25 August 2010

 

Dear Councillor,

In pursuance of the provisions of the Local Government Act, 1993 and the Regulations thereunder, notice is hereby given that a POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING of Penrith City Council is to be held in the Passadena Room, Civic Centre, 601 High Street, Penrith on Monday 30 August 2010 at 7:30PM.

Attention is directed to the statement accompanying this notice of the business proposed to be transacted at the meeting.

Yours faithfully

 

 

Alan Stoneham

General Manager

 

BUSINESS

 

1.           LEAVE OF ABSENCE

Leave of absence has been granted to:

Councillor Karen McKeown - 17 August 2010 to 20 September 2010 inclusive.

 

2.           APOLOGIES

 

3.           CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES

Policy Review Committee Meeting - 9 August 2010.

 

4.           DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

Pecuniary Interest (The Act requires Councillors who declare a pecuniary interest in an item to leave the meeting during discussion of that item)

Non-Pecuniary Conflict of Interest – Significant and Less than Significant (The Code of Conduct requires Councillors who declare a significant non-pecuniary conflict of interest in an item to leave the meeting during discussion of that item)

 

5.           ADDRESSING THE MEETING

 

6.           MAYORAL MINUTES

 

7.           NOTICES OF MOTION TO RESCIND A RESOLUTION

 

8.           NOTICES OF MOTION

 

9.           DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

10.         URGENT REPORTS (to be dealt with in the delivery program to which the item relates)

 

11.         CONFIDENTIAL BUSINESS


POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING

 

Monday 30 August 2010

 

table of contents

 

 

 

 

 

 

meeting calendar

 

 

confirmation of minutes

 

 

DELIVERY program reports

 


2010 MEETING CALENDAR

February 2010 - December 2010

(adopted by Council on 9/11/09 and amended by Council on 19/4/10)

 

 

 

TIME

FEB

MAR

APRIL

MAY

JUNE

JULY

AUG

SEPT

OCT

NOV

DEC

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

 

Ordinary Council Meeting

7.30pm

1

 

 

3v

 

19

16#

6ü

11¨

8#

13

(7.00pm)

22#

22

19

24#

21*

 

 

27^

(7.00pm)

 

29

 

Policy Review Committee

7.30pm

15

8

 

10

 

 

9

13@

 

15

 

 

29@

 

 

28

12

30

 

18

 

 

Operational Plan Public Forum

 

6.00pm

 

 

 

31

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

v

Meeting at which the Draft Operational Plan for 2010/2011 is adopted for exhibition

*

Meeting at which the Operational Plan for 2010/2011 is adopted

#

Meetings at which the Operational Plan quarterly reviews are presented

@

Delivery Program progress reports

^

Election of Mayor/Deputy Mayor

ü

Meeting at which the 2009/2010 Annual Statements are presented

¨

Meeting at which any comments on the 2009/2010 Annual Statements are presented

-                 Extraordinary Meetings are held as required.

-                 Members of the public are invited to observe meetings of the Council (Ordinary and Policy Review Committee).

Should you wish to address Council, please contact the Acting Executive Officer, Glenn Schuil.

 


UNCONFIRMED MINUTES

 OF THE POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING OF PENRITH CITY COUNCIL HELD IN THE PASSADENA ROOM, PENRITH

ON MONDAY 9 AUGUST 2010 AT 7:35PM

PRESENT

His Worship the Mayor Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM, Councillors Jim Aitken OAM, Kaylene Allison, Greg Davies, Mark Davies, Tanya Davies, Ross Fowler OAM, Ben Goldfinch, Prue Guillaume, Marko Malkoc, Karen McKeown, Kath Presdee and John Thain.

 

LEAVE OF ABSENCE

Leave of Absence was previously granted to Councillor Robert Ardill for the period 26 July 2010 to 20 August 2010 inclusive.

APOLOGIES

PRC 40  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Marko Malkoc seconded Councillor Ben Goldfinch that an apology be received for Councillor Jackie Greenow.

 

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES - Policy Review Committee Meeting - 12 July 2010

PRC 41  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Ben Goldfinch seconded Councillor Marko Malkoc that the minutes of the Policy Review Committee Meeting of 12 July 2010 be confirmed.

 

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

 

Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM declared a Non-Pecuniary Less than Significant Interest in Item 1  - Opportunity for Biodiversity Conservation Corridor - Wianamatta Regional Park to Former Air Services Australia Site as the land referred to within the report is within close proximity to his property.

 

Councillor Kath Presdee declared a Non-Pecuniary Less than Significant Interest in Item 1  - Opportunity for Biodiversity Conservation Corridor - Wianamatta Regional Park to Former Air Services Australia Site as the suburb of her family home borders the land subject of the report.

 

SUSPENSION OF STANDING ORDERS

PRC 42  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Ross Fowler OAM seconded Councillor Greg Davies RESOLVED that Standing Orders be suspended to allow members of the public to address the meeting, the time being 7:38 pm.

 

Mr Geoff Brown

 

Item 1 - Opportunity for Biodiversity Conservation Corridor - Wianamatta Regional Park to Former Air Services Australia Site      

 

Mr Geoff Brown an affected citizen, spoke against the recommendation, as he believes the report has a lack of vision in that hundreds of hectares of Cumberland Plain Woodland are at risk of clearing, and that the corridor should be made much larger. Mr Brown noted that this is the last opportunity to protect the Greenbelt and asked that Council write to the Director General of DECCW stating that the additional area of Cumberland Plain Woodland needed for the corridor within the ADI Site can be protected with a Critical Habitat listing providing an immediate resolution to the need for acquisition or compensation

 

Procedural Motion

PRC 43  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Ben Goldfinch seconded Councillor Marko Malkoc that Mr Brown be granted an extension of time to complete his address, the time being 7:44pm.

 

Mr Brown requested that Council shift its position on the development of the ADI Site to one of protecting a minimum of a further 100 hectares of the sites critically endangered Cumberland Plain Woodland (CPW). Mr Brown asked Council to amend its draft LEP to correct mistakes in its zonings of the numerous Deerubbin claimed lands and a small number of some other private lands.

 

A number of Councillors took the opportunity to raise questions with Mr Brown regarding his address to Council.

 

RESUMPTION OF STANDING ORDERS

PRC 44  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Ben Goldfinch seconded Councillor Kath Presdee that Standing Orders be resumed, the time being 7:47pm.

 

DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

A Leading City

 

1        Opportunity for Biodiversity Conservation Corridor - Wianamatta Regional Park to Former Air Services Australia Site                                                                                                 

PRC 45  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Ross Fowler OAM seconded Councillor Mark Davies

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Opportunity for Biodiversity Conservation Corridor - Wianamatta Regional Park to Former Air Services Australia Site be received.

2.     Council support the creation of a more extensive network of appropriately managed biodiversity corridors in Western Sydney and write to the Minister for the Environment, the Hon Frank Sartor, requesting that discussions with relevant landowners be undertaken to support the creation of a biodiversity conservation corridor linking the Wianamatta Regional Park and the former Air Services Australia site at Cranebrook.

3.     Council write to the Minister for Planning and the NSW Member for Londonderry, Allan Shearan, seeking their support to expedite negotiations to facilitate the creation of a biodiversity conservation corridor linking the Wianamatta Regional Park and the former Air Services Australia site at Cranebrook.

4.     A further report be brought to Council outlining the required processes and the consequences of reviewing the zoning of the land within the potential biodiversity conservation corridor linking the Wianamatta Regional Park and the former Air Services Australia site at Cranebrook.

 

2        Working Party Meetings

Councillor Tanya Davies left the meeting, the time being 8:16pm.

Councillor Tanya Davies returned to the meeting, the time being 8:17pm.                                          

PRC 46  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor John Thain seconded Councillor Kath Presdee

That the information contained in the report on Working Party Meetings be received.

 

3        2010 Local Government Association of NSW Annual Conference

Councillor Karen McKeown left the meeting, the time being 8:33pm.

Councillor Karen McKeown returned to the meeting, the time being 8:35pm.                                   

PRC 47  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Ross Fowler OAM seconded Councillor Ben Goldfinch

That:

1.      The information contained in the report on 2010 Local Government Association of NSW Annual Conference be received.

2.      The ten motions detailed in the report be submitted for inclusion in the 2010 Local Government Association NSW Conference Business Paper.

3.      A further report be brought to Council regarding the possible lodgement of a late motion dealing with the privatisation of electricity providers.

4.      A memo be provided to all Councillors on tendering with respect to elected local government organisations.

5.       The following additional motion be submitted for inclusion in the 2010 Local Government Association NSW Conference Business Paper.

 

MOTION 11

 

From:

Penrith City Council

 

Issue:

Swimming Pool Safety

 

Theme:

Modern Approaches to Community Wellbeing

 

Motion Text:

That the Local Government Association call on the State Government to institute legislation amendments aimed at implementing mandatory swimming pool fencing inspections and related cost recovery based inspection fees for Councils.

 

Note from Council:

The State Government in November 2009 enacted a number of amendments to the Swimming Pool Act (including a set of Australian Standards for pool fencing AS 1926.1 (2007)). Whilst these changes went some way to improving swimming pool safety generally, a regime for mandatory pool fencing inspections was not included. It is understood that the State Government considers a mandatory pool registration and inspection program was not warranted due to the cost that this would impose on pool owners.

