18 October 2010

 

Dear Councillor,

In pursuance of the provisions of the Local Government Act, 1993 and the Regulations thereunder, notice is hereby given that a POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING of Penrith City Council is to be held in the Passadena Room, Civic Centre, 601 High Street, Penrith on Monday 18 October 2010 at 7:30PM.

Attention is directed to the statement accompanying this notice of the business proposed to be transacted at the meeting.

Yours faithfully

 

 

Alan Stoneham

General Manager

 

BUSINESS

 

1.           LEAVE OF ABSENCE

Leave of absence has been granted to:

Councillor Jim Aitken OAM - 14 October 2010 to 6 November 2010 inclusive.

Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM - 14 October 2010 to 6 November 2010 inclusive.

Councillor Mark Davies - 14 October 2010 to 25 October 2010 inclusive.

 

2.           APOLOGIES

 

3.           CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES

Policy Review Committee Meeting - 13 September 2010.

 

4.           DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

Pecuniary Interest (The Act requires Councillors who declare a pecuniary interest in an item to leave the meeting during discussion of that item)

Non-Pecuniary Conflict of Interest – Significant and Less than Significant (The Code of Conduct requires Councillors who declare a significant non-pecuniary conflict of interest in an item to leave the meeting during discussion of that item)

 

5.           ADDRESSING THE MEETING

 

6.           MAYORAL MINUTES

 

7.           NOTICES OF MOTION TO RESCIND A RESOLUTION

 

8.           NOTICES OF MOTION

 

9.           DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

10.         URGENT REPORTS (to be dealt with in the delivery program to which the item relates)

 

11.         CONFIDENTIAL BUSINESS


POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING

 

Monday 18 October 2010

 

table of contents

 

 

 

 

 

 

meeting calendar

 

 

confirmation of minutes

 

 

DELIVERY program reports

 


2010 MEETING CALENDAR

February 2010 - December 2010

(adopted by Council on 9/11/09 and amended by Council on 19/4/10 and on 11/10/10)

 

 

 

TIME

FEB

MAR

APRIL

MAY

JUNE

JULY

AUG

SEPT

OCT

NOV

DEC

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

 

Ordinary Council Meeting

7.30pm

1

 

 

3v

 

19

16#

6ü

11¨

8#

13

(7.00pm)

22#

22

19

24#

21*

 

 

27^

(7.00pm)

 

29

 

Policy Review Committee

7.30pm

15

8

 

10

 

 

9

13@

 

22

 

 

29@

 

 

28

12

30

 

18

 

 

Operational Plan Public Forum

 

6.00pm

 

 

 

31

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

v

Meeting at which the Draft Operational Plan for 2010/2011 is adopted for exhibition

*

Meeting at which the Operational Plan for 2010/2011 is adopted

#

Meetings at which the Operational Plan quarterly reviews are presented

@

Delivery Program progress reports

^

Election of Mayor/Deputy Mayor

ü

Meeting at which the 2009/2010 Annual Statements are presented

¨

Meeting at which any comments on the 2009/2010 Annual Statements are presented

-                 Extraordinary Meetings are held as required.

-                 Members of the public are invited to observe meetings of the Council (Ordinary and Policy Review Committee).

Should you wish to address Council, please contact the Acting Executive Officer, Glenn Schuil.

 



UNCONFIRMED MINUTES

 OF THE POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING OF PENRITH CITY COUNCIL HELD IN THE PASSADENA ROOM, PENRITH

ON MONDAY 13 SEPTEMBER 2010 AT 7:36PM

PRESENT

His Worship the Mayor Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM, Councillors Jim Aitken OAM, Kaylene Allison, Greg Davies, Mark Davies, Tanya Davies, Jackie Greenow, Prue Guillaume, Kath Presdee and John Thain.

 

LEAVE OF ABSENCE

Leave of Absence was previously granted to Councillor Karen McKeown for the period 17 August 2010 to 20 September 2010 inclusive.

Leave of Absence was previously granted to Councillor Ross Fowler OAM for the period 3 September 2010 to 21 September 2010 inclusive.

PRC 54 RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor John Thain seconded Councillor Prue Guillaume that Leave of Absence be granted to Councillor Marko Malkoc and Councillor Ben Goldfinch for the period 13 September 2010 to 19 September 2010 inclusive.

APOLOGIES

PRC 55  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor John Thain seconded Councillor Prue Guillaume that an apology be received for Councillor Robert Ardill.

 

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES - Policy Review Committee Meeting - 30 August 2010

PRC 56  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Jackie Greenow seconded Councillor Mark Davies that the minutes of the Policy Review Committee Meeting of 30 August 2010 be confirmed.

 

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

 

Councillor Jim Aitken OAM declared a Non-Pecuniary less than Significant Interest in – Item 5 - Penrith Business Alliance Limited 2010 - 2011 Business Plan as he is a property owner in High Street, Penrith.

  

DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

A City of Opportunities

 

3        Access Committee - Highlights 2008-2010

Councillor Jim Aitken OAM left the meeting, the time being 7:39pm.

Councillor Jim Aitken OAM returned to the meeting, the time being 7:41pm.

Councillor Jackie Greenow introduced the report and advised that Penrith City Council had been short listed in the Local Government Category of the National Disability Awards 2010 for its work on the Penrith Inclusion Plan – People with Disability 2009-2013.

Councillor Jackie Greenow then invited Denise Heath the CEO of Nepean Area Disabilities Organisation Inc and Access Committee Community Member who gave a presentation on the Highlights of the Access Committee over the last two years.

His Worship the Mayor, Clr Kevin Crameri OAM then presented certificates of appreciation to the Access Committee members.

                                                                                                                                                      

PRC 57  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Jackie Greenow seconded Councillor Prue Guillaume

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Access Committee - Highlights 2008-2010 be received.

2.     The Committee members be thanked for their participation on and
contribution to Council’s Access Committee during the 2008-2010 period.

3.     Certificates of Appreciation be presented to the community members of the Access Committee for the period 2008-2010.

 

Councillor Jackie Greenow left the meeting, the time being 7:52pm.

Councillor Prue Guillaume left the meeting, the time being 7:53pm.

Councillor Jackie Greenow returned to the meeting, the time being 7:56pm.

Councillor Prue Guillaume returned to the meeting, the time being 7:57pm.

5        Penrith Business Alliance Limited 2010 - 2011 Business Plan

The Council’s Sustainability & Planning Manager, Paul Grimson introduced the report and invited Paul Brennan  - Chairman of the Penrith Business Alliance who gave a presentation on the Penrith Business Alliance Business Plan.

PRC 58  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Jim Aitken OAM seconded Councillor Mark Davies

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Penrith Business Alliance Limited 2010 - 2011 Business Plan be received.

2.     Council agree to the PBA Business Plan for 2010 – 2011 and provide funding in accordance with the provisions of the Deed of Agreement.

3.     Council thank the Board members for the presentation of their 2010-2011 Business Plan.

 

Councillor Greg Davies left the meeting, the time being 8.35 pm.

Councillor Greg Davies returned to the meeting, the time being 8.36 pm.

 

A Vibrant City

 

6        Penrith and St Marys Centres Associations - Annual Business Plans for 2010-11 and the Proposed Review of the Centres Management

The Council’s Place Management Coordinator, Terry Agar introduced the report and invited Steve Perry from St Marys Town Centre Management Inc and Gladys Reed from Penrith City Centre Association who gave presentations on their respective Business Plans.

Councillor John Thain left the meeting, the time being 9:24pm.

Councillor Jim Aitken OAM left the meeting, the time being 9:24pm.

Councillor John Thain returned to the meeting, the time being 9:25pm.

Councillor Jim Aitken OAM returned to the meeting, the time being 9:29pm.

PRC 59  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Tanya Davies seconded Councillor Greg Davies

That:

1.         The information contained in the report on Penrith and St Marys Centres Associations – annual Business Plans for 2010-11 and the Proposed Review of the Centres Management be received.

2.         Council support the advancement of the review of the Penrith and St Marys Centres management arrangements and a report be presented to Council for consideration following further discussions with the Associations on the details of the review process

3.         Funding for the Penrith City Centre Association be endorsed in the amount of $304,970 and funding for the St Marys Town Centre Association be endorsed in the amount of $228,789, for the 2010-11 financial year

4.          Following the receipt of the audited 2009-10 Financial Statements from each Association, the endorsed funding be paid in instalments at the beginning of each quarter.   

 

Councillor Mark Davies left the meeting, the time being 9:36pm.

 

A Leading City

 

1        Delivery Program 6 Month Progress Report                                                                   

PRC 60  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Tanya Davies that the information contained in the report on Delivery Program 6 Month Progress Report  be received.

 

 

2        Summary of Investments and Banking for the period 1 August 2010 to 31 August 2010        

PRC 61  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Kath Presdee

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Summary of Investments and Banking for the period 1 August 2010 to 31 August 2010 be received

2.     The Certificate of the Responsible Accounting Officer and Summaries of Investments and Performance for the period 1 August 2010 to 31 August 2010 be noted and accepted.

3.     The graphical investment analysis as at 31 August 2010 be noted

 

 

A City of Opportunities

 

Councillor Mark Davies returned to the meeting, the time being 9:38pm.

 

4        Amendments to the Waterside Estate Planning Controls                                                

 

PRC 62  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Jim Aitken OAM

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Amendments to the Waterside Estate Planning Controls be received.

2.     In accordance with the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 and Regulations 2000, Council adopt the amendments to Penrith Development Control Plan 2006 and draft Penrith Development Control Plan 2008 as attached to this report.

In accordance with Section 375A of the Local Government Act 1993, a DIVISION was then called with the following result:

 

For

Against

Councillor Prue Guillaume

Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM

Councillor Kath Presdee

Councillor Tanya Davies

Councillor Greg Davies

 

Councillor John Thain

 

Councillor Jackie Greenow

 

Councillor Jim Aitken OAM

 

Councillor Kaylene Allison

 

Councillor Mark Davies

 

 

A Leading City

 

7        50:50 Vision - Councils for Gender Equity                                                                        

PRC 63  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Kath Presdee seconded Councillor Tanya Davies

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on 50:50 Vision - Councils for Gender Equity be received

2.     Council endorse a statement of commitment as follows:

We will work towards increasing the representation of women in local government, both as elected members and senior managers and professionals.

 

We will undertake ongoing reviews of policies and practices to remove barriers to women’s participation and to engender safe, supportive working and decision-making environments that welcome and respect a wide range of views.

                  

                   3.       Council endorse the proposed actions discussed in this report and make                         application for the bronze award

 

There being no further business the Chairperson declared the meeting closed the time being 9:51pm.

    



DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

 

A Leading City

 

1        North Cranebrook Release Area Development Contributions Plan

Procedural note: Section 375A of the Local Government Act 1993 requires that a division be called in relation to this matter.

 

2        Formation of Local Health Networks

 

A City of Opportunities

 

3        Neighbourhood Renewal Program - Update of Activities and Neighbourhood Action Plans - Kingswood and St Marys 

 

4        Penrith Whitewater Stadium - Annual Report and Board of Directors

 

5        Concept Plan Precinct D & E in Glenmore Park Stage 2 Release Area. Applicant: Norwest Land Pty Ltd, Owner Mulpha FKP Pty Ltd

  

A Liveable City

 

6        Feral and Infant Animals Policy

 

7        Review of the Alcohol Free Public Spaces Policy 

 

A Vibrant City

 

URGENT

 

8        Transportation of Restricted Solid Waste to SITA landfill facility

 

 


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


A Leading City

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

1        North Cranebrook Release Area Development Contributions Plan

Procedural note: Section 375A of the Local Government Act 1993 requires that a division be called in relation to this matter.

 

2        Formation of Local Health Networks

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting

18 October 2010

A Leading City

 

 

 

1

North Cranebrook Release Area Development Contributions Plan   

 

Compiled by:                Anthony Milanoli, Senior Environmental Planner

Authorised by:             Paul Grimson, Sustainability & Planning Manager   

 

Objective

We plan responsibly for now and the future

Community Outcome

A Council that plans responsibly for a sustainable future (3)

Strategic Response

Build our City's future on the principles of sustainability (3.1)

      

Procedural note: Section 375A of the Local Government Act 1993 requires that a division be called in relation to this matter.

 

Executive Summary

The purpose of this report is to discuss the status of the North Cranebrook Release Area Development Contributions Plan.  The report recommends that the Plan is rescinded, given that all facilities have been funded and delivered.

 

Further reports will be presented to Council over the next 12-18 months regarding the review of other Development Contributions Plans.

 

Section 94 and Development Contributions

Section 94 of the Environmental Planning & Assessment Act authorises the levying of contributions towards provision or improvement of amenities or services where:

“a consent authority is satisfied that development for which development consent is sought will or is likely to require the provision of or increase the demand for public amenities and public services within the area”.

Contributions may take the form of the dedication of land free of cost, the payment of a monetary contribution or works in kind.

 

It is standard practice for all development contributions plans to be reviewed regularly to determine their suitability and where necessary, amend or rescind the plans.  Additionally, between 2009 and September 2010 the Department of Planning released a number of guidelines, Ministerial Directions and proposed changes to the EP&A Act (Part 5B) which suggested that all councils would be required to review all existing development contribution plans.  More recent announcements by the Minister have suggested review of all plans will not necessarily be required.

 

This report’s analysis of the North Cranebrook Release Area Development Contributions Plan – hereafter called the Plan or the North Cranebrook Plan – reflects the start of the review process.  Over the next 12-18 months, reports will be presented to Council regarding other contribution plans.

 


The North Cranebrook Contributions Plan

North Cranebrook was released for residential development in 1988.  To facilitate the development of the suburb for its new community, necessary infrastructure and facilities were identified in a draft Contributions Plan.  The North Cranebrook Contributions Plan was adopted by Council in 1988 and specifies facilities required to address the needs of additional residents and a contribution per additional dwelling for the delivery of those facilities.  In March 2004 the Plan was reviewed, amended and adopted by Council (in the amended form) to reflect changes in policy, costs and legislation and following community consultation.

 

1.    Facilities funded by the Plan

Section 8 of the North Cranebrook Plan outlines a detailed schedule of facilities and works funded by the Plan to meet the new community’s needs.  The schedule of works contained in the Plan can be summarised into the following categories:

·      Roads and traffic

·      Trunk drainage

·      Community facilities (land and facilities)

·      Open space (land and facilities)

·      Street trees

·      Plan administration

 

Development Contributions Plans have evolved in a series of ‘generations’ since they first commenced in 1980.  The North Cranebrook Plan represents the first generation of contributions plans prepared under Section 94 of the EP&A Act and hence reflects the community and legislative expectations of that time.

 

Facilities funded by the Plan can be described as beyond the purely functional, minimal infrastructure typical of residential estates in the 1950s – 1970s but not reflective of the current integrated approach typical of the current generation of plans.  In addition to essential roads and drainage works, the Plan funded a network of embellished, active and passive open space and community facilities to meet the recreation and social needs of new residents.

 

The standard and range of contribution plan-funded facilities constructed within North Cranebrook is considered to be equivalent to those of comparable release areas developed during similar timeframes (for example Erskine Park Residential Release Area).

 

3.    Current Status of the Plan

As of July 2010 all facilities identified in the Plan were completed and all contributions necessary to fund those works had been collected and expended.

 

Only minimal further development is expected (contributions for a further four, yet to be commenced dwellings/lots may be received) and this is expected to yield only $32,000 assuming these developments progress.  If outstanding development consents are not acted upon, there will be no further contributions received.

 

Given that all works have been completed and all necessary funds expended, the role of the plan has been concluded.

 

Photos of a selection of the new facilities funded by the completed North Cranebrook Development Contributions Plan are shown below.

 

The North Cranebrook Community Centre

 

Cycleway, Boundary Road, North Cranebrook

 

Rescinding the North Cranebrook Plan

With the completion of all the works identified in the North Cranebrook Plan and the collection and expenditure of all development contributions, it is timely that the Plan be rescinded.

