9 September 2009

 

Dear Councillor,

In pursuance of the provisions of the Local Government Act, 1993 and the Regulations thereunder, notice is hereby given that a POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING of Penrith City Council is to be held in the Passadena Room, Civic Centre, 601 High Street, Penrith on Monday 14 September 2009 at 7:30PM.

Attention is directed to the statement accompanying this notice of the business proposed to be transacted at the meeting.

Yours faithfully

 

 

Alan Stoneham

General Manager

 

BUSINESS

 

1.           LEAVE OF ABSENCE

Leave of absence has been granted to:

Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM - 11 September 2009 to 19 September 2009 inclusive.

Councillor Ross Fowler OAM - 4 September 2009 to 16 September 2009 inclusive.

 

2.           APOLOGIES

 

3.           CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES

Policy Review Committee Meeting - 17 August 2009.

 

4.           DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

Pecuniary Interest (The Act requires Councillors who declare a pecuniary interest in an item to leave the meeting during discussion of that item)

Non-Pecuniary Conflict of Interest – Significant and Less than Significant (The Code of Conduct requires Councillors who declare a significant non-pecuniary conflict of interest in an item to leave the meeting during discussion of that item)

 

5.           ADDRESSING THE MEETING

 

6.           MAYORAL MINUTES

 

7.           NOTICES OF MOTION

 

8.           DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

9.           URGENT REPORTS (to be dealt with in the delivery program to which the item relates)

 

10.         CONFIDENTIAL BUSINESS


POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING

 

Monday 14 September 2009

 

table of contents

 

 

 

 

 

 

meeting calendar

 

 

confirmation of minutes

 

 

DELIVERY program reports

 


 

2009 MEETING CALENDAR

February 2009 - December 2009

(adopted by Council 8/09/08 and amended by Council 6/4/09)

 

 

TIME

FEB

MAR

APRIL

MAY

JUNE

JULY

AUG

SEPT

OCT

NOV

DEC

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

 

Ordinary Council Meetings

7.30 pm

2

 

6

4v

 

20

3

7ü

12

9

14

23

23

 

25

29*

 

24

28^

 

30

 

Policy Review Committee

7.30 pm

 

9

 

 

15

13

 

14@

 

 

7

16#+

30@

27

18#

 

27

17

 

19

16#

 

 

 

 

#    Meetings at which the Management Plan 1/4ly reviews are presented

 

^  Election of Mayor/Deputy Mayor (meeting to commence at 7:00 pm)

<    Briefing to consider Draft Management Plan for 2009/2010

@  Strategic Program progress reports [only business]

v  Meeting at which the Draft Management Plan is adopted for exhibition

ü  Meeting at which the 2008/2009 Annual Statements are presented

*    Meeting at which the Management Plan for 2009/2010 is adopted.

Y  Management Plan Councillor Briefings/Public Forum (June)

 

 

 

 

-                 Council’s Ordinary Meetings are held on a three-week cycle where practicable.

-                 Extraordinary Meetings are held as required.

-                 Policy Review Meetings are held on a three-week cycle where practicable.

-                 Members of the public are invited to observe meetings of the Council (Ordinary and Policy Review Committee). Should you wish to address Council, please contact the Public Officer, Glenn McCarthy on 4732 7649.

1                


UNCONFIRMED MINUTES

 OF THE POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING OF PENRITH CITY COUNCIL HELD IN THE PASSADENA ROOM, PENRITH

ON MONDAY 17 AUGUST 2009 AT 7:33PM

PRESENT

Deputy Mayor Councillor Ross Fowler OAM, Councillors Kaylene Allison, Kevin Crameri OAM, Greg Davies (arrived 7:34pm), Mark Davies, Jackie Greenow, Prue Guillaume, Marko Malkoc, Karen McKeown, Kath Presdee and John Thain.

 

LEAVE OF ABSENCE

Leave of Absence was previously granted to Councillor Robert Ardill for the period 9 August 2009 to 24 August 2009 inclusive.

APOLOGIES

PRC 59  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Jackie Greenow seconded Councillor Marko Malkoc that apologies be accepted for His Worship the Mayor, Councillor Jim Aitken OAM, Councillor Tanya Davies and Councillor Ben Goldfinch.

 

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES - Policy Review Committee Meeting - 27 July 2009

PRC 60  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Kath Presdee seconded Councillor Mark Davies that the minutes of the Policy Review Committee Meeting of 27 July 2009 be confirmed.

 

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

 There were no declarations of interest.

  

DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

A City of Opportunities

 

1        South Penrith Library Branch Location                                                                            

PRC 61  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Karen McKeown seconded Councillor Jackie Greenow

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on South Penrith Library Branch Location be received.

2.     Council not take up the option of the lease for the South Penrith Branch Library in the redeveloped Southlands Shopping Centre under the current offer.

3.     Other innovative options for decentralised delivery of library services be evaluated as part of the current longer term review planning process.

4.     St Clair Library continues its current extended hours of operation.

5.     A further report by officers be prepared for presentation to the Library Working Party canvassing options for a physical library location on the South side of Penrith, giving details of specific sites, funding models and investigating innovative ideas for the provision of  library services.

 

 

A Green City

 

2        Unauthorised Business Operating in Rural Areas                                                           

PRC 62  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM seconded Councillor Marko Malkoc

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Unauthorised Business Operating in Rural Areas be received.

2.     All matters relating to the issue of orders and the commencement of proceedings relating to unauthorised business activities in rural areas be deferred until after the LEP process for Stage 1 is finalised by the Council, with the exception of those matters that have the potential to present a significant risk of harm to human health, property or the environment.

 

 

A Liveable City

 

3        Development Contributions Plan Review                                                                         

PRC 63  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor John Thain

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Development Contributions Plan Review be received.

2.     A progress report be submitted to the Minister in accordance with this report, advising of the outcomes of the review of the WELL Contributions Plan, Glenmore Park Stage 2 Contributions Plan and the Claremont Meadows Stage 2 Contributions Plan.

3.     The Minister be requested to make new Contributions Plans for WELL and Glenmore Park Stage 2 including the revised amounts detailed in this report.

4.     The Minister be requested to remake Claremont Meadows Stage 2 Contributions Plan in accordance with the plan adopted by Council on 13 December 2004.

5.     In accordance with the Minister’s Direction, Council cease to apply the levy under the Library Facilities Plan.

 

GENERAL BUSINESS

 

GB 1          The Bennett Wagon                                                                                                  

Councillor Jackie Greenow requested that an amount of $4,000.00 be allocated in equal amounts from each ward’s voted works to cover the cost of the horses required to pull the Bennett Wagon down Queen Street during the St Marys Spring Festival.