 

It is difficult to contemplate circumstances where a non-complying pool safety barrier would not constitute a risk to the safety of a person. Sadly, backyard drownings continue to occur.

 

Whilst educating pool owners still plays a vital role in pool safety, there remains the risk that not all pool owners are aware of their responsibilities and safety issues when they emerge. A mandatory pool fencing regime would ensure this circumstance is overcome.

 

It would be important for any mandatory swimming pool safety inspection process to be underpinned by a cost recovery based inspection fee for Councils. Further investigation should also be pursued in relation to the opportunity for pool fencing inspections to be undertaken by other accredited certifiers.

 

In any legislation amendment drafted, there should be a clear reference to legal protection from liability for a Council where it acts in good faith in respect of pool fencing inspections. This would be similar to the “good faith” protections currently afforded to Councils for flooding and contaminated land responses.

 

 

4        One Association for Local Government in NSW

Councillor John Thain left the meeting, the time being 8:55pm.

Councillor John Thain returned to the meeting, the time being 8:56pm.

Councillor Mark Davies left the meeting, the time being 8:57pm.

Councillor Tanya Davies left the meeting, the time being 8:58pm.

Councillor Mark Davies returned to the meeting, the time being 8:59pm.

Councillor Tanya Davies returned to the meeting, the time being 8:59pm.                                          

PRC 48  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Kath Presdee

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on One Association for Local Government in NSW be received.

2.     Council endorse the Position Paper and suggested responses with the exception that Council object to Taskforce Recommendation 38 and it seek:

·        amendment of the words “ordinary member councils” to read “ordinary members” (to cover NSW Aboriginal Land Council representation); and

·        scaled voting rights for the election of the Board of Directors according to the population of LG areas in the same way as now applies for voting for motions at the Conference, rather than equal voting rights as proposed.

 

 

There being no further business the Chairperson declared the meeting closed the time being 9:12pm.

    



DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

 

A City of Opportunities

 

1        Paint the Town REaD

 

2        Youth Action Plan 2010-2013 - Outcome of Further Consultations

  

A Liveable City

 

3        Draft Public Spaces Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) - Code of Practice

  

 


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


 

 

A Leading City

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


A City of Opportunities

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

1        Paint the Town REaD

 

2        Youth Action Plan 2010-2013 - Outcome of Further Consultations

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting

30 August 2010

A City of Opportunities

 

 

 

1

Paint the Town REaD   

 

Compiled by:                Karen van Woudenberg, Children's Services Development Officer

Authorised by:             Roger Nethercote, Group Manager - People and Places  

 

Objective

We have access to what we need

Community Outcome

A City with equitable access to services and facilities (7)

Strategic Response

Base the provision of services and facilities on principles of social justice and equity (7.1)

 

Presenters:                   Barbie Bates & Julie Jasprizza-Laus - Mission Australia - Paint the Town REaD      

 

Executive Summary

This report provides information about the Paint the Town REaD strategy, which aims to raise awareness about the importance of developing early literacy skills in young children. Penrith City Council has been approached to partner with the lead agency, Mission Australia, by providing support to the planning and implementation of activities across the Penrith Local Government Area. This includes an Annual Reading Day, and ‘thinking smarter’ about currently planned events to add an early literacy awareness component to each community event.

 

This report recommends that the report be received and also recommends that Council support the initiative “Paint the Town REaD” within existing resources available including the Annual Reading Day.

Background

The Paint the Town REaD initiative commenced in Parkes in 1997 instigated by a local primary school principal, Rhonda Brain. It has been embraced by many agencies and services in Parkes in an attempt to address an unsatisfactory level of communication and literacy amongst children starting school in the district. This issue is critical, as the research demonstrates that children with literacy problems entering school do not generally catch up – indeed the gap widens as they progress through school, and then in later life, they struggle with employment and self esteem.

 

This initiative has been embraced by many Councils as a way of rallying community support for improving early literacy for children from birth to the commencement of Kindergarten. The original title of the project was ‘Birth to Kindergarten’ but it has changed into ‘Paint the Town REaD’ (PTR) as more Councils state wide have adopted the concept.

 

Introduction

 

The Paint the Town REaD initiative is now rolling out at various stages in Western Sydney in the Blue Mountains, Blacktown, Parramatta, Holroyd and Auburn Local Government Areas (LGAs).

 

In each LGA, Paint the Town REaD involves establishing a partnership with the local Council and a lead agency (Mission Australia in Penrith) with co-champions from the community, child and family services and the education sector. Additional partners in this initiative can be any organisation working in the Penrith LGA who has an interest in children 0-5 years including service clubs and chambers of commerce.

 

Champions of the initiative have been drawn from many agencies including two of Council’s children’s services, Rotary, Connect Penrith Community Hub and SYPNS Inc to ensure local communities are included.

 

The initiative has two key long term strategies:

 

1)   Thinking smarter about existing opportunities: for all levels of the community to consider how they can transform ordinary community events into events where literacy is promoted and championed by all who participate.

 

For example: Lower Blue Mountains Rotary is now including a Reading Tent at their monthly Glenbrook Markets, where Rotarians read aloud to children and their families on the half hour.

 

St Marys Community Hub in partnership with Oxley Park Public School ran a Family Fun Day last year, completely focussed around early literacy activities.

 

St Marys Community Hub held a Reading Tent at the Glenmore Park Child and Family Centre Family Fun Day and at the recent NAIDOC festivities in Jamison Park – with Rooby Roo – the Paint Penrith REaD mascot delighting the children with an appearance at both events.

2)             An Annual Reading Day

 

Children (0-5 years) accompanied by their parents or carers are read to at a local shopping centre by shop keepers and community leaders. It provides an opportunity for general community education about the importance of reading to babies from birth and children experience the fun of being read to by their local community leaders and shop owners.

 

In the Blue Mountains, children are read to at several villages across a week. In Parkes, the children take over the main shopping centre and after the readings then converge on a local park for the Mayor’s Picnic.

 

The experience in Parkes has demonstrated the initiative really requires the leading support of the local Council to engage the whole community.

 

In Penrith, Council’s role will be to co-lead the initiative with Mission Australia with a particular focus on identifying vulnerable populations within the LGA.

 

Next Steps

 

The next step would be for Council to host a Mayoral Launch of the project. The current proposed date is September 16th and will be followed by taking a partnership role in the Annual Reading Day. This is proposed to be held in Emu Plains on 9th November 2010, in partnership with Mission Australia and Rotary as a co-champion.

 

How far Council wishes to then further commit to the project will be the decision of Councillors and staff.

 

For example:

 

·    Parkes Shire Council have always had a Councillor on the Paint the Town REaD Planning Committee and in Penrith Councillor Tanya Davies has already indicated her interest in taking on this role.

 

·    In the Blue Mountains, Paint the Blue REaD sits as an initiative of the Stronger Families Alliance and a Librarian represents Council at the LGA wide planning meeting.

 

·    In Parramatta and Blacktown, the Chief Librarian chairs the LGA Planning Groups and in Holroyd, the initiative is led by Children’s Services in partnership with Library staff.

 

·    Blue Mountains Council assisted in the funding of their Launch and their first Annual Reading Day. Holroyd City Council is funding their launch in August.

·    If Westfield chose to be a future partner, Penrith City Council staff may choose to volunteer at a regular reading session in the shopping centre.

 

Paint the Town REaD operates within a Results Based Accountability Model. The proposed population outcome for the Penrith LGA is that by 2020, all children in the Penrith LGA will enter school ready to engage in reading and writing.

 

Conclusion

International and national research has shown that improving literacy outcomes for children from birth support life long learning and improves life outcomes well into adulthood. The support of Local Government to improve literacy outcomes has benefits for the entire community and requires agency and services that deal with communities to ‘think smarter’ about how they can spread the message about reading to children from ‘Birth to Kindergarten’. Many activities within the Council calendar that already take place could include important messages about reading and communicating with children.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Paint the Town REaD be received

2.     Council support the initiative “Paint the Town REaD” within existing resources available including the Annual Reading Day.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Policy Review Committee Meeting

30 August 2010

A City of Opportunities

 

 

 

2

Youth Action Plan 2010-2013 - Outcome of Further Consultations   

 

Compiled by:                Katerina Tahija, Youth Development Officer

Authorised by:             Erich Weller, Community and Cultural Development Manager   

 

Objective

We have access to what we need

Community Outcome

A City with equitable access to services and facilities (7)

Strategic Response

Base the provision of services and facilities on principles of social justice and equity (7.1)

       

 

Executive Summary

This report provides information about the revised Youth Action Plan 2010-2013 that will provide direction for Council in responding to youth issues in Penrith City. The initial draft Plan was developed following extensive consultations held in March and May 2009 with young people at the Youth Speak Out and Summit. 

At the Policy Review Committee meeting on 7 December 2009, a report was presented on the Youth Summit and Speak Out held in 2009 and the resulting draft Youth Action Plan.  Council resolved that further consultation take place with young people on the draft Youth Action Plan including with those young people involved in the earlier Youth Speak Out and Summit consultations. The purpose of this additional consultation was to reconfirm that the strategies and actions in the draft Youth Action Plan incorporate and respond to the views and priorities of young people in the City.