 

In the event that current development consents for four additional dwellings in North Cranebrook are acted upon, demand for additional facilities will be incidental and not generate the need for any additional facilities.  Given this absence of additional demand (a fundamental tenet of section 94) it is proposed that these contributions be waived.  Contributions for City-wide facilities (such as District Open Space and Cultural Facilities) would continue to be levied.

 

If Council resolves to rescind the North Cranebrook Plan it will cease to apply immediately.  The next steps in the process will be closing off the relevant accounts and removing references to the Plan from our websites and registers of Contributions Plans.

 

1.    Legal advice on rescinding plans

With the review of existing contributions plans underway (and the prospect of rescinding further, completed plans) legal advice was sought to ensure the North Cranebrook Plan’s rescission is consistent with the relevant statutes and legal precedents.  Legal advice received confirms that:

·      Council may choose to rescind the Development Contributions Plan

·      If the Council resolves to rescind the Development Contributions Plan, applicants of current development approvals may ask Council to delete the relevant S94 conditions (by modifying the consent).  Such an application would be assessed on its merits.

 

2.    Equity Issues

Whilst it could be argued that it is inequitable for several new households not to pay for facilities that have been funded by earlier new residents, Section 94 does not permit Council to levy for additional facilities for which there is no additional demand.  The additional dwellings for which consents have been granted, but not yet acted upon, are not considered likely to generate sufficient demand to justify additional facilities.

 

The life of any suburb moves from its development stage to a more mature consolidation phase, at which point new residents maximise use of existing infrastructure rather than needing additional facilities.  North Cranebrook is now considered to be fully developed and in this consolidation phase, with only marginal growth in dwelling and population numbers still expected.

 

Conclusion

The North Cranebrook Plan has provided a successful framework for identifying, funding and implementing infrastructure delivery to meet the needs of the new residents of North Cranebrook.  Financially, the infrastructure was fully funded by contributions received under the Plan and constructed to the required standards.

 

With the Plan now fully subscribed and all works completed, it is timely that Council rescind the Plan and accept no further contributions.  A resolution to that effect is outlined below.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on North Cranebrook Release Area Development Contributions Plan be received.

2.     Council resolve to rescind the North Cranebrook Release Area Development Contributions Plan.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.  

North Cranebrook Release Area Development Contributions Plan

28 Pages

Attachment

  


Policy Review Committee Meeting

18 October 2010

A Leading City

 

 

 

2

Formation of Local Health Networks   

 

Compiled by:                Stephen Pearson, Executive Services Officer

Authorised by:             Glenn Schuil, Acting Executive Officer   

 

Objective

We demonstrate accountability, transparency and ethical conduct

Community Outcome

A Council that behaves responsibly and ethically (5)

Strategic Response

Champion accountability and transparency, and responsible and ethical behaviour (5.1)

       

 

Executive Summary

The NSW Government has finalised the proposed Local Health Network (LHN) boundaries and it is currently in the process of formation of Governing Councils for each of the Networks. It is expected that these will be in place by January 2011.

 

The NSW Government is calling for Expressions of Interest for general members of the Network Governing Councils, with recruitment to be finalised in November 2010. Interested persons must complete an Expression of Interest form and provide a curriculum vitae by close of business Friday 22 October 2010.

 

Councillors may wish to submit an Expression of Interest as a Member of a LHN Governing Council in the ‘Understanding of local community issues’ area of expertise in their role as a Councillor on Penrith City Council.

 

Background

The NSW Government, on 29 September 2010, outlined the future shape of New South Wales health system, with the announcement of 18 proposed LHN’s to strengthen local decision-making and community involvement in health service delivery.

 

The Government intends to introduce legislation in this session of Parliament to enable the

networks, and to deliver significant health reforms in the State. The LHN’s are a key plank of the historic national health reforms agreed with the Federal Government in April 2010.

 

These reforms are delivering an extra $1.2 billion in funding to the NSW health system over four years and are contributing to 488 beds being opened in NSW in 2010/11.

 

The Networks will be established in January 2011, and the NSW Health system will

progressively transition to the new structure over the following 6 to 12 months.

 

Proposed Model

Eighteen (18) LHN’s will replace the current eight Area Health Services and will have their own budgets, management and accountabilities within their local areas. They will be administered by a Chief Executive and Governing Council that includes local clinicians, health and health care management experts and community representatives.

 

The 18 LHN’s will be as follows:

•     eight will be geographically based and cover the Sydney metropolitan region:

•     seven will be geographically based and cover rural and regional NSW; and

•     three specialty networks will focus on Children's Health, Forensic Mental Health,

and services delivered by St Vincent’s Health.

 

The network boundaries have been determined after one of the most extensive consultation processes ever conducted across the NSW health system, including consultation with

clinicians, health professionals and communities across NSW.

 

The model was originally put out for consultation in August 2010, via a discussion paper that

proposed potential borders and governance arrangements for 17 LHN’s.

 

Nearly 400 submissions were received from the public, community groups and health

professionals, leading to further improvements to the model being put in place, including:

•     Establishment of a specialist 18th network that covers the St Vincent’s facilities (St

Vincent’s and St Joseph’s hospitals, and Sacred Heart Hospice);

•     Putting in place Ministerial directions for each network, including for Blacktown

Hospital, the Orana Region and St George, accounting for local feedback and local

population health needs;

•     Establishing clinical support clusters that will support services such as cancer,

renal, mental health, and drug and alcohol programs;

•     Expediting discussions to develop cross-border health agreements with the

ACT, Victoria, Queensland and South Australia;

•     Providing an enhanced role for the Clinical Excellence Commission, to

strengthen interaction with clinicians in the new, localised public health structure;

•     Establishing formal agreements between Governing Councils and local

government (Governing Councils oversee each individual network) to strengthen

local government engagement with health services; and

•     Continuing a strong role for Local Health Advisory Councils, which will provide

local advice to each network’s Governing Council.

 

Administrative arrangements have been put in place to ensure a close relationship between the networks, local government and communities.

 

The Government intends to enter a Statement of Intent with the Local Government and Shires

Associations, particularly in relation to the Western and Southern LHN’s.

 

New Local Health Networks

A ‘Rural and Regional NSW Map’ and a ‘Metropolitan NSW Map’ are attached showing the geographic boundaries of the LHN’s in NSW. There are eight LHN’s within the Sydney Metropolitan Region and seven LHN’s within Rural and Regional NSW as follows:

 

Sydney Metropolitan Region (8 Networks)

•     Sydney

•     South Western Sydney

•     South Eastern Sydney

•     Illawarra Shoalhaven

•     Western Sydney

•     Nepean Blue Mountains

•     Northern Sydney

•     Central Coast

 

Rural and Regional NSW (7 Networks)

•     Hunter New England

•     Murrumbidgee

•     Southern NSW

•     Western NSW

•     Far West

•     Mid North Coast

•     Northern NSW

 

The Nepean Blue Mountains and the Western Sydney Networks are the Networks that would service the Penrith LGA.

 

The Nepean Blue Mountains Network consists of:

•     Nepean Hospital

•     Hawkesbury

•     Springwood Hospital

•     Blue Mountains District ANZAC Memorial Hospital

•     Lithgow Hospital

•     Portland Tabulam Health Centre

 

The Western Sydney Network consists of:

•     Mt Druitt Hospital

•     Blacktown Hospital

•     Westmead Hospital

•     Cumberland

•     Auburn Hospital and Community Health Services

 

Recruitment of Governing Councils

The NSW Government now wants to move quickly to recruit Governing Councils to achieve the right balance of local knowledge and medical expertise to manage the new LHN’s.

 

Each Governing Council will be responsible for establishing and oversighting an effective governance and risk management framework for the Network, setting its strategic directions, ensuring high standards of professional and ethical conduct are maintained, involving providers and the community in decisions that affect them, monitoring the service delivery and financial performance of the Network against its targets and holding the Network Chief Executive accountable for their performance.

 

As described within the National Health and Hospitals Network Agreement specific responsibilities will include:

•     delivering agreed services and performance standards within an agreed budget based on annual strategic and operating plans, and the LHN Service Agreement;

•     ensuring the accountable and efficient provision of services and producing annual reports, subject to State financial accountability and audit frameworks;

•     monitoring LHN performance against the agreed performance monitoring measures in the LHN Service Agreement;

•     improving local patient outcomes and responding to system-wide issues; and

•     maintaining effective communication with State and relevant local stakeholders including clinicians and the community.

 

Each Governing Council will have between 6 and 13 members (including a Chair) depending

on the size of the network, complexity of the services to be provided, and other local factors.

 

Expressions of Interest for Chairs of the LHN Governing Councils have been sought, and a selection process will take place later this month.

 

Advertisements have already appeared in the press calling for Expressions of Interest for general members of the Network Governing Councils. Recruitment will be finalised in November 2010.

 

Upon finalisation of those appointments, a final round of recruitment will start for LHN Chief Executives, who will be appointed by each Network Governing Council with the approval of the Minister for Health.

 

Governing Council Members

Expressions of Interest have been invited for appointment as a Member of a Local Hospital Network Governing Council. Interested persons must complete an Expression of Interest form and provide a curriculum vitae by close of business Friday 22 October 2010.

 

The Members of Governing Councils will contribute to the governance and oversight of the LHN and represent the interests of consumers of health services and the local community.

 

Members will need to be knowledgeable about the LHN the Council governs, its affairs and the environment in which it operates. The Chair is responsible for leading the Council and ensuring that the members of the Council work together as a cohesive team. All members of the Governing Council will be appointed as independent individuals and be required to act in the best interests of the Council and LHN.

 

Further details for applicants wishing to submit an Expression of Interest in becoming a member of a LHN Governing Council is attached and contains information on:

·      Skills and Experience

·      Remuneration

·      Term of appointment

·      Public Sector employee applicants

·      Selection of Governing Council members

·      Selection process

·      Referee reports

·      Unsuccessful applicants

·      Probity checks for short listed applicants

·      Standards of conduct

·      Conflicts with external employment or other business

·      Privacy issues – information provided in application

 

 

 

 

 

 

Conclusion

The Joint Committee of the Local Government and Shires Associations has commented recently on the lack of consultation with Local Government at a national and state level during the National Health and Hospitals Reform process. The Associations are encouraging Councillors to submit an Expressions of Interest to ensure that the needs of the community are heard.

 

Councillors may wish to submit an Expression of Interest to become a Member of a LHN Governing Council in the ‘Understanding of local community issues’ area of expertise. All members of the LHN Governing Council will be appointed as independent individuals.

 

Nominees are able to select the LHN they wish to apply for. If more than one LHN is selected, then the selections need to be ranked in order of preference.

 

It has been suggested that a Council staff member may also submit an Expression of Interest. It is proposed that this be the General Manager’s nominee.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.   The information contained in the report on Formation of Local Health Networks be received.

2.   Interested Councillors may wish to submit Expressions of Interest to become a Member of a Local Health Network Governing Council.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1. View

Local Health Netwok Geographic Boundaries

2 Pages

Appendix

2. View

Local Health Network Governing Councils Membership - Information for Applicants

6 Pages

Appendix

  


Policy Review Committee Meeting

18 October 2010

Appendix 1 - Local Health Netwok Geographic Boundaries

 

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting

18 October 2010

Appendix 2 - Local Health Network Governing Councils Membership - Information for Applicants

 

 

 






 


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


A City of Opportunities

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

3        Neighbourhood Renewal Program - Update of Activities and Neighbourhood Action Plans - Kingswood and St Marys 

 

4        Penrith Whitewater Stadium - Annual Report and Board of Directors

 

5        Concept Plan Precinct D & E in Glenmore Park Stage 2 Release Area. Applicant: Norwest Land Pty Ltd, Owner Mulpha FKP Pty Ltd

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting

18 October 2010

A City of Opportunities

 

 

 

3

Neighbourhood Renewal Program - Update of Activities and Neighbourhood Action Plans - Kingswood and St Marys    

 

Compiled by:                Heather Chaffey, Community Engagement Officer

Jeni Pollard, Acting Community & Cultural Development Manager

Authorised by:             Erich Weller, Community and Cultural Development Manager   

 

Objective

We have access to what we need

Community Outcome

A City with equitable access to services and facilities (7)

Strategic Response

Base the provision of services and facilities on principles of social justice and equity (7.1)

 

Presenters:                   Jeni Pollard - Neighbourhood Renewal Coordinator - to introduce report      

 

Executive Summary

This report provides Council with a general overview of the Neighbourhood Renewal Program and a description of the community engagement processes undertaken in the Kingswood and St Marys areas during the 2009-10 period. This report is accompanied by a detailed Community Engagement Report and Neighbourhood Action Plan for each area. They are Attachments 1 to 4 to this report.

 

Both Kingswood and St Marys had been identified as targeted communities for the Neighbourhood Renewal Program in 2009. Each community is distinctive, Kingswood being a community with two significant regional facilities, UWS and Nepean Hospital included in its boundaries as well as a mix of older homes and newer medium density accommodation.  St Marys has many families that have lived in the area for a number of decades now experiencing significant change as a result of growth and development. Each community faces challenges but also has many strengths. The residents, whether they have lived in Kingswood and St Marys for many decades or they are new arrivals, are passionate about their community.

 

In both areas the Neighbourhood Renewal Team has actively engaged with a broad cross section of the community, through a variety of creative and interesting activities and events. Each of these engagement processes has assisted in building community connections and positive relationships between Council and the residents. The report gives an overview of each of these activities that have collectively engaged with hundreds of residents over the past 12 months.

 

In Kingswood and St Marys the issues raised through the engagement process with the community and other stakeholders centre around four themes. These themes include social activities and programs, traffic and transport, parks and public spaces and business and employment development. Distinct issues were raised in each community although concerns about access and safety close to the railway station area were similar in each area. Further to this, the quality of playgrounds and access to parks with shade and seating are common themes across both Kingswood and St Marys. 

 

The report gives an overview of progress in the implementation of Neighbourhood Action Plans in Kingswood Park, Londonderry and Oxley Park. The report also provides general information regarding the Neighbourhood Renewal Program for 2010-11 including community engagement, cultural development and local enterprise and development activities. Further to this an update is provided on activities in Llandilo, the current area of engagement for the Neighbourhood Renewal Program.

 

Finally, the report flags a proposed change to the schedule of the Neighbourhood Renewal Program in the 2010-11 year. A variation is requested to delay the commencement of activities in Penrith suburb in order to undertake an evaluation of the program and provide additional focus to the implementation of existing Neighbourhood Action Plans.

 

The report recommends that Council receive the information contained in the report and endorse the Kingswood Neighbourhood Action Plan 2010 and St Marys Neighbourhood Action Plan 2010. The report also recommends that Council endorse the proposed schedule of Neighbourhood Renewal activities through to 2015.

Background

Over recent years, Council has placed increasing emphasis on balancing the resources directed towards planning and implementation in new release areas to that of older established areas of the City. In 2006 Council endorsed a Neighbourhood Renewal Program to revitalise and enhance selected neighbourhoods, both urban and rural with an approach that integrates community development and cultural development as well as supporting opportunities for local employment and training. The program is funded for 10 years through the Asset Renewal and Established Areas Strategy (AREAS) special rates initiative.

 

The Penrith Neighbourhood Renewal Program is focussed on particular suburbs and rural localities which are considered to be relatively disadvantaged. The instrument used to determine this is the Australian Bureau of Statistics SEIFA Index of Relative Disadvantage which measures disadvantage across suburbs and regions. 

 

The Penrith LGA has 12 suburbs or rural localities considered to be of relative disadvantage compared to the NSW average, as calculated by the Australian Bureau of Statistics.   These areas are (in alphabetical order) Cambridge Park, Colyton, Cranebrook, Kingswood, Llandilo, Londonderry, North Penrith (including the locality of Kingswood Park), North St Marys, Oxley Park, Penrith suburb, St Marys and Werrington.  

 

A report was endorsed by Council in July 2008 that outlined a planned approach for implementing the Neighbourhood Renewal Program across these identified areas. The adopted program for 2009-10 included Kingswood and St Marys. These areas are the subject of this report and accompanying Neighbourhood Action Plans. 

 

In 2010-11, the Neighbourhood Renewal Program will focus activity in Llandilo. Later this year, engagement activity was due to commence in Penrith suburb and this will be the subject of further discussion later in the report.

