11 February 2010

 

Dear Councillor,

In pursuance of the provisions of the Local Government Act, 1993 and the Regulations thereunder, notice is hereby given that an EXTRAORDINARY COUNCIL MEETING of Penrith City Council is to be held in the Council Chambers, Civic Centre, 601 High Street, Penrith on Monday 15 February 2010 at 7:30PM.

Attention is directed to the statement accompanying this notice of the business proposed to be transacted at the meeting.

Yours faithfully

 

 

Alan Stoneham

General Manager

 

BUSINESS

 

1.           LEAVE OF ABSENCE

 

2.           APOLOGIES

 

3.           CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES

Ordinary Meeting - 1 February 2010.

 

4.           DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

Pecuniary Interest (The Act requires Councillors who declare a pecuniary interest in an item to leave the meeting during discussion of that item)

Non-Pecuniary Conflict of Interest – Significant and Less than Significant (The Code of Conduct requires Councillors who declare a significant non-pecuniary conflict of interest in an item to leave the meeting during discussion of that item)

 

5.           ADDRESSING THE MEETING

 

6.           MAYORAL MINUTES

 

7.           NOTICES OF MOTION

 

8.           ADOPTION OF REPORTS AND RECOMMENDATION OF COMMITTEES

 

9.           DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

10.         URGENT REPORTS (to be dealt with in the delivery program to which the item relates)

 

11.         QUESTIONS WITHOUT NOTICE

 

12.         COMMITTEE OF THE WHOLE



 

EXTRAORDINARY COUNCIL MEETING

 

Monday 15 February 2010

 

table of contents

 

 

 

 

 

ADVANCE AUSTRALIA FAIR

 

 

STATEMENT OF RECOGNITION OF PENRITH CITY’S ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER CULTURAL HERITAGE

 

 

PRAYER

 

 

COUNCIL CHAMBER seating arrangements

 

 

meeting calendar

 

 

confirmation of minutes

 

 

PROCEDURE FOR ADDRESSING COUNCIL MEETING

 

 

MAYORAL MINUTES

 

 

report and recommendations of committees

 

 

DELIVERY program reports


 

ADVANCE AUSTRALIA FAIR

 

 

 

Australians all let us rejoice,

For we are young and free;

We’ve golden soil and wealth for toil;

Our home is girt by sea;

Our land abounds in nature’s gifts

Of beauty rich and rare;

In history’s page, let every stage

Advance Australia Fair.

 

In joyful strains then let us sing,

Advance Australia Fair.

 

Beneath our radiant Southern Cross

We’ll toil with hearts and hands;

To make this Commonwealth of ours

Renowned of all the lands;

For those who’ve come across the seas

We’ve boundless plains to share;

With courage let us all combine

To Advance Australia Fair.

 

In joyful strains then let us sing,

Advance Australia Fair.

 


 

 


Statement of Recognition of Penrith City’s

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander
Cultural Heritage

 

 

Council values the unique status of Aboriginal people as the original owners and custodians of lands and waters, including the land and waters of Penrith City.

 

Council values the unique status of Torres Strait Islander people as the original owners and custodians of the Torres Strait Islands and surrounding waters.

 

We work together for a united Australia and City that respects this land of ours, that values the diversity of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural heritage, and provides justice and equity for all.

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

PRAYER

 

 

 

“Sovereign God, tonight as we gather together as a Council we affirm that you are the giver and sustainer of life.  We come together as representatives of our community to make decisions that will benefit this city and the people within it. 

 

We come not in a spirit of competition, not as adversaries, but as colleagues.  Help us to treat each other with respect, with dignity, with interest and with honesty.  Help us not just to hear the words we say, but also to hear each others hearts.  We seek to be wise in all that we say and do.

 

As we meet, our concern is for this city.  Grant us wisdom, courage and strength.

 

Lord, help us.  We pray this in the name of Jesus Christ our Lord.  Amen.”

 

 

 

 

 


For members of the public addressing the meeting

 
Council Chambers

Text Box: Lectern

Group Managers                          

                
          

 
Seating Arrangements

 

 

 

Director
Craig Butler

 

 

Director
Barry Husking

 

 

 

General Manager
Alan Stoneham

His Worship the Mayor
Councillor
Kevin Crameri OAM
North Ward

 

Acting Executive Officer
Glenn Schuil

 

 

Minute Clerk

 

 

 

 

 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 


                                                        

 

 

Text Box: Public Gallery
Text Box: Managers
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Group Managers                          

                
           

 
   


2010 MEETING CALENDAR

February 2010 - December 2010

(adopted by Council 9/11/09)

 

 

 

TIME

FEB

MAR

APRIL

MAY

JUNE

JULY

AUG

SEPT

OCT

NOV

DEC

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

 

Ordinary Council Meeting

7.30pm

1

 

 

3v

 

12

9#

6ü

11¨

8#

13

(7.00pm)

22#

22

19

24#

21*

 

 

27^

(7.00pm)

 

29

 

Policy Review Committee

7.30pm

15

8

 

10

 

 

16

13@

 

15

 

 

29@

 

 

28

19

30

 

18

 

 

Operational Plan Public Forum

 

6.00pm

 

 

 

31

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

v

Meeting at which the Draft Operational Plan for 2010/2011 is adopted for exhibition

*

Meeting at which the Operational Plan for 2010/2011 is adopted

#

Meetings at which the Operational Plan quarterly reviews are presented

@

Delivery Program progress reports

^

Election of Mayor/Deputy Mayor

ü

Meeting at which the 2009/2010 Annual Statements are presented

¨

Meeting at which any comments on the 2009/2010 Annual Statements are presented

-                 Extraordinary Meetings are held as required.