 

The report also outlines the process that has informed Council’s current practice in consulting with a diverse range of young people. The current practice has been developed following recommendations by young people in earlier youth consultation processes and has been reconfirmed as best practice by the ongoing successful results.

Council officers have now completed further consultations on the draft Youth Action Plan. Council officers have conducted consultations with young people across the Penrith LGA between May and July this year and have received 219 responses. The consultations were held widely across 16 sites and included the opportunity for young people that provided input into the 2009 consultations to contribute and confirm the directions in the draft Youth Action Plan responding to their priorities. Again these consultations also aimed to involve a broad range of young people with diverse interests, including young people that identify with different youth sub cultures.

 

The consultation responses have been collated and analysed. This report provides a summary of the responses. Attached with this report is the now revised draft Youth Action Plan 2010 – 2013 with updated actions and prioritisation of the actions.  This is Attachment 1.

 

It is expected that the majority of actions can be implemented within existing resources. Where opportunities exist, additional funding through grants will be sought.

 

The report recommends that the information be received. The report also recommends that Council endorse the draft Youth Action Plan 2010-2013 for implementation.

Background

Since the Council’s Youth Needs Audit process commenced in 2000, Council has had a pro-active approach to consulting with young people to hear what young people are saying about their needs and issues within Penrith City.

 

A report was provided to Council’s Ordinary Meeting on 10 March 2008 titled Consulting with Young People - WSROC Regional Advisory Committee. The purpose of this report was to provide Councillors with an update on Council’s current practice of consulting with young people and to advise Council of processes for youth representation on advisory committees. This report was requested after the Western Sydney Regional Organisation of Councils (WSROC) resolved to further investigate how it might work with member Councils to establish a Regional Youth Advisory Committee. WSROC has not proceeded with the establishment of a Regional Youth Advisory Committee.

 

This report also reiterated Council’s preferred model for consultation with and the contribution by young people to the priorities of Council and the future directions of the City. This best practice model was adopted as a result of the outcomes of the Youth Needs Audit and endorsed by Council in 2002 after extensive consultation with young people. 

 

During these consultations the responses of young people clearly stated that consultations with young people need to:

·    include a diverse representation of young people;

·    be held in their own communities, including at schools and youth centres;

·    be accessible;

·    be advertised where young people would access information;

·    be communicated in youth friendly language.

 

The preferred method of consultations, as discussed by young people at the Youth Needs Audit consultations, were:

·    small focus groups;

·    forums where young people could meet Council representatives and discuss issues that are relevant to young people’s lives.

 

Council has consistently been of the view that consultation with and contributions by young people to decision making processes are most effective on matters of particular and immediate relevance to young people. Thus Council, together with its partners, has organised many consultations with young people over the last few years.

 

Council officers are regularly coordinating or participating with community and government partners in consultations with young people in the City. In some cases, these will be project based consultations with the aim to ensure that a project is responsive to young people’s needs and aspirations. In other cases, it may be to ensure that Council and other partner decision making processes take into account the views of young people and facilitate outcomes that do not adversely impact on young people. Council has actively engaged with young people in a variety of forums and processes including:

·    consulting young people on Council’s four skate parks where innovative and creative consultation was used with young people to enable them to have input into the design of the skate parks;

·    consulting young people in Kingswood Park, Londonderry and Oxley Park in the development of local Neighbourhood Action Plans for these suburbs;

·    supporting government and community partners to consult with a group of Sudanese young people on a variety of issues including health, culture and settling in Australia;

·    consulting with young people with disability as part of the development of the Penrith Inclusion Plan – People with Disability 2009–2013.

Examples of ongoing consultation with young people include:

·    assisting with opportunities for consultation and participation in all Youth Week funded projects;

·    engagement of young people through local youth services;

·    ongoing  visits to all youth facilities;

·    ongoing support of networks with schools, training organisations, government services and youth projects to assist these agencies to maintain strong links and connections with young people including school leavers.

 

Consultation and education programs that target young people and which are coordinated by other Departments within Council include:

·    Public Domain, Amenity and Safety Department - graffiti education program targeting years 5 and 8;

·    Waste Management and Community Protection Department - organic education program which is available on request to local high schools for years 7-10;

·    Environmental Health Department - Enviro Adventures targeting young people in year 5 and 6.

 

This approach to consultation and participation by young people in Council processes is in line with Council’s Participation Policy and Manual. In particular, Council’s approach to consultation and participation by young people emphasises involvement and collaboration, utilising a variety of adaptable consultation mechanisms to best target a diverse range of youth.

 

Council continues to review and reflect on engagement and consultation processes to ensure best practice as recommended in the Best Practice Principles for Youth Participation, Premier’s Memorandum No. 2007-07 to all Ministers and Chief Executives on youth strategy and participation. The principles recognise young people’s rights to participate in developing government programs that impact on them and promotes the establishment of strong relations between government and young people which builds young people’s knowledge and skills. Importantly, the principles emphasise the role of government to develop inclusive participation strategies which take into account the capacity and interests of young people.

 

A further report was provided to Council’s Ordinary Meeting on 28 July 2008 titled Youth Advisory Committees. At this meeting, Council endorsed holding a Youth Speak Out and Summit to enable Council to provide further opportunities for consultation and participation by young people in Council processes and to support the development of a Youth Action Plan for the City.

A report was provided to Council’s Policy Review Committee meeting on 7 December 2009 to present feedback on the Youth Speak Out and Summit and to outline the draft Youth Action Plan. At this meeting, Council received the report and reconfirmed its best practice model to consult and engage with young people. Council also resolved that a further report  be provided after receiving input into the draft Youth Action Plan through further consultations with young people involved in the original forums as well as others prior to the adoption of the Plan.

 

Draft Youth Action Plan Consultations

In response to Council’s resolution from the Policy Review Committee meeting of 7 December 2009, Council officers undertook a planned approach to holding further consultations with young people across Penrith City.

 

The consultations were conducted during May to July 2010 using resources allocated for finalisation of the Youth Action Plan.

 

Council officers conducted consultations with a varied and diverse range of young people across Penrith City. The model used to consult and engage with young people incorporated public space outreach work, streetwork and service/program visits.

 

A survey was developed and participants were provided with an opportunity to self complete the surveys or be interviewed by Council staff. The majority of participants preferred to be interviewed. A copy of the survey questions is provided as Attachment 2 to this report.

 

In addition, all young people that attended the 2009 Youth Speak Out and Summit and provided contact details were given an opportunity to respond to the surveys. Surveys were also posted on Council’s website and emailed to youth services to gain a broad range of responses.

 

The most informative responses were from face to face interviews with young people and experienced youth workers.

 

The survey used during consultations was developed based on the 8 draft strategies that were prioritised from the outcomes of the 2009 Youth Speak Out and Summit consultations. These strategy themes are:

 

·    Consultation with young people

·    Cultural experiences and opportunities

·    Communication and promotional strategies

·    Accessibility of Services to young people

·    Education, Training and Employment opportunities

·    Transport

·    Public Space Issues

·    Safety and Public Amenities.

 

The consultations conducted with young people were extensive and resulted in 219 responses. The consultations were held across 16 separate sites across Penrith City, with Council officers visiting locations where young people hang out.

 

The consultations took place at the following locations:

 

·    Berkshire Park- at the Big Day Out event in May this year

·    Don Bosco Youth Recreation Centre St Marys - Friday night drop in

·    Londonderry Neighbourhood Centre - youth outreach event

·    Mondo – grassed area outside the Joan - Thursday night gathering

·    Westfields Plaza Shopping Centre- Thursday night shopping

·    Job Quest – Links to Learning program

·    Family Planning NSW the Warehouse Youth Health Centre - same sex attracted youth group meeting

·    Jamison Skate Park

·    Glenmore Park Skate Park

·    St Clair Skate Park

·    Cranebrook Skate Park

·    Nepean Youth Accommodation Service - client group

·    NSW Richmond Fellowship and Barnardos - Young Women’s Dual Diagnosis Group

·    Nepean Interyouth Services - client group

·    Youth Speak Out and Summit 2009 participant mailing list

·    Council’s website survey.

 

To use available resources efficiently, Council officers utilised existing opportunities that provided Council with the scope to conduct effective consultations with young people across the City.

 

Council officers endeavoured to reach a broad range of young people and the following information was extracted from the surveys to confirm this occurred. Characteristics of survey participants include:

 

·    Age range - participants consulted with were generally aged from 11 to 22 years old;

·    Gender - a mix of both females and males were represented in the consultations;

·    Culture - young people from a broad range of cultural and language backgrounds were included in the consultations to support a representative response;

·    Sub culture groups - a range of young people that identify with different sub cultures were also consulted including emos, skaters, lads, clubbers, hip hop, hard metal and alternative pop cultures.

 

The incentive to participate in the consultations was to contribute to the further development of Council’s youth engagement strategy and youth action plan. For young people completing the survey, there was also an opportunity to win an iPod 32GB, iTunes vouchers or movie tickets. These prizes were drawn in August 2010.

 

All young people that provided contact details during the consultations in both 2009 and 2010 will be provided with a copy of the final endorsed Penrith Youth Action Plan 2010–2013.

 

 

Consultation Outcomes

This second round of consultations reconfirmed the findings from the consultations held in 2009. In analysing the results from the additional consultations, the eight (8) priority strategy themes were supported. Throughout the survey, young people were given the opportunity to identify any new areas that were not currently prioritised in the draft Youth Action Plan.