 

The agreed approach to Neighbourhood Renewal has been to undertake extensive community engagement, both Council driven and in partnership with key stakeholders to develop a Neighbourhood Action Plan.

 

Neighbourhood Action Plans (NAPs) support a planned and coordinated approach to addressing the complex interplay of social disadvantage, access to economic and cultural participation, older physical infrastructure and generally poorer public amenity as well as reduced civic engagement. NAPs incorporate specific responses required to address identified community issues and needs. Actions for implementation that are included in the NAP are reported to Council through the Operational Plan reporting process. Furthermore, the NAP and progress on implementation are also be reported to the community through local activities and via a community newsletter.

 

It is envisaged that in the first instance the NAPs for Kingswood and St Marys will be implemented over four years.

 

This report will outline the methods of engagement undertaken in Kingswood and St Marys over the last 12 months, and the results of this engagement process including further actions as identified by residents. The more detailed Community Engagement reports and NAPs are provided as attachments to this report.

 

Community Engagement

 

Engaging residents in planning is essential to the sustainability of any work aimed at improving the socio economic outcomes and the physical environment of a neighbourhood. The engagement process aims to identify and build on the strengths of a group of people, in this case residents of a particular neighbourhood. A strengths focus leads to planning which builds on the positive aspects of a neighbourhood as well as addressing issues raised by local residents.

 

Engagement creates opportunities for residents to influence decisions and planning which directly affects their lives. It can empower residents to take ownership of plans and completed works in their community. The engagement of local residents by Penrith City Council is critical to the success of Neighbourhood Action Plans.

 

Importantly, many of the engagement activities undertaken build positive relationships between Council and residents in some of the more disadvantaged communities. Community engagement builds an understanding of civic decision making and facilitates a well informed decision making process by Council and partner organisations.

 

Kingswood 

 

Kingswood for the purpose of this report is bounded by Richmond Road and Victoria Street in the north, French Street, the Great Western Highway and the suburb of Claremont Meadows in the east, Caddens Road and Bringelly Road in the south and Parker Street in the west.

A group of younger residents proudly show their creative skills
 at a Food Family Culture event

 

Major features of the Kingswood area include the Penrith Campus of the University of Western Sydney, Nepean Hospital, TAFE NSW Western Sydney Institute (Nepean College), Western Sydney International Hockey Centre, Penrith General Cemetery, Chapman Gardens, Kanangra Reserve along Parker Street north of the railway line, Kingswood Park, Peppermint Reserve and a number of schools.

 

The population of Kingswood has remained relatively stable in recent years, with 8778 residents. Characteristics to note regarding the profile of residents in Kingswood is the higher than LGA average of people born overseas and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who make up (3.4%) of the population compared to (2.4%) across Penrith LGA. Kingswood has more single parent households (25.2%) than Penrith (18.5%), and also more lone person households (29%) compared to Penrith (18%).A full demographic profile is available in the attached Kingswood Community Engagement Report (Attachment 1).

 

 

Map 1. Kingswood Suburb, Source. ID Profile

 

Community engagement activities in Kingswood

In total, eight targeted community engagement activities were undertaken with stakeholders across Kingswood. The engagement activities have been dependent on positive partnerships developed with Bronte Child and Family Centre Mission Australia, Werrington Community Project Inc., Kingswood High School, the Church of the Rock Kingswood, Kingswood Anglican Church, and the Kingswood Sports Club. Over 120 residents and 20 businesses and service providers participated in various engagement activities and contributed to the Kingswood Community Engagement report (Attachment 1) and the development of the Kingswood Neighbourhood Action Plan 2010 (Attachment 2).

 

Many of the partner organisations are continuing to meet and advocate for the development of programs addressing the social needs identified by residents through this process. This partnership is known as the Kingswood Action Group (KAG) and will be led by Council’s Neighbourhood Renewal Program for the first 12 months.

Younger residents enjoying a drink after playing in the park at Kingswood

 

Community engagement activities undertaken in Kingswood included:

 

·    A Parkour (free running) workshop to engage with young people,

·    The Church of the Rock to engage with residents living in social housing, local volunteers and rough sleepers,

·    A survey to engage with local business operators,

·    A series of three “Food Family Culture” events held at Wainwright Park to engage with children and families,

·    A seniors consultation to engage with older residents,

·    A street survey to engage with residents and others,

·    Service provider interviews,

·    A community planning session which is discussed below.

 

Local women from Kingswood enjoy a break at a Food Family Culture event

 

A more detailed description of each engagement activity and a summary of the issues raised by residents is included in the attached Kingswood Community Engagement Report (Attachment 1).

 

 

 

 

 

 

Community Planning Session

A Community Planning Session was held in Kingswood on 1 June 2010. This session brought together a number of residents, one worker from Bronte House Mission Australia and two Church leaders, all of whom had been invited to participate based on prior engagement with Council Officers.

 

Council Officers presented on the demographics of the local community and provided an overview of the methods and results of each engagement activity undertaken in the area.

Residents identified a range of priorities for further action as well as clarifying information.

 

At all engagement activities, including the community planning session, residents are asked to identify the strengths of their community and the things that they believe are worth preserving. This information assists Council to understand and build on the strengths within each community.

 

 

 

Young people from Kingswood participate in a Parkour workshop and engagement activity at the PCYC in Penrith City Council

 

Community Strengths and Assets– Kingswood

Throughout the engagement process, a significant number of the residents identified that they enjoyed living in the Kingswood area and felt that there were a number of great things about their community. Many people identified access to the railway, the University and the Nepean Hospital as elements that made their community unique.

 

Many people identified the pleasant nature of the open space and trees with Chapman Gardens, Wainwright Park and Peppermint Reserve all being mentioned frequently. As a number of activities were held in Wainwright Park it is unsurprising that the playground equipment was identified as a local asset. In particular the location of the park being close to shops and Bringelly Road leads to good surveillance and a feeling of safety for park users.

 

The diversity of the community of Kingswood was identified as a strength by residents. Once again this is linked to the proximity of the two institutions, University of Western Sydney and Nepean Hospital. The hospital in particular employs a large and diverse workforce, many of whom live locally.

 

Playground equipment at Wainright Park is a community asset at Kingswood

 

The Bringelly Road shops are identified as a positive asset by both younger people and older residents. The Church of the Rock and the Anglican Church were spoken highly of by residents with both of these churches appearing to have a high public profile in the community particularly with older residents and those living in relatively disadvantaged circumstances.

 

Residents spoke positively about Council services, in particular the Library service and the Graffiti Hotline.

 

Community Issues - Kingswood

The issues raised by residents and other stakeholders in Kingswood can be grouped into four themes.

 

A full overview of the issues raised under each theme is included in the Community Engagement Report at Attachment 1. A summary of the issues raised include:

 

Theme 1: People – social activities and programs

 

1.   Need for youth, family and community programs and activities

2.   Promotion of service and activities for seniors.

Theme 2: Places – traffic and transport

 

1.   Need for upgrade of facilities and access to Kingswood Railway Station

2.   Speeding traffic/ cars along Bringelly Rd, Jamison Rd and Derby Street

3.   Traffic and pedestrian safety issues on Great Western Highway near Kingswood Railway Station and near Kingswood Public School

4.   Promote better understanding of recent changes to bus routes.

 

Theme 3: Places – public place maintenance, parks and unique sites

 

1.   Commercial renewal of shopping strip along the Great Western Highway

2.   Shade, adult exercise equipment and fencing in Wainwright Park

3.   Alcohol and other drug use in public spaces

4.   Upgrade to Red Cross Park.

Theme 4: Places – business, employment and training

 

1.   Need for increased Police patrolling around central business area, railway station and forecourt

2.   Commercial renewal and support for increased diversity of businesses along the Great Western Highway.

Responses to these themes are outlined in the attached Neighbourhood Action Plan for Kingswood. In some cases, actions will be achievable through the allocation of existing resources or through partnerships with external organisations. Some actions are currently unfunded and others require advocacy from Council to other levels of government.

Kingswood - Actions to date

A number of activities are underway in Kingswood in response to concerns raised by residents. Some issues will be addressed by longer terms projects and connected to opportunities of commercial renewal in the shopping strip along the Great Western Highway. Proposed upgrades to Kingswood Railway Station will respond to many of the resident concerns regarding access and signage.

The Public Domain Amenity and Safety Manager has commenced a proposal to upgrade lighting in Red Cross Park at the corner of Somerset Street and the Great Western Highway in response to concerns regarding safety for staff and visitors walking to the hospital. Staff from the Neighbourhood Renewal Program will work to assist this community safety initiative. 

Further community safety issues regarding perceptions of safety and feedback from residents have been raised at the Penrith Valley Community Safety Partnership Meeting, of which the St Marys Local Area Command is a member.

Traffic issues and pedestrian safety at Kingswood

 

Staff from the Community and Cultural Development Department have initiated a meeting with service providers to identify capacity for further programs addressing social concerns in Kingswood. There has been a positive response to this initiative and a decision has been made to partner in 4 community activities over the coming year. A partnership project has been developed with Mission Australia to deliver a program to enhance literacy development and positive parenting for families in the Kingswood community.

The Kingswood Primary School has identified the need for a breakfast program for students. The Church of the Rock are now in contact with the school to offer practical support and volunteer hours.

Further to this the Community Development Officer Older People has commenced the development of a promotional strategy to inform older residents of the range of programs and services available to them in the Kingswood community.

St Marys

St Marys for the purposes of this report is defined as the area bounded by Werrington and Claremont Meadows in the west, the M4 in the south and in the east, South Creek, Marsden Road and Sydney Street divide St Marys from Colyton and Oxley Park.  St Marys has a long and rich industrial and agricultural history including tanneries and munitions.

 

Unlike many other older established communities, St Marys has experienced a 5.2% population increase between 2001 and 2006 according to data released by the ABS. Lone person households represent over 30% of all households in St Marys, reflecting the ageing population and the need for services that reduce isolation. Diversity is strong in St Marys with an increasing number of residents born in countries where languages other than English are spoken. Approximately 20% of households in St Marys do not have access to a private motor vehicle. A full demographic profile is available in the attached St Marys Community Engagement Report (Attachment 3).

 

Map 2 St Marys Suburb, Source ID Profile

 

 

Community engagement activities in St Marys

Ten targeted community engagement activities were undertaken with stakeholders across St Marys. The engagement activities have been dependent on positive partnerships developed with the Bronte Child and Family Centre Mission Australia, St Marys Area Community Development, the St Marys Historical Society, St Marys Senior High School, CuriousWorks, St Marys South Public School, St Marys RSL Club, Nepean Migrant Access, and many residents. Nearly 200 residents and 13 businesses participated in various engagement activities and contributed to the St Marys Community Engagement report (Attachment 3) and development of the St Marys Neighbourhood Action Plan 2010 (Attachment 4).

 

Community engagement activities undertaken in St Marys included:

 

·    A survey of residents was conducted during the St Marys Spring Festival 2009,

·    A street survey to engage with residents at the shopping strip on Monfarville Road and on Queen St,

·    A focus group was held with Sudanese women and children through the Sudanese Playgroup held at Mamre House,

·    A focus group was held with the St Marys Historical Society,

·    A series of three “Food Family Culture” events held at Margaret Porter Reserve to engage with children and families,

·    A seniors consultation to engage with older residents,

·    A survey to engage with local business operators,

·    Surveys completed during the Twilight Concert – Harmony Day 2010, an event designed to engage residents from diverse cultural backgrounds,

·    The Neighbourhood Stories St Marys project, training residents and staff to collect local stories about St Marys,

·    A community planning session which is further discussed below.

 

 

The start of a great day for young people and families at the
Margaret Porter Reserve, St Marys South

 

A more detailed description of each engagement activity and the issues raised by residents is included in the attached St Marys Community Engagement Report (Attachment 3).

 

 

 

 

Community Planning Session

A Community Planning Session was held in St Marys on 13 May 2010. This session brought together around 20 residents including community workers from Nepean Migrant Access and St Marys Area Community Development and one local Church leader, all of whom had been invited to participate based on prior engagement with Council Officers.

 

Results were reported according to four themes, which emerged throughout the engagement process. These themes outlined below in the section on Community Issues are used to group actions within the St Marys Neighbourhood Action Plan 2010 (provided as Attachment 4).

 

As with other community engagement activities residents are asked to reflect on the positive things within their area.  This information assists Council to understand and built upon the strengths within each community.

 

Community Strengths and Assets - St Marys

The outstanding strength of St Marys is the pride that the local community feels for their suburb. Many of the residents that partook in the engagement process spoke about ‘loving’ St Marys viewing it as a great place to live. The history of St Marys was a regular theme as well as the future potential that many people felt for their community as it grows and changes.

 

Many people, longer term and newer residents expressed that they lived in streets where they know the majority of their neighbours. The residents of St Marys are happy to get to meet new people are actively involved in community events and like to know what is happening in their neighbourhood.

 

A number of people identified that they enjoy having a home on a larger block of land and others felt that one of the strengths of St Marys was that housing prices were still affordable, supporting the notion that grown children could afford to purchase a home and stay in the area.

 

The Queen Street area, particularly the southern end was identified as a community strength for the unique ‘country town’ feel and ambience. 

 

People identified local parks, particularly the newer playground equipment in Margaret Porter Reserve as community assets. People also valued the St Marys Library, the Don Bosco Youth Centre and the St Marys Corner Precinct as community assets.

 

Community Issues - St Marys

The issues raised by residents and other stakeholders in St Marys fall into four themes.

 

A full overview of the issues raised under each theme is included in the St Marys Community Engagement Report attached. A summary of the issues raised in each theme are:

 

Theme 1: People – social activities and programs

 

1.   Continued support for Don Bosco Youth Centre and additional cultural programs for young people throughout the St Marys Corner Community and Cultural Precinct.

2.   Social issues/perceived threat of violence and crime at northern end of Queen Street particularly close to the St Marys Railways Station and Transport Interchange area.

3.   Promote existing programs for older residents and families.

 

Theme 2: Places – traffic and transport

 

1.   Issues regarding rail and bus timetable changes

2.   Speeding, pedestrian safety and school zones in areas around Monfarville Road, Desborough Road and Swanston Street

3.   Upgrade to facilities at St Marys Railway Station.

 

Theme 3: Places – public place maintenance, parks and unique sites

 

1.   Community safety concerns on Queen Street

2.   Upgrades to Monfarville Reserve and Margaret Porter Reserve

3.   Concerns regarding weeds and dumping in various creek and park locations.

 

Theme 4: Places – business, employment and training

 

1.   Need to support increased diversity of shops on Queen Street

2.   Revitalise Queen Street through community and cultural events and projects

3.   New business sustainability on Queen Street

4.   Opportunities for work experience and training.

 

Responses to these themes are outlined in the attached Neighbourhood Action Plan for St Marys. In some cases, actions will be achievable through the allocation of existing resources or through partnerships with external organisations. Some actions are currently unfunded and others require advocacy from Council to other levels of government.

St Marys - Actions to date

Staff from the Neighbourhood Renewal Program have met on several occasions with the women from the Southern Sudan attending the programs at Mamre House. Opportunities for further employment and enterprise are being explored and the Enterprise Development Worker from STARTTS (the NSW Service for the Treatment and Rehabilitation of Torture and Trauma) has been put in contact with this group.

 

The Neighbourhood Stories St Marys project has generated considerable interest in both the cultural sector and in the local community as a model for engaging creatively with residents and building skills and activism on local issues. The St Marys Senior High School has further met with staff from the Neighbourhood Renewal Program and CuriousWorks and is interested in broadening the program to support the development of research skills in Yr 11 students. The School Principal is seeking further funding opportunities to realise this project

 

The recently opened St Marys Corner is providing a focus for local community and cultural activity in St Marys. The development and delivery of programs such as ‘Disorder Disorder’ in Queen Street contribute to the cultural vitality of St Marys.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Progress on Neighbourhood Action Plans

Along with current engagement activities, cultural and employment related programs, the Neighbourhood Renewal Program also supports the implementation of a number of actions and activities identified in previous Neighbourhood Action Plans for Kingswood Park, Londonderry and Oxley Park.