-                 Members of the public are invited to observe meetings of the Council (Ordinary and Policy Review Committee).

Should you wish to address Council, please contact the Acting Executive Officer, Glenn Schuil.

 


PENRITH CITY COUNCIL

 

Procedure for Addressing Meetings

 

Anyone can request permission to address a meeting, providing that the number of speakers is limited to three in support of any proposal and three against.

 

Any request about an issue or matter on the Agenda for the meeting can be lodged with the General Manager or Public Officer up until 12 noon on the day of the meeting.

 

Prior to the meeting the person who has requested permission to address the meeting will need to provide the Public Officer with a written statement of the points to be covered during the address in sufficient detail so as to inform the Councillors of the substance of the address and a written copy of any questions to be asked of the Council in order that responses to those questions can be provided in due course.

 

In addition, prior to addressing the meeting a person addressing Council or Committee will be informed that they do not enjoy any privilege and that permission to speak may be withdrawn should they make inappropriate comments.

 

It should be noted that persons who wish to address the Council are addressing a formal part of the Council Meeting. All persons addressing the Meeting should give consideration to their dress attire. Smart casual is a minimum that is thought to be appropriate when addressing such a forum.

 

It should be noted that speakers at meetings of the Council or Committee do not have absolute privilege (parliamentary privilege).  A speaker who makes any potentially offensive or defamatory remarks about any other person may render themselves open to legal action.

 

Prior to addressing the meeting the person will be required to sign the following statement:

 

“I (name) understand that the meeting I intend to address on (date) is a public meeting.  I also understand that should I say or present any material that is inappropriate, I may be subject to legal action.  I also acknowledge that I have been informed to obtain my own legal advice about the appropriateness of the material that I intend to present at the above mentioned meeting”.

 

Should a person fail to sign the above statement then permission to address either the Council or Committee will not be granted.

 

The Public Officer or Minute Clerk will speak to those people who have requested permission to address the meeting, prior to the meeting at 7.15pm.

 

It is up to the Council or Committee to decide if the request to address the meeting will be granted.

 

Where permission is to be granted the Council or Committee, at the appropriate time, will suspend only so much of the Standing Orders to allow the address to occur.

 

The Chairperson will then call the person up to the lectern or speaking area.

 

The person addressing the meeting needs to clearly indicate:

 

· Their name;

 

· Organisation or group they are representing (if applicable);

 

· Details of the issue to be addressed and the item number of the report in the Business Paper;

 

· Whether they are opposing or supporting the issue or matter (if applicable) and the action they would like the meeting to take;

 

·           The interest of the speaker (e.g. affected person, neighbour, applicant,        applicants spokesperson, interested citizen etc).

 

Each person then has five minutes to make their address.  Those addressing Council will be required to speak to the written statement they have submitted.  Permission to address Council is not to be taken as an opportunity to refute or otherwise the points made by previous speakers on the same issue. 

 

The Council or Committee can extend this time if they consider if appropriate, however, everyone needs to work on the basis that the address will be for five minutes only.

 

Councillors may have questions about the address so people are asked to remain at the lectern or in the speaking area until the Chairperson has thanked them.

 

When this occurs, they should then return to their seat.

 

Glenn McCarthy

Public Officer

02 4732 7649                                                       

   



DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

 

A Green City

 

1        Domestic Waste Service - Three Bin System

   

 


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


 

 

A Leading City

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


 

 

A City of Opportunities

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


A Green City

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

1        Domestic Waste Service - Three Bin System

 

 



Extraordinary Council Meeting

15 February 2010

A Green City

 

 

 

1

Domestic Waste Service - Three Bin System   

 

Compiled by:                Barry Ryan, Waste and Community Protection Manager

Authorised by:             David Burns, Group Manager - City Presentation   

Strategic Objective: We use our resources wisely, and take responsibility for our levels of consumption

Strategic Direction: The City’s ecological footprint is reduced

       

 

Executive Summary

In 2005 Council adopted a Domestic Waste Strategy (copy attached) for domestic waste services that would provide for a significant reduction in waste to landfill and provide high sustainability outcomes.

 

The implementation of the strategy has occurred over a number of years, with the introduction of the revised collection services in August 2009.

 

There are concerns over the effectiveness of the service, particularly in relation to bin capacity, collection frequency, odour and fly infestation.

 

This report will provide some background on the development of waste services and issues relating to waste disposal, information on the current service, examine the above mentioned concerns and recommend possible solutions. The report provides information on the outcomes of the Special Workshop on 8 February 2010 and recommends a number of adjustments to the three bin domestic waste service determined at the briefing. The recommended adjustments are:

 

1.   Provision of an optional weekly 140L red lid residual waste bin to all households on the three bin service at additional cost, on request. 

 

2.   Introduction of Biodegradable bags (for the kitchen organics bin) for the storage of food waste prior to placement in the organics bin for all households using the three bin system as detailed in the report.