 

The following section of the report provides a snap shot of the interview/ survey question under each Youth Action Plan strategy along with a general summary of the responses and specific quotes from young people.

 

STRATEGY 1 – Consultation with young people

An overwhelming majority believed that it was important for Council to consult with young people. Approximately 70% of the respondents were interested in taking part in future Council consultations and provided contact details.

 

Among the comments were:

 

“We are only young but we represent a vast majority of the population. If only the older generation listened as they only hear their own views.” Young person interviewed at the Mondo

 

“We are the future generation of the City. Council needs to know what to put in place.” Young person interviewed at Berkshire Park

 

“So they know what we want not what they like Skater

 

“It promotes a strong relationship and understanding between adults and teenagers.” Same sex attracted young person

 

STRATEGY 2 – Cultural experiences and opportunities

Young people were asked to comment on what activities they wanted to participate in across Penrith City.

 

Overwhelmingly the respondents wanted a safe area where “they could hang out with their friends in a hassle free environment”. The main focus for activities or additional activities are the “Mondo”, Nepean River area and current or additional skate parks. There were also requests for activities in local parks and communities for young people that did not frequent the Penrith City Centre.

 

Anything that is creative gains interest and inspires us to do something” Young person interviewed at the Mondo

 

Across the services and venues involved in consultations, young people identified the need for affordable and accessible drama, art, music and/or dance workshops.

 

“Big Day Out” events and outdoor concerts, especially featuring local artists were high on the priority lists. Also highlighted were art walls, Parkour and hip hop dance activities.

 

 

STRATEGY 3 – Improve communication and promotional activities

The four (4) main ways young people find out what is happening in the Penrith area are:

 

·       Talking to friends

·       Internet/social network sites

·       Local newspapers and advertising

·       “Word of mouth”

 

A number of young people identified schools and local services as their source of information – Fusion, St Clair Youth Centre, the Warehouse, Interyouth, Don Bosco, Centrelink and Barnardos.

 

“Through schools – that’s where we spend most of our time” young person interviewed at Don Bosco

 

Young people identified the best ways Council could promote what is going on for young people in Penrith City.

 

The five (5) communication and promotion activities suggested by young people are:

 

·       Through schools – use school noticeboards and newsletters

·       Flyers and posters (that are interesting, exciting and attractive)

·       Social network sites

·       Local media

·       Noticeboards where young people gather (Skate Parks, Plaza, Youth Centres)

 

“I have never heard about anything except through friends so maybe you need to get the word out more” Same sex attracted young person

 

STRATEGY 4 – Improve accessibility of services to young people

Young people were also asked how they found out about what services are available for young people in the City.

 

The five (5) most common ways that young people find out about services are:

 

·       Friends and family

·       Schools, Counsellors and teachers

·       Local newspapers

·       Internet

·       Posters and flyers

 

          “I don’t find out a lot of information about services for young people. It’s hard to get access” Youth Summit 2009 participant

 

STRATEGY 5 – Strengthen education, training and employment opportunities.

Young people were asked where they would seek assistance if having problems with school, training and/or employment.

 

The majority of respondents identified the following three (3) responses:

 

·         Parents/families

·         Friends

·         School/Teachers/Counsellors/Principal/Year Advisor

 

Other responses include:

 

·         Youth services/Youth workers

·         Internet and Yellow pages

·         Centrelink/Employment Agency

·         Not really sure what help might be needed.

 

The majority of young people indicated they would be interested in accessing Council web based material that provided information on common problems and issues with education and employment.

 

A lot of people don’t know the laws and expectations in jobs” Nepean Youth Accommodation Service respondent

 

Yes (it would be useful) because a lot of teenagers are unsure and confused” Youth Summit 2009 participant

 

“We wouldn’t have to try to do it on our own” Nepean Interyouth Services respondent

 

Web based checklists, links and tips were nominated as the preferred assistance. Easy to read postcards with relevant information was also suggested.

 

STRATEGY 6 – Transport

Issues were raised about learning to drive, specifically the difficulties and costs involved in getting the required 120 learner hours. Driver safety and learner driver awareness training featured quite prominently.

 

Buses were also identified as a main issue. Most young people relied on the buses as their main form of transport if their parents/friends were not available to drive them. The issues raised are:

 

·    The reliability and frequency of the services especially to the rural areas of the City

·    The lack of buses after 7.00pm

·    There are still concerns among some young people about the attitude of some bus drivers.

 

Issues of cost and fares were also raised. The general consensus was that fares were too high and there was a need for a concession structure outside school hours.

 

The majority of young people felt safe on buses but felt there was a lack of security on trains and at railway stations. Penrith, Kingswood and St Marys Stations were particularly noted as unsafe by a number of young people. Travel at night was also a safety concern.

 

       “Train stations don’t feel safe. I never go by myself” young person interviewed at Londonderry

 

STRATEGY 7 – Public Space

Young people were asked where they usually hang out with friends in Penrith City.

 

The majority of responses identified they generally hang out in their local area/suburb. Young people specifically identified the following favourite hangout places:

 

·         Home and friend’s place

·         Shopping Centres or local shops – particularly Westfield Penrith

·         The Mondo between Penrith Plaza and the JSPAC

·         Skate Parks

·         Local parks

·         Nepean River

 

          “There is no where to go without having to spend money” young person in Londonderry

 

Young people were asked to identify any issues they may experience when hanging out with friends. A majority of young people interviewed stated that they felt safer in groups and never went out alone.

 

The interactions between police, security guards and young people were identified as issues in public spaces. While young people commented on the sometimes negative interactions, the majority wanted there to be both a police and security presence. The responses from young people clearly identified that there was a need to improve interactions so any tensions between the parties could be reduced. Specific reference was made about the interactions between young people and police and security at the Mondo.

 

Police and security are usually fine” Mondo respondent

 

“Security guards at shopping centres always moving us on even if we are not doing anything wrong” Same Sex Attracted young person

 

It would be good to have the security talk to us as normal people” Skater

 

Young people expressed a lot of interest in having youth workers and services come to public places and distribute information and/or run activities.

 

STRATEGY 8 – Safety and Public Amenities

The main four (4) safety issues identified by young people are:

 

·       Risk taking behaviour including alcohol and drug abuse and unsafe sex

·       The availability of illegal substances

·       Violent and aggressive behaviour including bullying

·       Lack of safe transport options at night.

 

The following points were identified at specific locations:

 

·         Strangers on Facebook

·        Older men hanging around where young people, both girls and boys congregate

·         Lack of decent lighting at the Mondo

·         Violence at local railway stations.

 

The main four (4) ways to get safety messages to young people are:

 

·         Through the schools

·         Social networking sites

·         Youth events

·         Role models to promote safe behaviour.

 

Summary

Overall, the results from the consultations reinforce that there is a need for an ongoing commitment to identify and develop strategies that address the issues that young people have identified. While it is essential to have clear strategies that provide direction to the Youth Action Plan, it is important that the actions be flexible and able to be adapted to changing needs and groups of young people.  To be effective, actions will also require community and government partnerships and adequate resourcing to promote sustainable outcomes.

 

Council’s Draft Youth Action Plan (YAP) 2010 - 2013

Resulting from the 2009 Youth Speak Out and Summit and 2010 outreach consultations, the revised draft Youth Action Plan (YAP) is provided as Attachment 1 to this report.

 

Resulting from the further round of consultations, the timeframe for the YAP has now been revised. Initially implementation was to occur over the 2010–2012 period. The proposed new timeframe for the YAP is for the years 2010–2013. This allows more time to progress and complete the actions listed in the Action Plan.

 

The YAP incorporates the eight (8) strategy areas that have been identified and prioritised, with additional actions being added following the more recent youth consultations.

 

The majority of the actions listed in the eight (8) strategic areas are to be implemented within existing resources. Where opportunities exist, additional funding through grants will be sought. Other actions require advocacy, co-ordination between levels of government, partnerships within the youth/community sector and collaboration with the private sector.

 

The actions in the YAP are ranked high, medium and low. This ranking is an indicator as to when the action will be advanced. A ranking of high is an action for 2010–11, a medium ranking is for action in 2011–12, and a low ranking is an action for 2012–13. Some of the actions will also require work over more than one year.

 

 

The highest priority areas for implementation include:

 

·    Develop social media networks to communicate with young people

·    Develop postcard series to communicate Council’s direction with the Youth Action Plan to young people

·    Develop opportunities for young people to be involved in the planning and implementation of activities and programs in the Mondo

·    Co-ordinate outreach activities for young people in the Penrith Northern Rural Areas.

 

Once the draft Youth Action Plan 2010–2013 is endorsed, a summary document about the consultation process and the Youth Action Plan will be produced. Also planned for development is a postcard series promoting the YAP and Council’s ongoing commitment to young people in Penrith City. These postcards can also be used to promote local services as well as Youth Week.

 

The outcomes achieved through implementing the Youth Action Plan 2010–2013 will be reported to Council on an annual basis.

 

Conclusion

For a number of years, Council has consistently consulted with young people in the City on a broad range of issues and priorities. Council’s commitment to young people is to use the results from the consultations to better inform the scope and direction of work undertaken to meet the needs of young people in Penrith City. This information is also shared at Penrith Youth Interagency to identify partnerships to progress actions as well as advocacy.

