rolling component of the CAP.  This will be formally reported to Council through the six monthly updated CAP report to Council in July 2008.

The proposal to establish the language school at the St Marys Senior Citizens Centre is consistent with Council’s objective of supporting equitable access to Council’s community and cultural facilities for a broad range of culturally and linguistically diverse groups.  The location is ideal in terms of access to public transport and there are strong synergies between the aims of the Philippine Language and Cultural Association of Australia and Council’s objectives for the Penrith Valley Cultural Precinct.

Conclusion

The provision of funding from the Community Assistance Program of $600.00 leaves a balance of $1,766.00 that would be required should Council choose to support the school’s establishment costs for a twelve month period.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the information contained in the report on Establishment of the Penrith Community Filipino School be received.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Ordinary Meeting

7 April 2008

The City as a Social Place

 

 

The City as a Social Place

 

 

5

The Healthy Penrith Program   

 

Compiled by:                Monique Desmarchelier, Healthy People Partnership Officer

Authorised by:             Wayne Mitchell, Environmental Health Manager   

Strategic Program Term Achievement: Strategies are in place to respond to the social and health needs of the community.

Critical Action: Develop and implement a healthy strategy for the City that will guide planning and strategies that embrace healthy outcomes.

     

Purpose:

To inform Council of the Healthy Penrith Program that will be commencing in April 2008.  The report recommends that the information be received.

 

Background

Council’s Healthy People Partnership Officer and Economic Development and Marketing Officer, in conjunction with the Penrith Star, have developed a program called ‘Healthy Penrith’. The aim of this program is to highlight the allied health professionals and preventative services available to the Penrith community and promote opportunities for these local businesses. The development of the project was initiated by the Penrith Star and is aligned with health promotion and marketing projects being undertaken in Council.

 

The consequences of living in Cities such as Penrith are that we are generally not as active as previous generations, have excessive food consumption, rely on cars and are exposed to huge numbers of marketing messages to sell a multitude of products. The impacts of environments and these lifestyles on the health of Penrith communities is reflected in the many known challenges such as obesity levels, rates of smoking, cancer and diabetes.

 

There are no simple solutions to the complex reasons why people experience health problems relating to lifestyle choices. Solutions need to be diverse with involvement not only by the health sector, but by all levels of government and the community. Modification to the environment is one of the ways that can be effective in improving health of people, for example by providing opportunities for cycling and walking. With these environmental changes there also need to be opportunities for behavioural change.  Providing opportunities for people to learn about the services and facilities that are available in their community is one way to facilitate changes in people’s behaviour. This is the inspiration for the Healthy Penrith Program.

 

The Economic Development Department promotes the City's lifestyle attributes and central to this is the "wellness" industry. Wellness encapsulates lifestyle industries and services, health services, environmental industries and agribusiness and rural tourism. The Economic Development Manager has indicated support for the project which will promote Penrith as a regional city that values wellness both as a concept and for the diverse business opportunities it provides, demonstrating leadership and innovation in the wellness industry.  

 

The editor of the Penrith City Star (of the Fairfax Community Newspapers’ group) indicated they work within the community to nurture a positive atmosphere and that the paper has a weekly Business section which is designed to inform and promote business and business growth. This project will form part of that endeavour.

The Healthy Penrith Program

A policy has been developed to carefully explain the type of health professionals and groups we are seeking for the program.  The policy explains the program, promotes services and will not tolerate hard sell or quick fix style products.

 

Participants in the program include Penrith Council, the Penrith City Star who are the media Partners, Health Professionals and Sydney West Area Health Service’s publicity department who will be providing health professionals for the Wednesday events and quotes for the newspaper article.

 

Details of the program include:

 

·    The program will run from April to November 2008. The first event will be held on 11 April and will involve raising awareness for Diabetes. This event is in conjunction with the Diabetes Centre at Nepean Hospital and the Nepean Division of General Practice.

·    The promotion will be one health topic per month initially. This may increase to once per fortnight or weekly depending on the level of interest by residents and health professionals.

·    The Penrith City Star will publish an article on the selected topic, the opportunity to meet health professional and the location.

·    Expressions of interest will initially be sought from health professionals through the Penrith Star. Other methods of contact will be individual letters sent to health professionals from existing databases and networks.

·    A health information stand will be set up in the Joan Sutherland precinct, with a health care topic for that month (eg blood pressure/cholesterol checks, fitness test). Health professionals will provide health care information and promotion of service on a roster basis, from 11.30 am - 1.30 pm initially. In the event of wet weather, the Nepean room at Council or the theatrette in the Penrith Library will be used.

·    Health topics will be geared to the Health calendar and local events, eg sporting clubs to be allocated the school holiday weeks, nutrition to be covered in Nutrition Week.

·    Council will provide administrative support to allocate the time and place for health professionals who have expressed an interest in a particular event.

 

A review of the program will involve Health Professionals being contacted via a survey at the end of 2008 to ascertain whether there has been an increase in the use of professional services promoted in the program. Based on this initial information, the same survey may be distributed again in April 2009 to determine if residents have accessed more services over a period of twelve months.

 

Initial Health topics to be canvassed for the program include:  Asthma, bowel health, massage, blood pressure, blood sugar, fitness check, heart check, acupuncture, weight/height ratio, eye sight check, hearing tests, feet checks, skin checks, mammogram info, sports injuries, back injuries, medication help, iridology, reflexology, diet, mental health, speech therapy, meditation, tai chi, Pilates, blood donation, cooking demonstrations, quit smoking, drug help points, aerobics demonstrations. This list is not exhaustive and will be updated as the program continues.