 

Many departments across Council contribute to the delivery of identified actions and priorities in these communities. Some of these implementation highlights for the past 12 months include:

 

Kingswood Park

·    Council’s Youth Development Officer is working with the Kingswood Park Action Network to develop a youth strategy with the community. Fusion Youth Services have recently joined the Action Network and are offering a service to young people through the North Penrith Community Centre.

·    The Nepean Community and Neighbourhood Services (formally known as Spyns) continues to deliver programs to families and children through the North Penrith Community Centre and in partnership with the Kingswood Park Public School.

·    Road safety and bike safety programs have been run through the Kingwood Park Public School in response to concerns about safety of children on or near roads.

·    The local park redevelopment project was launched officially in September 2009 by the Mayor, Councillor Jim Aitken OAM. The significant increase in usage has resulted in a number of community safety issues being identified. An audit was completed by staff from the Public Domain Amenity and Safety Department which resulted in a number of improvements to support amenity for nearby residents.

 

Londonderry

·    The opening of the redeveloped Londonderry Neighbourhood Centre and adjacent playground upgrade has resulted in increased usage of both of these community assets.

·    Council’s Youth Development Officer has been working with local residents and service providers to develop a youth activity to occur in the community once a term. The last activity, held in September 2010 was well attended by local young people and their families. Local residents take responsibility for organising the events with support from Council. Promotion is done through letter box drops undertaken by residents.

·    The shops along Carrington Road have received a clean up from Public Domain resulting in improved amenity for local residents and visitors thus supporting small business viability.

 

Oxley Park

·    Staff in the Community and Cultural Development Department have been working with other partners to develop a scope to support establishment of the St Marys Mt Druitt Pacific Islander and Maori Schools and Community Group. Families and residents involved in previous consultations have been invited to join this group that is working on the development of an Islander festival.

·    In partnership with Bronte House Mission Australia Council has been supporting regular family gatherings for Aboriginal residents in Oxley Park including school holidays activities. This group is growing in number and participants are becoming more actively involved in planning and promoting activities. 

·    The Local Enterprise and Employment Officer has developed a partnership with TAFE Outreach to provide employment ready skills for local women. This project was held at the Oxley Park Public School.

 

Other activities of the Neighbourhood Renewal Program

In addition to the engagement activities from 2009/10, a range of micro project activities have been supported by the Neighbourhood Renewal Program over the previous 12 months. In the Cranebrook community, Council continues to work in close partnership with other levels of government and community service providers. This occurs predominately through the Cranebrook Neighbourhood Advisory Board which meets monthly to progress activity on social and other issues in the Cranebrook area. A key priority for the NAB has been the development and promotion of the ‘Choose Respect’ project.

 

Participants from one of the workshops held at the ENGAGE CREATE EMPOWER Forum

 

In September 2009, the ENGAGE CREATE EMPOWER forum was held in the Nepean Room. The purpose of the forum was to build greater skills and knowledge in community engagement theory and practice and to hear presentations from a range of successful engagement projects from across Western Sydney. The forum was well attended with over 80 participants both council staff as well as representatives from local community, youth and environmental groups.

 

Other micro projects have been linked to the Magnetic Places Program, resulting in a wide range of projects such as ‘Parkour at our Place’ in Werrington, the ‘When we were kids’ project in Kingswood Park and ‘Inspire’ at Parklawn Place in North St Marys. These projects have all been initiated by local residents, artists and service providers to bring activity and creativity to local places and spaces across the LGA. The Magnetic Places program was recognised this year at the NSW Local Government and Shires Association Cultural Awards.  The Magnetic Places program achieved a first place award for the demonstration of Integrated Cultural Policy. The Magnetic Places Project will be the subject of a further report to Council in the coming months.

 

The Artist+Community Toolkit Series is an activity of the Neighbourhood Renewal Program. The Toolkit Series is designed to build skills and interest in creativity as a way of engaging residents as well as enhancing placemaking and community cultural development skills. The Artist+Community Toolkit in 2009-10 was comprised of six workshops including grant writing, legal issues, using the web for promoting activities and place making. A workshop on legal issues and copyright law was held specifically for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander artists. The content and delivery of the workshop was evaluated as highly relevant by those attending. The Artist Community Toolkit is recognised across Western Sydney and beyond as a significant resource for local artists and community organisations seeking to work creatively with residents, particularly those from disadvantaged communities.

 

Work continues on the development of local employment, training and enterprise opportunities across a range of areas. The Neighbourhood Renewal Program developed a partnership with the School for Social Entrepreneurs to deliver a series of workshops aimed at promoting local enterprise development. Social enterprise can often provide an alternative to traditional employment fields for people who may have a creative idea or a desire to promote social sustainability and well being through their activities.

 

An initiative was organised with Spyns and HousingNSW to support residents in Kingswood Park and Cranebrook to attend a recent Job Expo organised by Centrelink. A transport link was provided to these communities to support access to this important employment related event.

 

The Neighbourhood Renewal Program provides an integrated model of community engagement, cultural and employment and enterprise development in disadvantaged communities.  All activities seek to build on the strengths and latent potential within each community.

 

Current Activity in Llandilo

Community engagement activities have commenced in Llandilo to support the development of a Neighbourhood Action Plan. A number of engagement events are already completed or underway. Consultations have been held with the P&C association members at Llandilo Public School, the Maltese Social Group and the Llandilo, Berkshire Park, Shanes Park Resident Action Group. These meetings are lively and bring forward a range of issues, many centred on traffic and transport issues that are common in rural communities.

 

Students from Llandilo Public School thinking about their experiences in Llandilo

 

A project has commenced with students from Year 5 at Llandilo Public School called 'Postcards from Llandilo' where students have listened to stories from a range of residents and then they reflect on their own experiences and daily life in their community. 

 

Many residents of Llandilo are proud of their community and enjoy their rural lifestyle and employment. Similarly to St Marys, living in Llandilo is a generational choice and family and community are important aspects of staying in the area. A range of common issues are emerging regarding concerns about support for older residents and access to services.

 

Priority Area Assessment

In August 2008, Council endorsed the Priority Area Assessment Project for the Neighbourhood Renewal Program. The project outlined a planned implementation of the Neighbourhood Renewal Program across 12 identified areas, based on evidence of issues within each community and opportunities that may arise over time.  The report outlined the adoption of a flexible approach with the capacity to respond to emerging issues, funding opportunities or key partnerships with external agencies. This approach is balanced with the capacity of the program to engage meaningfully with residents and to spend sufficient time in each community to break down barriers to participation or preconceived ideas regarding civic engagement.

 

The endorsed roll out of the program through to 2011-12 is shown in Table 1 below

 

Table 1 - Schedule of Activity

Area/Locality

Pre 2007

Cranebrook, North St Marys, Cambridge Park, Werrington

2007-08

Kingswood Park

2008-09

Londonderry, Oxley Park

2009-10

Kingswood, St Marys

2010-11

Llandilo, Penrith

2011-12

Colyton

 

This approach has been successful to date and experience has been that some community partners have modified their programs in order to complement the Neighbourhood Renewal Program activities in communities.

 

The program for 2010 is in progress in Llandilo and has been strategically timed to build on the work of the NSW Government funded Northern Rural Areas Community Development Project. As outlined in the section above, in Llandilo a range of engagement activities are either underway or completed. However it is proposed that the timing for moving into the area of Penrith suburb be reviewed and the area of Llandilo be the only locality completed in the 2010-11 period.

 

This amendment to the endorsed roll out is proposed for two reasons. Firstly it is timely to direct some of the resources to an evaluation of the program. The evaluation would engage residents and other stakeholders and would aim to develop evidence of the efficacy of the current model. The feedback from residents, partner agencies and other levels of government is generally very positive regarding the program, particularly following the development of the Neighbourhood Action Plan in each community. There is no doubt that community engagement and cultural development activities are building positive relationships in the community. However it is timely to review the approach to the development of Neighbourhood Action Plans to ensure that they are the most appropriate mechanism for delivery sustainable outcomes to these communities.

 

Thus it is recommended that a scope be developed to undertake an evaluation of the program, with the support of an independent consultant. The role of the consultant will be to interview key stakeholders and make recommendations regarding areas of the program that require further development or a change of approach in achieving the strategic goals of Council.  This project will be funded from within the current budget.

 

The second issue requiring a redirection of resources is in implementation of actions identified within the NAPs. There are now five NAPs with a significant and growing range of capital, social and other issues that require implementation and investigation of funding opportunities. Much of the implementation is progressing effectively as documented in the previous section on activities to date. However, some of the more complex actions are outstanding and require further attention and resources in order to be implemented.

 

It is proposed that the development of the Neighbourhood Action Plan for Penrith suburb be shifted to 2011-12 and be completed alongside the engagement in Colyton. The proposed program for the next five years will be as identified in Table 2 below.

 

Table 2  - Proposed Schedule of Activity

Area / Locality

2010-11

Llandilo

2011-12

Colyton, Penrith suburb

2012-13

North St Marys, Werrington

2013-14

Cranebrook, Cambridge Park

2014-15

Kingswood Park, Londonderry

 

This schedule will be reviewed following the availability of ABS data from the 2011 Census.

 

Conclusion

The Neighbourhood Renewal Program continues to support positive outcomes for residents in older established and disadvantaged communities across Penrith.

 

The Penrith Neighbourhood Renewal Program is focussed on suburbs considered to be of relative disadvantage as measured through the ABS SEIFA Index.  The areas of Kingswood and St Marys, whilst diverse and distinct from each other are both considered to be relatively disadvantaged.

 

The engagement process in both communities utilised a range of creative and interesting methods, including face to face surveys, community celebrations, shop keeper and business surveys, meetings with a range of age groups and different cultural groups as well as the development of the Neighbourhood Stories - St Marys project.

 

A community planning session was the final engagement activity in each area and contributed to the refinement of resident priorities and concerns. These sessions support the development of Neighbourhood Action Plans in each community.  All actions listed in the NAP have been agreed to by the relevant Council officers. Some actions all already underway and some actions are currently unfunded. The implementation timeframe for each NAP is four years.

 

In addition, community services or resident volunteers have contributed significantly to the engagement process and have in some instances initiated processes to address social issues raised throughout the engagement process.

 

It is proposed to make a change to the schedule of the Neighbourhood Renewal Program in the current 2010-11 year. The variation is requested to delay the commencement of activities in Penrith suburb in order to undertake an evaluation of the program and provide additional focus to the implementation of existing Neighbourhood Action Plans.

 

A proposed schedule for the Neighbourhood Renewal Program to continue to engage residents and build positive relationships through to the 2014-15 year is included in the report.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Neighbourhood Renewal Program - Update of Activities and Neighbourhood Action Plans - Kingswood and St Marys  be received.

2.     Council endorse the Neighbourhood Action Plans for Kingswood and St Marys as provided in the attachments to this report.

3.     Council endorse the proposed schedule of Neighbourhood Renewal activities as outlined in Table 2 of the report.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.  

Kingswood Community Engagement Report 2010

17 Pages

Attachment

2.  

Kingswood Neighbourhood Action Plan 2010

8 Pages

Attachment

3.  

St Marys Community Engagement Report 2010

21 Pages

Attachment

4.  

St Marys Neighbourhood Action Plan 2010

7 Pages

Attachment

  


Policy Review Committee Meeting

18 October 2010

A City of Opportunities

 

 

 

4

Penrith Whitewater Stadium - Annual Report and Board of Directors   

 

Compiled by:                Glenn Schuil, Acting Executive Officer

Authorised by:             Glenn Schuil, Acting Executive Officer   

 

Objective

We have access to what we need

Community Outcome

A City with equitable access to services and facilities (7)

Strategic Response

Base the provision of services and facilities on principles of social justice and equity (7.1)

 

Presenters:                   Cr Ross Fowler OAM Chairperson - Penrith Whitewater Stadium Limited - Chairperson's Annual Report

                                      Jack Hodge - Stadium Manager - Penrith Whitewater Stadium - Stadium Manager's Report      

 

Executive Summary

Each year, following the Annual General Meeting of the Company, a report is presented to the Council on the year’s activities of the Penrith Whitewater Stadium (PWS), including the financial performance.

 

The reports from both the Chairman and the Stadium Manager highlight the strong financial position of Penrith Whitewater Stadium and the success it has had achieving publicity as a national and international premier sporting facility. The venue has continued throughout the year to attract professional athletes, sporting championships and casual users, the participation rates in each activity are detailed in the report.

Annual Report

The Twelfth Annual General Meeting of the Company was held on 23 September 2010 for the period ended 30 June 2010.

 

The Chairman of the Board and Stadium Manager will be in attendance tonight to make a short presentation which will focus on:

 

·    The Past year – highlights, financial position and issues arising; and

·    The Year ahead.

 

Following are their reports that have been extracted from the Annual Report of Penrith Whitewater Stadium Limited (PWS).

 

Chairman’s Report

 

It gives me much pleasure to present the Chairman’s Report to the Twelfth Annual General Meeting of Penrith Whitewater Stadium Limited.

 

The operations for the year have produced a financial result that is very pleasing. Patronage for whitewater rafting and canoeing based activities remains healthy. Revenue for the year was $2,302,701 which is 6.8% less than $2,471,294 for 2009. The financial outcome for the year ended 30 June 2010 resulted in a surplus before depreciation, amortisation and interest of $421,755, an increase of 3.2% when compared to the surplus achieved in 2009 of $408,550.  During the year some $66,204 was spent on capital improvements. 

 

The Stadium continues to contribute to the overall Penrith economy and to the advancement of the sport of canoe slalom both locally and internationally.

 

Penrith Whitewater Stadium continues to generate a great deal of publicity both nationally and internationally, adding to its reputation as one of the world’s premier sporting facilities. Again the venue has successfully hosted both international and local competitions and has continued to attract a significant number of athletes who see the Stadium as their preferred off-season training venue.

 

I would like to take this opportunity to thank Venue Manager, Jack Hodge and his management team (Simonetta, Jeff, Vicki and Stuart) for leading the organisation throughout the year.  Penrith Whitewater staff continues to show great dedication and commitment to the business. The underlying enthusiasm and commitment of staff is fundamental to the venue’s continuing success.

 

I would also like to thank my fellow directors for their continuing commitment and input to the operations of Penrith Whitewater Stadium. This year sees the retirement of Rebecca Wright.  Rebecca has been a Director for a number of years and her expertise, enthusiasm and drive has been highly valued in the development of the business.  I wish Rebecca all the very best for the future.

 

Finally, I would like to take the opportunity to congratulate the coaches and members of the Australian Canoe Slalom Team on their outstanding results throughout the year, particularly the excellent results achieved by local junior paddler Jessica Fox.  Jessica  won a gold medal in K1W at the inaugural Youth Olympic Games in Singapore, gold medals in both the Ladies K1W and C1W at the Junior World Championships (the first paddler to do so), gold in C1W at the Seo World Cup, bronze in C1W and 5th in K1W at the World Championships.  In addition, Leanne Guinea won silver and bronze in C1W at the World Cup and silver at the World Championships.  The Australian K1W team won the Nations Trophy at the World Championships for the first time with Jessica Fox 5th, Sarah Grant 6th and Kate Lawrence 9th making this the best result for the Australian Team to date.

 

Stadium Manager’s Report

 

Overall participation in the activities offered by PWS increased in 2009-10. Rafting remained steady, but Canoe/Kayak increased by 58% due to strong participation in the World Masters Games and the establishment of a Canoe Polo court that subsequently hosted a number of major events. Swiftwater Rescue courses increased by 9%.

 

Whitewater rafting remains the most popular activity and the highest revenue earner for PWS. Rafting participation decreased slightly from 20,760 to 20,527. Total revenue for rafting increased by only 1.1% from $1,704,195 to $1,723,702, due to a 4.7% price increase. 

 

Total PWS income increased by 9.3% from $2,471,295 in 2008-09 to $2,701,648 in 2009-10.  Total expenses increased by 7.2% from $2,297,323 to $2,462,107 resulting in an increase in operating profit from $173,972 to $239,541. Net profit increased from $55,637 to $154,583. 