 

PRC 64  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Jackie Greenow seconded Councillor Greg Davies that the matter be brought forward as a matter of urgency.

 

The Deputy Mayor, Councillor Ross Fowler OAM, ruled that the matter was urgent and should be dealt with at the meeting.

 

PRC 65  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Jackie Greenow seconded Councillor Greg Davies that an amount of $4,000.00 be allocated in equal amounts from each ward’s voted works to cover the cost of the horses required to pull the Bennett Wagon down Queen Street during the St Marys Spring Festival.

 

There being no further business the Chairperson declared the meeting closed the time being 8.03pm.

    



DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

 

A Leading City

 

1        Draft Policy on the Payment of Expenses and Provision of Facilities to Mayor, Deputy Mayor and Councillors

 

2        The Independent Pricing and Regulatory Tribunal's Draft Report into the Revenue Framework for Local Government

 

A City of Opportunities

 

3        Neighbourhood Action Plans 2009 - Londonderry and Oxley Park

    

 


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


A Leading City

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

1        Draft Policy on the Payment of Expenses and Provision of Facilities to Mayor, Deputy Mayor and Councillors

 

2        The Independent Pricing and Regulatory Tribunal's Draft Report into the Revenue Framework for Local Government

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting

14 September 2009

A Leading City

 

 

 

1

Draft Policy on the Payment of Expenses and Provision of Facilities to Mayor, Deputy Mayor and Councillors   

 

Compiled by:                Adam Beggs, Administration Officer - Policy and Council Support

Authorised by:             Glenn Schuil, Acting Executive Officer  

Strategic Objective: We demonstrate accountability, transparency and ethical conduct

Strategic Direction:  We champion responsible and ethical behaviour

     

 

Executive Summary:

Section 252 of the Local Government Act 1993 (the Act) requires Council to adopt a Policy on the payment of expenses and provision of facilities to the Mayor, Deputy Mayor and Councillors (252 Policy), within 5 months of the end of each financial year.  Section 253 of the Act requires that the Council must give at least 28 days’ public notice of its intention to adopt or amend the policy, unless it is of the opinion that the proposed amendment (s) are not substantial.  Council must comply with these provisions of the Act each year, even if it proposes to adopt a Policy that is the same as its existing Policy.

 

Council has received advice from the Department of Local Government through DLG Circular 08-03 which provides guidelines on a number changes Councils should consider when reviewing their Policy. The changes that have been made are provided in Attachment 1 (Colour copies will be provided separately to Councillors) and are highlighted as follows:

 

1.   Existing policy largely consistent with the Guidelines are in normal text

2.   Proposed deletions are in red text

3.   Proposed additions are in green text

 

The report highlights the proposed changes that have been made in response to the information provided by the DLG such as, no general allowance is to be provided, changes to the reconciliation and reimbursement process, strengthening of carer expenses, disallowing private benefit. In addition several changes have been suggested by Council’s staff and Councillors such as travel arrangements and expenses and class of air travel.

 

A Reference Group was held on 31 August 2009 to discuss the proposed changes to the Council’s draft Policy on the Payment of Expenses and the Provision of Facilities.  As a result, Council staff are now preparing correspondence to the DLG and a late motion to the Local Government Association’s Annual Conference requesting that consideration be given to providing an allowance to Councillors to enable them to attend conferences and training related to their civic functions to cover loss of income due to absence from their work.

 

This report recommends that Council’s current Policy be amended to ensure that it is  consistent with the Guidelines issued by the DLG, and that the amended Policy is advertised for 28 days in accordance with the Act notifying the public of the Council’s intention to adopt the amended Policy.

 

Council officers will review the draft Policy again after the notification period has concluded, and when further information is received from the DLG and as a result of the late motion to the Local Government Association Conference.

Current Situation

Council adopted its current Policy at the Ordinary Meeting of 15 October 2007, upon a recommendation of the meeting of the Policy Review Committee held on 8 October 2007. 

 

The Act provides that the Director General of the DLG may issue Guidelines in relation to the review and adoption of Councils’ Section 252 Policies.  The DLG issued Guidelines in January 2008 to assist Councils in reviewing their Section 252 Policies. In addition, the DLG reviewed 45 Council’s 252 Policies (including Penrith City Council’s Policy in August 2007) and feedback was provided to the Council from the review of our 252 Policy. Council’s staff were waiting on a revised Guideline to be issued by the DLG before a review of the Council’s 252 Policy was undertaken. However, as the DLG advised Council’s staff that a timeframe for revised Guidelines was not available, Council’s staff commenced a review of the Council’s 252 Policy taking into consideration the advice provided by the DLG.

 

The Guidelines and the findings from the review have been examined to identify how they may affect Council’s current policy.  A draft Policy that complies with the Guidelines and the DLG review can be found in Attachment 1 (Colour copies provided separately) to tonight’s business paper.  The provisions of Council’s existing 252 Policy are largely consistent with the Guidelines and are in normal text, proposed deletions are in red text, and proposed additions are in green text. The proposed changes are not seen to be major additions to the existing Policy. Some of the more significant changes will be discussed in this report, the remainder are highlighted in the attachment but are considered minor. 

 

Changes made as a direct result of DLG guidelines

 

·    Council’s 252 Policy was not to provide for a general allowance. This has been included within the draft Policy at 9.1.1.Limits were to be placed for all expenses and facilities. This has been included in section 9.2.3.1 as well as 11.2.1. The DLG have suggested that the limits on sustenance should be based on the Australian Tax Office’s determination. This issue has been catered for in the revised draft Policy.

·    Clarification of the process for the approval, reconciliation and reimbursement of expenses and facilities was to be included. While the Council’s existing Policy reflected the comments made by the DLG, the Policy has been strengthened and this has been included within section 9.1.5.

·    Councillor expenses / facilities may not be used to support attendance by Councillors at political fund raising functions. This has been included within 9.1.8 of the draft Policy.

·    Councils were to state in their Policy that the Policy would apply if an Administrator was appointed to the Council’s area. This has been included within 9.1.9 of the draft Policy.

·    Policies should extend to the provision of expenses for carer expenses. This has been included within 9.2.6 of the draft Policy.

·    Policies need to clarify that gifts and benefits given by a Councillor should be of token value. This has been included within section 12.6 of the draft Policy.

·    Policies reviewed by the DLG identified that Councils may be at risk of paying inappropriate legal expenses for Councillors. The DLG have suggested appropriate words to address this issue and these are included within section 9.2.8 of the draft Policy.