 

Conclusion

Statistical information for Penrith indicates that lifestyle related diseases have a significant impact on health. The Healthy Penrith Program has been developed to inform the community and influence behavioural change through a partnership with the Penrith City Star and local health care professionals.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the information contained in the report on The Healthy Penrith Program be received.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Ordinary Meeting

7 April 2008

The City as a Social Place

 

 

The City as a Social Place

 

 

6

Status of Victoria Park Landscaping    

 

Compiled by:                Lindsay Clarke, Parks Coordinator

Authorised by:             Raphael Collins, Parks Construction & Maintenance Manager  

Requested By:             Councillor Kaylene Allison

Strategic Program Term Achievement: The City’s recreation and leisure facilities and services meet its needs and are optimally used.

Critical Action: Ensure facilities and services reflect the City's diverse current and future recreation and leisure needs.

     

Purpose:

To advise Council on the current status of the landscaping of Victoria Park.  The report recommends that the information contained in the report be received and that the Masterplan approved by Council in 2004 be implemented in stages.

 

Background

A landscape Master plan was prepared for Victoria Park in 2004. The Master plan was presented to Council on 26 July 2004. This report advised that the total cost to implement the Master plan would exceed $800,000, excluding the new toilet building.  Due to the size of the project, it will require staging in future funding programs.

 

Two stages of landscape works have already been completed in Victoria Park at a cost of $100,000. This amount was funded from the old citywide S94 Open Space Plan.

 

In June 2007, Council adopted the Local Open Space Developer Contributions Plan. Included in this plan is $300,000 for the implementation of selected elements of the Master plan. When these works are eventually completed, a total of $400,000 of S94 funds will have been spent in Victoria Park.

Current Situation

The landscape works that have been implemented in the park to date include:

 

·        Removing old garden beds at the northern end of the Park

·        Planting advanced trees near the war memorial

·        Relocation of play equipment

·        Path paving around new play area

·        Under surface treatment in play area

 

A project evaluation bid has been submitted for inclusion in the 2008/09 Parks Improvement Program. The amount of the bid is $212,000 and includes the following elements:

 

·        Provision of picnic shelters and park furniture

·        Extend path paving near play area

·        Purchase and establish plant material

·        Fencing and edging

Local Planning Manager’s Comments

Victoria Park is currently listed as a heritage item with a number of other heritage items located around its edge. 

 

Victoria Park, dedicated in 1842, is the first and only public space in the historic township of St Marys.  The park demonstrates both nineteenth century town planning ideals and the impact of the First World War on the small town community of St Marys.  The role of the park as a memorial to past national conflicts brings an association with numerous generations of local people.  The park continues to provide the focus for the community’s commemoration of the sacrifice of war and also provides a public place for recreation activities.

 

The proposed improvements listed above are supported ‘in principle’, provided they are in accordance with the Masterplan and the detailed design is subject to the approval of Council’s Heritage Adviser. 

Landscape and Design Supervisor’s Comments

Victoria Park is a major city park for St Marys. A high quality response is expected for the park commensurate with its high profile, both in the community and its high profile position on the Great Western Highway. Victoria Park also has a rich heritage which calls for a unique approach to the Park which has been reflected in the approved Master Plan.

 

There is potential for Victoria Park to become a “Magnetic Place” in St Marys with quality outcomes and finished to complement the local significance of the place.

 

Based on the above, a higher quality of design and finish is expected of this Park than standard local parks, which in turn triggers the provision of higher than standard maintenance.

 

Option 1

Implement the approved Master Plan (2004) in stages according to the availability of funds in future annual budgets.

 

Stages of Master Plan include:

 

1.       Completion of the memorial precinct on the Great Western Highway (excludes works to the memorial itself, eg restoration, lighting);

2.       Completion of the play precinct in the south east corner (includes paths, planting, shelters and perimeter fencing) plant procurement of trees (particularly complete);

3.       Corner entry treatments and tree plantings (infill natives, street trees, structure / feature trees, Bunya pines);

4.       Pathworks and heritage interpretation stations (including feature path to the memorial);

5.       Central diagonal pathworks, amenity block demolition and new pavilion feature lighting of mature trees in memorial precinct.

 

Option 2

Review the 2004 Master Plan to reduce the scope of works so that it is more aligned with available funds ($300,000). This would mean the scope of works would be changed and that would influence the following landscape elements:

 

·        Delete some of the new pathway works;

·        Simplify treatment to the park’s entries;

·        Delete amenities pavilion at southern end of the park and upgrade existing amenities building;

·        The reduced scope of works be staged.

Recreation and Cultural Facilities Planner’s Comments

The development of the Local Open Space Development Contributions Plan considered priorities for open space embellishment across the entire LGA to be levied against infill development. This Plan was adopted by Council on 25 June 2007 and became effective from 26 June 2007. Consultation was conducted with the Parks Construction and Maintenance Department regarding the proposed recommendations contained in the Local Open Space Development Contributions Plan, and it was agreed that selected elements of the proposed Master Plan of Victoria Park be included as a reasonable approach, considering the overall needs and priorities for active and passive open space embellishment in other areas of the City.