 

Council’s approach to consultation has been developed from advice from young people during consultations and is in line with the best practice recommendations by the NSW Premiers Department memorandum outlining best practice for engaging with young people.

 

In July 2008, Council endorsed the holding of a Youth Speak Out and Summit in March and May 2009.

 

Following the completion of the Youth Summit consultations with young people, a draft Youth Action Plan was developed. A report on the Summit and a draft Youth Action Plan was presented to Council’s Policy Review Committee meeting on 7 December 2009. Council resolved at this meeting to seek further input from young people including those that had participated in the Summit consultations to confirm the draft Youth Action Plan actions.

 

Council officers have now completed the second round of consultations and have used the information to revise the draft Youth Action Plan 2010–2013. This report summarises the outcomes of these additional consultations.

 

The consultations have reinforced the strategy themes and actions that were included in the initial draft Plan. Further actions have been added as a result of feedback from young people. It is expected that the majority of actions can be implemented within existing resources. Where opportunities exist, additional funding through grants will be sought. The timeframe for implementation has also been revised and the draft Youth Action Plan 2010–2013 is submitted to Council for endorsement.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Youth Action Plan 2010-2013 - Outcome of Further Consultations be received

2.     Council endorse the Youth Action Plan 2010–2013 at Attachment 1 for implementation.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1. View

Penrith City Council Youth Action Plan 2010 - 2013

6 Pages

Appendix

2. View

Youth Action Plan Survey Questions

2 Pages

Appendix

  


Policy Review Committee Meeting

30 August 2010

Appendix 1 - Penrith City Council Youth Action Plan 2010 - 2013

 

 

 







Policy Review Committee Meeting

30 August 2010

Appendix 2 - Youth Action Plan Survey Questions

 

 

 


 


 

 

 

 

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A Green City

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

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A Liveable City

 

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3        Draft Public Spaces Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) - Code of Practice

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting

30 August 2010

A Liveable City

 

 

 

3

Draft Public Spaces Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) - Code of Practice   

 

Compiled by:                Olivia Kidon, Community Safety Co-ordinator

Yvonne Perkins, Public Domain Amenity and Safety Manager

Authorised by:             Yvonne Perkins, Public Domain Amenity and Safety Manager   

 

Objective

Our public spaces encourage safe and healthy communities

Community Outcome

A City with safe, inviting parks and public spaces (18)

Strategic Response

Provide safe, well-maintained public spaces and parks (18.1)

     

 

Executive Summary

Penrith City Council, together with local police and key community stakeholders, is committed to fostering a local environment which is safe to live in, work in, and visit.

 

Public Spaces Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) aims to deter criminal activity, antisocial behaviour, minimise crime levels, reduce fear of crime in the community and assist with detection and prosecution of offenders.

 

In an effort to minimise criminal activity and antisocial behaviour, CCTV cameras have been installed in identified priority public space locations in the Penrith Local Government Area (LGA). These locations have been identified as areas requiring increased levels of formal surveillance to deter criminal activity and enhance community safety.

 

The installation of CCTV is only one component of Council’s broader strategy to minimise crime and improve safety of public spaces in the LGA.  To support the installation of CCTV in public spaces, the Draft Public Spaces Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) Code of Practice has been developed to provide a policy framework and set of underlying principles to assist in the implementation, management, operation and review of the CCTV Program.

 

Pending adoption by Council, this Code of Practice will be a public document outlining Council’s guidelines for the effective management, operation and monitoring of all CCTV cameras that are under the ownership, management and control of Penrith City Council.

 

The Draft Code of Practice is based on relevant State and Federal legislation and has been developed in accordance with the NSW Government Policy Statement and Guidelines for the Establishment and Implementation of CCTV in Public Places. The Draft Code of Practice reflects all relevant legislative requirements for the establishment and monitoring of CCTV systems in public spaces. This includes, but is not limited to, the Privacy and Personal Information Protection Act 1998, Workplace Surveillance Act 2005 and Local Government Act 1993.

 

The report seeks Council endorsement of the attached Draft Public Spaces Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) Code of Practice. This will provide a clear policy framework for the operation of all CCTV cameras under the ownership and control of Penrith City Council in accordance with relevant legislative guidelines.

 

Pending endorsement by Council, Local Area Agreements will be made with Penrith and St Marys Local Area Commands as key partners of the program.

 

Background

In recent years, advances in technology and concerns for safety have seen an increase in the use of CCTV as a tool by local councils to assist in the detection and prevention of criminal activity and enhance the safety of identified public spaces. A number of councils have now implemented CCTV programs in public spaces as part of their broader program of community safety and crime prevention initiatives.

 

Research suggests that on its own CCTV is not an effective long-term crime prevention strategy, but rather must be used as part of a coordinated response to address identified crime and safety issues.

 

The complexities of establishing a CCTV program, cost of installation, management and maintenance and legal matters requires that a clear policy framework be developed to support the program outlining the aims, protocols and underlying principles.

 

A Draft Public Spaces Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) Code of Practice has been developed giving consideration to the above issues.  This Code of Practice, once adopted, will be accompanied by a set of Standard Operating Procedures for staff to follow in the operation and management of the CCTV Program.

 

Installation of CCTV cameras in public spaces in the Penrith LGA

Whilst Penrith City Council has previously operated a number of CCTV cameras to safeguard Council property, including the Civic Centre, Queen St Centre, Joan Sutherland Performing Arts Centre, Lewers Gallery and Kingswood Depot, CCTV cameras had not previously been used to provide surveillance of public spaces in the Penrith LGA.

 

In 2008, after lengthy investigations into the protocols of installing CCTV in public spaces, works commenced to install public space CCTV cameras at Judges Place Car Park, Penrith.

 

This location was chosen after a Community Safety Audit held in 2007 indicated that the car park had minimal levels of passive surveillance. The car park had reported incidents of motor vehicle theft, malicious damage and antisocial behaviour. At this time there was also strong representation from businesses within the Penrith City Centre and Penrith Police for enhanced security measures within the car park.

 

Judges Place Car Park was determined to be an ideal first site for the installation of public space CCTV cameras. A number of cameras were installed to cover all levels of the car park including entry/exit points and external walkways. Signage was installed to notify the public that CCTV cameras are in use. 

 

The cameras are linked to a central system and can be viewed from the Civic Centre. The cameras are not monitored, but rather footage is recorded to an external hard drive and retained for a period of approximately 21 days (recording cycle).

 

Since the installation of the cameras in Judges Place Car Park, staff have received 8 (eight) requests from Police for footage associated with criminal investigations.

 

Cameras have also been installed on the exterior of the Joan Sutherland Performing Arts Centre building to provide surveillance to areas of the “green space”.  Cameras at this location were installed in response to consultations with key stakeholders regarding community safety concerns at this location. Similarly these cameras are not monitored, but rather footage is recorded and retained for approximately 21 days (recording cycle) in the event that it is required by Police to assist with investigations into a criminal event.  To date Council staff have received 4 (four) requests from Police for footage.

 

While the Draft Code of Practice has been in development, in the meantime the operation of the cameras and the retrieval of Police requested footage has been managed in accordance with the NSW Government Policy Statement and Guidelines for the Establishment and Implementation of CCTV in Public Places.

 

Development of the Draft Public Spaces CCTV Code of Practice

The Draft Public Spaces CCTV Code of Practice has been developed to support the effective implementation, operation and management of the Public Spaces CCTV network.

 

The Draft Code of Practice outlines the aims, objectives and basic standards in accordance with which Penrith City Council’s CCTV network will be operated. Once adopted by Council, the Code of Practice will be the primary policy document under which all CCTV cameras under the ownership, management and control of Penrith City Council will be operated.

 

The Draft Code of Practice also outlines an evaluation mechanism for the CCTV program, to ensure that it is delivered in accordance with stated aims, objectives and key principles.

 

Key principles of the Public Spaces CCTV Program

As outlined in the Draft Code of Practice the following principles will apply:

 

-     The CCTV program will be operated within applicable legislative requirements and only for the purposes for which it is established or which are subsequently agreed in accordance with the Code of Practice.

 

-     The CCTV Program will only be used to identify crimes occurring within the area covered by the Program.

 

-     The CCTV Program will be operated with due regard to the privacy and civil liberties of individual members of the public.

 

-     In the operation of the CCTV Program public interest will be recognised by ensuring the security and integrity of operational procedures.

 

-     Penrith City Council has primary responsibility for compliance with the purposes and objectives of the CCTV Program; the maintenance, management and security of the Program; and the protection of the interests of the public in relation to the Program.

 

-     As a partner to Penrith City Council’s CCTV Program, the NSW Police Force will act in accordance with the Code of Practice.

 

-     The public will be provided with clear and easily accessible information in relation to the operation of the CCTV Program.

 

-     Regular review and evaluation of the CCTV Program will be undertaken to identify whether the program’s aims and objectives are being achieved.

 

-     Information recorded will not exceed that necessary to fulfil the purposes of the CCTV Program.

 

-     Information will be obtained in accordance with the privacy and confidentiality provisions of the Code of Practice.

 

-     Access to the CCTV monitoring equipment shall be restricted to authorised staff and will be protected from unauthorised access.