3.   Provision of an additional yellow lid recycling bin (fortnightly collection), currently available to households at $38 per annum, at a reduced cost to the residents on the 3 bin waste service, on request.

 

4.   Providing an enhancement to the communication and education program with the involvement of a residents’ focus group and the provision of support teams.

 

5.   Investigate providing suitable insecticide products.

 

6.   Re-establish the Domestic Waste Working Party.

 

Other recommended adjustments which will require further discussion and investigation include:

 

7.   Providing additional waste services at Christmas time.

 

8.   Possible use of air odour controls.

Background

The Sydney Metropolitan Area and the regional centres of New South Wales have been trying to come to terms with domestic waste management issues and diminishing landfill sites since the 1980s.

 

During the 80s domestic and commercial waste disposal was controlled by the Metropolitan Waste Disposal Authority who owned the key landfill sites in the Sydney Metropolitan Area.  During this time one of the key landfill sites, Eastern Creek, had a finite capacity and was expected to close to landfilling of untreated waste in 2014.  The Metropolitan Waste Disposal Authority endeavoured to establish a new landfill site at Castlereagh.  The Authority was not successful in establishing the new waste disposal facility.

 

During the 1990s Regional Waste Boards were established with the objective of reducing waste to landfill by 60% by the year 2000.  The Northern, Southern and Western Sydney Waste Boards were established, which were represented by Councillors, the community and industry professionals.  It was the objective of each of the Waste Boards to establish a strategy and systems that would reduce waste by 60% by the year 2000 and to generate a high resource value product from the waste. 

 

In 2001 the Waste Avoidance & Resource Recovery Act was enacted, which created the Department of Environment & Conservation, now the Department of Environment Climate Change & Water (DECCW). 

 

The objectives of the Waste Avoidance & Resource Recovery Act 2001 are as follows:

 

(a)  to encourage the most efficient use of resources and to reduce environmental harm in accordance with the principles of ecologically sustainable development,

 

(b)  to ensure that resource management options are considered against a hierarchy of the following order:

 

i. avoidance of unnecessary resource consumption,

ii.  resource recovery (including reuse, reprocessing, recycling and energy recovery),

iii. disposal,

 

(c)  to provide for the continual reduction in waste generation,

 

(d)  to minimise the consumption of natural resources and the final disposal of waste by encouraging the avoidance of waste and the reuse and recycling of waste,

 

(e)  to ensure that industry shares with the community the responsibility for reducing and dealing with waste,

 

(f)  to ensure the efficient funding of waste and resource management planning, programs and service delivery,

 

(g)  to achieve integrated waste and resource management planning, programs and service delivery on a State-wide basis,

 

(h)  to assist in the achievements of the objectives of the Protection of the Environment Operations Act 1997.

 

In 2003 the Waste Avoidance & Resource Recovery Strategy was developed in accordance with the objectives of the Waste Avoidance & Resource Recovery Act.  This resulted in a number of targets to be achieved, including a reduction of waste from landfill by 66% by the year 2014. 

 

Further, a Local Government Action Plan was developed as a guideline for councils in the development of their own local strategies with the view of meeting the State Government’s objectives.

 

In November 2005 Council adopted its own waste strategy that would achieve a high diversion of waste from landfill whilst ensuring that waste that is being diverted will be utilised at its highest resource value. 

 

Numerous surveys were issued and received by Council staff over a 12-month period at community events and waste education activities. In response to a general question as to whether residents would like a full organics service, and what they would be prepared to pay for such a service, over 85% of respondents replied that they were in favour of an organics service and would be willing to pay any additional costs.

 

Council’s strategy was developed to complement the Waste Avoidance and Resource Recovery Strategy 2003, as set by the State Government, and Council’s Strategic Plan objective 4i “we use our resources wisely, and take responsibility for our levels of consumption”. The strategy was developed through a series of Working Party meetings and adopted at Council’s Ordinary Meeting of 21 November 2005.

 

It must also be noted that at this time existing waste contracts were nearing completion and new tenders were required to be issued for new contracts to commence on 1 October 2007.  Hence, the development of Council’s strategy was necessary to develop tenders for new contracts for a period of ten years; i.e., up to 2017.

 

Council’s adopted strategy involved a staged implementation of various components including comingled recycling, trialling alternative waste technologies, introduction of organics collection and composting, and the processing and treatment of residual waste through alternative waste treatment facilities.

 

In developing the strategy it was expected that waste to landfill will be reduced by 66% in accordance with the State Government’s objectives and a high quality resource will be recovered for reuse within the community. Council’s current waste diversion rate is approximately 58% based on volumes being taken to landfill, recycling and processing of organics (taking into account contamination levels). The diversion rate will increase further on the introduction of the processing of the residual waste through alternative waste treatment facilities.

 

In addition to this, a “carbon footprint” for the domestic waste management service was provided by an independent consultant using guidelines from the Australian Greenhouse Office. The study indicated that the collection, treatment, composting and reuse of organics will reduce the carbon footprint of 47,809 carbon equivalent tonnes per annum to 29,576 tonnes per annum, the equivalent of taking 4,320 cars off the road permanently.

 

It was intended to use an innovative approach and ensure that the composted organics were used in a beneficial way.  It was determined that composted material be used on local sporting fields as a top dressing and possibly in the reconstruction/construction of new fields.  The compost would also be available for use in other areas of the City, such as Council properties, local schools, etc.  This was on the basis of the material meeting the appropriate Australian Standard.

 

Subsequent to the adoption of Council’s Domestic Waste Strategy, tenders were developed for the collection and processing of domestic waste.  Again, it should be noted that tenders for new contracts were required due to the impending expiry of existing waste collection contracts in September 2007.

 

At Council’s Ordinary Meeting of 5 March 2007, Council considered reports on Domestic Waste Contract Tenders for ten year contracts, which included recycling collection services, organics collection and composting services, and residual waste collection and processing services. 

 

Council adopted the recommendation that SITA Environmental Solutions be the preferred tenderer for organics and residual waste collection services and organics composting services.  Council also adopted the recommendation that VISY be the preferred tenderer for recycling services and WSN be the preferred tenderer for residual waste treatment and processing.

 

Contracts were successfully negotiated and signed with SITA for the collection of domestic waste and the processing of organics and VISY for recycling collections.  Negotiations are ongoing with WSN for the processing of residual waste.

 

The new contracts for residual (garbage) waste collection and recycling services commenced operation in October 2007.  The organics collections service commenced in August 2009 when SITA’s composting plant was completed.

 

Council also considered a report at its Ordinary Meeting of 8 September 2008 for the supply of kitchen organics tidy bins to be used within households to compliment the organics collection service.  This contract was awarded to Source Separation Systems to supply 50,000 kitchen organics tidy bins to single and dual occupancy households within urban areas of the City. The distribution of these bins to households was performed by SITA in conjunction with the supply and distribution of the third bin.

 

 

 

 

 

Development of domestic waste services in Penrith

 

·     Prior to 1982 residents in the urban area of Penrith City were provided with a twice weekly collection of a 56 litre garbage bin.

 

·     In 1982 Council introduced a weekly waste collection using 240 litre mobile garbage bins.

 

·     In 1990 recycling services were introduced using a 20 litre yellow plastic bucket for collection of recyclable containers.

 

·     Bundled and tied newspapers and cardboard were collected separately as from 1992.

 

·     In 1993 the 20 litre yellow plastic bucket was replaced with a black 56 litre crate for the collection of recyclable containers. 

 

·     In 1997 the 240 litre (split) yellow lid recycling bin service was introduced under a ten year collection contract with Cleanaway.  The bin was split to allow the separation of containers from paper and cardboard.  This was to ensure that a clean paper/cardboard product was produced.

 

·     In 2006 the divider was removed from the 240 litre recycling bin to allow ease of use and increase capacity. Technology advancements in the processing of recyclables allowed for this to occur.

 

·     In 2009 Council introduced a new three bin system for the source separation of organics, recyclables and residual garbage, which are the three major components of the domestic waste stream.  The separation and processing of these waste components allow Council to achieve the waste diversion targets and to provide a high value product for reuse within the community.

 

In addition to the commencement of the new service, Council provided an education program.  Some residents have raised concerns and issues in relation to this program.  A summary of the new service and education program are listed below.

 

Communication program

 

Commencing in November 2008, Council and its contractor, SITA, commenced its educational and promotional program (examples have been provided to Councillors under separate cover) in the lead up to the introduction of the new service.  This program included the following activities:

 

·     November 2008 - a glossy Recycling Organics for the Future brochure introducing the new collection and waste processing service was developed and distributed to the community through local mail and community promotional events.

 

·     School education – during 2009 a school education program was offered to all schools within the City with 38 schools and 11,000 students participating.  In addition, the Sustainable Times newsletter, which is regularly sent to all schools, included details of Council’s new service.

 

·     A community education program involving numerous community groups was conducted outlining details of the new service and the benefits to the community.

 

·     Discussions with representatives of Housing NSW and information to Housing NSW residents to inform and discuss the new service. 

 

·     Shopping centre displays and promotional programs were conducted throughout May/June 2009 leading up to the commencement of the service.  This program was conducted by Council, SITA and Envirocom (consultant educators) at all the main shopping centres throughout the City over a six week period. 

 

·     Numerous advertisements and editorials in local print media providing half and full page colour promotions about the new three bin service from October 2008 through to May 2009.

 

·     Weekly advertisements in local print media providing full and half page colour promotions during July and August 2009 leading up to the commencement of the service.

 

·     Advertisements through Council’s resident newsletters from January – October 2009.

 

·     Mayoral letter to all households in June 2009 advising residents of the new service and its commencement date in August 2009.

 

·     An information pack and Mayoral letter detailing the new service delivered with the new red lid residual garbage bins.

 

New service commencement

 

Under the old two bin system Council provided a number of service options ranging from multiple garbage bins per household to a standard service and down to a small service.  Resident charges for these services were generally based on a user-pays arrangement.  Any household that was on a non-standard service was contacted by Council prior to introduction of the new three bin service so that they could nominate the new service option most suitable for their circumstances.

 

A large (240L) fortnightly service for the red lid bin is also available for households who generated larger quantities of residual waste, including nappies.

 

This service was enhanced with the introduction of a weekly service for households with children in nappies and medical issues, at the request of Council following a workshop in February 2009.

 

The current service options available to households are numerous; however, the main options and the take up of these options are as follows:

 

Service Type

Red

Green

Yellow

No.