 

PWS maintained its strong support for the sport of canoeing throughout the year. The venue hosted the Oceania Canoe Polo Championships, the Canoe Slalom and Polo disciplines of the Sydney World Masters Games in October and the Oceania Canoe Slalom Open as part of the World Series in February. The venue also hosted the NSW State Slalom Championships and NSW Southern Zone Slalom. PWS facilitated over 536 hours of slalom training and competitions for Australian and International paddlers. This included 202 hours for the Australian team as part of the Canoe Slalom National Centre of Excellence (NCE) Agreement between PWS, the Australian Institute of Sport (AIS), the New South Wales Institute of Sport (NSWIS) and Australian Canoeing. The value of PWS’s contribution to the agreement was approximately $29,000.

 

PWS continued its support of various charitable and community organisations. This included the donation of 240 gift certificates to the value of $21,360.

 

Thanks to all PWS staff for their assistance during the year. Thanks also to the PWS Board of Directors for their ongoing dedication and support. The successful operation of PWS relies upon the support of the general public and a network of companies and organisations. PWS would like to thank the general public, suppliers, venue stakeholders and neighbouring organisations for their support and looks forward to working together more closely in the future to maximise the ongoing success of PWS and Penrith Lakes.

 

Board of Directors

 

The Constitution of the Company provides, in part, that:

 

1.   To provide continuity the members of the Board shall resign on a rotating basis. At the First Annual General Meeting, three (3) Directors (including one (1) Councillor) shall resign. At the Second Annual General Meeting, three (3) members shall resign (including one (1) Councillor). Thereafter, the members of the Board, except the Council Officer, shall resign after they have served on the Board for three (3) years after appointment or re-appointment to the Board.   

2.   All retiring Directors shall be eligible for re-appointment.

 

Council should note that George Dodds resigned as a Director as per the Constitution and was reappointed effective from the date of the Annual General Meeting held on 23 September 2010.

 

It was also resolved that the Council’s Group Manager City Presentation, Mr David Burns be the Council’s General Manager’s representative and Company Secretary on the Board.

 

Councillor Ross Fowler OAM was re-appointed Chairman and Helen Brownlee OAM was re-appointed as Deputy Chairman of the Board.

 

 

 

 

Financial Accountant – Entities Comment

 

The Penrith Whitewater Stadium Limited reported a net profit for the 2009-10 Financial year of $154,583. This is a $98,946 increase from their 2008-09 profit of $55,637 or a 177.8% increase. Council provided the Company with a direct subsidy of $398,948 to offset increased costs in their workers compensation premiums which resulted from being grouped with Council and its other entities. The financial result for 2009-10 continues the strong performance of the Company over the past few years in very difficult economic conditions.

 

 

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Penrith Whitewater Stadium - Annual Report and Board of Directors be received

2.     Council agree to underwrite the operation of the Penrith Whitewater Stadium Limited until the presentation to Council of the Penrith Whitewater Stadium Limited Annual Report for 2010-11

3.     Council note and support the Board’s re-appointment of Councillor Ross Fowler OAM as the continuing Chairman of Penrith Whitewater Stadium.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Policy Review Committee Meeting

18 October 2010

A City of Opportunities

 

 

 

5

Concept Plan Precinct D & E in Glenmore Park Stage 2 Release Area. Applicant: Norwest Land Pty Ltd, Owner Mulpha FKP Pty Ltd   

 

Compiled by:                Jonathon Wood, Trainee Environmental Planner

Authorised by:             Paul Lemm, Development Services Manager   

 

Objective

We have access to what we need

Community Outcome

A City with lifestyle and housing choice in our neighbourhoods (8)

Strategic Response

Encourage housing that provides choice, achieves design excellence, and meets community needs (8.1)

 

Presenters:                   Cameron Lamb - Norwest Land - Presentation of Concept Plan      

 

Executive Summary

Penrith Development Control Plan 2006 requires that for Glenmore Park Stage 2, a concept plan setting out proposals for the development of a precinct is required to be lodged and approved by Council prior to, or with, the first subdivision development application for each precinct.

 

Council has now received a concept plan for Precinct D and E of the Glenmore Park Stage 2 release area. The concept plan was submitted prior to the lodgement of the first subdivision development application for Precinct E. The concept plan is the second lodged for the release area, with a concept plan previously endorsed for Precinct B (located to the north) which is owned by Stockland. This concept plan will provide guidance for the future development of both Precincts D and E. The concept plan also aims to demonstrate that the critical elements contained within the Development Control Plan (DCP) can be achieved.

 

The concept plan has been examined and found to be satisfactory when considered against the relevant criteria in Part 6.44 of Penrith Development Control Plan 2006. The concept plan is considered appropriate and it is recommended that it is given support by Council.

 

Council is also in receipt of a development application for Precinct E that seeks to subdivide part of the precinct in accordance with the provisions of the concept plan, as well as an application to construction a bridge that will link the precinct with the future development of Bradley Street. These applications have been assessed in detail and found to be generally in accordance with Penrith Local Environmental Plan (Glenmore Park Stage 2) 2009, and Penrith Development Control Plan 2006. However, the applications cannot be determined until such times as the uncertainty surrounding Section 94 contributions is resolved. In addition, the application for subdivision cannot be determined until such times as certification is received from the Director General of the Department of Planning is received indicating that satisfactory arrangements for state public infrastructure are in place. Discussion on the current state of Section 94 contributions is provided further in this report.

 

Site and Surrounds

The Glenmore Park Stage 2 Release Area is situated on part of the land previously utilised by Mulgoa Quarries as an extractive industry. The majority of the release area has been disturbed in the past through the operations of the old clay/shale mining site. The exception to this is the eastern fringe and southern portion of the release area which has been used predominantly for agricultural purposes in the past.

 

The Glenmore Park Stage 2 release area comprises eight (8) development precincts, identified alphabetically as precincts A-H. The release area is bordered by Ridgetop Drive, Rosecrea Court, Parakeet Grove, and Mulgoa Nature Reserve to the north, Mulgoa landfill and Mulgoa Nature Reserve to the west, rural properties to the south, and rural properties to the east - with the Northern Road approximately 300m from the eastern boundary of the release area. A copy of an indicative Precinct layout plan of the release area is provided at Appendix No.1.

 

Precincts D and E, being the location of the current concept plan, is approximately 58 hectares in area and is located in the central portion of the release area. Precinct D is bound by the proposed riparian corridor to the east, the proposed school and open space areas to the north, and future residential housing to the south (Precinct G) and west (Precinct C). Precinct E is contained between the two (2) riparian corridors and shares a boundary with future residential development to the south (Precinct H).

 

Both Precincts D and E are zoned predominantly for urban purposes, with additional provision for the development of part of the central active open space within the release area, as well as the provision of a smaller scale local park that will straddle the boundary of Precinct E and H. 

 

Refer to the Locality Plan at Appendix No. 2 for further details.

 

Background

The Glenmore Park Southern Expansion release area was endorsed by the NSW Government for inclusion in the Metropolitan Development Program in 2002, with the Minister for Planning declaring the study area as a release area in July 2003 and naming the area as Glenmore Park Stage 2. After this process, Council engaged EDAW Pty Ltd to prepare a detailed Local Environmental Study (LES) relating to the release area to enable Council to prepare a detailed Local Environmental Plan (LEP) for the area. The LES incorporated nine key (9) key elements, including:

 

1.   Biodiversity;

2.   Environmental Analysis;

3.   Bushfire Management;

4.   Culture and Heritage;

5.   Visual Environment;

6.   Connectivity and Accessibility;

7.   Physical Infrastructure;

8.   Economy and Employment;

9.   Social and Community Services.

 

These studies provided direction in Council’s preparation of a comprehensive LEP for the release area. Considerable work was undertaken by Council planners over the last few years, with a draft LEP, DCP and Development Contribution Plan being publicly exhibited and adopted for the release area.  A Planning Agreement between Council and the various landowners for contributions towards affordable housing and employment was also negotiated. The Planning Agreement also provided for the completion of trunk drainage works and the completion of substantial revegetation within the biodiversity corridor by the landowners group. 

 

Penrith Local Environmental Plan (Glenmore Park Stage 2) 2009 was gazetted on 8 May 2009, and concurrently Part 6.44 of Penrith Development Control Plan 2006 (Glenmore Park Stage 2) came into force. The LEP rezoned 225 hectares of land to permit a range of urban, commercial, conservation and recreational uses. The overall release area contains a total of eight (8) precincts that are labelled Precincts A-H.

 

As mentioned previously, Council has also entered into a Planning Agreement with the landowners within Glenmore Park Stage 2 that make provision for:

 

·    monetary contributions towards affordable housing and employment;

·    the dedication of land for biodiversity conservation;

·    works in kind for trunk drainage; and

·    biodiversity corridor planting within the release area.  

 

Further discussion of the current situation surrounding Section 94 contributions is provided further in this report.

 

Concept Plan

The requirement for the submission of a concept plan for these precincts in the release area stems from the provisions of Part 6.44 of Penrith Development Control Plan 2006. Section 1.9 of the DCP outlines:

 

A Concept Plan setting out proposals for the development of each precinct or site is required to be lodged and approved by Council prior to, or with, the first subdivision development application for each precinct.

 

A Concept Plan shall demonstrate:

·     Proposed urban structure and public domain elements, including Landscape Masterplan

·     Delivery of required dwelling yield and diversity targets set out in Table 1

·     Distribution of lot types and housing forms to suit a variety of lifestyles, household types and financial capacities

·     Road hierarchy, sections and details

·     The location and design of open space networks

·     The location of pedestrian and cycle paths

·     The Northern Road viewshed analyses where required

·     Development Staging

·     Infrastructure Delivery Strategy.

 

The concept plan is to serve as a guide for future development of the precinct and as such it is a broad brush approach to the indicative layout of the precinct. The relevant extracts of the concept plan provided by Norwest for Precinct D and E are at Appendix No. 3 and should be viewed in conjunction with this report (colour copies have been provided to Councillors under separate cover). It is important to note that the concept plan also provides detail on the development of other precincts in the release area, however this is provided for context only. A future concept plan will be required to be considered as part of the development of other precincts. 

 

Each element required to be detailed in the concept plan is discussed in turn.

 

1. Proposed urban structure and public domain elements, including Landscape Masterplan

The urban structure is clearly defined in the documentation submitted, and also provides detail on the public domain elements - most significantly in relation to the central active open space area and smaller local park. The location and design of open space networks will be addressed further in this report.

 

The concept plan provides detail on a potential entry feature to Precinct E, which serves to establish what is described as ‘a rural New England feel’ that is consistent with the landscape masterplan elements contained within the concept plan. The final detail on the entry element, particularly the appropriateness of providing a water feature, will be determined as part of a development application for the works.

 

The landscape masterplan submitted provides the indicative street landscaping elements, and seeks to create a variety of sub precincts, described as follows:

 

·    Central garden precinct

·    Recreational precinct

·    Hillside precinct, and

·    Riparian precinct.

 

There is also a rural lifestyle precinct identified, however this will be subject to a future concept plan for Precinct C.

 

Discussions were held with Council’s Landscape Architect who agreed that the landscape concept acknowledges the natural features and associated constraints of the land and also provides an appropriate design response to these features. Detail on final street tree species selection will be established at development application stage.

 

2. Delivery of required dwelling yield and diversity targets set out in Table 1

Table 1 is located in Section 2.5 of the DCP, and provides for the minimum delivery of different dwelling types within the precinct. In relation to Precincts D and E, the table outlines:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table 1: Dwelling Diversity

DWELLING TYPE

Precinct

Apartments and Studios

Terraces / Live-Works and

Semi- Detached

Built to Boundary

Detached

Precinct Total

D

25

40

97

140

302

E

25

40

30

65

160

Combined

50

80

127

205

462

 

The concept plan submitted for consideration provides detail on the lot mix and lot layout, with the dwelling yield and diversity numbers summarised below:

 

DWELLING TYPE

Precinct

Apartments and Studios

Terraces / Live-Works and

Semi- Detached (corner lot)

Built to Boundary

Detached

Precinct Total

D

29

27

140

114

310

E

5

33

26

103

167

Combined

34

60

166

217

477

 

It can be seen from the tables above that the required dwelling yield is achieved, with a total of 477 dwellings to be delivered, which is 15 dwellings in excess of the required DCP yield. The proponent has outlined that the most appropriate means of considering the concept plan is to combine the diversity numbers across both precincts, as the design response is holistic, rather than looking at individual precincts in isolation. Following on from this argument the table below provides for a summary of dwelling types and details whether there is a combined net deficit or surplus of dwelling types, measured against the DCP, across the precincts:

 

DWELLING TYPE

Precinct

Apartments and Studios

Terraces / Live-Works and

Semi- Detached (corner lot)

Built to Boundary

Detached

Precinct Total

DCP

50

80

127

205

462

Combined

34

60

166

217

477

Deficit/Surplus

-16

-20

+41

+12

+15

 

As can be seen from the table, there is a departure from the higher density dwelling types in favour of the medium to low density dwelling types. The proponent has presented a number of arguments for the departure and contends that the variation is appropriate in the circumstances and manages to achieve the underlying objectives of the DCP. A summary of the design principles and arguments conveyed by the proponent are outlined below:

 

·    Higher density and attached housing are located adjacent to areas of high amenity and service provision such as playing fields, school, retail centre and open space corridors;

 

·    The dwelling mix facilitates the delivery of up to 94% of all dwellings as affordable housing based on weekly rentals, and 14% of all dwellings as affordable housing based on purchase price. This substantially exceeds Council’s sustainability blueprint which provides for a minimum of 3% of housing stock in new release areas as affordable housing (this assertion is discussed further in this report);

 

·    The substantial topographical constraints (primarily the slope of the land)  in Precinct E are not amenable to the provision of higher density dwellings due to the need to provide substantial retaining structures which raise construction costs and reduce affordability;

 

·    Market research indicates a strong preference for larger family homes; and

 

·    The commercial impact of a DCP compliant plan would result in approximately $1 million to $2 million in additional costs and foregone revenue due to the increased construction costs associated with providing higher density dwelling types on areas of the precinct with difficult topography.

 

In assessing the appropriateness of the departure it is necessary to examine the underlying intent of the prescribed dwelling diversity numbers. The DCP provides the following objectives and performance measures relating to dwelling diversity:

 

Objectives

 

·    To promote diverse housing forms that meet the increasingly diverse demands of the local community;

·    To ensure affordable housing strategies for the release area are achieved;

 

Performance Measures

 

These objectives may be achieved where:

 

·    Diverse housing forms are provided within precincts and across the overall development area.

 

The application outlines that there will be adequate provision for affordable housing with the altered dwelling mix, and there is also a monetary contribution payable by the proponent towards the provision of affordable housing as part of a planning agreement with Council. The information provided by the proponent was based on a report commissioned as part of the rezoning process for the release area that detailed those particular dwelling types that would be affordable for households with very low, low, and medium incomes. Detailed discussions were held with Council’s Community Development team who concurred with the information provided by the applicant. It was acknowledged that the dwelling mix would provide a substantially higher proportion of affordable housing than that outlined in Council’s Sustainability Blueprint for new release areas. Therefore the proposal satisfies the objective that seeks to ensure that affordable housing strategies for the release area are implemented.  

 

The overall diversity within the release area remains within a single percentage point of the envisaged 80/20 mix of lower density to higher density dwelling types after taking into account the variation to the DCP.

 

When viewed holistically Precinct D and E provide a diversity of housing types, with the distribution across the precincts giving consideration to site constraints and locating higher densities in those areas with greatest amenity.

 

The design principles behind the departure, with particular emphasis on the provision of affordable housing, site topography constraints, and concentrating densities in areas of higher amenity, are supported. It must also be recognised that the development controls relating to dwelling diversity within the DCP states ‘development achieves indicative housing type numbers identified for each precinct at Table 1 . Therefore the variation to the dwelling mix portrayed within the DCP is supported based upon the arguments presented by the proponent.

 

3. Distribution of lot types and housing forms to suit a variety of lifestyle, households types, and financial capacities

This element is interrelated with the delivery of the required lot yield and diversity discussed previously. The proponent has demonstrated that the diversity of lot sizes and built forms is able to suit a variety of lifestyle, household types and financial capacities.