 

This methodology was applied to major proposed district open space projects including the Gipps St site, where the costs to deliver a significant component (but not all) of the recommended facility embellishments, as identified through the Master Planning process, were included in the District Open Space Facilities Development Contributions Plan. This was the recommended approach in order to sustain the reasonableness of the overall Plan, to embellish our existing open space land and make it “work harder” to meet future demands created by population growth, and keeping the proposed works and their costs in context with other projects identified as priorities for the City.

Financial Services Manager’s Comments

The current Penrith City Local Open Space Contributions Plan includes an allocation of $300,000 for the implementation of selected elements of the approved Master Plan for the site.  To date, $100,000 worth of works have been completed from the old Section 94 Plan.  The expected cost to implement the entire Master Plan, as discussed above, would result in a funding shortfall of over $400,000.  Any expanded program could be considered in future Management Plan processes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.   The information contained in the report on Status of Victoria Park Landscaping be received.

2.   The Masterplan approved by Council in 2004 be implemented utilising funds identified in the Section 94 Local Open Space Developer Contributions Plan and that the remaining work be nominated for consideration through subsequent Project Evaluation processes.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Ordinary Meeting

7 April 2008

The City as a Social Place

 

 

The City as a Social Place

 

 

7

Erskine Business Park (Section 94) Development Contributions Plan   

 

Compiled by:                Tony Crichton, Senior Environmental Planner

Authorised by:             Roger Nethercote, Environmental Planning Manager   

Strategic Program Term Achievement: Timely delivery of services to new release areas is being secured.

Critical Action: Prepare and implement services and infrastructure delivery plans for each new release area that ensures that the early establishment of services and facilities match community needs.

     

Purpose:

To inform Council on the content of submissions received during the public exhibition of the draft (Section 94) Development Contributions Plan for the Erskine Business Park and to present revised plans with minor amendments for adoption by Council.  The report recommends that the Development Contributions Plan 2008 be adopted by Council.

 

Background

The Erskine Business Park Development Contributions Plan was reported to Council’s Policy Review committee meeting on 19 November 2007.  The report outlined the conclusion of investigations into the establishment of a revised biodiversity management strategy for the estate which provided a balanced development and conservation outcome.  The report also outlined the agreement reached between the Department of Planning (DoP) and the Erskine Business Park (EBP) land owners group on the establishment of a biodiversity corridor through the estate and a range of financial contributions for biodiversity and enhancement in the area.

 

Council resolved to place the Erskine Business Park draft Development Contributions Plan 2007 on public exhibition.

 

The Erskine Business Park (Section 94) draft Development Contributions Plan 2007 was publicly exhibited from December 2007 until 8 February 2008.  Council wrote to all current landowners and to relevant State Government Departments and Agencies. 

 

Four submissions have been received to the public exhibition process.  Two submissions were received from land owners in Erskine Business Park (EBP), namely Allens Arthur Robinson P/L on behalf of Jacfin P/L, and FDC Construction & Fitout P/L on behalf of Fitzpatrick Investments P/L.  Two other submissions were received from Blacktown City Council and the Sydney Catchment Authority. 

 

Assessment of Submissions

 

Our assessment and commentary raised in the submissions is outlined below.

 

1.  Submission by Allens Arthur Robinson P/L (AAR)

 

(a)     AAR is of the view that the designation of a ‘Biodiversity Conservation Area’ does not apply to the Jacfin land because this was superseded by the Biodiversity Strategy adopted for Erskine Business Park (EBP) by the Minister for Planning.

 

Comment:

Jacfin P/L owns a small parcel of land adjacent to the southern boundary of EBP next to the Sydney Water pipeline.  A biodiversity conservation area extending along the northern edge of the Jacfin property has been identified in previous environmental studies undertaken in EBP. 

 

The biodiversity area on the Jacfin land has been indicated as such in the original EBP Development Control Plan and original Section 94 Developer Contribution Plan, both of which came into force on 3 January 2003.  It is also currently nominated on Penrith DCP 2006 which is in force and in draft Penrith DCP 2008 which includes the development control plan provisions for EBP.  It is also nominated as an E2 (Environmental Conservation) Zone in draft Penrith LEP 2008 which is currently with the DoP awaiting certification for public exhibition.

 

However, it is understood that Jacfin P/L was not a land owner with whom the DoP ultimately negotiated dedication of a biodiversity corridor through EBP.  Notwithstanding, Council, DoP and DECC have all consistently supported the protection of this northern portion of the Jacfin land as a biodiversity conservation area. 

 

(b)     The position of AAR on the status of the Jacfin land is consistent with the declaration by the Minister for Planning on 6 September 2007 that the Minister for Planning has elected to declare the Jacfin application as a project under Part 3A of the EP&A Act 1979. 

 

Comment:

Jacfin has submitted a major project application to the Minister for Planning for the development of the site for employment/industrial purposes including earthworks, construction of a warehouse and ancillary offices, installation of services and construction of an access road.  It is noted that the Minister for Planning has elected to declare the Jacfin application a major project to which Part 3A of the EP&A Act 1979 applies.  This application is currently in the preliminary stages and is yet to be formally exhibited or determined by the Minister.

 

In recent years, a number of project applications under Part 3A of the EP&A Act 1979 have been lodged by applicants with the Minister for Planning for sites within EBP.  Those applications have been assessed on their merits by DoP and have incorporated provisions relating to Council’s adopted planning controls for the estate, including Section 94 contributions.  It is our expectation this would be the same process pursued by DoP in its assessment of the current development proposal.

 

 (c)    AAR is of the view that (i) an area of land adjacent to the southern boundary of the Jacfin property should be included as developable area for Jacfin; (ii) Electricity Transmission Line easements should be available for use as carparking or hardstand areas; and (iii) the proposed public road reserve from Templar Road to the Jacfin property should be shown on maps within the EBP draft Development Contributions Plan.

 

Comment:

(i)      This land is in the ownership of Sydney Catchment Authority (SCA).  It is not covered by Penrith LEP 1994 (EPEA) and is not zoned for employment or industrial purposes.

(ii)      The current DCP and draft Development Contributions Plan has nominated all Electricity Transmission Line easements as ‘non-developable’ land to reflect the electricity authority’s view that development should not occur within the electricity easements. 

(iii)     The road referred to has only recently been dedicated as a public road and as such can now be shown on the maps included in the draft Plan.  The draft Plan has been amended accordingly.

 

(d)     The term ‘voluntary planning agreement’ should be defined within the list of definitions.

 

          Comment

          The reference to voluntary planning agreement is not required in the draft plan and has been removed.

 

2.   Submission by FDC Construction & Fitout P/L

Requested that Council delete the requirement for a Section 94 contribution for the Eastern Drainage Catchment and instead permit the drainage works to be provided by the landowner incorporating both on-site detention and water quality requirements along the eastern perimeter of the property which will be clear of the 1:100 year flood line and the biodiversity corridor. 

 

Comment:

The Eastern Catchment of the EBP is in effect in the one ownership, namely Fitzpatricks P/L.  The land owner has provided an undertaking to Council that covers this part of the estate that will accommodate Council’s required drainage outcome within the proposed development of this land, inclusive of ongoing care and maintenance in perpetuity of the new drainage system.

 

This alternative approach is considered acceptable.  These requirements can be effectively dealt with as conditions of consent in future Development Applications applying to the land.  The draft plan has been amended accordingly. 

 

Arising from the land owner’s submission, the revised total developable area of EBP nominated in the draft Plan has increased marginally to 326ha.  This amendment has been made to the draft Plan.

 

3.  Submission by Blacktown City Council

Blacktown City Council (BCC) raises no objection in principle to the draft Plan but raises the following issues:

(a)     BCC raises concerns that land acquisition costs are excluded from total drainage costs.

Comment:

Acquisition costs for the Western Drainage Basin were offset by the ability of the developer to use the basin to assist in meeting their water quantity and quality requirements.  Arrangements have been made with the landowner within the catchment of the Eastern Drainage Basin to incorporate drainage facilities within the developable area of their land.

 

(b)    As Blacktown City Council has no intention of funding the bridge over Ropes Creek and the road link, the draft Plan should include the funding of the full cost of the bridge and possibly the extension of Lenore Drive to Old Wallgrove Road.

 

Comment:

The draft Plan proposes the upgrading of Lenore Drive to a four lane median divided arterial class road to the local government boundary which is along the centre of Ropes Creek.  This provides for the road in EBP and half of a four lane bridge to the centre of the creek. 

 

Current legislation for Section 94 Plans does not permit Section 94 contributions which were levied within one local government area being spent in an adjoining local government area. 

 

Blacktown Council’s position in regard to funding of the road connection to the M7 has been previously expressed.  The DoP has indicated the view that the link road network should be the subject of developer funding through a regional infrastructure levy system.  Accordingly, the link road network, including the remaining section in the Blacktown LGA, is the subject of the RTA Concept Plan and draft SEPP for the Western Sydney Employment Hub which has recently been placed on public exhibition by DoP. 

 

We are currently assessing these draft plans and will be bringing forward shortly a report to Council which details the results of that investigation and outlines key points for Council to consider in making its submission to DoP on its plans. 

 

4.  Submission by Sydney Catchment Authority

 

The Sydney Catchment Authority (SCA) has reviewed the draft Plan and has no objections to that Plan. 

Conclusion

The development of the Erskine Business Park is critical to the growth of employment opportunity in the city.  It is also a major contributor to Council’s strategic objectives in regard to providing local jobs for our workforce by growing local businesses.

 

The review and public exhibition of the existing EPEA Section 94 Contributions Plan and the commencement of the Biodiversity Conservation Scheme for Erskine Business Park now allows Council to be in a position to formally adopt the revised developer contributions arrangements outlined in the draft Plan. 

 

The Plan provides certainty for investors in financing the development of the remainder of the Estate.  It will enable lodgement and processing of current and upcoming applications for development with greater certainty as to infrastructure funding requirements and will assist in clarifying development opportunities.  As such the draft Plan is recommended for Council’s adoption.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Erskine Business Park (Section 94) Development Contributions Plan be received.

2.     Council adopt the Erskine Business Park Development Contributions Plan 2008 as attached to this report.

3.     Those persons who made submissions on the draft Plan be advised of Council’s decision.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.  

Erskine Business Park Development Contributions Plan 2008

38 Pages

Attachment

  


Ordinary Meeting

7 April 2008

The City as a Social Place

 

 

The City as a Social Place

 

 

8

The Australian Chapter of the Alliance for Healthy Cities - National Forum and Meeting 7 - 9 May 2008   

 

Compiled by:                Carmelina Loughland, Development Services Dept & Environmental Health Dept Secretary

Authorised by:             Wayne Mitchell, Environmental Health Manager   

Strategic Program Term Achievement: Strategies are in place to respond to the social and health needs of the community.