%

Small service

140

140

240

1,536

3.1

Standard service

140

240

240

45,268

91.5

Weekly service

140

240

240

453

0.9

Large service

240

240

240

2,243

4.5

The delivery of the new red lid residual garbage bins and the green lid changeover program commenced in June 2009.  The new three bin collection service commenced on 3 August 2009.

 

Resident concerns

 

On introduction of the new service concerns raised by residents mainly related to capacity and collection frequency of the red lid residual garbage bin.  Council staff assisted residents with their concerns and provided further information on how to use the bins correctly. 

 

Households with children in nappies, or residents with medical conditions in need of a weekly service were offered the option of a weekly collection service or a large red lid bin collected fortnightly at an increased rate of $50 per year above the standard service rate. A number of households have taken up either option, whilst others have not and have raised concerns as to the additional charge.

 

Households with large families requiring additional waste disposal capacity have also been offered the option of a large red bin service (collected fortnightly) at an increased rate of $50 per year above the standard service rate. Again, some households have taken up this option, whilst others have not and raised concerns as to the additional charge.

 

Other concerns raised have included odour and fly infestation, which have increased in summer. Residents were offered advice in appropriate ways to deal with these concerns including freezing of highly odorous food waste (including seafood, chicken and meat waste) and placement of this material in the bin closer to collection time. 

 

Although Council staff have provided this advice, concerns of this nature continued. In December 2009 the Mayor requested a review of the program at a Special Councillor Workshop at the earliest opportunity in early 2010, where these issues could be addressed. 

 

Special Workshop

 

On Monday, 8 February 2010 a Special Workshop was held at the request of the Mayor for Councillors to examine and consider the challenges some residents were facing with the new three bin waste service.

 

Council invited residents who represented varying views on the three bin waste service.  Council also invited the Consultant from Wright Corporate Strategy who assisted Council in preparing its Domestic Waste Strategy, representatives from SITA, who with VISY provide Council’s waste collection service, McGregor Environmental Services who have provided audits on Council’s waste system, the NSW Department of Health and NSW Department of Environment Climate Change and Water, and Jon Dee NSW Australian of the Year and Founder of Planet Ark.

 

Residents

 

The workshop was attended by 11 residents with four residents addressing Council.  The residents spoke about their experience of the system, a summary of which is provided below:

 

·    Concerns as to the frequency of the service and therefore capacity to remove extra rubbish and recycling when required.

·    The presence of maggots in the red and green bins.

·    Concern as to the speed of introduction of the new service.

·    Whilst there was acknowledgement that the new system was designed to reduce waste to landfill, it was felt that there is a need to provide more flexibility in the services and there should be a weekly collection of the red lid bin.

·    Concern was raised about the potential health issues with nappies and sanitary waste being left in the bin for two weeks.

·    Questions were raised as to why the same level of service was not provided to rural and multi unit dwellings.

·    Discussion was also held on the possibility of public place recycling services and the waste services provided to multi unit dwellings and the commercial sector.

·    Other residents advised that they were satisfied with the service and could see the benefits of the service in encouraging the community to be responsible for their waste and had no issues with maggots, whilst understanding that for larger families there may need to be extra capacity for waste disposal provided.

·    Suggestions were raised that Council should consider additional services over Christmas.

·    Residents were willing to pay for the services they required, and were reluctant to subsidise services provided to others.

 

Tony Wright – Wright Corporate Strategy

Mr Wright spoke about how he had assisted Council to prepare the Waste Strategy in 2005. Drivers included:

·    Reducing waste going to landfill

·    Commercial imperatives

·    Broad community pressure to provide improved recycling services

·    State Government targets of a 66% diversion rate by 2014

 

He also spoke about how the remainder of Sydney’s putrescible landfill capacity will be progressively depleted over the next 10 years, with Eastern Creek (where Penrith City Council currently takes its putrescible waste) being the first to close.

 

Mr Wright also advised that by 2016, it would cost an additional $150 per tonne plus CPI to send waste to landfill due to increases in the landfill levy, increases in landfill operating costs and the likely introduction of a Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme. This does not, however account for increases in waste disposal costs due to market forces.

 

He advised that other councils have adopted similar strategies to contain costs to the community and reduce waste to landfill in line with the State Government target.

 

Ben Connell – SITA

In representing SITA Environmental Services, Mr Connell spoke of SITA’s commitment to the current contract and provided information on SITA’s new waste processing facility at Kemps Creek.  This facility is designed to process 33,000 tonnes of organics annually.

 

SITA has been successful in producing an unrestricted use compost that meets Australian Standard 4454 that can be applied to sporting fields and landscaping, despite higher than expected levels of contamination. SITA has re-refined the compost to remove additional contaminants in order to achieve this standard at considerable additional cost. This is not sustainable and the contamination level must be reduced.

 

SITA has committed $450,000 over three years on education and promotion of the new system. SITA advised that if biodegradable bags are introduced they must meet Australian Standard 4736 to be suitable for the composting process.

 

Ken Dick – McGregor Environmental Services

In November 2009 a detailed audit on the waste output from the current three bin waste collection service was provided through analysis of the contents of all bins from 353 randomly selected households across the City.  This information provided details on the content and percentage breakdown of waste categories found in each of the red, green and yellow lidded bins.  It was found that 41% by weight of compostable organics and 23% by weight of recyclables were placed in the red lid residual bin for disposal at landfill. 

 

The audit report also indicated that on average the used capacity of each bin was as follows:

 

·    Organics – 51% by volume

·    Recycling – 73% by volume

·    Residual – 76% by volume

 

The Auditor provided additional information including:

 

·    18% of premises had babies in nappies

·    30% of red lid bins were at 100% capacity and 3% of red lid bins were overfull

·    30% of full or overfull garbage bins were from houses with babies in nappies

·    40% of premises with babies in nappies did not have full or overfull bins

·    98+% could cope with this system if food was placed in the organics bin and recyclables (particularly plastic containers) were placed in the recycling after crushing or stacking

·    A major problem found is that vast volumes of pre-prepared very wet food leftovers or excess food dumped in bags and placed in the garbage bin – the wetness of this waste caused fly strike problems

 

Dr Steve Corbett  - Director for Population Health

Dr Corbett advised that faeces should be handled as little as possible, but nappies and medical waste are not a health risk when immobile in a properly contained bin

 

Dr Corbett also spoke on how policies of environmental health protection and sustainability have sometimes come into conflict, and it is important Council is vigilant and any changes to waste disposal do not infringe public health standards.

 

 

Bernard Carlon – Department of Environment and Climate Change

Mr Carlon said approximately 25% of overall waste going to landfill across NSW comes from households, 50% is commercial and 25% is demolition waste. He emphasised the economic and environmental benefits of increased recycling and noted the strong support across the community for recycling, which not only saves resources but also saves water and energy and creates many more jobs than sending waste to landfill.

 

The NSW Government returns more than 60% of the waste levy from household waste to councils as a part of the Waste and Sustainability Improvement Payments. In 2007-2008, six councils exceeded State Government targets of 66% (although the number has to be verified). He also clarified that the South Australian Government had introduced a regulation to ensure weekly waste collection, but that Council’s three bin service would meet the requirements of that regulation as all putrescible waste is collected weekly.

 

Jon Dee – NSW Australian of the Year and Founder of Planet Ark

Mr Dee spoke about the experience of Lismore Council, who has been successfully using the same three bin system for years. Lismore had similar problems with implementation including maggots and an initial education program that had not worked well enough.

 

Lismore introduced the supply of “Bin Kill” to address issues with maggots and reinvented their education program, and more recently introduced the use of biodegradable bags complying with Australian Standard 4736, as mentioned above.

 

His suggestions for improvement included:

·    The provision of an insecticide product to residents for fly control

·    Issuing biodegradable bags

·    There should be provision within the three bin domestic waste service for families with special needs

·    Manufacturers and suppliers should review packaging

·    Providing an additional recycling bin

·    More engagement with the community

·    An audit on quality control of bin design

 

Workshop Outcomes

 

Following the presentations, Councillors had an extensive discussion on the three bin waste system. Principles that were discussed and agreed to were the need to ensure equity in service cost and therefore maintaining a user pays principle in waste services charges; the necessity to respond to the need for improvements to the current system; and the need to respond to issues that are limiting the use of, and contamination levels in the organics bin.

 

The following options were endorsed:

 

1.   Provision of an optional weekly 140L red lid residual waste bin to all households on the three bin service at an additional cost, on request. 

 

2.   Introduction of biodegradable bags (for the kitchen organics bin) for the storage of food waste prior to placement in the organics bin. This will be free to residents for an initial period of 15 months at which point it will be reviewed.

 

3.   Provision of an additional yellow lid recycling bin (fortnightly collection), currently available to households at $38 per annum, at a reduced cost, to all households on the three bin service on request.

 

4.   Providing an enhancement to the communication and education program with the involvement of a residents’ focus group and the provision of support teams.

 

5.   Investigate providing suitable insecticide products to residents for fly control.

 

6.   Re-establish the Domestic Waste Working Party.

 

Other recommended adjustments which will require further discussion and investigation include;

 

7.   Providing additional waste services at Christmas time.

 

8.   Possible use of air odour controls.

 

Implications of Outcomes

 

The implementation of the improvements to the service mentioned above needs to be considered in respect of the potential impact on existing contracts.  A variation to the contract terms and conditions requires agreement by both Council and its contractors and both parties shall have regard to the contract aims and objectives in considering the variation.  The contracts generally provide:

 

·    To facilitate a sustained effort to increase the type, quality and amount of resources recovered from the waste stream

·    To maximise and preserve the resource integrity and value of recoverable and reusable materials within the waste stream

·    To provide high standard, integrated waste and resource recovery services, based on “best practice” principles, which are complementary to national, state and regional waste management policies, as well as Council’s own Domestic Waste Strategy

·    To fulfil Council’s obligations under legislation relating to provision of waste and resource recovery services

 

Following the Special Workshop on 8 February 2010, discussions were held with representatives of Council’s contractors, SITA and VISY.

 

At the time of writing this report, discussions with VISY were continuing over the initiative to provide additional recycling services and this will be subject to a further report to Council via the Domestic Waste Working Party.

 

Discussions with representatives of SITA have been fruitful and SITA has shown support and commitment to the contract and its current partnership with Council. SITA has displayed a willingness to work with Council on the introduction of the optional weekly red lid residual bin service and the provision of biodegradable bags.

The introduction of biodegradable bags is likely to cause an impact on the processing of organics and require additional staff to account for this impact. 

 

Discussions with SITA have indicated that the bags should be specifically labelled and ideally of a distinguishing colour to reduce confusion with plastic bags and other bags that are called biodegradable but are not suitable for the composting system.

 

SITA advised that the organics processing line will need to be adjusted to account for the separation and examination of the product to ensure that the contents of the bags will not adversely affect the compost. This will require additional staff on the production line with an increased cost of $10.87 per tonne of organics delivered. This constitutes a variation to the contract price.

 

In further discussions with SITA they have agreed to subsidise this cost and have agreed to an increased cost for processing organics of $3.00 per tonne. This is on the basis that Council will provide relief to SITA in respect of a delay in the introduction of the contamination management program for the organics service. Initial discussions with SITA have indicated that this can be managed and the matter will be brought back to the Domestic Waste Working Party.

 

Surveys of residents will be undertaken to determine relevant issues that need to be considered in the ongoing purchase and supply of the bags.

 

The timing of introduction of the bags will need to be determined and brought to the Domestic Waste Working Party.

 

To minimise impact on SITA’s operations, with the introduction of the optional weekly residual waste service and provision of biodegradable bags, SITA have advised that we need to move forward and implement programs that will encourage organics being diverted from the residual waste bin when collected weekly and contamination rates in the organics bin.

 

An estimation of the total additional cost (collection costs and disposal costs above the standard charge) for the weekly service is $58.00 per annum (2009-2010) which will escalate by CPI and increased tipping and collection costs to $67.00 in 2010-2011. 

 

The implementation of an optional weekly red lid bin service will require communication with all residents to determine the need for the additional service, potential sourcing of additional vehicles and employment of additional drivers, and be introduced in conjunction with the delivery of the initial rollout of biodegradable bags. 

 

The number of households taking up the weekly service (whilst difficult to estimate) may not be significant and therefore the aims and objectives of the contract can be maintained.

However, should there be a significant uptake of the weekly service the implications of this would have to be considered with regards to the contractual objectives.

 

The following table indicates the likely impact on waste diversion from landfill based on the uptake of weekly services.

Table 1 - Waste Diversion Rates

Additional weekly services (households)

0

2,000

5,000

10,000

50,000

Waste diversion (from landfill)

66.52%

65.72%

64.51%

62.49%

46.34%

 

The lower waste to landfill diversion rate reflects the high likelihood of residents continuing existing practices of placing food organics into the residual garbage (leftover waste) bin when collected on a weekly basis.  Current audits indicate that this practice (placement of food in the red lid bin) is at about 41% by weight.  It is difficult to estimate the number of households that would possibly take up the offer of a weekly service, however, the above table indicates the impact that this would have, based on the number changing to a weekly service.

 

Financial Services Manager’s Comment

 

Residential properties in the Penrith City Council area are required to be charged for domestic waste services.  Council’s domestic waste function, as prescribed by legislation, must be self funding.  Prior to the introduction of the three bin system the pricing structure provided incentive for households to generate less waste and take up smaller bins at reduced charges that were set below full cost recovery.  This principle was continued for some of the smaller services in 2009-2010.  To accommodate the new three bin service in 2009-2010 and the variable service options a range of charges were introduced with the standard three bin service having an annual charge of $245.

 

The Domestic Waste Management Charge has traditionally been, and is continuing to be, structured to make provision for future alternative waste technologies by way of an annual transfer to the Domestic Waste Reserve.  It is this annual allocation that provided the funding source for the purchase of both the new red bins and the kitchen organics bins without the need for an additional call on general revenue or a special purpose external loan.  The Reserve also provides for an annual contribution to road maintenance, ongoing educational programs and capacity to implement future alternative waste technology.


This report outlines a number of initiatives to be implemented immediately on either a temporary or permanent basis.  The increased cost for 2009-2010 for the introduction of these initiatives is proposed to be addressed as below:

 

Table 2: Costing and Charges for remainder of 2009-2010

 

Option

Description

Cost

1

Optional weekly collection of all 140L residual bins

$50 charged directly to the user of additional service.

2

Provision of biodegradable bags (for kitchen organics bins)

$120,000 to $160,000 for supply and delivery to residents of bags along with additional processing costs, still being negotiated, funded from the Domestic Waste Reserve.*

3

Optional additional recycling services

Discussions are continuing with provider

4

Provision of support teams and an enhanced communication and education program

Funded from the Domestic Waste Reserve

       * prices subject to finalisation of negotiations with contractors.

 

Therefore any resident on the standard service who opts for the optional weekly collection of their 140L residual bin would have an equivalent annual charge for 2009-2010 of $295 (pro rata from date of service).  As discussed previously the additional charge of $50 per annum for the weekly collection of the 140L residual bin had only been available to households with nappies or medical waste and was at a subsidised cost.  The true cost for this service is $58. Council will continue to subsidise this service for 2009-2010 from the Domestic Waste Reserve. In 2010-2011 full cost recovery will be implemented as the Reserve is unable to sustain the subsidy on an ongoing basis.

 

The development of the 2010-2011 Domestic Waste Management Charge has commenced and as previously reported to Council this structure will be based on full cost recovery across all services and again will allow for a contribution to the Reserve to provide for future alternative waste technologies.  The proposed Domestic Waste Management Charge for 2010-2011, subject to further development, will be presented to Council during the upcoming Operational Plan process.  This will include the proposed charges for the range of service configurations available including the standard service and the additional charge for an optional weekly collection of the 140L residual bin. 

 

The provision of an optional additional recycling service is continuing to be investigated and any implementation will be the subject of a further report.

 

All costs have been developed based on initial estimates and may vary slightly following the conclusion of any contract negotiations or tender processes that may be required.

 

Communications Strategy

 

One of the primary concerns raised at the special workshop was that the communications of the three bin waste system had been either inadequate or ineffectual. The next stage of implementing the amended three bin system includes a comprehensive communications strategy designed to reach all sectors of the community using a variety of channels and tools, as well a tailored internal communications strategy which will ensure all staff and Councillors have adequate access to clear, concise and correct information.

 

The communications strategy will include, but not be limited to the following:

 

·    Media briefings/use of regular media channels

·    Council Facebook Page

·    Council website

·    Direct Mail and Customer Feedback Surveys

·    Use of Support Teams

·    Working with Neighbourhood Renewal and Community and Cultural Development Teams

·    Clear, concise fact sheets which are easily translatable to reach culturally and linguistically diverse community groups

·    A free community “Bin It” event held around April to celebrate the first laying of Grade A compost. The event will include free compost giveaways, games, education stalls, children’s activities plus Council has planned to approach some “community icons” for their support

·    More bin audits with ward-based community events for suburbs that are getting it right

·    Regular briefings for all frontline staff

·    School Workshops to be provided by Keep Australia Beautiful teams

·    A residents’ focus group which will inform the Domestic Waste Working Party and assist Council in the development of its communication programs

 

Conclusion

 

This report and the presentations made to Council at the special workshop on February 8 clearly demonstrate the need for Council to deliver an enhanced three bin waste program to the community. Given the issues currently facing Council, including the future shortage of putrescible landfill and the environmental effects of placing organic material in landfill, it is of vital importance that Council works with the community to ensure the successful implementation of the three bin waste system and Council’s Waste Strategy.

 

The special workshop on February 8 gave residents the chance to detail their experiences of implementing the three bin system, including challenges they had faced and also what was working well. These presentations allowed Council to develop the following options addressing their main concerns:

 

1.   Provision of an optional weekly red 140L red residual service to all households on the three bin service on request at an additional cost.

 

2.   Introduction of biodegradable bags (for the kitchen organics bin) for the storage of food waste prior to placement in the organics bin, provided by Council free for 15 months.

 

3.   Enhanced communications and provision of information, including support teams, and a residents’ focus group to inform the Domestic Waste Working Party, which will play an integral role in confirming Council’s communications strategy and oversee the rollout of the enhanced system.

 

There was a general consensus at the workshop that residents were willing to pay for the services they required, and were reluctant to subsidise services provided to others.

 

There were three other options discussed at the workshop which require further investigation by Council, or are subject to ongoing contractual and cost implications that are not yet resolved. These include:

 

1.   Providing suitable insecticides to reduce fly strike issues and products to reduce bin odour.

 

2.   Provision of additional collection services at Christmas time. Council understands Christmas is a difficult time for residents regarding waste disposal and is committed to finding a solution, however, discussions with VISY and SITA are still ongoing. 

 

3.   Provision of an additional 240L yellow- lid recycling bin at a reduced cost. Council is committed to encourage recycling among residents and will continue to pursue an enhanced recycling service with VISY. At the time of writing, there are still contractual issues and cost implications to be resolved before the cost of this service can be confirmed.

 

Councillors and residents are assured that Council officers will seek to resolve any issues as quickly as possible, and will address the provision of these options through the Domestic Waste Working Party.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Domestic Waste Service - Three Bin System be received.

2.     An optional weekly 140L red lid residual waste bin to all households on the three bin service be provided at an additional cost, on request.

3.     Biodegradable bags (for the kitchen organics bin) for the storage of food waste prior to placement in the organics bin be provided to all households using the three bin system as detailed in the report.

4.     An enhanced communication and education program be developed and implanted as detailed in this report.

5.     The Domestic Waste Working Party be reconvened for the purpose of confirming the communications strategy and overseeing the roll out of the enhanced three bin waste program.

 

6.     The identified funding for the implementation of biodegradable bags, subsidy for additional weekly collections and education and communication programs, as identified in the report, be funded from the Domestic Waste Reserve.

7.     A further report be submitted to Council, via the Domestic Waste Working Party, on the optional additional yellow lid recycle bin (fortnightly collection) for residents on the three bin waste service.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.  

Penrith City Council - Domestic Waste Strategy

40 Pages

Attachment

   


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


 

 

A Liveable City

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


 

 

A Vibrant City

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled



 

ATTACHMENTS   

 

 

Date of Meeting:          Monday 15 February 2010

Delivery Program:       A Green City

Issue:                            We use our resources wisely, and take responsibility for our levels of consumption

Report Title:                Domestic Waste Service - Three Bin System

Attachments:                Penrith City Council - Domestic Waste Strategy



Extraordinary Council Meeting

15 February 2010

Attachment 1 - Penrith City Council - Domestic Waste Strategy

 

 

 








































 


 

ATTACHMENT       

 

 

 


Date of Meeting:  4th February 2008

 

Delivery Program:              

 

Program:                      Providing Capacity

 

Report Title:                 2007-2008 Voted Works