 

-     The retention of, and access to recorded material, will be only for the purposes provided by the Code of Practice.

 

-     Recorded material will be retained for 21 days (recording cycle) unless required in relation to the investigation of crime or for court proceedings.

 

The NSW Government Information (Public Access) Act

 

The Government Information (Public Access) Act 2009 (the GIPA Act) came into force on 1 July 2010. This Act replaced the Freedom of Information Act 1989 and Section 12 of the Local Government Act 1993.

 

As stated earlier in the report, the Draft Code of Practice allows for NSW Police to obtain footage in relation to a criminal investigation. Advice was sought concerning Council’s obligation to provide footage for requests received under the GIPA Act. Section 14 of the GIPA Act provides considerations that may be taken into account under this Act as public interest considerations against disclosure. 

 

Maddocks Solicitors advised that a public interest consideration against disclosure of information exists where the disclosure of the information could reasonably be expected to “endanger, or prejudice any system or procedure for protecting, the life, health or safety of any person” and “endanger the security of, or prejudice any system or procedure for protecting, any place, property or vehicle”.

 

Any application for access to CCTV footage under the GIPA Act would be dealt with on its merits.

 

 

 

Conclusion

 

The Draft Code of Practice has been developed in accordance with the NSW Government Policy Statement and Guidelines for the Establishment and Implementation of CCTV in Public Places. These guidelines were developed by the Premier’s Council on Crime Prevention to assist local councils and other organisations with the implementation of public space CCTV programs. Guidelines and standards are included in the Draft Code of Practice to ensure confidentiality, adherence to correct procedures and to safeguard the privacy of all persons authorised to manage the CCTV system.

 

Pending adoption by Council, all authorised operational staff will be made fully aware of the contents of the Code of Practice. This is particularly important as the credibility of the program relies upon complete understanding and full knowledge of correct policies and procedures. 

 

Consultations were also conducted with other councils who have developed policies and procedures relating to CCTV programs, including Fairfield City Council, which provided information to assist in the development of the Draft Code of Practice and Standard Operating Procedures.

 

As key partners of the program, Penrith and St Marys Local Area Commands have also been consulted during the development of these policies, and Local Area Agreements have been prepared between Council and local Police to outline the responsibilities of each party in relation to the management of the Program. Pending adoption of the Draft Code of Practice by Council, each of the Local Area Agreements will be signed and implemented.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Draft Public Spaces Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) - Code of Practice be received.

2.     Council adopt the Draft Public Spaces Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) Program Code of Practice.

 

3.     All CCTV cameras under the ownership and operation of Penrith City Council be operated in accordance with the Public Spaces Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) Program Code of Practice.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1. View

Draft Public Spaces Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) Code of Practice

13 Pages

Appendix

  


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Public Spaces

Closed Circuit Television (CCTV)

 

 

CODE OF PRACTICE

 

 

 

 


TABLE OF CONTENTS

1.   OVERVIEW …………………………………………………………………………………

3

2.   PRELIMINARY INFORMATION …………………………………………………………..

2.1.    Introduction

2.2.    Key Principles

2.3.    Aims of CCTV Program

2.4.    Ownership of the CCTV Program

2.5.    Operational Boundaries

2.6.    Confidentiality

2.7.    Media Enquiries

2.8.    Public Information

2.9.    Breaches of the Code of Practice

2.10.  Review and/or Changes to the CCTV Program or Code of Practice

 

4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3.   SYSTEM INFORMATION ………………………………………………………………….

3.1.    System Description

3.2.    Camera Design

3.3.    Camera Locations

3.4.    CCTV Monitoring Unit

 

8

 

 

 

 

4.   OPERATIONAL INFORMATION ………………………………………………………….

4.1. Authority

4.2. Primary Duties

4.3. Use of Equipment

4.4. Monitoring Screen

4.5. Equipment Operating Manuals

4.6. In Case of an Event or Criminal Incident

4.7. Storage & Security of CCTV Footage

4.8. Release of CCTV Footage and/or Recorded Material

4.9. Requests for CCTV Footage by the NSW Police Force

4.10.  Viewing of CCTV Footage on Control Monitor

4.11.  Release & Security of CCTV Hard Drive

4.12.  Requisition Forms

4.13.  Destruction of Recorded CCTV Footage

4.14.  Loss or Damage of Recorded CCTV Footage

4.15.  Equipment Failure

4.16.  Maintenance of CCTV Equipment

4.17.  Public Information

 

9

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5.   AUDIT COMMITTEE ……………………………………………………………………….

16

6.   EVALUATION OF CCTV PROGRAM …………………………………………………….

17

 

1.   OVERVIEW

 

 

1.1       This document has been compiled as the Code of Practice for the Penrith City Council Public Spaces CCTV Program.

 

1.2       This Code of Practice contains the aims, objectives and basic standards in accordance with which Penrith City Council’s CCTV Program will be operated.

 

1.3       Guidelines and standards required to ensure confidentiality, correct procedures and privacy of all persons authorised to manage the CCTV system are also included.

 

1.4       This Code of Practice will be supported by a set of Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) for authorised staff to manage the system. 

 

1.5       Authorised monitoring and operational staff must be fully aware of the contents of this Code of Practice. The credibility of the program relies upon complete understanding and full knowledge of correct policies and procedures. 

 

1.6       It is critical that all equipment relating to the program are used for their identified purpose.

 

1.7       This Code of Practice has been prepared by Penrith City Council, utilising the New South Wales Policy Statement and Guidelines for Establishment and Implementation of Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) in Public Places.     

 

1.8       This Code of Practice has been developed to ensure compliance with all relevant State and Federal legislation and policy guidelines pertaining to the use of CCTV systems in public places. This includes, but is not limited to:

 

i.          Privacy and Personal Information Protection Act 1998;

ii.         Workplace Video Surveillance Act 2005;

iii.         Local Government Act 1993.

 

 

2.   PRELIMINARY INFORMATION

 

 

2.1 Introduction

 

2.1.1    Penrith City Council, together with Local Police and key stakeholders, is committed to fostering a local environment which is safe to live in, work in and visit.

 

2.1.2    In an effort to minimise criminal and anti-social behaviour across the City, Penrith City Council has developed the Public Spaces CCTV Program.

 

2.1.3    The CCTV Program forms one component of Council’s broader strategy to minimise crime and improve safety in the Penrith Local Government Area (LGA).

 

2.1.4    This Code of Practice is based on State and Federal law, and reflects all relevant legislative requirements for the establishment and monitoring of CCTV systems in Public Places.

 

2.1.5    This Code of Practice is supported by Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) for the effective management, operation and monitoring of the CCTV Program.

 

 

2.2 Key Principles

 

The Code of Practice is based on the following guiding principles:

 

2.2.1    The CCTV Program will be operated fairly, within applicable legislative requirements and only for the purposes for which it is established or which are subsequently agreed in accordance with this Code of Practice.

 

2.2.2    The CCTV Program will only be used to identify crimes occurring within the area covered by the Program.

 

2.2.3    The CCTV Program will be operated with due regard to the privacy and civil liberties of individual members of the public, including the rights to freedom of religious and political expression and assembly.

 

2.2.4    The public interest in the operation of the CCTV Program will be recognised by ensuring the security and integrity of operational procedures.

 

2.2.5    Penrith City Council has primary responsibility for compliance with the purposes and objectives of the CCTV Program, the maintenance, management and security of the Program, and the protection of the interests of the public in relation to the Program.

 

2.2.6    As a partner to the Penrith City Council CCTV Program, the NSW Police Force will act in accordance with the Code of Practice.

 

2.2.7    The public will be provided with clear and easily accessible information in relation to the operation of the CCTV Program.

 

2.2.8    Regular review and evaluation of the CCTV Program will be undertaken to identify whether the program’s aims and objectives are being achieved.

 

2.2.9    Information recorded will not exceed that necessary to fulfil the purposes of the CCTV Program.

 

2.2.10  Information will be obtained fairly and in accordance with the privacy and confidentiality provisions of this Code of Practice.

 

2.2.11  Access to the CCTV monitoring equipment shall be restricted to authorised staff and will be protected from unauthorised access.

 

2.2.12  The retention of, and access to recorded material will be only for the purposes provided by this Code of Practice. Recorded material will be retained for 21 days (recording cycle) unless required in relation to the investigation of crime or for court proceedings.

 

2.3 Aims of CCTV Program

 

The primary aims of the CCTV Program are to:

 

2.3.1    Enhance safety and minimise crime in the Penrith City area;

 

2.3.2    Reduce fear of crime in the community;

 

2.3.3    Assist with detection and prosecution of offenders;

 

2.3.4    Promote a safer environment for those people who live in, work in and visit the City of Penrith.

 

 

2.4 Ownership of the CCTV Program

 

2.4.1    Penrith City Council is the owner of the CCTV Program.

 

2.4.2    Penrith City Council is responsible for the development, implementation, monitoring and auditing of the CCTV Program as part of its broader community safety program.

 

2.4.3    Penrith City Council retains ownership of and has copyright in all equipment, footage, images and documentation pertaining to the Program.

 

2.4.4    Penrith City Council will be responsible for the introduction and implementation of the Code of Practice and all supporting  procedures relating to the CCTV Program.

 

2.4.5    Penrith City Council will consult with and provide relevant information to the public about the operation of the CCTV Program and about any proposed changes to the Code of Practice.