·    Policies should disallow private benefit for Councillors. This has been included within section 13 of the draft Policy.

Furthermore there were several other issues which were raised for consideration by Council’s staff or Councillors to ensure the Policy remains contemporary. The following points highlight the changes proposed:

·    In the draft Policy (attached) the provisions relating to the use by Councillors of their own private motor vehicle have been streamlined to reflect the Council’s current practice. In the draft Policy it is proposed that if a Councillor has approval to attend a meeting / Conference and that it will take less than three hours to drive, that a Councillor is authorised to use their private motor vehicle.  Where a Councillor has authority to attend a meeting / Conference and the expected travel time by motor vehicle is greater than three hours, a Councillor is able to receive the lesser of the cost of an economy air fare or the cost according to the “rates applicable under the relevant State Award” if they choose to use their private motor vehicle to travel to the meeting / Conference.

·    Currently Councillors are able to travel by air (economy class) for all official air travel, “with the exception that business class may be used for air travel to Western Australia; the Northern Territory, Tasmania, destinations in Queensland north of Brisbane and destinations overseas”. Due to the recent introduction of premium economy air fares on domestic air travel and international travel, it is considered appropriate that when available this option should be utilised.

Next Steps

On 31 August 2009, a Reference Group was held with all available Councillors invited to attend to discuss the proposed changes to the Council’s current 252 Policy. At the Reference Group the issue of costs incurred by Councillors in attending conferences was discussed. The specific issue raised was that the DLG were encouraging Councillors to undertake training, but a Councillor may not have sufficient leave from their work to enable them to attend a training course which may impact on the Councillor’s ability to attend a training course. This issue had been previously raised by a Councillor and Council officers wrote a letter to the DLG in April 2009 requesting the Department’s views on providing an amount of money to Councillors to enable them to attend conferences and training related to their civic functions to cover loss of income due to absence from their work. The DLG replied to Council advising that “In the Department’s view it is therefore inappropriate to provide a payment to a councillor, such as you describe in your correspondence, either as a fee or as an expense in a councillor expenses and facilities policy”.

The Reference Group asked that Council Officers prepare further correspondence to the DLG requesting reconsideration of this issue. In addition, the Reference Group requested that a motion be put forward to the Local Government Association’s Annual Conference as follows:

Subject: Reimbursement of income loss due to Councillors attendance at training and conferences

 

Motion:

 

That the Local Government Association make representations to the Department of Local Government requesting that provision be made in the Section 252 Policy on Payment of expenses and provision of facilities for a daily amount of money to Councillors to enable them to attend conferences and training related to their civic duty to cover their loss of income.

 

Note from Council:

 

Penrith City Council is committed to providing all Councillors with the opportunity to attend as many training courses and conferences as required to ensure Councillors can carry out their civic duty as best as possible.

 

The DLG have strongly advocated that Councillors should receive adequate training opportunities to enable them to effectively and efficiently discharge their responsibilities of being a Councillor. Penrith City Council recognises that some Councillors may be disenfranchised by not being able to attend essential training courses, attend peak Conferences due to their own work commitments and subsequent financial limitations. The motion attempts to encourage more Councillors to attend training courses and conferences by providing reimbursement for the loss income by way of a daily payment, with a capping on the number of days that a Councillor can access this allowance.

 

Conclusion

 

Given that the Council’s 252 Policy must be reviewed within 5 months of the end of each financial year and that Council must give at least 28 days’ public notice of its intention to adopt or amend its Policy, it is considered prudent that Council approves the draft policy, and then a 28-day public exhibition period will commence. Once further information has been received from the Department of Local Government or the outcome of the motion to the Local Government Association Conference, a further report will be submitted to the Council.

 

In the event that proposed amendments are made at the Meeting by Councillors to the draft 252 Policy, these will be included prior to advertising the document. A further report, detailing any submissions received within the 28-day public exhibition period will be submitted to a future Policy Review Committee Meeting.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Draft Policy on the Payment of Expenses and Provision of Facilities to Mayor, Deputy Mayor and Councillors be received

2.     Council advertise for 28 days’ a public notice of its intention to adopt the amended Policy

3.     Council write to the Department of Local Government, requesting reconsideration of the issue of costs incurred by Councillors in attending training courses and conferences and the provision of a daily payment to reimburse Councillors for lost income.

4.     A motion be put forward to the Local Government Association Conference requesting that provision be made in the Section 252 Policy on Payment of expenses and provision of facilities for a daily payment to Councillors to enable them to attend conferences and training related to their civic duty to cover the loss of income.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.  

Draft Policy on the payment of expenses and provision of facilities to the Mayor, Deputy Mayor and Councillors

18 Pages

Attachment

  


Policy Review Committee Meeting

14 September 2009

A Leading City

 

 

 

2

The Independent Pricing and Regulatory Tribunal's Draft Report into the Revenue Framework for Local Government   

 

Compiled by:                Andrew Moore, Financial Services Manager

Ken Lim, Management Planning Co-ordinator

Authorised by:             Andrew Moore, Financial Services Manager   

Strategic Objective: We demonstrate leadership, and plan responsibly for now and the future

Strategic Direction: We deliver services for the City and its communities, and maintain our long term financial sustainability

      

 

Executive Summary:

The Independent Pricing and Regulatory Tribunal (IPART) was commissioned by the NSW Government to conduct a review of the Revenue Framework for Local Government.  While the review was to consider the entire revenue framework for Local Government it is acknowledged that rates and charges levied by Councils provide a major source of funding for Local Government operations.

 

IPART have now released their draft report and have invited submissions.  Council’s Finance Working Party has met to discuss the recommendations contained in the draft report. Based on the recommendations of Council officers presented to the Finance Working Party and the discussions at the meeting a submission has been prepared.

 

The draft report into the Revenue Framework for Local Government has proposed an amended framework be implemented to replace the existing rate pegging regime. While the proposed framework does not recommend the complete removal of rate pegging it does provide for greater transparency and flexibility than the current system. IPART have proposed two options under the framework:

·    Option A – Delivers a minimum or default option for all Councils and retains the essential ratepayer protection elements of rate pegging.  The annual rate increase under this option would be made in reference to a new Local Government Cost Index, assessed annually by IPART.  This option also introduces a mechanism by which councils can seek medium term revenue paths with incentives to improve their financial practices, planning and accountability.

·    Option B – This element introduces an additional opportunity for qualifying Councils to gain greater flexibility in revenue setting and would run in tandem with option A.  Option B allows qualifying councils to seek full autonomy in setting revenue requirements and annual rate increases above the regulated rate of annual increase subject to their ability to demonstrate sound financial and planning practices and community support for its proposals.

 

This report recommends that Council provide a submission to IPART giving general support to the recommendations and requesting that consideration be given to reassessing some of the recommendations concerning the qualifying criteria for Option B.

 

Background

The NSW Government commissioned the Independent Pricing and Regulatory Tribunal (IPART) to complete a review of the Local Government Revenue Framework in May 2008. 

The initial stages of this review saw IPART distribute an issues paper in July 2008.  The paper invited submissions and comments from interested parties, including Local Government.  Council’s response to this issues paper was coordinated by WSROC.

 

The NSW Government introduced the regulation of council rates in NSW in 1977. This regulation has been largely based on an approach known as ‘rate pegging’. Under this approach, each year the NSW Government determines the maximum amount by which councils can increase their annual general rate income. Individual councils must then adjust their rates and annual charges so their general income increases up to this maximum amount, or seek a special variation to exceed the amount. The rates cap is in effect calculated in per property terms so that rates revenues grow in line with the number of properties. In announcing the review the NSW Government acknowledged that while the review would consider rate pegging they remained committed to rate pegging. However, during an address to the Local Government Association Annual Conference held in Broken Hill in October 2008 Premier Nathan Rees softened this stance by stating that he would consider removing rate pegging in NSW Local Government.  NSW is the only state that currently maintains a rate pegging regime.

 

In July 2009 IPART issued their draft report and has invited submissions from Councils.  Council’s Finance Working Party meet on 31 August to discuss the recommendations contained within IPART’s draft report and the details of the proposed Council submission in response to the draft report. The closing date for these submissions is 18 September 2009.

 

IPART have conducted a number of workshops across the state and Council’s Financial Services Manager and Management Planning Coordinator have attended one of these sessions.

Current situation

IPART released the draft report for its Review of the Revenue Framework for Local Government on 23 July 2009. While the review looked at the overall framework available to Councils for revenue raising particular focus was given to the regulation of Council rates through rate pegging.  IPART noted the importance of balancing the accountability of local government and the protection of ratepayers are policy objectives that are important to the NSW community. However, the current rate pegging system has created competing tensions between these objectives with ratepayer protection being delivered at the expense of transparency and accountability and responsibility of Councils to their electorates. IPART considered that in practice, these competing, but desirable objectives, must and can be balanced.

 

IPART has proposed an adjusted framework for regulating local government rate increases which provides two options to the current rate pegging system. The recommended framework does not abolish rate pegging but instead provides an adjustment to the mechanism that has greater transparency and objectivity and can provide council with greater medium term certainty of rating revenues.

 

 

The proposed framework has 2 elements:

 

·    Option A – This element is envisaged as the minimum or default option for all Councils and retains the essential ratepayer protection elements of rate pegging whilst providing a mechanism by which councils can seek medium term revenue paths with incentives to improve their financial practices, planning and accountability.

·    Option B – This element introduces an additional opportunity for qualifying Councils to gain greater flexibility in revenue setting and would run in tandem with option A.  Option B allows qualifying councils to seek full autonomy in setting revenue requirements and annual rate increases above the regulated rate of annual increase subject to their ability to demonstrate sound financial and planning practices and community support for its proposals.

 

IPART is proposing Option A as the minimum or default option to be applied to all councils. Option B should be seen as an enhancement to Option A rather than a stand alone option. Both options envisage a default arrangement that would use a price index for capping rate revenue for councils.  Further information on the proposed mechanics of the frame work are outlined below. IPART proposes that the new framework should be introduced for the 2012/2013 financial year to coincide with Council elections.

 

Option A

 

Option A maintains the current rate pegging arrangements, while improving the rigour, transparency and independence of the rate pegging process. It also emphasises a longer term focus for revenue planning and rate setting and improves links between strategic revenue and expenditure plans. Under this approach:

·    each year, IPART would calculate and advise the Minister for Local Government of the percentage change in a new local government cost index, after an adjustment for productivity

·    the Minister would then determine the increase in rates

·    there would be the introduction of a new process for the Minister to determine rates over a number of years to replace the existing special variation process.

 

Option A is partly aimed at creating a focus on longer term revenue path and improved links between rate setting and strategic planning. The current arrangements whereby councils seek annual variations of the rate peg would be replaced with a mechanism that enables councils to seek Ministerial approval for “multi-year revenue paths”, for the length of the electoral cycle. Councils would be able to request medium term revenue paths with rate increases above the regulated annual rate increase. Eligibility for a medium term rate path would be based on council compliance with the Integrated Planning and Reporting Framework.

 

It is envisaged that the two elements of Option A, regulated annual rate increases and multi-year revenue paths, would operate together. Those councils that can not or do not want to move beyond the regulated annual rate increase would apply the regulated annual rate increase. Councils could then choose to apply to the Minister for a Multi-Year Revenue Path (MYRP) that would instead create additional certainty of rating revenue, this MYRP would apply for each election cycle. It is asserted by IPART that the combination of these elements is designed to provide flexibility for councils and certainty of outcomes.

 

 

Option B

 

Option B would provide a new element in the council rate revenue framework, with increased flexibility for councils, based on higher standards of performance and community involvement.

It is not envisaged that Option B would be operated in isolation to Option A.

 

In essence, Option B provides an alternative mechanism for determining the medium term revenue path, whereby eligible councils would seek autonomy in setting revenue requirements and annual rate increases above the regulated rate of annual increase. Under this option Council would have the ability to lock in rate rises for up to 4 years in advance, in line with the election cycle.

 

However, councils would need to earn their independence by demonstrating:

·    a track record of sound financial management, and

·    a community mandate for the council’s proposed medium term revenue plan.

 

Option B would be available to councils that:

·    have demonstrated high standards of financial management

·    have developed a medium term approach to revenue, expenditure and service delivery plans and

·    their plans have the support of their constituent communities, especially when these plans involved greater than the regulated annual rate increase.

 

IPART notes that the effectiveness of local government democracy in ultimately achieving rate levels and revenue and expenditure choices that are efficient and equitable is at this stage unknown, and in this regard, the outcomes under Option A are more assured than under Option B. However, a model that incorporates a progressive move to Option B is theoretically more consistent with the achievement of democratic accountability, greater community engagement and development, and the position of local government as a genuine third tier of government.

 

Response to draft report issued by IPART

The draft report has been considered by the Finance Working Party and it is proposed that Council’s response will include the following statement that:

“Penrith City Council generally supports the recommendations of the draft report into the Revenue Framework for Local Government.  Council is encouraged by the prospect of greater transparency in the setting of the annual rate increase and the prospect of increased autonomy for local communities in setting their rates.”

 

In addition to this statement of support it is proposed that Council recommend that IPART give consideration to reassessing some of the financial criteria and community consultation required by Council’s to qualify for Option B and the timing and composition of the Local Government Cost Index.  A summary of these recommendations is provided below:

·    The Unrestricted Current Ratio (UCR) measuring liquidity be lowered from the proposed benchmark of 2:1.  Council believes that recurrent financial sustainability can be achieved below this benchmark.  An UCR of this level suggests existing capacity and seems to contradict the need for a rate rise. It is recommended that a more appropriate benchmark would be the level recently set by the Division of Local Government of 1.5:1.

·    The expectation of a council’s Operating result (excluding capital amounts) being an average 5% cent over each economic cycle be reviewed to consider the impact on the Operating Result of developing Councils. Council recommends that greater focus be placed on the Long Term Financial Planning of Councils to demonstrate financial sustainability as opposed to the retrospective consideration of operating results.  Again the requirement of surplus operating results may only be identifying existing capacity.

·    Council supports, in principle, the use of customer surveys to determine the extent of a community mandate supporting a proposed rate increase. However, how this mandates determination needs to be re-examined in regard to

§ Who is the “Community”?

§ Criteria for Representative Sampling

§ The Benefits of Contracting out the Survey Function

·    The introduction of the Local Government Cost Index (LGCI) does provide greater transparency to the annual increase of rates.  While the composition of the new LGCI has been identified by IPART in the draft report it would be recommended that Local Government have an opportunity to provide input into the final composition of this index.  Once the index is finalised it is agreed that this independent assessment conducted annually by IPART is a desired outcome however it is recommended that the release of this information be brought forward to be better aligned with Council’s budget processes.

 

Conclusion

IPART has now released its draft report into the Revenue Framework for Local Government and has encouraged submissions on the report’s recommendations. It is recommended that Penrith City Council provide a submission to IPART on their draft report. Council’s submission has been developed in consultation with the Finance Working Party and must be received by IPART by 18 September 2009.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on The Independent Pricing and Regulatory Tribunal's Draft Report into the Revenue Framework for Local Government be received

2.     Council endorse the sending of the submission to IPART, in the terms identified in this report.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.  


A City of Opportunities

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

3        Neighbourhood Action Plans 2009 - Londonderry and Oxley Park

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting

14 September 2009

A City of Opportunities

 

 

 

3

Neighbourhood Action Plans 2009 - Londonderry and Oxley Park   

 

Compiled by:                Heather Chaffey, Community Engagement Officer

Cali Vandyk-Dunlevy, Cultural Development Officer

Authorised by:             Jeni Pollard, Acting Community & Cultural Development Manager   

Strategic Objective: We play an active role in our communities

Strategic Direction: Our capacity and wellbeing is enhanced through the support of collaborative networks and partnerships

 

Presenters:                   Jeni Pollard - Community and Cultural Development Department - Speak to the Report    

 

Executive Summary:

This report provides Council with a general overview of the Neighbourhood Renewal Program and then a description of the community engagement processes undertaken in the Londonderry and Oxley Park areas. This report is accompanied by a detailed Community Engagement Report and Neighbourhood Action Plan for each area.

 

Both Londonderry and Oxley Park had been identified as targeted communities for the Neighbourhood Renewal Program in 2009. Each community is distinctive, Londonderry being a largely rural area with many families having lived in the area for decades with Oxley Park an urban place with significant numbers of families from culturally diverse backgrounds.  However, each community has strengths and some shared challenges including concerns regarding the employment prospects of young people, caring for the aged within the community and a desire for well maintained public spaces and parks.

 

In Londonderry and Oxley Park the Neighbourhood Renewal Team have actively engaged with a broad cross section of the community, through a variety of creative and interesting activities and events. Each of these engagement processes has assisted in building community connections and positive relationships between Council and the residents. 

 

One of the more creative activities was the Story Exchange Project, a digital story telling project engaging children from Londonderry and Oxley Park Public Schools as well as young people from across other areas of Penrith City. This project culminated in a presentation at the Joan Sutherland Performing Arts Centre on July 30th and was attended by a range of families from each community.

 

In both Oxley Park and Londonderry, four themes emerged through the engagement process. These themes were economic development and local businesses, public space and parks, traffic and transport and finally access to services and community programs.  The specific issues raised are different in each community although concern for the safety of children and other pedestrians around the primary school area was consistent in both areas.

 

The report recommends that Council receive the information contained in the report and endorse the Londonderry Neighbourhood Action Plan 2009 and Oxley Park Neighbourhood Action Plan 2009.

Background

Over recent years, Council has placed increasing emphasis on balancing the resources directed towards planning and implementation in new release areas to that of older established areas of the City. The Penrith Neighbourhood Renewal Program is focussed on particular suburbs and rural localities which are considered to be relatively disadvantaged according to the SEIFA Index of Relative Disadvantage.

 

The SEIFA Index of Relative Disadvantage is utilised to measure disadvantage across suburbs and regions.  The Penrith LGA has 12 suburbs or rural localities considered to be of relative disadvantage compared to the NSW average, as calculated by the Australian Bureau of Statistics.   These areas are (in alphabetical order) Cambridge Park, Colyton, Cranebrook, Kingswood, Llandilo, Londonderry, North Penrith (including the locality of Kingswood Park), North St Marys, Oxley Park, Penrith suburb, St Marys and Werrington.  

 

A report was endorsed by Council in July 2008 that outlined a way forward for implementing the Neighbourhood Renewal Program across these identified areas in a planned approach. The adopted program for 2008-09 included Londonderry and Oxley Park. These areas are the subject of this report and accompanying Neighbourhood Action Plans. 

 

In 2009-10, the Neighbourhood Renewal Program will focus activity in Kingswood and St Marys with engagement activities already underway in each community.

 

The agreed approach to Neighbourhood Renewal has been to undertake extensive community engagement, both Council driven and in partnership with key stakeholders to develop a Neighbourhood Action Plan.

 

Neighbourhood Action Plans (NAPs) support a planned and coordinated approach to addressing the complex interplay of social disadvantage, access to economic and cultural participation, poor physical infrastructure, generally poorer public amenity and reduced civic engagement. NAPs incorporate specific responses required to address identified community issues and needs. Actions for implementation that are included in the NAP are reported to Council through the Operational Plan reporting process. Furthermore, the NAP and progress on implementation will also be reported to the community through local activities and via a community newsletter.

 

It is envisaged that in the first instance the NAPs for Londonderry and Oxley Park will be implemented over four years.

 

This report will outline the methods of engagement undertaken in Londonderry and Oxley Park over the last 12 months, and the results of this engagement process including further actions that residents have identified.

 

Londonderry

 

Londonderry for the purposes of this report is defined as the area bounded by The Driftway as the northern boundary with Hawkesbury Council, the Northern Road and the Berkshire Park area on the eastern side and the suburbs of Cranebrook to the south and Agnes Banks to the west.

 

Londonderry is predominantly rural land use with much of it still being Crown Land. The area is closer to facilities and services in Richmond than Penrith. 

 

Map of Londonderry

 

A brief demographic profile of Londonderry is included in the Londonderry Community Engagement Report (attached). Analysis of the data from the 2006 Census suggests that Londonderry has made some progress on some issues including education levels and employment status since the 2001 Census but it is still clearly of relative disadvantage within the Penrith LGA.

 

Developing a Neighbourhood Action Plan for Londonderry 

The NAP for Londonderry has been developed through creative community engagement and robust discussion. The engagement process has identified community strengths and addresses the contributing factors to the social disadvantage by supporting the strengths within each community. The development of the NAP in Londonderry as well as the implementation of actions is underpinned by strong partnership arrangements particularly with the Londonderry Primary School as well as a number of volunteer organisations based in this community.

 

Engaging residents at the Londonderry Christmas Celebrations

 

The Neighbourhood Renewal team undertook a number of activities in Londonderry over nine months. Each of these activities was designed to collect information from resident’s which has informed the development of the Londonderry Neighbourhood Action Plan.

 

The activities undertaken in Londonderry included:

 

·    A community Christmas celebration held at the Londonderry Public School in December 2008. This event was organised in partnership with the school and became a focus for the local community with over 800 people attending over 4 hours. Staff from the Neighbourhood Renewal Team surveyed local residents as well as assisting with the BBQ and running activities for children.

·    Individual interviews and surveys completed with each shop owner/operator completed in November – December.

·    A focus group held at the Londonderry Public School with the P&C group. This group discussed issues for local families and children.

·    A community survey conducted outside the local supermarket in January 2009. The survey attracted responses from a wide range of residents that the team had not previously had the opportunity to access through other activities including several older residents as well as younger shift workers.

 

A local woman is interviewed by Council’s Community Engagement Officer

 

·    Maltese residents were consulted over lunch in February at a regular get together supported by the Nepean Migrant Access organisation. The group shared a meal with Council officers and discussed the strengths of their neighbourhood. 

·    A focus group was held with older residents of Londonderry over lunch at the Robert Martin Centre in February. Once again this group raised a number of issues, particularly those concerning the aged community in Londonderry.

·    A focus group was held at Richmond High School with young people from Londonderry. This group discussed issues of importance for young people such as public transport and access to training and employment.

·    The Story Exchange Project conducted at the Primary School will be discussed later in the report.

 

Methods used in each consultation were designed to be age appropriate and written in plain English in order to be accessible to people with varying levels of literacy.  Face to face surveys were completed with participants to encourage discussion and clarify issues as they arise. Contemporary technologies and popular culture were utilised when working with young people, written tasks were accompanied by images, and in most cases there were alternative ways for residents to respond apart from written questions.

 

Some focus groups were held, but most engagement events were less structured and designed with interaction and resident interest in activities as the framing principles.  The purpose was for participants to also enjoy themselves, meet other residents and have positive interaction with Council officers.

 

Community Planning and Priorities

The objective of the Community Planning Session in Londonderry was to gain a greater understanding of the level of importance placed on the different issues and requested actions identified by residents throughout the engagement process. This session aimed at providing a framework through which Council can prioritise actions for future work in the locality.

 

The Community Planning Session was well attended with 20 adult residents and a small number of children attending. The session was held at Londonderry Public School and childcare and a meal were provided to support attendance.

 

 

Groups of residents engaging in Community Planning at Londonderry

 

The session included short presentations from the Community and Cultural Development Manager on the Neighbourhood Renewal program, the Neighbourhood Renewal Co-ordinator on the demographic profile of the locality, and the Community Engagement Officer on the preliminary findings of the engagement process.

 

Residents and community workers were divided into small groups facilitated by Council staff to prioritise the many issues raised during the extensive engagement process. As a result the findings within the attached Londonderry Community Engagement Report are grouped according to themes and include key resident priorities to be considered by Council in the development of the Neighbourhood Action Plan (NAP).  The Londonderry Neighbourhood Action Plan is provided as Attachment 2.

 

Neighbourhood Strengths

Londonderry is a friendly and quiet, rural community. The residents speak with pride of its community spirit, heritage, open space and peaceful country atmosphere. Residents like that they are close to Richmond, Penrith and Sydney.

 

Community members feel that they know each other. They wish to protect local bushland, the Londonderry Public School, the local shops as well as the large lot sizes, which are considered unique attributes of Londonderry. The Londonderry Soccer Club, the Rural Fire Service and the newly renovated Community Centre are all seen as community assets in Londonderry.

 

Many residents that we met through the engagement process have lived in Londonderry for decades and speak passionately about their aspirations for the town.

 

 

 

Londonderry Public School – a community strength

 

Emerging Themes - Londonderry

The findings of the overall community engagement process are detailed below in four themes. Further detailed information on each of the themes is also available in the Londonderry Community Engagement Report.

 

The priorities identified by residents include matters that are the responsibility of Council as well as State or Federal funded community and other services. Where Council is not the principal responsible authority for an issue there may well be a role for Council to advocate for action to be taken.

 

Please note that the key requests/issues identified by residents in the themes are summarised here but are specifically detailed as actions in the Neighbourhood Action Plan. The Neighbourhood Action Plan is provided as Attachment 2.