 

4. Road hierarchy, sections and details.

The concept plan outlines the proposed road hierarchy, sections for the collector road and details on the other minor local roads. The proponent has outlined that the precinct will generally adopt the road dimensions for local roads, minor local roads, and laneways. The detail on these roads will be considered with the development applications for the precincts.

The details submitted in relation to the road hierarchy, sections and details are sufficient at concept stage with the exception of a minor local road discussed in detail at point 6 ‘the location of pedestrian and cycle paths’.

 

5. The location and design of open space networks

The concept plan submitted provides significant detail on the location and design of open space networks, with particular reference to the central active open space area and the local neighbourhood park located on the southern edge of Precinct E.

 

The location of the open space elements is consistent with the provisions of the DCP. Discussions have also been held with Council’s Landscape Architect on the detailed design elements of the local neighbourhood park to the south of Precinct E. The general principles in the park are appropriate, subject to review of more detailed documentation at development application stage.

 

The indicative layout of the active open space area in the centre of the release area is consistent with the location identified in the DCP. However, the layout of the open space area differs slightly in that a portion of the open space is proposed to be utilised as a large rain garden. The reasoning behind the provision of this large rain garden is to eliminate the need for a series of smaller raingardens to be provided throughout the riparian corridors. In doing so, the functionality of the riparian corridor and creek system is improved which has been confirmed by the NSW Office of Water. The second benefit is that ongoing maintenance for Council is much simpler and less costly once the riparian corridor and active open space elements are handed over to Council. The loss of open space is marginal, with a an area of approximately 1200m2 no longer being usable as active open space. The stormwater detention basin will also remain useable as active open space, similar to the sporting fields adjacent to the existing town centre in Glenmore Park.

 

The effect of locating the central rain garden on the edge of the active open space has been assessed comprehensively with regard to the recreational elements. All the elements identified in the DCP are able to be accommodated within the revised active open space area. Detailed discussions were held with Council’s Parks Manager, and it was confirmed that the active open space area is adequately sized to accommodate the particular active open space elements. The only concern raised was the indicative levels of the park, which currently show a slope across the playing fields which is not appropriate. However this can be dealt with at development application stage. The concept plan indicates that all the relevant elements of the active open space area can be provided, and as such it worthy of support at this stage.

 

6. The location of pedestrian and cycle paths

The concept plan submitted contains documentation showing the location of pedestrian and cyclist paths/routes. The location and type of both pedestrian and cycle paths remains generally consistent with the provisions of the DCP and will enable linkages to other precincts with the release area.

 

The area of departure relates to the provision of a shared pedestrian/cycle path on the southern edge of Precinct D. The shared path is of adequate width however the proposed width of the road reserve is some 1.6m narrower than that prescribed in the DCP. The DCP requires that where a shared pedestrian/cyclist path is provided the width of the road reserve is increase by 1.3m to ensure that a 2.5m pathway can be provided. The proponent has demonstrated that the pathway can be provided, however there are minimal opportunities for landscape plantings due to the provision of a 1m verge. The proponent outlines that there is adequate space for substantial tree plantings on the southern side of the pathway, as the root systems can establish themselves partly on an adjoining rural property. In the majority of circumstances such an approach would necessitate the consent of the adjoining landowner- and this is something that may be necessary at DA stage.

 

However, this design approach is not considered appropriate as locating substantial tree plantings on the southern side of the pathway will expose pedestrians and cyclists to the harsh summer sun. This viewpoint has been reinforced by Council’s Landscape Architect. The current design approach is inconsistent with one of the performance measures of the DCP, which provides:

 

·    Street landscaping is provided to enhance the appearance of the street and pedestrian environment, including providing protection from the sun.

 

The DCP provides for a wider verge that is able to achieve a substantial street tree planting on the northern side of the shared pathway that will provide a degree of shading in the summer months. The DCP departure as proposed in the concept plan is not worthy of support as it results in a poor planning outcome when compared to a concept that achieves DCP compliance. This is particularly relevant when considering that the release area is currently a greenfield site and as such detailed design should be able to achieve DCP compliance. Therefore this component of the concept plan should not be endorsed at this stage, and a recommendation of this report is that the verge width and street tree location is to comply with the DCP.

 

An extract of the proposed road section is provided at Appendix No. 4 (also provided under separate cover for Councillors).

 

7. The Northern Road viewshed analyses where required.

The provisions of Section 3.1.6 identify those areas within the release area that have potential to adversely impact on the existing viewshed from the Northern Road towards the Blue Mountains. Precincts D and E are not identified as an area where a viewshed analysis is required. Therefore the concept plan is not required to be supported by a viewshed analysis.

 

8. Development Staging

The concept plan, through the lot mix and layout, provides detail on the staging of the precincts. The detail provided is sufficient at concept stage, and gives an indication on the delivery staging of the precinct.

 

9. Infrastructure Delivery Strategy

The concept plan outlines the location and types of infrastructure required to service the precinct, in terms of initial lot creation through to the servicing of individual dwellings. As discussed below the provision of infrastructure contained in the Section 94 plan is not entirely certain at this point in time given the recent move by the NSW Government to cap developer levies. This does not impede Council’s ability to endorse the current concept plan for Precinct D and E and is a matter that will be dealt with as part of development applications for the Precinct’s.

 

It is understood that a separate report has been prepared for the Policy Review Committee tonight that provides significant detail on the current situation regarding Section 94 contributions. In summary, Council currently faces a shortfall across the release area in light of the recent $30,000 per lot cap on development contributions. As previously resolved by Council, no development applications for subdivision have been issued due to these implications.

 

At this stage the landowners group have put forward a preliminary proposal indicating a willingness to enter into a separate planning agreement with Council for the provision of all infrastructure contained in the Section 94 plan. Until such times as a planning agreement is put forward by the landowners, and its contents are generally agreed to by Council staff, no development consents will be issued for subdivision.

 

Comments from other Sections of Council

The concept plan was referred to the relevant sections of Council for comment and feedback received indicated support for the concept plan. There will be further opportunity afforded to relevant internal staff to provide comment at development application stage, where greater detail will be provided by the proponent.

 

Conclusion

The concept plan submitted satisfies the provisions of Section 1.9 of Part 6.44 contained within Penrith Development Control Plan 2006. The plan provides direction to the future development of the precincts and gives Council comfort that the relevant provisions of the DCP are able to be achieved, or that the departures from the DCP are appropriate. It has been established as part of this assessment that the concept plan is worthy of Council’s endorsement, with the exception of the proposed width of the southern most local road.

 

The current development applications are likely to be determined under delegated authority when the Section 94 issues are resolved and certification is received from the Director General indicating that satisfactory arrangements for the provision of state public infrastructure are in place.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Concept Plan Precinct D & E in Glenmore Park Stage 2 Release Area. Applicant: Norwest Land Pty Ltd, Owner Mulpha FKP Pty Ltd be received.

2.     The Precinct D & E Concept Plan be endorsed by Council with the exception of the departure proposed on the width of southern most local road where DCP compliance is required to be achieved. 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1. View

Indicative Precinct Layout of Release Area

1 Page

Appendix

2. View

Locality Plan

1 Page

Appendix

3. View

Norwest Concept Plan extract

11 Pages

Appendix

4. View

Minor Local Road Section

1 Page

Appendix

  


Policy Review Committee Meeting

18 October 2010

Appendix 1 - Indicative Precinct Layout of Release Area

 

 

 

 


Policy Review Committee Meeting

18 October 2010

Appendix 2 - Locality Plan

 

 

 


Policy Review Committee Meeting

18 October 2010

Appendix 3 - Norwest Concept Plan extract

 

 

 












Policy Review Committee Meeting

18 October 2010

Appendix 4 - Minor Local Road Section

 

 

 

 


 

 

A Green City

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


A Liveable City

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

6        Feral and Infant Animals Policy

 

7        Review of the Alcohol Free Public Spaces Policy 

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting

18 October 2010

A Liveable City

 

 

 

6

Feral and Infant Animals Policy   

 

Compiled by:                Noel Fuller, Co-ordinator Ranger and Animal Services

Authorised by:             Tracy Chalk, Waste and Community Protection Manager   

 

Objective

Our public spaces encourage safe and healthy communities

Community Outcome

A City with safe, inviting parks and public spaces (18)

Strategic Response

Provide safe, well-maintained public spaces and parks (18.1)

       

 

Executive Summary

The purpose of this report is to inform Council of the proposed Feral and Infant Animals Policy.  The report seeks Council endorsement of the attached draft Feral and Infant Animals Policy so as to provide a clear policy framework for the management of such animals by Council’s and contractors’ staff.

Background

Feral animals pose a serious threat to the natural and built environment, conservation of biodiversity and sustainability of natural ecosystems, whilst posing a further threat to resident welfare and safety.  Feral animals inhabit areas of the Penrith Local Government Area causing environmental, social and economic impacts within our community.

 

The draft Feral and Infant Animals policy:

·    aims to reduce such impacts and to assist Council’s responsible animal management systems;

·    covers animals impounded by Council’s Animal Services Team;

·    complies with Section 64 and 64A of the Companion Animals Act 1998.

 

Animals that are seized or captured by an authorised Council Officer or members of the public are transported to an authorised facility.

 

Feral animals are usually received at authorised facilities in poor condition.  They are difficult to handle and are not suitable to be re-homed.  Caging Feral animals causes stress on the animal.  Companion animals that are wearing a collar, identification tag or are microchipped must not be deemed Feral.

 

Infant animals require vast amounts of resources to raise and have a low resistance to diseases.  However, the policy includes options to consider prior to euthanasia of infant animals:

 

·    Is there a rescue organisation that may take the animal for rearing?

·    Is there a compatible lactating animal within the animal holding facility that could “adopt” and care for the infant?

·    Does the animal appear to be in good health?

 

The Policy provides information on:

 

·    Feral Animal Management Strategies

·    Environmental Impacts

·    Economic and Social Impacts

·    Public Safety, Community Education

·    Collection and Management of Data

·    Customer Response

 

Procedures for Council staff and Animal Shelter staff for managing Feral and Infant Animals are detailed in the draft Policy. 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Feral and Infant Animals Policy be received.

2.     Council adopt the Feral and Infant Animals Policy.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1. View

Feral and Infant Animal Policy

5 Pages

Appendix

  


Policy Review Committee Meeting

18 October 2010

Appendix 1 - Feral and Infant Animal Policy

 

 

 

 

 

FUNCTION:               FERAL AND INFANT ANIMALS POLICY

 

 

SECTION:           RANGER AND ANIMAL SERVICES

 

 

SUBJECT:                  MANAGEMENT OF FERAL AND INFANT ANIMALS AND COMPANION ANIMALS

 

 

 

AUTHORISED BY:  WASTE AND COMMUNITY PROTECTION

MANAGER

 

 

ISSUED TO:               EACH DEPARTMENT STAFF,

ANIMAL SHELTER CONTRACTOR

 

 

FIRST ISSUED: SEPTEMBER 2010

 

 

AMENDED:

 

 

PAGE:                 1 OF 5

 

 

DATE OF

NEXT REVIEW:       JUNE 2012

 


 

Purpose/Objective

 

Feral animals pose a serious threat to the natural and built environment, conservation of biodiversity and sustainability of natural ecosystems, whilst posing a further threat to resident welfare and safety.  Council acknowledges feral animals inhabit areas of the Penrith Local Government Area. 

 

This policy:

·    Aims to reduce such impacts and to assist Council’s responsible animal management systems

·    Covers animals impounded by Council’s Animal Services Team

·    Complies with Section 64 and 64A of the Companion Animals Act 1998

 

Animals that are seized or captured by an authorised Council Officer or members of the public are transported to an authorised facility.

 

Feral animals are usually received at authorised facilities in poor condition.  They are difficult to handle and are not suitable to be re-homed.  Caging Feral animals causes stress on the animal.  Infant animals require vast amounts of resources to raise and have a low resistance to diseases.

 

This Policy complies with Section 64 and 64A of the Companion Animals Act 1998.

 


 

Policy Statement

 

Council acknowledges feral animals (such as dogs and cats) inhabit areas of the Penrith Local Government Area. These animals cause environmental, social and economic impacts within the community.

 

1.      Feral Animal Management Strategies

Council will develop and implement integrated strategies to reduce the environmental, social and economic impacts of feral animals in the Local Government Area. Council aims to manage and control populations of feral animals through a cooperative approach with other agencies and land owners.

 

The strategies will be cost effective and develop actions and performance measures for the desired policy outcomes. Strategies will be regularly reviewed and adaptive management approach used for their implementation.

 

2.      Environmental Impacts

Council will take active measures to protect the flora and fauna habitats from the threat of feral animals. Control programs will be targeted in areas of greatest conservation value, such as where threatened species are affected. Council will adopt the most appropriate techniques and take action to control feral animals on land it manages.

 

3.      Economic and Social Impacts

Council will take active measures to reduce the economic and social cost of feral animals to the community. Control programs will be developed to control feral animal populations in areas where damage to both public and private property is affected.

 

4.      Public Safety

Council will take actions to reduce the danger and health risks to the community associated with feral animals on roadways, public places and Council managed land.

 

5.      Community Education

Council will continue to research and gather information on the impact of feral animals and their control through active involvement with other agencies.

Council will promote a better understanding of feral issues among the community through the use of fact sheets, Council websites, presentations and providing information for media releases.

 

6.      Collection and Management of Data

Council will keep a record of customer requests.  Council will collect information through surveys and the Information Management System on the number, distribution and impacts of feral animals in the community and utilise the data to make informed decisions on feral animal management.

 


 

7.      Customer Response

Council will provide a consistent response to customer requests regarding feral animals.  Council will liaise with other agencies including the National Parks and Wildlife Service, Rural Lands Protection Board, NSW Police and Department of Infrastructure Planning and Natural Resources to ensure unified and up-to-date information is provided. 

 

 

Definitions

 

a.   Companion Animal – means dog or cat.

b.   Feral – means wild, or existing in a state of nature and showing no signs of domestication.

c.   Companion Animals that are wearing a collar, identification tag or micro chipped MUST NOT be deemed Feral.

d.   Infant - means in the first period of existence and refers to an animal that is not able to feed and fend for itself.

 

 

Procedures

 

1.   Observe and assess the behaviour of the animal or companion animal captured or received from the public to determine if they are Feral or Infant.

 

2.   Follow the procedure set out below:

 

a.   Procedure for companion animal deemed Feral

 

·    Receive the animal noting the animal was deemed Feral

 

b.   Procedure for companion animal deemed Infant

 

·    Receive the animal noting the animal was an Infant

 

Options to consider prior to euthanasia:

·    Is there a recue organisation that may take the animal for rearing

·    Is there a compatible lactating animal within the animal holding facility that could “adopt” and care for the infant

·    Does the animal appear to be in good health

 

3.   Feral or Infant animals be euthanased prior to the end of any required holding period as determined by the Companion Animals Act 1998.

 


 

History

 

Feral animals are generally received at the Animal Holding Facility in a poor condition, are difficult to handle and accommodate and are not suitable to be re-homed.  Caging Feral animals causes stress on the animal.  Infant animals require vast amounts of resources and time to raise and have a low resistance to diseases. 

 

This policy complies with Section 64 and 64A of the Companion Animals Act 1998.

 


Policy Review Committee Meeting

18 October 2010

A Liveable City

 

 

 

7

Review of the Alcohol Free Public Spaces Policy    

 

Compiled by:                Olivia Kidon, Community Safety Co-ordinator

Authorised by:             Yvonne Perkins, Public Domain Amenity and Safety Manager  

 

Objective

Our public spaces encourage safe and healthy communities

Community Outcome

A City with safe, inviting parks and public spaces (18)

Strategic Response

Provide safe, well-maintained public spaces and parks (18.1)

       

 

Executive Summary

This report proposes the adoption of four (4) amendments to Council’s adopted Alcohol Free Public Spaces Policy that provides a framework to support the implementation and/or suspension of designated areas within the Penrith Local Government Area where the consumption and possession of alcohol is prohibited. The report recommends the proposed amendments to the Alcohol Free Public Spaces Policy to allow for a shorter determination process, suspension to cover multiple events in one year and alignment with the insurance requirements of Council’s insurer, Westpool, be adopted.

Background

At Council’s Ordinary Meeting held on 1 December 2008, Council adopted the recommendation of the Policy Review Committee Meeting of 17 November 2008 to adopt the Alcohol Free Public Spaces Policy as a framework for the implementation and/or suspension of designated areas within the Penrith Local Government Area where the consumption and/or possession of alcohol is prohibited.

 

The Policy details the procedures to be followed for the implementation of Alcohol Free Zones and Alcohol Free Areas in accordance with New South Wales Ministerial Guidelines and legislation under Sections 632 and 644 of the Local Government Act 1993 (referred to as the Act).

 

This report proposes four (4) amendments to the current Alcohol Free Public Spaces Policy that relate to the suspension of an Alcohol Free Zone or Alcohol Free Area. The catalyst for these proposed changes follow a request from Hawkesbury Harvest Inc. to temporarily suspend the recently established Alcohol Free Area in the Civic Arts Space (also known as the ‘Green Space’ bounded by the Civic Centre, Westfield’s Plaza and the Joan Sutherland Performing Arts Centre). The suspension would accommodate stall holders who provide alcoholic beverage tasting as part of the Hawkesbury Harvest Farmers and Fine Food Market that takes place on the first Saturday of every month.

 

The Policy currently provides flexibility for the possible temporary suspension of an Alcohol Free Area for community events and/or celebrations where it is considered suitable for alcohol to be consumed (e.g. wine tasting at the Hawkesbury Harvest Inc.).  Four proposed changes to the policy however, allow for a shorter determination process, suspension to cover multiple events in one year and a revision to the public liability requirements in line with Council’s insurer, Westpool.

 

The Penrith Valley Community Safety Partnership at its meeting of 30 September 2010 supported the proposed changes to the Policy and members were also requested to review all other aspects of the policy and provide feedback on any issue that they thought may need further consideration.  No requests for further changes were forthcoming from the Partnership.   The following amendments to the policy are proposed as outlined below.

 

Proposed amendments to the Alcohol Free Public Spaces Policy

 

·    Clause 2.1.1 of the current Policy states that all requests for the suspension of an Alcohol Free Zone or Alcohol Free Area shall be forwarded to Council in writing at least 60 days prior to the proposed suspension period.  It is now considered that an application lodged at least 30 days prior to a proposed suspension period is adequate to allow for an application to be considered and the suspension period, once approved, to be advertised in local media.  The revised Policy recommends that the timeframe in which a request for suspension is to be submitted be reduced to at least 30 days prior to the proposed suspension period.

 

Amended clause to read:

 

2.1.1  All requests for the suspension of an Alcohol Free Zone or Alcohol Free Area, or part thereof, shall be forwarded to Council in writing at least 30 days prior to the proposed suspension period.

 

·    Clause 2.1.3 of the current Policy states that applicants seeking approval to suspend an Alcohol Free Zone or Alcohol Free Area shall provide relevant certificates in respect of a minimum $20 million public liability insurance cover. The revised Policy recommends that the amount of public liability insurance cover required to be provided by applicants be reduced to $10 million. Council’s Risk Management Coordinator verified that Westpool’s standard requirement for public liability cover is $10 million.

 

Amended clause to read:

 

2.1.3  An applicant seeking approval to suspend an Alcohol Free Zone or Alcohol Free Area, shall provide relevant certificates in respect of a minimum $10 million public liability insurance cover.

 

Clause 3.2 of the current Policy states that the suspension or cancellation of an Alcohol Free Area shall require a valid resolution of the Council to suspend the notice designating an Alcohol Free Area. The revised Policy recommends that an application for suspension of an Alcohol Free Area not require a resolution of Council but instead be determined under delegated authority by the Public Domain Amenity and Safety Manager.

 

The amendment of Clause 3.2 is made possible because Alcohol Free Areas, unlike Alcohol Free Zones which are governed by Section 644 of the Local Government Act 1993 and require a valid resolution of Council to be suspended, do not comply with the official definition of an Alcohol Free Zone as defined in the Act and subsequently do not require a valid resolution to be suspended.

 

Council’s Alcohol Free Areas have been developed in accordance with Section 632 of the Local Government Act 1993 – Acting Contrary to Notices, allowing Council to make it illegal to consume or possess alcohol by erecting a notice in a designated alcohol free location. The legislation does not stipulate conditions for the suspension of an erected notice, providing Council the liberty to decide how an application for suspension is determined.

 

Amended clause to read:

 

3.2     Suspension or cancellation of an Alcohol Free Area shall be determined under delegated authority by the Public Domain Amenity & Safety Manager.

 

Clause 3.5 states “suspension of an Alcohol Free Zone, or suspension of the notice designating an Alcohol Free Area for an event in one year, does not apply to the event in subsequent years.  Separate applications shall be submitted as required in line with this policy.” To allow for situations such as the request from the Hawkesbury Harvest Inc. who have monthly events in the Civic Arts Space, it is proposed to add an additional clause under 3.5 as follows:

 

3.5.1  Suspension of an Alcohol Free Zone, or suspension of the notice designating an Alcohol Free Area for multiple events, can be made on an annual basis, but does not apply to  multiple events in subsequent years.  Separate annual applications shall be submitted in line with this policy.

 

Conclusion

 

This request by the Hawkesbury Harvest Inc. is the first request for suspension of an Alcohol Free Area or Alcohol Free Zone that Council has received since the adoption of the Policy in 2008.  It should be noted however that the Civic Arts Space has only recently been designated as an Alcohol Free Area.  It is anticipated, at this time, that future requests for suspensions will most likely be received for locations within the Penrith & St Marys CBDs.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Review of the Alcohol Free Public Spaces Policy be received.

2.     The proposed changes to the Alcohol Free Public Spaces Policy be adopted to support the establishment, suspension and/or cancellation of Alcohol Free Areas and Alcohol Free Zones in designated areas in the Penrith Local Government Area.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1. View

Alcohol Free Public Spaces Policy

5 Pages

Appendix

  


Policy Review Committee Meeting

18 October 2010

Appendix 1 - Alcohol Free Public Spaces Policy

 

 

 

ALCOHOL FREE PUBLIC SPACES POLICY

 

 

Responsible Department:        Public Domain Amenity & Safety

Responsible Section:                Community Safety

 

 

 

OBJECTIVE:

 

To provide a policy for the implementation and/or suspension of designated areas within the Penrith Local Government Area (LGA) where the consumption and possession of alcohol is prohibited, thereby promoting responsible social behaviour in designated public spaces.

 

INFORMATION:

 

Designated locations within the Penrith LGA may be established as areas where it is illegal to consume or possess alcohol.

 

This can be enacted as an Alcohol Free Zone, created in accordance with section 644 of the Local Government Act 1993, on public roads and public car parks.

 

In other areas (e.g. parks, reserves and other public spaces) Council can make it illegal to consume or possess alcohol by erecting a notice in accordance with section 632 and 670 of the Local Government Act 1993. For the purpose of this policy these areas will be known as Alcohol Free Areas as they do not comply with the official definition of an Alcohol Free Zone as defined in the Local Government Act 1993.

 

POLICY:

 

1.   ESTABLISHMENT OF AN ALCOHOL FREE ZONE OR ALCOHOL FREE AREA IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE LOCAL GOVERNMENT ACT 1993

 

1.1    Penrith City Council shall establish Alcohol Free Zones on public roads and car parks, within the Penrith LGA, in accordance with Section 644 of the Local Government Act 1993.

 

1.2    Penrith City Council shall establish Alcohol Free Areas on other public land, within the Penrith LGA, in accordance with section 632 of the Local Government Act 1993.

 

1.3    An Alcohol Free Zone or Alcohol Free Area may only be established by resolution of Council.

 

1.4    When Alcohol Free Zones and/or Alcohol Free Area are established or reviewed by Council, the following information shall be provided.

 

·    Reasons supporting the implementation of the Alcohol Free Zone or Alcohol Free Area;

·    Locations of Alcohol Free Zone or Alcohol Free Area;

·    Expiration date of an Alcohol Free Zone or Alcohol Free Area;

·    Times of day that the Alcohol Free Area will apply;

·    List of stakeholders consulted during the implementation process.

 

 

2.   SUSPENSION OR CANCELLATION OF AN ALCOHOL FREE ZONE OR ALCOHOL FREE AREA TO ACCOMMODATE A SPECIFIC COMMUNITY EVENT

 

2.1   Request for the suspension of an Alcohol Free Zone or Alcohol Free Area

 

2.1.1   All requests for the suspension of an Alcohol Free Zone or Alcohol Free Area, or part thereof, shall be forwarded to Council in writing at least 30 days prior to the proposed suspension period;

 

2.1.2   All requests for suspension of an Alcohol Free Zone or Alcohol Free Area, shall detail the following information:

·    The organisation or individual requesting the suspension;

·    The reason for the suspension;

·    The section of Alcohol Free Zone or Alcohol Free Area to be suspended;

·    The date and timeframe for the suspension;

·    Estimated number of people attending the community event;

·    The proposed security and control measures to be implemented;

·    Council may request a copy of the risk management plan for publicly advertised events.

 

Council has a standard form available for such requests to be submitted.

 

2.1.3   Insurance

An applicant seeking approval to suspend an Alcohol Free Zone or Alcohol Free Area, shall provide relevant certificates in respect of a minimum $10 million public liability insurance cover.

 


 

 

2.2   Request for the cancellation of an Alcohol Free Zone or Alcohol Free Area

 

2.2.1   All requests for the cancellation of an Alcohol Free Zone or Alcohol Free Area, or part thereof, shall be forwarded to Council in writing.

 

2.2.2   All requests for the cancellation of an Alcohol Free Zone or Alcohol Free Area, shall detail the following information:

 

·    The organisation or individual requesting the cancellation;

·    The reason for the cancellation;

·    The section of Alcohol Free Zone Alcohol Free Area to be cancelled;

 

Council has a standard form available for such requests to be submitted.

 

 

3    DETERMINATION OF APPLICATION FOR SUSPENSION OR CANCELLATION OF ALCOHOL FREE ZONES OR ALCOHOL FREE AREAS

 

3.1   Suspension or cancellation of an Alcohol Free Zone shall be as per Section 645 of the Local Government Act 1993, requiring a valid resolution of the Council to suspend a Zone.

 

3.2   Suspension or cancellation of an Alcohol Free Area shall be determined under delegated authority by the Public Domain Amenity & Safety Manager.

 

3.3   An application to suspend or cancel an Alcohol Free Zone or Alcohol Free Area shall be forwarded to the Local Police Force for comment;

 

3.4   An application to suspend or cancel an Alcohol Free Zone or Alcohol Free Area shall be assessed under the following criteria:

 

3.4.1   Suspension:

·   Consideration of comments by the Local Police Force;

·   The nature of the event;

·   The proposed number of people attending the event;

·   The security and control measures to be instigated;

·   The timeframe proposed for the suspension of the zone/area;

·   Perceived benefits or otherwise to the broader community interests;

·   Traffic Management Plan and event Management Plan if required by Council;

·   Insurance coverage;

·   Council may undertake any other consultation with relevant stakeholders that it considers necessary.

 

3.4.2   Cancellation:

·   Consideration of comments by the Local Police Force;

·   Perceived benefits or otherwise to the broader community interests;

·   Council may undertake any other consultation with relevant stakeholders that it considers necessary.

 

3.5   Suspension of an Alcohol Free Zone, or suspension of the notice designating an Alcohol Free Area for an event in one year, does not apply to the event in subsequent years. Separate applications shall be submitted as required in line with this policy.

 

3.5.1   Suspension of an Alcohol Fee Zone, or suspension of the notice designating an Alcohol Free Area for multiple events, can be made on an annual basis, but does not apply to multiple events in subsequent years. Separate annual applications shall be submitted in line with this policy.

 

3.6   Following determination of the suspension of an Alcohol Free Zone and the appropriate resolutions of Council, the suspension shall be advertised as per Section 645 of the Local Government Act 1993, and the local Police Force advised.

 

3.7   Following determination of the suspension of the notice designating an Alcohol Free Area and the appropriate resolutions of Council, the suspension shall be advertised in a relevant local newspaper, and the local Police Force advised.

 

3.8   Should the application to suspend an Alcohol Free Zone or suspend the notice designating an Alcohol Free Area not be successful, the applicant shall be advised in writing, and the local Police Force notified.

 

 

4    ENFORCEMENT OF ALCOHOL FREE ZONES AND ALCOHOL FREE AREAS

 

4.1   Alcohol Free Zones shall be enforced as per Sections 642, 643, 647, 648 and 649 of the Local Government Act 1993. The Police are responsible for enforcing Alcohol Free Zones.

 

4.2   Alcohol Free Areas shall be enforced as per Section 632 of the Local Government Act 1993. The Police are responsible for enforcing the notices erected by Council.


 

5    SIGNAGE DENOTING ALCOHOL FREE ZONE OR ALCOHOL FREE AREA

 

5.1   An Alcohol Free Zone shall be indicated by the erection of a sign as follows:

 

 

“Alcohol Free Zone

 

For the period

Dd/mm/yy

To

Dd/mm/yy

Pursuant to Section 644

Local Government Act 1993

 

By Order: General Manager

Penrith City Council”

 

A map will also be included on signage to clearly indicate the area covered by the zoning.

 

5.2   An Alcohol Free Area shall be created by erecting a notice in accordance with Section 632 and 670 of the Local Government Act 1993, stating:

 

Penrith City Council

Notice to the Public

 

No intoxicating liquor is to be taken onto or consumed on any portion of this reserve within the specified times, without Council consent.

 

Pursuant section 632 Local Government Act 1993

By Order: General Manager

Penrith City Council”

 

 

The word ‘reserve’ may need to be substituted from time to time by more relevant wording, e.g. park, river foreshore, etc, to properly reflect Council’s resolution.

 

 

POLICY ADOPTED ………………………………………………………..xx/xx/xxxx

 

POLICY TO BE REVIEWED ……………………………………………...xx/xx/xxxx

 

 


 

 

 

 

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A Vibrant City

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

URGENT

 

8        Transportation of Restricted Solid Waste to SITA landfill facility

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


Urgent Reports

 

DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

CONTENTS

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

8        Transportation of Restricted Solid Waste to SITA landfill facility

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting - Urgent Report

18 October 2010

A Vibrant City

 

 

 

8

Transportation of Restricted Solid Waste to SITA landfill facility   

 

Compiled by:                Graham Liehr, Environmental Health Manager

Authorised by:             Roger Nethercote, Group Manager - People and Places 

Requested By:             Councillor Ross Fowler OAM

 

Objective

We build on our strengths, value our heritage, celebrate our cultural diversity, and foster creativity

Community Outcome

A City that promotes health and wellbeing (21)

Strategic Response

Encourage the wellbeing of our communities (21.1)

       

 

Executive Summary

A Briefing to Councillors was provided on 28 June 2010 on the proposal of the State Property Authority proposal to prepare an Environmental Assessment to support a Part 3A application under the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 for the remediation of 7-9 Nelson Road, Hunters Hill.  The remediation will also extend to adjoining land that has also been identified as contaminated through its past use.

 

The remediation of the site includes the proposal to remove the contaminated material from the site and transport it to the SITA landfill site in Kemps Creek, within the Penrith City Local Government Area.  The SITA site is the only site in NSW licensed by the Department Environment Climate Change and Water (DECCW) to accept the waste that has been classified as “Restricted Solid Waste.” 

 

The contaminated properties which include numbers 7 and 9 Nelson Road, Hunters Hill and extends to some adjoining properties has been the subject of substantial media interest and raised concern to residents in Hunters Hill.

 

Councillors raised a number of issues in the briefing which have not yet been formally responded to by the State Property Authority (SPA). There are a range of public health and environmental issues relating to the transportation of the waste to, and its deposition on, the SITA site that remain unanswered.

 

Following media attention yesterday, the SPA has been requested by the Premier to investigate alternative options for the disposal of the contaminated material.