 

2.4.6    The NSW Police Force is a key partner in the CCTV Program. A Local Area Agreement will be developed and entered into by Penrith City Council and the St Marys and Penrith Local Area Commands of NSW Police Force outlining the respective roles of each party in relation to the CCTV Program. 

2.5 Operational Boundaries

 

2.5.1    For the purposes of definition, the area of operation shall be taken to be locations within the Penrith Local Government Area identified as having a higher crime risk or specific need for CCTV.

 

 

2.6 Confidentiality

 

2.6.1    Under no circumstances is any technical information relating to the CCTV Program including the number of authorised staff, camera capability, police procedures, etc., to be provided to any unauthorised person.

 

2.6.2    It is essential that all authorised staff members are aware of the need to refrain from disclosing or offering opinions, recommendations or remarks, especially “off the record”, to any third person, unless authorised by Penrith City Council.

 

2.6.3    Subject to the provisions of any legislative requirement, all requests for CCTV footage and Police inquiries are to remain confidential.

 

 

2.7   Media Enquiries

 

2.7.1    Staff shall direct all media enquiries relating to the CCTV Program to Council’s Media Liaison Officer.

 

2.7.2    Under no circumstances is any information to be provided to the media by unauthorised staff.

 

2.7.3    Media enquiries relating directly to Police matters should be directed to the relevant Local Area Commander.

 

 

2.8   Public Information

 

2.8.1    Clearly visible signs that CCTV cameras are operating will be displayed at the perimeter of the area covered by the system and at other key points. These signs will:

 

i.    Inform the public that cameras are in operation;

ii.    Allow people entering the area to make a reasonable approximation of the area covered by the system;

iii.   Identify Penrith City Council as the owner of the system and give a telephone number and address should further information be required.

 

2.8.2    Inquiries in relation to the Penrith City Council’s CCTV Program and its operation can be made in writing to:

 

The General Manager

Penrith City Council

PO Box 60

PENRITH NSW 2751

 

 

2.9   Breaches of the Code of Practice

 

2.9.1    Prime responsibility for ensuring adherence to this Code of Practice rests with Penrith City Council. This responsibility includes ensuring any breaches of the Code are investigated and remedied to the extent that breaches are within Council’s capacity to remedy.

 

2.9.2    The Privacy and Personal Information Act 1998 authorises Privacy NSW to receive and investigate complaints about alleged violations of privacy. Any member of the public is entitled to lodge a complaint with Privacy NSW. Penrith City Council will cooperate with the investigation of any complaint by Privacy NSW. The contact details for Privacy NSW are as follows:

 

Privacy NSW

PO Box A2122

SYDNEY SOUTH  NSW 1235

Tel: (02) 9268 5588

Fax: (02) 9268 5501

 

 

2.10 Review and/or changes to the CCTV Program and/or Code of Practice

 

2.10.1  The CCTV Program and Code of Practice shall be reviewed on an annual basis.

 

2.10.2  The review is to be undertaken by the Penrith City Council Public Domain Amenity & Safety Manager, in conjunction with NSW Police Force and other relevant stakeholders. 

 

2.10.3  A major change to the CCTV Program or to the Code of Practice will take place only after consultation with relevant stakeholders and upon the agreement of Penrith City Council. A report shall be submitted to Council detailing a major change to current policy and procedures manual if this were to occur. A major change is such as will have a significant impact upon the operation of the system or the Code of Practice for example, a change to the aims of the Program or a proposal to install further cameras.

 

3      SYSTEM INFORMATION

 

3.1   System Description

 

3.1.1    The CCTV Program involves a number of cameras installed at a number of locations throughout the City. 

 

3.1.2    Live and/or recorded footage is able to be retrieved by authorised Penrith City Council staff. All recorded footage is retained for 21 days unless required in relation to the investigation of a crime or for court proceedings.

 

3.1.3    Cameras are installed in areas within the public areas of Penrith City area that have been identified as being subject to a high incidence of crime and/or antisocial behaviour. These locations are determined on the basis of crime statistics provided by the NSW Police Force and other statistical data. Social, environmental and commercial considerations are also taken into account.

 

3.1.4    ‘Dummy’ cameras will not be used.

 

 

4      OPERATIONAL INFORMATION

 

4.1 Authority

 

4.1.1    Staff authorised for the operation, monitoring and retrieval of recorded footage and materials of the CCTV Program shall undertake their duties under the authority of Penrith City Council.

 

4.1.2    Procedures will be put in place to ensure that access to the CCTV monitoring equipment is restricted to authorised operating staff and that equipment is protected from unauthorised access.

 

4.1.3    Operators of camera equipment will act in accordance with the highest levels of probity.

 

4.1.4    The circumstances in which Police or other authorised persons are able to access recorded materials and footage will be carefully controlled and outlined in the Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs). 

 

 

4.2 Primary Duties

 

4.2.1    A set of SOPs supplement this Code of Practice, and provide clear instructions for authorised staff on all aspects of the operation of the program including duties, responsibilities and procedures. These SOPs will be based on the Code of Practice, to ensure adherence to the principles and purposes on which the CCTV Program is based.

 

4.2.2    Authorised Penrith City Council Staff will be responsible for the retrieval and management of the CCTV program.

 

4.2.3    The prime duties and responsibilities of authorised staff are, but not limited to:

 

i.    Operation and maintenance of the CCTV equipment and software;

ii.    Retrieval of footage and other recorded materials of the CCTV system;

iii.   Respond to requests from Police relating to incidents and recorded material/footage in accordance with the Local Area Agreement;

iv.   Adherence to policies, rules of conduct and procedures;

v.   Undertaking basic maintenance and housekeeping;

vi.   Reporting technical problems affecting the equipment to the nominated maintenance and service contractor appointed by Penrith City Council.

 

 

4.3 Use of Equipment

 

4.3.1    Authorised staff shall use or maintain all equipment in an acceptable manner at all times and shall report immediately any damage, deficiency or deformity discovered.

 

4.3.2    Equipment used for the CCTV Program shall be used in accordance with the Code of Practice and SOP.

 

4.3.3    All authorised staff will be trained in the use of all equipment in accordance with Penrith City Council’s SOP for the CCTV Program.

 

4.3.4    Authorised staff shall maintain the highest level of protection and care whilst using the equipment and property and shall take all prudent and reasonable actions necessary to protect the system against deterioration, abuse, misuse, negligence, malicious damage and vandalism.

 

4.4 Monitoring Screen

 

4.4.1    The monitoring screen is the primary point for viewing and retrieval of footage and performing CCTV system checks.

 

4.4.2    The monitoring screen shall only be accessed and utilised by authorised staff. Access to unauthorised persons will be restricted.

 

 

4.5 Equipment Operating Manuals

 

4.5.1    Equipment operating manuals are for the use of authorised staff and maintenance staff only. The manual must not be copied or released to any third party.

 

 

4.6 In Case of an Event or Criminal Incident

 

4.6.1    In the event that an authorised staff member observes footage and/or recorded materials which are considered to be unsafe or suspicious, the staff member will:

 

i.     Commence real time recording of the event (if not already being recorded in real time);

ii.    Refer the incident as soon as possible to their supervisor;

iii.    Notify the Police as to the circumstances of any criminal event;

iv.   Ensure footage is secured, saved and marked appropriately in the event that it is required for legal purposes;

v.    Complete an Incident Report Form.

 

4.6.2    For the purposes of definition, a criminal incident is one which involves, but is not limited to, one or more of the following:

 

i.    An assault;

ii.    A brawl;

iii.   All criminal events such as drug trafficking, break enter and steal offences, malicious damage to property;

iv.   Motor Vehicle accident;

v.   Immediate safety hazards or risks;

vi.   Any observations of any dangerous activities undertaken by any person;

 

4.6.3    Where the authorised staff member has requested the assistance of the Police or reported a safety hazard or risk, an Incident Report is to be submitted to the Public Domain Amenity & Safety Manager (PDASM).

 

4.6.4    Incident Reports are also to be submitted where due to circumstances the authorised staff member is of the opinion that such events may be of significance or should be brought to the attention of the PDASM or their authorised representative.

 

4.6.5    When compiling Incident Reports the authorised staff member shall ensure that the exact location, time, date and relevant particulars pertaining to the event are included in the Incident Report Form.

 

4.6.6    The Incident Report is also to include the actions taken by the authorised staff member, including notification to the Police and/or other emergency authorities, if applicable.

 

 

4.7 Storage & Security of CCTV Footage

 

4.7.1    All recorded CCTV footage will be kept for a maximum of twenty-one (21) days (recording cycle). After this period, footage will be overwritten.

 

4.7.2    Each authorised officer shall complete the necessary paperwork in the CCTV footage log each time a copy is made to disk from the hard drive.

 

4.7.3    All disks of recorded CCTV footage are to be kept in a securely locked cupboard, with access restricted to authorised personnel.

 

 

4.8 Release of CCTV Footage and/or Recorded Material

 

4.8.1    Access to CCTV footage and materials will only take place in compliance with the needs of police in connection with the investigation of crime and/or if necessary for the purposes of legal proceedings.

 

4.8.2    CCTV footage and/or recorded materials shall only be released to authorised persons of the Penrith City Council or New South Wales Police Force where there is a specific requirement to verify an incident or event that has occurred.