 

These specific actions in the NAP have all been agreed to by the responsible Council managers or group managers.  Many of these actions will be delivered through Council services, including adjustments to existing programs. The priorities identified in Londonderry are:

 

Economic Development and Local Business

 

·    Opportunities for the future sub division of land is an important economic aspiration for local residents

·    Improvements to the local shopping strip aesthetic

·    Encouraging a diversity of shops

 

Public Spaces and Parks         

 

·    Creating local meeting places in parks

·    Expanding the local footpath network

·    Access to the Hawkesbury tip and reducing illegal dumping

·    Need to burn off and clear around residential properties – particularly for older residents who are unable to manage heavy tasks

 

 Traffic and Transport              

 

·    Addressing speeding in the school zones

·    Riding and walking on Londonderry Road (death 5 years ago) to Richmond

·    More parking around Trahlee Street

·    Kangaroo warning signs on Carrington and Nutt Roads

·    Pedestrian safety and parking around the public school

 

Access to services and community programs        

 

·    Youth programs or safe transport to youth programs/activities

·    Greater access to pre-school, childcare and OOSH care to support child development and women’s participation in the workforce

·    The Neighbourhood Centre hall is considered expensive for private hire and access to a key is only available in Penrith

·    Greater communication about local issues such as plans to change roads and traffic conditions        

 

 

Actions to date

A number of actions identified within the Londonderry NAP have commenced implementation. Some actions, such as the installation of additional footpath paving have been completed independently of the Londonderry NAP as part of existing works programs and schedules. Other actions, such as the installation of seating in the new playground attached to the neighbourhood centre development have occurred as a result of the Londonderry NAP.

 

The employment of the Northern Rural Areas Community Development Worker for 2 years through the WSAAS will assist in delivery of a number of requests. A number of meetings have already occurred with local residents regarding the development of a youth activities program to be held monthly, supervised by volunteers with the assistance of local youth services.  Provision of activities for young people in Londonderry is a key concern for residents. The Northern Rural Areas Community Development Worker is currently preparing a newsletter to update residents on community activities.

 

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, Richmond Ward has recently approached Council staff looking for a volunteer project to assist people in the local community. This group willingly took on the task of mowing and cleaning up some of the roadside drainage channels outside of the homes of elderly residents in Londonderry. This work has been of great benefit to those residents and has assisted in making connections between volunteers and residents in Londonderry.

 

The redevelopment of the Londonderry Neighbourhood Centre was recently been completed and launched by the Public Domain and Community Safety Department. The new centre has been warmly received by the local community and it provides a meeting place and community focus for the residents of Londonderry. Work continues to support access to a key to the Neighbourhood Centre held locally for potential hirers.

 

The Story Exchange Project

 

As reported to Council at the Ordinary Meeting 7th September 2009, the Story Exchange was a creative engagement project aimed at consulting children and young people about the strengths and needs of their neighbourhoods through digital photography, story telling and new technologies. The project was a partnership between the Penrith City Council Neighbourhood Renewal Team, Londonderry Public School, Oxley park Public School and the Information and Cultural Exchange (ICE) and involved three stages of development. The project began as a specific consultation methods focussed on Londonderry and Oxley Park but due to difficulty in recruit young people to stage two, these areas broadened out after stage one.

 

Stage one of the project saw 30 students for Londonderry Public School and 30 students from Oxley Park Public School participate in three creative workshops throughout April and May. Workshops included digital photography and photo composition, Photoshop and animation, creative writing and story development, and finally, polishing the final works.

 

Stage two of the Story Exchange saw three young women from Cranebrook and one young man from St Marys create short digital stories or films about their neighbourhoods and the things which they are passionate about.

 

  

Young Participants of the story exchange explore different cameras and features

 

Stage three of the project included a launch, held on 30 July and opened by the Mayor Councillor Jim Aitken OAM. The event was held at the Joan Sutherland Performing Arts Centre and participants from the Story Exchange project (stage one and two), their families, friends and school representatives gathered to view the work of the young people and applaud their creativity and skills. The launch was well attended by over 100 families and friends from Oxley Park and Londonderry who were proud of the work of the young people and the strengths of their communities.

 

Oxley Park

 

Oxley Park is located on the easternmost side of the Penrith Local Government Area and is defined as the area bounded by Ropes Creek, the Great Western Highway, Sydney Street (generally) and the western railway line.

 

Oxley Park is mainly residential with St Marys Cemetery, the second largest cemetery in the Penrith Local Government Area located in the suburb.

 

 

 

Map of Oxley Park

 

A brief demographic profile of Oxley Park is provided in the Oxley Park Community Engagement Report (Attachment 3). An analysis of the data from the 2006 Census suggests that Oxley Park has made progress on some issues such as education levels where there has been a significant increase in the percentage of residents with a tertiary qualification since the 2001 Census but it is still clearly of relative disadvantage within the Penrith LGA.

 

Developing a Neighbourhood Action Plan for Oxley Park 

The NAP for Oxley Park, as with Londonderry, has been developed through creative community engagement and robust discussion. The engagement process has identified community strengths and the contributing factors to the social disadvantage. The development of the NAP in Oxley Park as well as the implementation of actions is underpinned by strong partnership arrangements particularly with the Oxley Park Public School and Mission Australia, as well as a number of community organisations that serve this community.

 

Engaging residents at the Oxley Park Shops

 

The Neighbourhood Renewal team undertook a number of activities in Oxley Park over 9 months. Each of these activities was designed to collect information from resident’s which has informed the development of the Oxley Park Neighbourhood Action Plan.

 

The activities undertaken in Oxley Park included:

 

·    Family Fun Day held at the Oxley Park Public School in September 2009 in partnership with Mission Australia, St Marys Area Community Development Project, TRI community exchange and Anglicare. The day was attended by over 200 residents with a variety of activities held including a survey.

 

Children from the Oxley Park Playgroup

 

·    A community Christmas celebration held at the Oxley Park Public School on December 17 2008.  This event was organised in partnership with the school and Mission Australia and became a focus for the local community with over 700 people attending. Staff from the Neighbourhood Renewal Team surveyed local residents as well as assisting with the BBQ and running activities for children. A survey was also undertaken separately with teachers from the primary school on their perceptions of the Oxley Park area.

·    A community survey conducted outside the local supermarket in February. The survey attracted responses from a wide range of residents.

·    A creative consultation was held with the playgroup that meets at the primary school. The consultation focused on engaging with pre-school children with age appropriate craft activities.

·    A series of events called Food Family Culture focused on consulting with Aboriginal and Islander families.

·    A focus group was held at Colyton High School with young people from Oxley Park. This group discussed a wide range of issues.

·    Older residents were consulted through the senior’s social group at St Marys Uniting Church.

·    The Story Exchange Project conducted at the Oxley Park Public School, discussed earlier in the report.

 

Methods used in each consultation were designed to be age appropriate and written in plain English in order to be accessible to people with varying levels of literacy. 

 

Some focus groups were held such as with the seniors group, but most engagement events were less structured and designed with interaction and resident interest in activities as the framing principles.  The Food Family Culture events were particularly well received in the community and these activities have been scheduled for Kingswood and St Marys over coming months.

 

Community Planning and Priorities

The Community Planning Session at Oxley Park was well attended with around 25 adult residents and a large number of children and adolescents attending.  The session was boisterous and energetic with all members of the community having a say and discussing local issues. The session was held at Ridge Park Hall and childcare and a meal were provided to support attendance. Representatives from Mission Australia, the Oxley Park Public School and one local shopkeeper also attended.