Critical Action: Develop and implement a healthy strategy for the City that will guide planning and strategies that embrace healthy outcomes.

     

Purpose:

To provide details regarding the The Australian Chapter of the Alliance for Healthy Cities - National Forum and Meeting which will be held on 7 - 9 May 2008 in Kiama. The report recommends that the information be received.

 

Background

Healthy Cities in Australia is in its 21st year and the movement has enjoyed a resurgence as increasing urbanisation creates challenges and opportunities for all people concerned with creating healthy, sustainable, safe and fair communities.  In 2007, Australian representatives made a commitment to progress the development of Healthy Cities in Australia through the formation of an Australian Chapter of the International Alliance for Healthy Cities.

 

The Alliance for Healthy Cities is an international network aiming at protecting and enhancing the health of city dwellers.  The Alliance is a group of cities and other organisations that try to achieve the goal through an approach called “Healthy Cities”.

 

The Healthy Cities approach was initiated by the World Health Organisation.  In order to cope with the adverse effects of an urban environment over health the World Health Organisation has been promoting the approach worldwide.

The Program

The Australian Chapter of the Alliance for Healthy Cities has organised a forum with some of Australia’s foremost experts in discussing “solutions to the urban challenges facing Healthy Cities in Australia”.

 

The Forum will be held over two days from 7 – 9 May 2008 in Kiama.  The topics to be covered are:

 

·    Actions to solve the Urban Challenges facing Australian Healthy Cities

o Transport Services & Infrastructure

o Urban Design & Planning

o Environmental Sustainability

o Social Justice and Equity

o Evaluating Impact of Healthy Cities

o Community Engagement/Participation – a vital key to success

·    Healthy Cities Illawarra

·    Kiama Municipal Council’s Vision for their Healthy Community

·    Local Government Planning for health

·    Healthy Cities in Australia – State of Play

 

There will be two site tours:

1.   Environmental Planning and Protection, Kiama Region

2.   Futureworld Eco-Technology Centre, Wollongong

Summary

The Australian Chapter of the Alliance for Healthy Cities Forum on 7 – 9 May 2008 provides an excellent opportunity for Councillors to gain an increased understanding of the health challenges facing increasingly urbanised areas and cities in Australia.

 

Councillors may wish to nominate to attend the Conference.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the information contained in the report on The Australian Chapter of the Alliance for Healthy Cities - National Forum and Meeting 7 - 9 May 2008 be received.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.  


The City In Its Environment

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

9        Tender 10-07/08 Ropes & South Creek Rehabilitation Works

 

 



Ordinary Meeting

7 April 2008

The City in its Environment

 

 

The City in its Environment

 

 

9

Tender 10-07/08 Ropes & South Creek Rehabilitation Works   

 

Compiled by:                Mal Ackerman, Supply Co-ordinator

Hamish Robertson, Natural Resources Management Officer

Authorised by:             Wayne Mitchell, Environmental Health Manager   

Strategic Program Term Achievement: Effective land use management policies, regulatory practices and controls are being implemented to protect the environment.

Critical Action: Implement sustainable land use management programs that protects the environment.

     

Purpose:

To establish a preferred contractor to carry out Rehabilitation Works including community education and awareness for Ropes & South Creek over a period of three years.  The report recommends that a three year contract with provision for rise & fall be awarded to Greening Australia NSW.

 

Introduction

Penrith City Council, in alliance with Blacktown City Council, has been successful in gaining NSW Environmental Trust Funding under its Urban Sustainability Program to implement actions from the Ropes and South Creek Regional Open Space Management Plan (ROSSMP) as a model Sustainability project.

 

The project focuses on areas of high public amenity and is located in an area that is and will be impacted upon by further development. 

 

The project includes actions relating to urban areas, rehabilitation of riparian zones, public open space management and community education. 

 

The overall objectives of the project are to:

 

·       Improve water quality through best practice management of urban water runoff;

·       Rehabilitate riparian corridors, targeting high impact locations and threatened species and endangered vegetation communities;

·       Provide integrated passive recreation and active recreational opportunities and pathways;

·       Promote strategic and integrated planning and management of parklands that recognise their local and regional significance; and

·       Develop long-term partnerships and collaborations across the region.

 

 

 

Background

The first stage of the project included the development of a Project Business Plan. Environmental consultants ENSR Australia (HLA) were engaged to create a Business Plan which included the guiding framework for implementation of the project.  The Plan provided a methodology and costings for the project which was approved by the Environmental Trust on 27 November 2007. A Memorandum of Understanding between Penrith and Blacktown Councils was developed and submitted to the Environmental Trust.

 

The second stage of the project involves the engagement of a suitably qualified and experienced Contractor to implement the key activities specified in the Project Business Plan. The key activities are to create and implement an education and awareness program for the duration of the project and riparian rehabilitation of approximately 50 metres either side of Ropes and South Creek as defined in the appended site plan. The works are focused on six key sites described in the table below. 

 

Table 1. key sites for riparian rehabilitation works.

 

Creek

Corridor Reference Area

Description

South Creek

S1

Along South Creek between the Great Western Highway and the Main Western Rail Line at St Marys/Werrington.

S2

Along South Creek between the Western Motorway and the Great Western Highway at St Marys.