 

4.8.3    Where any other organisation or individual makes a request for CCTV footage (either verbally or in writing) the authorised staff member shall record all particulars in relation to the request and complete an Incident Form.

 

4.8.4    All requests for CCTV footage shall be recorded in the “Request for CCTV Footage Log Book” and all relevant information completed.

 

4.8.5    A copy of the requested footage is only to be released whereby a Requisition Form has been completed and submitted by the Local Area Commander or a NSW Police Officer who has been given delegated authority by the Local Area Commander to request CCTV footage, and approved by an authorised Council officer. Authorised Council staff are:

 

i.    Penrith City Council Community Safety Systems and Administration Support Officer;

ii.    Penrith City Council Community Safety Support and Administration Officer;

iii.   Penrith City Council Community Safety Coordinator;

iv.   Penrith City Council Public Domain, Amenity & Safety Manager;                   

v.   Penrith City Council Group Manager ~ City Presentation;

vi.   Penrith City Council General Manager.

 

4.8.6    Where a request has been made for the holding of any footage for possible evidentiary purposes has been approved, the authorised staff member shall comply ensuring that appropriate forms are completed.

 

4.8.7    Prior to release of any requested CCTV footage, the authorised staff member shall ensure that all particulars required in the Requisition Form have been included.

 

4.8.8    Completing all details, the authorised staff member shall make one (1) copy of relevant footage requested and clearly label the disk as “on hold for collection”. The disk shall be securely stored. 

 

4.8.9    Requests for CCTV footage must be made within twenty-one (21) days of the event/incident. Police should advise Council of an approximate timeframe that footage will be collected and of any delays in collecting the footage should they arise. A copy will be retained for Penrith City Council records.

 

4.8.10  Upon collection of requested CCTV footage, authorised staff member shall ensure that all particulars pertaining to the footage record log have been entered and the authorised person has signed for the acceptance of such footage.

 

4.8.11  Where there is insufficient information contained within the Requisition Form, the authorised staff member shall not release such CCTV footage until such information has been provided.

 

4.8.12  Where a dispute arises, the authorised staff member shall make immediate contact with either of the following:

 

i.    Penrith City Council Community Safety Coordinator;

ii.    Penrith City Council Public Domain Amenity & Safety Manager; or

iii.   Penrith City Council Group Manager ~ City Presentation.

 

4.8.13  All records will be subject to random inspection by the Audit Team (refer Section 5) and/or Council’s Internal Auditor.

 

4.8.14  Where a request for CCTV footage is made by way of a formal access application under the Government Information (Public Access) Act 2009, the application will be assessed on its merits.

 

4.9 Viewing of CCTV Footage on Control Monitor

 

4.9.1    Viewing of CCTV footage on the control monitor is restricted to authorised staff only.

 

4.9.2    Under no circumstances are unauthorised persons allowed to view CCTV footage from the control monitor.

 

4.9.3   Prior to allowing an authorised person to view CCTV footage the staff member shall record the person(s) identity, department, contact details and reasons for viewing the footage in the CCTV record log. 

 

4.10         Release and Security of CCTV Hard Drive

 

4.10.1  The CCTV hard drive of the CCTV system can only be released where a court subpoena has been issued on Penrith City Council.

 

4.10.2  An authorised officer from Penrith City Council will notify the PDASM that a subpoena has been received for the hard drive as a ‘master copy’ of CCTV footage. 

 

4.10.3  The request will be recorded on a ‘Request for CCTV Footage Form’.

 

4.11         Requisition Forms

 

4.11.1  Prior to release of any requested CCTV footage, the authorised staff member shall ensure that all particulars required in the Requisition Form have been included.

 

4.11.2  All Requisition Forms supplied requesting access to CCTV footage are to be referenced and retained.

 

4.11.3  The time and date of issue is to be included on the Requisition Form by the authorised staff member, who will also sign his/her name as being on duty at the time.

 

 

4.12         Destruction of Recorded CCTV Footage

 

4.12.1  Disks of recorded CCTV footage may only be destroyed when authorised by the PDASM, in writing.

 

4.12.2  Any CCTV footage authorised to be destroyed shall be contained within a sealed security bag and be destroyed in the presence of a authorised officer of Penrith City Council.

 

4.13         Loss or Damage of Recorded CCTV Footage

 

4.13.1  In the event that disks and/or records of footage become damaged or lost for whatever reason, the authorised staff member shall immediately inform the  PDASM, Penrith City Council.

 

4.13.2  The authorised staff member shall, in addition to informing the PDASM, submit an Incident Report Form as soon as possible setting out all details as to the cause and nature of such damage or loss.

 

 

4.14         Equipment Failure

 

4.14.1  Where any item of CCTV equipment is found to be defective, has failed, or is not working in accordance with its intended purpose, in addition to submitting an Incident Report Form, the PDASM is to be contacted immediately, whether or not the failure is deemed to be of an urgent nature or not.

 

4.14.2  Where such failure or repair is deemed to be of an urgent nature, in the absence of the PDASM, the authorised repairer/contractor shall be contacted immediately.

 

 

4.15         Maintenance of CCTV Equipment

 

4.15.1  CCTV equipment will be maintained by the authorised contracted company. The appointed contractor will work under the direct supervision of an authorised Council Officer.

 

4.15.2  All field visits by maintenance staff must be approved in advance by an authorised Council Officer.

 

4.15.3  Staff shall never authorise the undertaking or request of work without written consent of the PDASM.

 

4.15.4  At any time that works are performed upon the system, including minor works, authorised staff are to perform a quality control check of all recording and camera equipment on completion of the works.

 

 

4.16         Complaints Received by the Public

 

4.16.1  An Incident Report Form shall be completed by staff upon receiving a complaint from a member of the public regarding any aspect of the CCTV Program.

 

4.16.2  Persons making a complaint to Council regarding the CCTV Program should be advised that they can lodge an official complaint to Council in writing.

 

4.16.3  When receiving a complaint via telephone, it is essential that relevant information is obtained, including the name, contact telephone number, address and description of the issue/incident.

 

4.16.4  Where the telephone call relates criminal or immediate safety issues, staff shall ensure that relevant authorities have been notified and that the date and time of notification is recorded.

 

4.16.5  Council will investigate all official complaints by the public in relation to the CCTV Program and will provide a timely response to all enquiries in accordance with Council policy.

 

5    AUDIT TEAM

 

5.1 Aims of the Audit Team

 

5.1.1    To provide an independent overview of the CCTV Program and ensure that the system is operated in a manner, which promotes ethical use of equipment/materials to protect the privacy of the general community.

 

5.1.2    The audit team shall consist of the following persons:

 

i.    Penrith City Council authorised representative;

ii.    Penrith and St Marys Local Area Command representative of NSW Police;

iii.   Representative (non Council/Police) from the Penrith Valley Community Safety Partnership.

 

5.1.3    The Penrith City Council representative shall chair the audit inspection.

5.1.4    As an absolute minimum, representatives from Penrith City Council, Penrith and St Marys Local Area Command and one (1) other representative are to attend each and every audit inspection.

 

5.1.5    Auditing of the CCTV Program shall be undertaken on an annual basis.

 

5.1.6    Each member of the audit team should be conversant with the Code of Practice and supporting Procedures relevant to the Program.

 

5.1.7    The audit inspection shall include as a minimum:

 

i.    Review of all requests for CCTV footage within the period;

ii.    Review of Incident Report Forms

iii.   Review of CCTV footage storage provisions and procedures,

iv.   Review of CCTV footage destruction provisions,

v.   Review of compliance with all procedures and documentation as required.

 

5.1.8    To protect the privacy of the community, no member of the Audit Committee will have the right to release information gathered as part of the audit process to any individual/organisation.

 

5.1.9    CCTV footage that is considered to breach the privacy of an individual or indicate misuse of the system is to be placed into the custody of the Public Officer of Penrith City Council.

 

5.1.10  The audit team shall provide a written report to the General Manager, Penrith City Council within twenty-one (21) days of carrying out an audit, setting out any discrepancies or deficiencies uncovered as part of the audit.

 

5.1.11  The General Manager, Penrith City Council shall, upon receiving such report, commence measures and actions as relevant to remedy such deficiencies or inadequacies and protect the privacy of the general community.

 

5.1.12  The Audit Team shall provide a written report on the operation of the CCTV system to each of the Audit Team members on an annual basis.

 

6    EVALUATION OF THE CCTV PROGRAM

 

6.1  Penrith City Council will continuously monitor the operation of the CCTV Program and implementation of this Code of Practice, in conjunction with the NSW Police Service.

 

6.2  Penrith City Council is responsible for ensuring that the CCTV Program is meeting the aims and objectives as outlined in Section 2 of this Code of Practice.

 

6.3  Evaluation will be conducted according to independent established criteria to measure the effectiveness of the Program.

 

6.4  Evaluation of the CCTV Program will include as a minimum:

 

i.     Assessment of its impact upon crime;

ii.     Assessment of its impact upon neighbouring areas;

iii.    The views of the public on the operation of the program;

iv.    Operation of the Code of Practice and SOPs;

v.    Whether the purposes for which the Program was established still exist.

 

6.5  The results of the evaluation will be taken into account in the future functioning, management and operation of the Program.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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A Vibrant City

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled