27 July 2011

 

Dear Councillor,

In pursuance of the provisions of the Local Government Act, 1993 and the Regulations thereunder, notice is hereby given that a POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING of Penrith City Council is to be held in the Passadena Room, Civic Centre, 601 High Street, Penrith on Monday 1 August 2011 at 7:30PM.

Attention is directed to the statement accompanying this notice of the business proposed to be transacted at the meeting.

Yours faithfully

 

 

Alan Stoneham

General Manager

 

BUSINESS

 

1.?????????? LEAVE OF ABSENCE

 

2.?????????? APOLOGIES

 

3.?????????? CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES

Policy Review Committee Meeting - 6 June 2011.

 

4.?????????? DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

Pecuniary Interest (The Act requires Councillors who declare a pecuniary interest in an item to leave the meeting during discussion of that item)

Non-Pecuniary Conflict of Interest ? Significant and Less than Significant (The Code of Conduct requires Councillors who declare a significant non-pecuniary conflict of interest in an item to leave the meeting during discussion of that item)

 

5.?????????? ADDRESSING THE MEETING

 

6.?????????? MAYORAL MINUTES

 

7.?????????? NOTICES OF MOTION TO RESCIND A RESOLUTION

 

8.?????????? NOTICES OF MOTION

?

9.?????????? DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

10.???????? REQUESTS FOR REPORTS AND MEMORANDUMS

 

11.???????? URGENT BUSINESS

 

12.???????? CONFIDENTIAL BUSINESS


POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING

 

Monday 1 August 2011

 

table of contents

 

 

 

 

 

 

meeting calendar

 

 

confirmation of minutes

 

 

DELIVERY program reports

 


B&WHORIZ

2011 MEETING CALENDAR

January 2011 - December 2011

(adopted by Council on 29 November 2010, amended by Council on 28 February 2011, revised March 2011)

 

 

 

TIME

JAN

FEB

MAR

APRIL

MAY

JUNE

JULY

AUG

SEPT

OCT

NOV

DEC

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

 

Ordinary Council Meeting

7.30pm

 

7

 

11v

2

 

 

15#@

5?

10

7

12

(7.00pm)

 

28#@

21

 

30#*

27

18

 

19^

(7.00pm)

 

21#

 

Policy Review Committee

7.30pm

 

 

14

4

9

6

4

1

 

 

14

5

31

21

 

 

 

 

 

22

26

31

 

 

Operational Plan Public Forum

 

6.00pm

 

 

 

 

Wed

4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

?v

Meeting at which the Draft Operational Plan for 2011-2012 is adopted for exhibition

?*

Meeting at which the Operational Plan for 2011-2012 is adopted

?#

Meetings at which the Operational Plan quarterly reviews are presented

?@

Delivery Program progress reports

?^

Election of Mayor/Deputy Mayor

??

Meeting at which the 2010-2011 Annual Statements are presented

?

Meeting at which any comments on the 2010-2011 Annual Statements are presented

-           Extraordinary Meetings are held as required.

-           Members of the public are invited to observe meetings of the Council (Ordinary and Policy Review Committee).

Should you wish to address Council, please contact the Senior Governance Officer, Glenn Schuil.

?



UNCONFIRMED MINUTES

?OF THE POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING OF PENRITH CITY COUNCIL HELD IN THE PASSADENA ROOM, PENRITH

ON MONDAY 6 JUNE 2011 AT 7:30PM

PRESENT

Deputy Mayor, Councillor Jim Aitken OAM, Councillors Kevin Crameri OAM, Kaylene Allison, Greg Davies, Mark Davies, Ben Goldfinch, Jackie Greenow, Marko Malkoc, Karen McKeown, Kath Presdee and John Thain.

?

APOLOGIES

PRC 33? RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Marko Malkoc seconded Councillor Ben Goldfinch that apologies be received for Councillors Ross Fowler OAM, Tanya Davies, Robert Ardill and Prue Guillaume.

?