S3

Along South Creek, north of Luddenham Road to the Western Motorway at Orchard Hills.

Ropes Creek

R1

Along Ropes Creek between Forrester Road and Debrincat Avenue (Tregear Reserve) at Tregear.

R2

Along Ropes Creek between Debrincat Avenue and the Main Western Rail Line at Whalan.

R3

Along Ropes Creek between the Main Western Rail Line and the Great Western Highway at Mount Druitt.

 

Tender

Penrith City Council was the nominated lead Council for the Tender, however Blacktown City Council’s concurrence was sought at key stages throughout the Tenderer selection and commissioning processes as well as the implementation and finalisation of the Scope of Works.

 

Tenders for Ropes & South Creek rehabilitation works were advertised on 3 December 2007 and closed on 22 January 2008. Environmental consultants ENSR Australia (HLA) were engaged to produce a tender technical paper for the rehabilitation works. The document highlighted the key components of the project which formed the basis for the request for tender (RFT 10-07/08).

 

All prospective tenderers were invited to attend a pre-tender briefing. The briefing included site visits along Ropes and South Creeks, detailed information on the project’s requirements and Council’s expectations. A great deal of interest was generated with twenty-one organisations attending the briefing. 

 

To help deliver the required works of the Project Business Plan and achieve its objectives, Tenderers would be required to provide services for the completion of rehabilitation works and community environmental education.  Tenderers were requested to provide responses in accordance with a series of Tender Schedules typical of those used for this kind of tender. The scope of works for the project was developed by an independent consultant and the estimated cost to complete the project between $1.6M and $2M.

 

It was proposed in the tender documents that only one preferred contractor would be selected to perform all of the required works over the stated 3 year period with provision for rise and fall.

Evaluation Plan

A detailed evaluation plan was developed setting out the details of the evaluation committee and the process for evaluating responses. This included the evaluation methodology and weightings for each of the evaluation criteria.

 

The evaluation committee comprised Hamish Robertson - Natural Resources Officer (PCC) Mal Ackerman - Supply Coordinator (PCC), Natalie Payne - Waterways Rehabilitation Officer (BCC), Belinda Rollason - Grants Program Officer (DoP), Janet Rannard - Bushland Management Officer (PCC),  and Justine Clarke - Snr Environmental Health & Projects Officer (BCC).

Evaluation Criteria

The following evaluation criteria was used in evaluating the tender responses:

 

Mandatory Requirements

·    Critical Assumptions

·    Conforming Requirements

·    Conflict of interest

·    Insurance

·    Compliance statements

 

Scope of Requirements

·    Demonstrated ability

·    Relevant experience

·    Methodology

·    Technical Skills

·    Project Management Experience

·    Project Timeline

 

Cost/Price Category

·    Project cost & unit rates

·    Other cost impacts

·    Provisional cost items

 

 

Business Category

·    Financial viability

·    Business record

·    Industrial Relations

·    Safety record

 

Management and Administration

·    Occupational Health and Safety and Public Liability Management

·    Company resources and personnel

·    Quality Assurance System

·    Environmental Management System

Tenders Received and Tendered costs

Requests for Tenders (RFTs) were posted to an electronic tender distribution service managed by the Western Sydney Regional Organisation of Councils Ltd (WSROC). The best practice tendering process allowed for organisations to respond electronically via the WSROC website. A total of 9 responses were received from the following companies:

 

Tenderer

Lump sum cost

Greening Australia NSW

$1,739,622

Ecowise Environmental

$1,908,054

Land Partners Ltd

$1,920,500

Spectrum Employment Services Co-operative Limited

$1,921,000

Earth Repair & Restoration

$1,942,157

Eco Logical Australia

$1,953,200

The Bush Doctor (NSW) Pty Ltd

$4,665,255

Regal Innovations Pty. Ltd.

$5,247,950

Total Earth Care Pty Ltd

$72,993,750

 

Following an initial review of submissions, the evaluation committee determined that the following companies did not represent value for money and were excluded from the final evaluation stage. In all cases, the project lump sum cost offered was well in excess of the estimated project cost:

 

Regal Innovations Pty Ltd, Total Earth Care Pty Ltd & The Bush Doctor (NSW) Pty Ltd.

Evaluation

All remaining Tenders were assessed against the evaluation criteria and the final rankings (indicated below) were determined based on the overall capability, experience and compliance to all of the specified requirements.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tenderer

Criteria Ranking

Greening Australia NSW

1

Eco Logical Australia

2

Ecowise Environmental

3

Earth Repair & Restoration

4

Land Partners Ltd

5

Spectrum Employment Services Co-operative Limited

6

 

Greening Australia NSW submitted the lowest offer and demonstrated its capability and experience in projects of this size and was ranked highly following the assessment against the evaluation criteria. All other companies submitted proposals that were within the estimated project cost of $1.6m to $2.0m however, there were no apparent advantages to Council in considering these higher priced offers.

 

Greening Australia NSW is a not for profit organisation and has over 25 years experience in delivering ecological restoration outcomes throughout Sydney, NSW and Australia. Its partners and clients include Federal, State and local government agencies as well as a number of property developers, landscapers, mining companies and consultancies. Originally established as a grants based organisation, Greening Australia NSW has evolved over the years to become a leader in the ecological restoration field and is the company recommended for selection by the evaluation committee.

 

Greening Australia NSW has an ongoing involvement in numerous large scale restoration projects throughout Sydney and regional NSW, particularly involving endangered ecological communities such as the Cumberland Plain Woodland. One of its largest projects within Sydney is the Greening Western Sydney project.  It is responsible for the management and restoration of over 7,000 hectares of remnant vegetation within Ropes, South and Eastern Creek corridors.

 

Greening Australia NSW has formed a partnership with Mura Mittigar to assist in the development and delivery of indigenous training and engagement strategies and to assist in the delivery of onground work targets.

Project Budget

The implement the Ropes and South Creek Regional Open Space Management Plan (ROSSMP) by the NSW Environmental Trust Funding under its Urban Sustainability Program for the sum of two million dollars over a three year period.

 

Penrith City Council and Blacktown City Council have committed to substantial in-kind contributions as part of the project. A large proportion of contributions will be through investigating stormwater management measures, and the implementation of such measures, including the installation of stormwater quality improvement devices such as gross pollutant traps, channel rehabilitation, and associated maintenance costs. Other in-kind contributions form part of Council’s ongoing operational maintenance which includes RID squad patrols, waste education, and sustainability education programs.

 

Grant funding will be directed to complete riparian restoration work and community education and awareness. The budgeted expenditure for the project is summarised in the following table.

 

Additional to community education and riparian restoration work that will be undertaken by Greening Australia NSW, the Hawkesbury River County Council (HRCC) will control aquatic weeds. The HRCC administers the Noxious Weed Act within the Hawkesbury/Nepean River catchment and will be allocated $100,000 for the three year duration of the project. Using mechanical, physical and biological techniques, the HRCC will control aquatic weeds along both Ropes and South Creeks.

 

The budgeted expenditure for the project is summarised below.

 

Environmental Trust Funding

Budgeted Expenditure

  Yr 1 ($)

  Yr 2 ($)

  Yr 3 ($)

Total

Project Planning, implementation, & monitoring

200,000

-

25,500

225,500

Wages/ Salaries

67,500

168,750

168,750

405,000

Boom construction

5,500

-

-

5,500

Waste Removal Ropes Creek

10,000

20,000

20,000

50,000

Waste Removal South Creek

13,000

28,000

28,000

69,000

HRCC Aquatic Weed Management

20,000

40,000

40,000

100,000

Seed collection

15,000

5,000

-

20,000

Terrestrial Weed control

66,000

73,000

42,500

181,500

Revegetation (inc. site preparation)

-

402,750

256,250

659,000

Follow up planting maintenance (weeds, watering, replacement planting)

-

-

204,500

204,500

Fencing

-

23,000

 

23,000

Rehabilitation monitoring and reporting

7,400

11,300

11,300

30,000

Project publicity/ communication/ promotion

6,000

21,000

-

27,000

Total

410,400

792,800

796,800

2,000,000

 

Conclusion

The Ropes and South Creek Rehabilitation Work is funded through an Urban Sustainability Program major grant for the sum of two million dollars over a three year period. Through urban water management, rehabilitation of riparian zones in the creek corridors, management of public open space adjoining the corridors and education programs targeting householders, community groups and businesses, multiple sustainability objectives of Council and State strategies will be achieved.

 

Tenders for Ropes & South Creek rehabilitation works were advertised on 3 December 2007 and closed on 22 January 2008. Requests for Tenders (RFTs) were posted to an electronic tender distribution service managed by the Western Sydney Regional Organisation of Councils Ltd (WSROC),  with a total of 9 responses being received.

 

A detailed tender evaluation plan was developed setting out the details of the evaluation committee and the process for evaluating responses. The evaluation panel was formed with representatives form Penrith City Council, Blacktown City Council, and the Department of Planning. Using weighted criteria, the evaluation panel ranked Greening Australia NSW as the best value for money.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Tender 10-07/08 Ropes & South Creek Rehabilitation Works be received.

2.     A Contract be awarded to Greening Australia NSW for Ropes & South Creek Rehabilitation works, incorporating community education and awareness, as detailed in the report.

3.     The Common Seal of the Council of the City of Penrith be affixed to all relevant documentation, if required.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1. View

Ropes & South Creek Site Plan

1 Page

Appendix

  


Ordinary Meeting

7 April 2008

Appendix 1 - Ropes & South Creek Site Plan

 

 

 

Railway

 

Great Western Highway

 

    St Marys

 

M4

 

  


The City as an Economy

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

10      Young Achievement Australia Business Skills Program

 

11      CLAIR Forum 2008

 

 



Ordinary Meeting

7 April 2008

The City as an Economy

 

 

The City as an Economy

 

 

10

Young Achievement Australia Business Skills Program   

 

Compiled by:                Bijai Kumar, Local Economic Development Program Manager

Authorised by:             Bijai Kumar, Local Economic Development Program Manager   

Strategic Program Term Achievement: The City’s business community, learning institutions and training institutions are working in an integrated way to strengthen and develop the City’s local economic base.

Critical Action: Work with appropriate economic partners on developing mutual understanding and support for a common agenda for action.

     

Purpose:

To inform Council of the purpose, benefits  and costs for sponsoring the Young Achievement Australia Business Skills program.  The report recommends that the information contained in the report be received.

 

Background

Council has received a request from Young Achievement Australia (YAA) to sponsor its Business Skills Program at a cost of $5,500.

 

YAA is a non government, not for profit organisation committed to developing the business potential of young Australians. YAA operates nationally through a network of state and regional locations and is represented internationally through its affiliation with Junior Achievement Worldwide. Since its establishment in 1977, over 160,000 young Australians have benefited from programs offered by YAA. The organisation’s mission is “to build partnerships  with business, government, education providers and the community to provide all Australians, particularly young Australians the opportunity to access vital business enterprise programs regardless of location, circumstances, curricula choice, career paths or academic choice.”

 

YAA has been offering the Business Skills Program to secondary and tertiary students throughout Australia since 1977. They provide students with an opportunity to participate in enterprise learning programs that provide hands on experience to build their employment skills and business knowledge.

 

The Business Skills Program™ is free of charge to students as corporate sponsors and government grants provide the necessary funding to run the program. The program’s key focus is on empowering the next generation of business leaders and preparing today’s students to meet the social and economic challenges of the next decade.

 

The Business Skills Program presents a most challenging business proposition for students. It requires students to set up and operate their own small business, with the assistance of mentors from the business community and the Business Skills Manual that is provided at no cost. The students complete the full business cycle over a period of twenty four weeks, meeting once a week after school for two hours. The students sell two dollar shares to raise their start-up capital, write a business plan, produce, market and sell their product or service. At the end of the twenty four week period, the students liquidate the company, write an annual report and return the profit to the shareholders. The students are then eligible to enter the State and National Awards.

 

The programs commence in March / April 2008 and are run for two hours a week (usually between 4.00 to 6.00pm) over a twenty four week period.

 

Current Situation

YAA is now expanding the program to incorporate Western Sydney schools resulting from strong registered expressions of interest from students in this area. According to YAA, students from Sydney’s West have previously registered for the program in other areas but have not proceeded due to travel requirements.

 

A sponsorship cost of $5,500 enables 15-25 students to participate in this program free of charge, and according to YAA this only equates to thirty percent of the total cost of implementing the full program. YAA has approached several Western Sydney Councils for support for their program, with Holroyd Council and Parramatta City Council already signing up to sponsor the Business Skills Programs for 2008. However, as each program can only cater for up to 25 students YAA is seeking other sponsors, including Council, to meet their 2008 targets for Sydney’s Western     .

 

The Penrith Valley Economic Development Corporation was requested to consider sponsoring the YAA program in Penrith, given its role in business development and fostering entrepreneurship. The Board has decided not to support the program.

 

Comments from the Financial Services Manager Comments

The Business Skills project provides innovative and interesting learning experiences for high school students however there is no identified available funding to support the program within the current budget.  The current 2007-08 budget remains in a balanced position. Council may wish to consider alternative funding for this project.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the information contained in the report on Young Achievement Australia Business Skills Program be received.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Ordinary Meeting

7 April 2008

The City as an Economy

 

 

The City as an Economy

 

 

11

CLAIR Forum 2008   

 

Compiled by:                Geoff Shuttleworth, Economic Development and City Marketing Manager

Authorised by:             Geoff Shuttleworth, Economic Development and City Marketing Manager   

Strategic Program Term Achievement: Programs are attracting domestic and international visitors to the City for access to cultural and sporting exchange and experiences and language education and training.

Critical Action: The City's international relationships are maintained and opportunities for enhancing these relationships are explored.

     

Purpose:

To inform Council of the 2008 CLAIR Forum.  The report recommends that Councillor Jackie Greenow represent Council at the 2008 CLAIR Forum to be held on Friday 11 April 2008 in Rotorua, New Zealand.

 

Background

The Council of Local Authorities for International Relations (CLAIR) works to promote international understanding by supporting the overseas activities of Japanese local authorities, conducts research into local government in other countries and provides information about local administration in Japan.

 

CLAIR has an office in Sydney and Council has developed a strong working relationship with staff in the office and particularly with the Director of CLAIR Sydney, Mr Kenji Ikeda, through our Japanese International relations Fujieda and Hakusan.

 

Council’s Chief Financial Officer and Director City Services participated in the CLAIR Local Government Exchange and Cooperation Seminar in Japan in 2007 and 2006 respectively.

 

An invitation was received on 26 March from Mr Kenji Ikeda for Council to attend the 2008 CLAIR Forum which will be held on Friday 11 April 2008 in Rotorua, New Zealand.

 

The Forum will have the theme “Sharing for the Future” and will explore a range of cross-cultural exchanges.

 

If Council were to be represented at the Forum it would reinforce the strong relationship which has been built up with CLAIR which provides support to Council’s Japanese international relationships.  Deputy Mayor, Councillor Jackie Greenow, who is the Chairperson of the Penrith International Friendship Committee has indicated an interest in representing Council at the CLAIR Forum.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on CLAIR Forum 2008 be received.

2.     Councillor Jackie Greenow represent Council at the 2008 CLAIR Forum to be held on Friday 11 April 2008 in Rotorua, New Zealand.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.  


 

 

The City Supported by Infrastructure

 

 

There were no reports under this Master Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


Leadership and Organisation

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

12      Best Practice Grants Management Conference

 

13      Personnel Matter 909/91 Pt9

 

 



Ordinary Meeting

7 April 2008

Leadership and Organisation

 

 

Leadership and Organisation

 

 

12

Best Practice Grants Management Conference   

 

Compiled by:                Ray Richardson, Grants Support Officer

Authorised by:             Vicki O’Kelly, Finan