 

This report recommends Council write to Premier Keneally registering its strong opposition to the proposal and seeking the Remediation Action Plan include an alternative option for disposal of the waste. It also recommends that Council seek the support from the Member for Mulgoa.

Introduction

The State Property Authority (SPA) has advised of the proposed remediation of a property owned by NSW Health and located at 7-9 Nelson Road Hunters Hill as well as some adjoining land (“the site”).  The remediation includes a proposal to dispose of excavated contaminated material from the site and to dispose of it at the SITA landfill facility in Kemps Creek, within the Penrith City Local Government Area.

 

The SPA was formed under the State Property Authority Act 2006 and has responsibilities that include the management of properties of government agencies. 

 

The site was contaminated as a result of the processing of uranium ore for extraction of radium between 1911 and 1916.  Whilst the site is currently vacant, there are residential properties on either side. 

 

The SPA has appointed the successful tender for the preparation of an Environmental Assessment (EA). This will be lodged to NSW Planning for the approval of the Minister for Planning. A Remediation Action Plan will also be prepared for inclusion in the EA and more recently, the SPA has appointed a remediation contractor who will prepare a Remediation Action Plan. The SPA has been requested to ensure that Penrith Council is a genuine participant in the assessment and consultation process. 

 

The briefing in June 2010 was organised so the SPA would provide Council with an overview of its plans prior to the preparation of the Environmental Assessment documentation and provide opportunity for Council to raise concerns that Council considers should be addressed in the planning. Councillors raised a number of issues with the SPA which are yet to be formally addressed. Premier Keneally has now directed the SPA to investigate other landfill options to the SITA site in Kemps Creek.

Background

The property at 7-9 Nelson Parade, Hunters Hill was the site of a commercial processing plant owned by the Radium Hill Company and used to extract radium from uranium ore between 1911 and 1916, when the company went bankrupt and vacated the site.

 

The radium was extracted for commercial purposes including medical applications and the manufacture of luminous watch dials. The uranium ore that was stockpiled on site occurs naturally, and was mined in South Australia.

 

The NSW Government acquired 9 Nelson Parade Hunters Hill in 1978 and 7 Nelson Parade in 1983 in the interests of public health following the discovery of radioactive contamination. Since the Government’s acquisition of 7 and 9 Nelson Parade, there have been no buildings or human occupation on the site. 11 Nelson Parade Hunters Hill was acquired by the Government in 2009 and includes a large residence.

 

The site has been the subject of a number of contamination assessment studies, which have identified the presence of contaminants (both chemical and radiological) at concentrations that would preclude the site’s redevelopment for residential purposes in its current state.

 


The residual radioactive material remains on the site from remnants of the stockpile of ore, and discarded tailings after the radium was extracted. Testing of neighbouring private and public property has been undertaken by the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) and has identified some areas of elevated radiation levels (i.e. significantly above background levels).

 

The SPA, as owner of the property, has recommended to the Government that the site be remediated reasoning that a suitably licensed landfill site is a more appropriate place for contaminated material than for the material to remain in a residential area. The SPA advises the property has significant potential capital value, which could be put to more effective use by the government.

 

The remediation plan will involve the removal of radioactive contaminated material and other chemical contaminants from the site and surrounding areas to an extent where the sites can be certified as suitable for residential use by an independent site auditor. The exact amount of material to be removed from the site will not be known until the site works are under way, but has been estimated at over 5,000 tonnes.

 

The remediation work is subject to a planning process which involves a detailed description of the intended removal and disposal process, and public exhibition of the associated documents and plans. SPA has recently engaged Parsons Brinckerhoff, environmental management consultants, to assist in preparing the Environmental Assessment.

 

The radioactive contaminated material on the site has been classified by an independent site auditor as “Restricted Solid Waste” and this classification has been confirmed by the Department of Environment, Climate Change and Water (DECCW). The classification allows the material to be deposited in a suitably licensed landfill site. The Classification only relates to the radiological properties and the chemical contamination is subject to separate waste classification. See Appendix No. 1 for a copy of the letter of “Review of Waste Classification of Radiological Soil” from the accredited site auditor, Graeme Nyland dated 20 February 2009 and Appendix No. 2 for the letter of Classification of Waste from the Department of Environment and Climate Change dated 7 October 2009.

 

DECC has confirmed that the SITA site in Kemps Creek is the only landfill site in NSW that is licensed by the Department of Environment Climate Change and Water (DECCW) to accept the Restricted Solid Waste.

 

Chronology with Council

 

On 12 January 2010 representatives from the State Property Authority and Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) met with Council officers and introduced the proposal to remediate the Hunters Hill site and transport the contaminated waste to the SITA landfill site.  The SPA was requested to provide details in writing as early as possible and the SPA agreed to brief Council.

 

Following the meeting, Council sent a number of emails to the SPA confirming request for information to Council on the project and for the SPA to commit to a date to attend the briefing. On 13 April 2010, a tentative date was set for a briefing however cancelled at the request of the SPA as ANSTO staff were unavailable to attend.

 

On 27 April 2010 a letter was sent to the SPA advising of Penrith’s likely opposition to the transport of contaminated waste, seeking to be a genuine participant in the assessment and consultation process and requesting urgent responses to a number of issues relating to the proposal.

 

On 27 April 2010 Councillors were advised of the SPA proposal and our request for SPA to attend a briefing.

 

On 19 May 2010 SPA confirmed their ability to attend a briefing to Council for 31 May 2010.  On 20 May 2010 SPA provided a summary of issues for briefing paper and other documents provided to Council. 

 

On 31 May 2010 the SPA contacted Council and advised that Mr Furness was unable to attend the briefing and following a request for a delegate to attend, we were advised no one else was able to attend the briefing.  Councillors were notified of the cancellation.

 

On 11 June 2010 Councillors were advised of a briefing scheduled for 28 June 2010. ANSTO, SITA and SPA representative attended the briefing on 28 June 2010.

 

GHD Preliminary Environmental Assessment 2007

In 2007 GHD Pty Ltd prepared a Preliminary EA for the site which was commissioned by NSW Health.  The GHD report summarises the contamination status of the site including elevated levels of radium.  The report also indicates the site is contaminated with fill material containing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) compounds, plus arsenic and lead, at concentrations well above the relevant (residential) land use criteria.

 

Remediation options

With regard to site remediation, the NSW Department Environment Climate Change and Water (DECCW) endorses the policy of the Australian and New Zealand Environment and Conservation Council (ANZECC) and National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) – as published in the Australian and New Zealand Guidelines for the Assessment and Management of Contaminated Sites , ANZECC, 1992.

 

Under this policy, the preferred options for site remediation and management are (in descending order):

 

1.   On-site treatment of contamination – so that the contaminant(s) are either destroyed or the associated hazard is reduced to an acceptable level;

 

2.   Off-site treatment of contamination - so that the contaminant(s) are either destroyed or the associated hazard is reduced to an acceptable level, after which the formerly contaminated material is returned to the site.

 


If these options cannot be implemented, then other options that should be considered include:

 

3.   Removal of contaminated material to an approved site or facility (such as a landfill), followed, where necessary by the reinstatement of formed excavations using clean fill;

4.   Consolidation and isolation of the contaminated material on-site by containing the contaminated material within a properly designed barrier.

 

The GHD report reasoned that the excavation and off-site disposal of the contaminated material is the preferred remedial strategy for the site.  This is the adopted approach indicated by the SPA.

Parliamentary Enquiry

In 2008 a Parliamentary Inquiry was held into the site investigating the radiological contamination. The Inquiry made 12 recommendations to the NSW Government in its report of September 2008 which included a proposal that the contaminated areas be remediated back to the background radiation level of the Hunters Hill area. The Government responded to the Inquiry in March 2009, largely supporting the recommendations.

 

The SPA has advised Council that the justification for remediating the site by disposal at the SITA site is pursuant to the decision of the Parliamentary Inquiry.  The Parliamentary Inquiry agreed with recommendations of DECC and NSW Health that the contaminated material should be removed from Nelson Road.

 

Approval process

Major projects are defined by clause 6 of State Environmental Planning Policy (Major

Projects) 2005 as:

‘Development that, in the opinion of the Minister, is development of a kind:

(a) Described in Schedule 1 or 2, or

(b) Described in Schedule 3 as a project to which Part 3A of the Act applies,

is declared to be a project to which Part 3A of the Act applies.’

 

Clause 28 of Schedule 1 of the SEPP states that the following development is a major

project:

(1) Development for the purpose of remediation of land that is category 1

remediation work on a remediation site.

(2) In this clause, category 1 remediation work, remediation and remediation site

have the same meanings as in State Environmental Planning Policy No 55 —

Remediation of Land.

 

The site was declared a remediation site under Division 3 of Part 3 of the

Contaminated Land Management Act 1997 on 23 August 2007. The site is therefore

defined as a remediation site under SEPP 55. The proposed remediation is classified

as Category 1 remediation under SEPP 55, due to the site’s location in a foreshore

scenic protection area under Hunters Hill Local Environmental Plan 1982.

 

The proposal is therefore a major project, and requires the approval of the Minister for

Planning under Part 3A of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979.

 

SITA Waste Management Facility

Discussions with SITA confirm that they are aware of the proposal and have received approval from their head office to accept the classified waste from the remediation process of this site.

Restricted Solid Waste

The Department Environment Climate Change and Water issued the Waste Classification Guidelines in 2008.  The classification to “restricted solid waste” of the radiological contaminated material is established by comparing waste contaminant concentrations against set contaminant thresholds.  The Restricted Solid Wastes was formally referred to as “Industrial Wastes” in the former guidelines “Environmental Guidelines: Assessment, Classification and Management of Liquid and Non-liquid Wastes”. Council has not received advice from the SPA as to the classification of the soil containing chemical contamination.

Nuclear Free Zone

At Council’s meeting of 19 June 1979 it was resolved that Penrith City Council area be declared a Nuclear Free Zone and that no nuclear waste be deposited or conveyed through the area.

The significance of Council declaring itself a Nuclear Free Zone is the important symbolic function. The declaration of Penrith should be seen by the public as Council’s resolve to prohibit the storage and transportation of nuclear waste.

Since the adoption of this position there has been the substantial increased use of nuclear medicine in the community however depositing of nuclear waste in the Penrith local government area would be of significant concern to the communities.

Current Situation

The process timeframes

A Remediation Action Plan (RAP) is required to be developed for the Part 3A Approval and will be reviewed before the Environmental Assessment is completed.  The SPA has advised that as a result of the direction issued yesterday from Premier Keneally to investigate other options for the disposal of the wastes, the Environmental Assessment is not due to be completed until early 2011. Consultants have only recently been engaged by the SPA to undertake the remediation works including preparation of the RAP.

 

Councillor Briefing 28 June 2010

 

Simon Furness from the SPA provided a Briefing to Councillors of the proposed transportation of the contaminated wastes to the SITA site in Kemps Creek. Representatives from SITA and ANSTO also attended. At the briefing, a range of issues were raised by Councillors and the SPA undertook to respond to a number of specific questions with additional information. To date we have not received any further written advice from the SPA.  We have forwarded a letter today to the SPA reminding them of the issues raised and of their commitment to keep Council informed of progress.

 

Some of the commitments from the SPA included:

·    A copy of testing reports and the draft Remediation Action Plan would be provided to Council for consideration;

·    Details on the approvals process, including timeframes for finalisation of the Remediation Action Plan and Environmental Assessment, when formal decisions are required to be taken including project approval and when public exhibition and consultation would be called;

·    The SPA committed to giving Council regular updates; and

·    A more simplified explanation of the proposal, in particular providing comparisons of radiation levels in the materials to more “everyday” scenarios would be provided.

 

It is noted that the Premier has now sought for a review of alternative options for the disposal of the contaminated material. Council raised this specific matter about exploring alternatives to taking the material to the SITA site at Kemps Creek. We have now requested the SPA clarify as to what changes Premier Keneally’s comments make in respect to the planning process and the Environmental Assessment.

Conclusion

The State Property Authority is preparing an Environmental Assessment for the remediation of a site in Nelson Road Hunters Hill.  The site has been the subject of substantial concern to residents in Hunters Hill since the late 1970’s due to the identification of radioactive contamination as a result of the past use of the site.

 

Following a number of environmental assessments and a Parliamentary Inquiry, a determination has been made by the State Property Authority to remediate the site by removing the contaminated material and disposing of it to landfill.

 

The radioactive contaminated material on the site has been classified as “Restricted Solid Waste” and the option to remediate the site by removal of the contaminated material and disposal to landfill and this classification has been confirmed by DECCW.  The Environmental Assessment is now required to investigate sites outside NSW as options for landfill of the classified waste.  

 

The State Property Authority advised of its desire to liaise with Council in the early planning stages of the Environmental Assessment.  Council conveyed its initial concerns into the proposal of disposing of the classified waste at the Councillor briefing on 28 June 2010.  It is unfortunate that since the briefing, the SPA has not further communicated with Council in relation to the issues of concern raised by Council.

 

There are a number of significant concerns that need to be addressed in the Environmental Assessment for the remediation.  These include health and environmental risks associated with the transportation, handling, landfill and ongoing security of the contaminated material after disposal. Premier Keneally has requested the SPA investigate options for landfill disposal other than the Kemps creek site. This review is strongly supported and it is understood the Environmental Assessment will now address these options.

 

Council has historically raised objection to inappropriate landfill proposals in the City, and has expressed concern over the perception that Penrith City should continue to receive a disproportionate share of Sydney’s waste. This was firmly outlined to the NSW Government recently in relation to the Patons Lane Quarry Proposal which was subsequently refused by the Minister for Planning. 

 


Council expressed its concerns in the briefing session to the SPA over the proposal to transport the contaminated waste from the Hunters Hill site to the SITA landfill facility. Given that, and the fact that this matter has now been the subject of public media attention, it is timely that Council formally register its opposition to this proposal to the NSW Government. As the planning process is still in the early stages, it is recommended Council make representations to the Premier outlining its opposition to the proposal.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Transportation of Restricted Solid Waste to SITA landfill facility be received

2.     Council write to Premier Keneally indicating Council’s opposition to the proposal to dispose of the contaminated wastes from 7-9 Nelson Parade, Hunters Hill and request that the Remediation Action Plan include an alternative option for disposal of the waste

3.     Council write the member for Mulgoa, Diane Beamer and seek her support in opposing the proposal to dispose of the contaminated waste to the SITA landfill site.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1. View

Letter of Soil Classification

9 Pages

Appendix

2. View

Classification of Waste

1 Page

Appendix

  


Policy Review Committee Meeting

18 October 2010

Appendix 1 - Letter of Soil Classification

 

 

 










Policy Review Committee Meeting

18 October 2010

Appendix 2 - Classification of Waste

 

 

 

 


 

ATTACHMENTS   

 

 

Date of Meeting:          Monday 18 October 2010

Delivery Program:      

Issue:                            Build our City's future on the principles of sustainability (3.1)

Report Title:                North Cranebrook Release Area Development Contributions Plan

Attachments:                North Cranebrook Release Area Development Contributions Plan



Policy Review Committee Meeting

18 October 2010

Attachment 1 - North Cranebrook Release Area Development Contributions Plan

 

 

 





























 

ATTACHMENTS   

 

 

Date of Meeting:          Monday 18 October 2010

Delivery Program:      

Issue:                            Base the provision of services and facilities on principles of social justice and equity (7.1)

Report Title:                Neighbourhood Renewal Program - Update of Activities and Neighbourhood Action Plans - Kingswood and St Marys

Attachments:                Kingswood Community Engagement Report 2010

                                      Kingswood Neighbourhood Action Plan 2010

                                      St Marys Community Engagement Report 2010

                                      St Marys Neighbourhood Action Plan 2010



Policy Review Committee Meeting

18 October 2010

Attachment 1 - Kingswood Community Engagement Report 2010

 

 

 


















Policy Review Committee Meeting

18 October 2010

Attachment 2 - Kingswood Neighbourhood Action Plan 2010

 

 

 









Policy Review Committee Meeting

18 October 2010

Attachment 3 - St Marys Community Engagement Report 2010

 

 

 






















Policy Review Committee Meeting

18 October 2010

Attachment 4 - St Marys Neighbourhood Action Plan 2010