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES - Policy Review Committee Meeting - 9 May 2011

34? RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Marko Malkoc seconded Councillor Mark Davies that the minutes of the Policy Review Committee Meeting of 9 May 2011 be confirmed.

?

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

?

There were no declarations of interest.

?

DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

A Leading City

 

1??????? Sustainable Events Policy??????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????

35? RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Marko Malkoc seconded Councillor Karen McKeown

That:

1.???? The information contained in the report on Sustainable Events Policy be received

2.???? The Draft Sustainable Events Policy be adopted.

 

 

There being no further business the Chairperson declared the meeting closed the time being 7:34pm.

????



DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Item?????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????? Page

 

 

A Leading City

 

1??????? Mount Vernon Development Contributions Plan

Procedural note: Section 375A of the Local Government Act 1993 requires that a division be called in relation to this matter.

 

2??????? 2011 Local Government Association of NSW Annual Conference

?

A City of Opportunities

 

3??????? Neighbourhood Renewal Program - Llandilo Neighbourhood Action Plan

???

A Vibrant City

 

4??????? Place Making and Public Art Policy

?

 


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK? INTENTIONALLY


A Leading City

 

Item?????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????? Page

 

1??????? Mount Vernon Development Contributions Plan

Procedural note: Section 375A of the Local Government Act 1993 requires that a division be called in relation to this matter.

 

2??????? 2011 Local Government Association of NSW Annual Conference

?

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting ?????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????? 1 August 2011

A Leading City

 

 

1

Mount Vernon Development Contributions Plan???

?

Compiled by:?????????????? Anthony Milanoli, Senior Environmental Planner

Authorised by:??????????? Paul Grimson, Sustainability & Planning Manager ??

 

Objective

We plan responsibly for now and the future

Community Outcome

A Council that plans responsibly for a sustainable future (3)

Strategic Response

Build our City's future on the principles of sustainability (3.1)

??????

Procedural note: Section 375A of the Local Government Act 1993 requires that a division be called in relation to this matter.

 

Executive Summary

The purpose of this report is to discuss the status and future of the Mount Vernon Development Contributions Plan.? The Plan has applied since 1995, with the objective of delivering new community and traffic infrastructure required to address the needs of additional residents in the estate. All new infrastructure identified in the Plan has been delivered, with the exception of two intersection facilities. Legal precedent now precludes Council from delivering one of the intersection upgrades, as it is a State rather than local government liability and may be funded under a ?Black Spot? funding program. The report recommends that the remaining collected contributions be allocated to upgrading the intersection of Kerrs Road and Mount Vernon Road. With the completion of these works all other facilities that may be legally funded by the Plan will have been delivered. Only incidental further subdivision is envisaged and this limited growth will not warrant further facilities or contributions. The report recommends rescission of the Mount Vernon s94 Plan upon allocation of remaining funds for the described intersection treatment works.

 

Section 94 and Development Contributions

Section 94 of the Environmental Planning & Assessment Act authorises the levying of contributions towards the provision or improvement of amenities or services where:

?a consent authority is satisfied that development for which development consent is sought will or is likely to require the provision of or increase the demand for public amenities and public services within the area?.

Contributions may take the form of the dedication of land free of cost, the payment of a monetary contribution or works in kind.

 

It is prudent for development contributions plans to be reviewed regularly to determine their suitability and where necessary, amend or rescind the plans, at Council?s discretion.?

 

The Mount Vernon Development Contributions Plan

In 1994, Mount Vernon was rezoned through Amendment No.2 to LEP 201 to enable its development for large lot (1ha) residential development. Following completion of background studies and community consultation, on 18 April 1995 Council adopted the Mount Vernon Development Contributions Plan. The aim of the Plan was delivery of new public infrastructure to meet the resident needs of 120 additional dwellings arising as a consequence of subdivisions within Mount Vernon. The Plan further sought to reasonably apportion costs for that infrastructure amongst development proponents within the estate.

 

Facilities funded by the Plan

The Mount Vernon s94 Contributions Plan details those facilities funded to meet the new community?s needs.? The works contained in the Plan can be summarised into the following categories:

?????? Traffic Management (involving improvements to intersections and road widening at curves)

?????? Community facilities (involving augmentation of existing recreation facilities)

?????? Design, Supervision and Contract Administration associated with delivery of the new facilities

?????? Plan Administration

 

The more limited range of facilities funded by the Mount Vernon Plan reflects the fact that this is a very low density, large lot residential estate occurring with only 120 new dwellings. Moreover, this growth is occurring in a locality which already contains all required roads and some recreation facilities and where drainage is accommodated on-site.

 

Current Status of the Plan

Funds Collected

Contributions necessary to meet the cost of all new facilities identified in the Mount Vernon s94 Plan have now been collected. As of 30 June 2011unspent funds remaining in this account amount to $173,250. There are currently three development consents for the creation of four additional lots in Mount Vernon for which contributions totalling $35,000 would be payable if the consents are acted upon.

 

Which facilities funded by the Plan have been completed ?

As of July 2011, all the facilities identified to be funded through the Mount Vernon s94 Plan were completed, with the exception of intersection treatments at the junctions of Kerrs Road/Mount Vernon Road and at Mamre Road/ Kerrs Road.

 

Completion of traffic facilities identified in the Plan

The treatment of the intersection of Mamre Road and Kerrs Road can now no longer be lawfully funded under the Mount Vernon s94 Plan due to a legal precedent. Council?s legal officer advises that Plan funds can now only be allocated to those facilities for which Council has a legal liability. Mamre Road is a State road under the authority of the Roads and Traffic Authority (RTA). State roads (including their intersections) must be funded either by the RTA or via Council?s general revenue, but not s94 Plan funds.

 

To determine whether an upgrade of the Mamre Road/Kerrs Road intersection is required,? Council?s Design and Technical officers are assessing its merit for inclusion in the 2012/1013 Auslink Black spot program. This exercise is being carried out across our Local Government Area to identify intersections that meet criteria for a submission for funding by the RTA under that program. As part of this process we identify RTA roads and intersections that have a significant accident history and advise the RTA accordingly. The intersection of Mamre Road and Kerrs Road will be assessed under this process and the RTA advised and funding sought, if warranted.

 

Since Mount Vernon s94 Plan funds cannot be spent on Mamre Road, it is proposed to expend remaining funds on treatment of the Kerrs Road/Mount Vernon Road intersection. This will complete delivery of facilities funded under the Plan. With respect to this intersection, Council?s Design and Technical Advice Department state :

 

?the intersection? currently operates as a reverse ?T? intersection and has been the subject of a report to Council?s Local Traffic Committee endorsing the operation of the intersection in its current reverse ?T? configuration.

 

The Mount Vernon s94 Plan identified a number of potential solutions for treatment of this intersection. Current investigations determined that there is scope to provide additional improvements to the intersection in the form of signs, lines and traffic management devices to improve intersection safety and efficiency above the current requirement. These proposed works are consistent with the range of possible treatments identified in the plan.?

 

In light of this technical advice, this report recommends achieving the Mount Vernon s94 Plan requirements by implementing the Kerrs Road/Mount Vernon Road intersection upgrade described above.

 

Mount Vernon community recreation area, playground equipment and community facility building augmentation funded by the s94 plan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Improvements to Mount Vernon car park and new picnic shelters funded by the s94 Plan??????????????????????????????????????? ????????????????????????????

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Road widening 002? Curve widening funded through s94 Plan

 

 

No further facilities required, no further contributions levied

Only approximately 20 further dwellings are expected to be developed in Mount Vernon under the LEP, and, as with any rural-residential estate, not all these subdivisions will occur. Assuming subdivisions creating ten new lots occur over the next decade, this would yield only $87,500 in s94 development contributions. Given that all facilities required for the Mount Vernon estate will have been delivered before these dwellings are constructed it is not legally possible - under the provisions of s94 legislation - to impose contributions on this development, as no additional demand arises. The Mount Vernon s94 Plan should therefore be rescinded.