 

 

Groups of residents engaging in Community Planning at Oxley Park

 

The session included short presentations from the Community and Cultural Development Manager on the Neighbourhood Renewal program, the Neighbourhood Renewal Co-ordinator on the demographic profile of the locality, and the Community Engagement Officer on the preliminary findings of the engagement process.

 

Residents, community workers and other participants were divided into small groups facilitated by Council staff to prioritise the many issues raised during the extensive engagement process. The findings from this process are grouped within the attached Oxley Park Community Engagement Report.

 

Neighbourhood Strengths

Oxley Park is a quiet, friendly and diverse community. Many families have lived in the neighbourhood for two or more generations. Residents are culturally and linguistically diverse and this is considered a local strength.

 

Local businesses are involved in the community and residents consider the neighbourhood shopping strip a unique asset for Oxley Park.

 

Children and adults value local parks and public spaces and wish for improved play equipment, gardens and maintenance of these areas.

 

The school, its teachers and local community services, such as Mission Australia, are also named by residents as local strengths.

 

 

Emerging Themes – Oxley Park

The findings of the overall community engagement process are detailed below in four themes. The strengths of the neighbourhood are also briefly summarised where appropriate. Further detailed information on each of the themes is also available in the Oxley Park Community Engagement Report.

 

The priorities identified by residents include matters that are the responsibility of Council as well as State or Federal funded community and other services. Where Council is not the principal responsible authority for an issue there may well be a role for Council to advocate for action to be taken.

 

Please note that the key requests/issues identified by residents in the themes are summarised here but are specifically detailed as actions in the Neighbourhood Action Plan. The Oxley Park Neighbourhood Action Plan is provided as Attachment 4.

 

These specific actions in the NAP have all been agreed to by the responsible Council manager or group manager.  Many of these actions will be delivered through Council services, including adjustments to existing programs. The priorities identified in Oxley Park are:

 

Public Spaces and Parks

 

·    Residents request that park upgrades are completed with shade, fencing, seating and rubbish bins. The children are burning themselves on the slides. Landscape and trees need to be part of the playground design.

·    Need for a half basketball court and 2 poles for a volleyball net.

·    Play area is required near Ridge Park Hall.

·    Dog waste in parks and on footpaths.

 

Traffic and Transport

 

·    Child pedestrian safety surrounding the public school.

·    Generally, speeding traffic is of great concern to residents.

·    The pedestrian crossing on Sydney Street near the shops is considered dangerous.

 

Access to quality services and programs     

 

·    Continue with community celebrations (fun days).

·    Greater promotion of existing family/carer support programs and new programs addressing gaps.

·    Support for women’s groups to be developed for Islander and Aboriginal residents

·    A community notice board at the shopping strip.

·    Continued support for cultural diversity and awareness programs

 

Economic Development and Local Business

 

·    Need for a greater variety of shops e.g. news agency.

·    ATM Access (note: this may not be cost effective for local businesses).

·    Parking.

·    New signage for business strip to be located on the Great Western Highway.

 

Actions to date

A number of actions identified within the Oxley Park NAP have commenced implementation. Discussion has commenced with the St Marys Area Development Project with an aim for this group to auspice and support the development of a Women’s Group for Islander residents 

 

Mission Australia is continuing to work in the Oxley Park community and an Islander Day is being organised in the near future with support from Council. 

 

Summary

The Penrith Neighbourhood Renewal Program is focussed on suburbs considered to be of relative disadvantage as measured through the ABS SEIFA Index.  The areas of Londonderry and Oxley Park, whilst diverse and different from each other are both considered to be relatively disadvantaged.

 

The engagement process in both communities utilised a range of creative and interesting methods, including face to face surveys, Christmas and other community celebrations, shop keeper surveys, meetings with a range of age groups and different cultural groups as well as the Story Exchange project.

 

A community planning session was the final engagement activity in each area and contributed to the refinement of resident priorities and concerns. These sessions support the development of Neighbourhood Action Plans in each community.  All actions listed in the NAP have been agreed to by the relevant Council. The implementation timeframe for each NAP is four years.

 

In addition, community services or resident volunteers have contributed significantly to the engagement process and have in some instances commenced a process to address social issues raised throughout the engagement process

 

This report has provided a summary of the engagement process, the findings from the process and proposed priority actions in the Neighbourhood Action Plan

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the information contained in the report on Neighbourhood Action Plans 2009 - Londonderry and Oxley Park be received.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.  

Londonderry Engagement Report

18 Pages

Attachment

2.  

Londonderry Neighbourhood Action Plan

9 Pages

Attachment

3.  

Oxley Park Engagement Report

19 Pages

Attachment

4.  

Oxley Park Neighbourhood Action Plan

8 Pages

Attachment

   


 

 

A Green City

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


 

 

A Liveable City

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


 

 

A Vibrant City

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled



 

ATTACHMENTS   

 

 

Date of Meeting:          Monday 14 September 2009

Delivery Program:       A Leading City

Issue:                            We demonstrate accountability, transparency and ethical conduct

Report Title:                Draft Policy on the Payment of Expenses and Provision of Facilities to Mayor, Deputy Mayor and Councillors

Attachments:                Draft Policy on the payment of expenses and provision of facilities to the Mayor, Deputy Mayor and Councillors



Policy Review Committee Meeting

14 September 2009

Attachment 1 - Draft Policy on the payment of expenses and provision of facilities to the Mayor, Deputy Mayor and Councillors

 

 

 


















 


 

ATTACHMENTS   

 

 

Date of Meeting:          Monday 14 September 2009

Delivery Program:       A City of Opportunities

Issue:                            We play an active role in our communities

Report Title:                Neighbourhood Action Plans 2009 - Londonderry and Oxley Park

Attachments:                Londonderry Engagement Report

                                      Londonderry Neighbourhood Action Plan

                                      Oxley Park Engagement Report

                                      Oxley Park Neighbourhood Action Plan



Policy Review Committee Meeting

14 September 2009

Attachment 1 - Londonderry Engagement Report

 

 

 


















 


Policy Review Committee Meeting

14 September 2009

Attachment 2 - Londonderry Neighbourhood Action Plan

 

 

 









 


Policy Review Committee Meeting

14 September 2009

Attachment 3 - Oxley Park Engagement Report

 

 

 



















 


Policy Review Committee Meeting

14 September 2009

Attachment 4 - Oxley Park Neighbourhood Action Plan