 

Rescinding the Mount Vernon s94 Plan

Allocation of the Mount Vernon s94 Plan?s remaining funds for traffic management measures at the Kerrs Road/Mount Vernon Road intersection will conclude delivery of the Plan?s facilities. As stated above, any minimal further development will not generate a need for facilities additional to those already delivered under the Plan. On this basis, it is timely that the Plan be rescinded. Contributions for City-wide facilities (such as District Open Space and Cultural Facilities) would however continue to be levied on new residential development in the estate.

 

If Council resolves to rescind the Mount Vernon Plan it will cease to apply upon a notice appearing in the local newspaper.? Expending the remaining Plan funds on the Kerrs Road intersection upgrade would occur over the next 12-18 months.

 

Senior Legal Officer?s Comments

It is the Senior Legal Officer?s opinion that it is open to Council to rescind the Mount Vernon Section 94 Development Contributions Plan.

 

The position of the Land and Environment Court in relation to spending s94 funds is that s94 entitles the Council as the provider of the amenity or service to impose conditions requiring contributions towards recoupment of the costs for which Council has a legal liability to pay for.

 

The Court has said that if Council collected s94 money for works that the RTA is liable to carry out then Council?s would be entitled to levy contributions for services and amenities provided by any third party, whether government or private enterprise, for which Council?s would never be liable for.

 

Therefore, Council is constrained from spending s94 funds on state owned roads. Following on from this, Council is not able to spend any remaining s94 funds on intersection works which involve Mamre Road as it is a State Government liability.

 

Financial Services Manager?s Comments

The rescinding of the Mount Vernon Development Contributions Plan will require that the remaining work, outlined in this report, be completed within the funds available currently within the plan and reasonably collected.? Given the uncertainty of the outstanding consents it should be considered that the available funds for this project is limited to the funds available in the Contributions Plan of $173,250 as at 30 June 2011.

 

Equity Issues

While it could be argued that it is inequitable for a small number of new households not to pay for facilities that have been funded by earlier new residents, Section 94 does not permit Council to levy for additional facilities for which there is no additional demand.? Any future dwellings are not considered likely to generate sufficient demand to justify additional facilities.

 

Every suburb or new estate moves from a development stage to a more mature, consolidation phase, at which point new residents maximise use of existing infrastructure rather than require additional facilities.? Mount Vernon is now considered to be at this consolidated stage.

 

Conclusion

The Mount Vernon Development Contributions Plan has provided a successful framework for identifying, funding and delivering infrastructure to meet the needs of new residents of the estate.? With the Plan now fully subscribed and all works soon to be completed, it is timely that Council rescind the Plan and that future contributions levied on any additional lots/dwellings relate only to the City-wide District Open Space and Cultural Facilities s94 Plans.

 

Since all works identified in the Plan have been completed and all necessary funds will be expended upon completion of the traffic measures described in this report, the role of the plan has been concluded.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.???? The information contained in the report regarding the Mount Vernon Development Contributions Plan be received

2.???? Upon allocation of remaining funds in the Plan for traffic measures at the intersection of Kerrs Road and Mount Vernon Road (as described in this report), Council authorise staff to rescind the Mount Vernon Development Contributions Plan in accordance with the requirements of the Environmental Planning & Assessment Act and Regulations.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Policy Review Committee Meeting ?????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????? 1 August 2011

A Leading City

 

 

2

2011 Local Government Association of NSW Annual Conference???

?

Compiled by:?????????????? Adam Beggs, Acting Senior Governance Officer

Authorised by:??????????? Stephen Britten, Group Manager - Legal & Governance ??

 

Objective

We demonstrate accountability, transparency and ethical conduct

Community Outcome

A Council that behaves responsibly and ethically (5)

Strategic Response

Champion accountability and transparency, and responsible and ethical behaviour (5.1)

???????

 

Executive Summary

This report advises Council of proposed motions for the Local Government Association Annual Conference to be held in Shoalhaven from 23 - 26 October 2011 and seeks endorsement from Council to submit the motions, as detailed, to the Conference.

 

The proposed motions cover the following matters:

 

1. Establishment of national independent access accreditation system for tourist accommodation in Australia

2.?? Increased support to councils and pensioners

3.?? Compliance with accessibility requirements for bus stops

4.?? Service delivery by local government to people experiencing homelessness

5.?? COAG Early Childhood agreement

6.?? Development Contributions Cap imposed on local government

7.?? Regional Structure Plans

 

The report recommends that:

 

1.?? The information contained in the report on 2011 Local Government Association of NSW Annual Conference be received.

2.?? The seven motions detailed in the report be submitted for inclusion in the 2011 Local Government Association NSW Conference Business Paper.

Background

The Local Government Association of NSW (LGA) will hold its annual policy-making Conference in Shoalhaven from 23 - 26 October 2011. At this year's conference there will be an update provided on the movement towards One Association, acknowledging the need for one voice to be representing Local Government in NSW.

Current Situation

Council?s voting delegates were determined, at the Ordinary Meeting held on 18 July 2011, to be Councillors Prue Guillaume, Greg Davies, Marko Malkoc, Ross Fowler OAM, Kevin Crameri OAM, Jim Aitken OAM and Ben Goldfinch. Councillor Jackie Greenow has been authorised to attend the Conference as an observer. Up to three (3) Aboriginal observers, nominated by the Deerubbin Local Aboriginal Land Council, will also be attending as observers.

Motions to Conference

Council is entitled to submit motions for consideration at the 2011 LGA Conference.

 

In accordance with resolution 2 of the 2010 LGA Conference, motions before the Conference shall be classified into three categories by the Executive Committee, prior to the Conference as follows:

 

Category 1

Matter concerning the good governance of the Conference or the Association including, without limitation:

 

a)?? The adoption of Standing Orders;

b)?? Amendments to the Constitution;

c)?? Matters of compliance by the Association with any legislative provision;

d)?? The finances of the Association; or

e)?? The health and welfare of staff members of the Association.

 

Category 2

Matters not covered by existing policy and matters involving change of policy.

 

Category 3

Those matters that are reaffirmations of existing policy or issues of a specific local nature.

 

a) Motions grouped under Category 1 shall be given priority over Category 2 and Category 3 motions and shall be discussed in the order in which they appear in the business paper.

 

b)????????? Motions grouped under Category 3 shall be adopted under a general motion - subject to the reservation that, should any delegate wish any motion to be taken from Category 3 for general discussion, it shall open to the delegate to request Conference to do so. In view of the importance of some motions in Category 3, especially those of an urgent nature, the Executive is empowered to resubmit those it considers to be important for Conference's consideration.

 

When drafting motions, council should ensure that motions

 

???? MUST not attempt to enforce one council's position on other councils, and

???? MUST not cause detriment to one council over another

 

Motions must be received by close of business, Friday 5 August 2011. Motions received after this time will be considered late. Late motions will only be accepted prior to Friday 7 October 2011. Late motions will be categorised using the same methodology as motions received prior to cut-off and will then be published in the LG Weekly on 14 October 2011.

 

 

 

The following seven motions have been identified as issues for which motions can be framed for debate at the Conference:

 

1.?? Establishment of national independent access accreditation system for tourist accommodation in Australia

2.?? Increased support to councils and pensioners

3.?? Compliance with accessibility requirements for bus stops

4.?? Service delivery by local government to people experiencing homelessness

5.?? COAG Early Childhood agreement

6.?? Development Contributions Cap imposed on local government

7.?? Regional Structure Plans

 

The details of the Motions that are proposed to be submitted to the LGA Annual Conference are provided below:

__________________________________________________________________________________________

MOTION 1

 

From:

Penrith City Council

 

Topic:? ???

Establishment of national independent access accreditation system for tourist accommodation in Australia

 

Issue:

The issues relating to the lack of information about the accessibility of tourist accommodation are experienced for tourist facilities across Australia. To ensure consistency across state boundaries the establishment of an independent access accreditation system would need to be implemented on a national basis.

 

Motion: ????

That the Local Government Association call on the Parliamentary Secretary for Disabilities and Carers, Senator the Hon Jan McLucas, to make representations to The Hon Martin Ferguson AM, MP Minister for Tourism, seeking the establishment of a national independent access accreditation system for tourist accommodation in Australia.

 

Note:

The international star rating of accommodation in Australia is maintained by a national body, AAA tourism. The system does not cover matters relating to accessibility. Until 2006, AAA Tourism provided for operators to display a wheelchair logo to claim that they catered for guests with accessibility needs. There were many complaints about misleading information and the scheme was withdrawn. AAA Tourism has recently introduced a new self assessment scheme, but it is entirely voluntary and does not provide an independent audit of facilities or a consistent approach to reporting information.

 

 

 

 

 

 

MOTION 2

 

From:

Penrith City Council

 

Topic:

Increased support to councils and pensioners

 

Issue:

The objective of this motion is to ensure the broader population is not disadvantaged through increased costs or reduced services as a result of providing pensioner rebates to an ageing population as well as providing greater financial support to pensioners.

 

Motion:

That the Local Government Association call on the Australian Government to:

 

1.????????? increase the percentage of subsidy provided to councils in providing pensioner rebates on council residential rates; and

2.????????? ensure that any increase in pensioner rebates be fully funded by state and federal governments.

Note:

Since 1988 pensioners in NSW have received mandatory subsidy of up to $250 on residential rates. 55% of this is subsidised by the State Government. The remaining 45% is borne by ratepayers ? currently more than $1 million in Penrith City. Penrith City Council believes the $250 rebate is overdue for review. We believe State and Federal Governments should further support councils by increasing the level of subsidy to reduce the impost of these rebates on remaining residents as well as providing greater financial support for pensioners.

__________________________________________________________________________________________

 

MOTION 3

 

From:

Penrith City Council

 

Topic:

Compliance with accessibility requirements for bus stops

 

Issue:

In December 2010 the Australian Human Rights Commission produced a guideline titled ?Guideline for promoting compliance of bus stops with the Disability Standards for Accessible Public Transport 2002?. However, the guideline is non-prescriptive and creates uncertainty as to who is responsible for providing essential infrastructure as outlined in the Guideline for new and existing Bus Stops.

 

Motion:

That the Local Government Association (LGA) of NSW call on the Department of Transport and the Australian Human Rights Commission to clarify responsibilities in respect of compliance with requirements for the upgrading of infrastructure associated with new and existing bus stops to meet the requirements of ?Guideline for promoting compliance of bus stops with the Disability Standards for Accessible Public Transport 2002? and the DSAPT.

 

Note:

The Human Rights Commission Document is a summary of national legislation set out in the Disability Standards for Accessible Public Transport (DSAPT) which affects all providers of Bus Infrastructure and all Local Governments. To date Penrith Council has been unable to receive clarification from the Department of Transport, the Australian Human Rights Commission, or Bus operators regarding these responsibilities. There are suggestions from these organisations that Council should be providing infrastructure at existing and new Bus Stops, which can cost from $5,000 per site for a basic bus stop up to $30,000 for a bus shelter. However, the Department of Transport and Bus operators control bus routes and where they want Bus Stops. Which means bus routes could be changed by the DoT and Council left to fund the new infrastructure to allow public transport services to be provided. Recently, a local bus company has requested approval for 2 new Bus Stops in the Penrith Area and will not commit to providing the legislative infrastructure associated with their proposal, hence Council have deferred their decision, pending advice from Department of Transport, the Australian Human Rights Commission, or Bus operators.

__________________________________________________________________________________________

 

MOTION 4

 

From:

Penrith City Council

 

Topic:

Service delivery by local government to people experiencing homelessness

 

Issue:

The aim of this Protocol is to ensure that Council officers are supported in responding to and working with homeless people through an agreed process for customer service delivery.

 

Motion:

That the Local Government Association promote Penrith City Council?s Protocol for Service Delivery to People Experiencing Homelessness as leading practice for working with and responding to homeless people within local government areas in NSW.

 

Note:

Penrith City Council adopted a Protocol for Service Delivery to People Experiencing Homelessness at its Policy Review Committee Meeting on 14 March 2011.

 

Development of the protocol results from Penrith Council?s participation in the Blacktown/Nepean Regional Taskforce on Homelessness. This Taskforce coordinates the region?s responses to homelessness and includes representatives of government agencies such as Housing NSW, Community Services and Centrelink, homelessness service providers, and the four Councils in the region.

 

The Protocol clarifies staff roles, responsibilities and obligations to support a high quality and responsive service to homeless people and maintain a safe environment for the whole community. The Protocol applies across all service delivery areas, particularly those that have an operational presence in indoor and outdoor public places.

 

Council recognises that homelessness impacts upon a person?s ability to enjoy basic rights and freedoms. This Protocol has been developed within a human rights framework to ensure that people who are homeless in public places are treated appropriately and that their rights are respected. The Protocol also recognises that in exceptional circumstances where public safety is at risk due to the actions of a homeless person then the police will be contacted as a matter of urgency.

 

In Penrith City the implementation of this Protocol will be supported by the development of a training package for Council officers. A local and regional service information card and the Homeless Persons Information Centre card will also be distributed to a range of Council staff to support Council officers in their service delivery role.

__________________________________________________________________________________________

 

MOTION 5

 

From:

Penrith City Council

 

Topic:

COAG Early Childhood agreement

 

Issue:

The linking in of funding to the provision of 15 hours of early childhood care in the year before school has serious repercussions for NSW preschool service operations.

 

Motion:

That the Local Government Association request that the Federal Government review the language of the COAG Early Childhood agreement to provide 15 hours of early childhood care to every four year old in Australia to include the phrase ?12-15 hours?? of early childhood education.

 

Note:

The 2008 COAG agreement specified that funding received from the Federal Government be linked to the commitment from the Government that each child receives 15 hours of early childhood education in the year before school.

 

Currently, most preschools offer care for children in the two years before school between 9:00 am and 3:00 pm. Children traditionally access 12 hours of care in the year before school as the cost of three days for a single income family is often too high.

 

The linking in of funding to the provision of 15 hours of early childhood care in the year before school has serious repercussions for NSW preschool service operations. This is particularly so in rural and remote areas where services operate a mobile part time service, and in regional preschools where there is no capacity to expand provision due to building restrictions and parent capacity to engage with longer days.

 

The changing of the funding requirement to add 12-15 hours as an option would enable children to access the amount of care recommend in the latest international research without having the funding? formulas compromised at a service delivery level. Recent research commissioned by the Community Child Care Cooperative identified that 67% of member services survey identified that it would be difficult for the service to implement a requirement of 15 hours of care provision per child in the year before school, but many already provide 12 hours to children in the year before school.

__________________________________________________________________________________________

 

MOTION 6

 

From:

Penrith City Council

 

Topic:

Development Contributions Cap Imposed on local government

 

Issue:

In 2010 the NSW Premier announced changes to the development contribution process that caps contributions for new residential development in greenfields release areas at $30,000 per lot/dwelling. The consequence of these announced changes on growth area councils include an inequitable and unreasonable levying of existing and future ratepayers to finance the funding shortfall.

 

Motion:

That the Local Government Association call on the Premier (and Minister for Western Sydney) to recognise the serious adverse financial and community equity implications of the previous State Government to impose a $30,000 cap on developer contributions for growth area councils, revoke the cap and commit to working with councils to deal with the problems of housing affordability in NSW.

 

Note:

In 2010 the NSW Premier announced changes to the development contribution process that caps contributions for new residential development in greenfields release areas at $30,000 per lot/dwelling. This change will result in infrastructure cost shortfalls of $46.5 million in the Werrington Enterprise Living and Learning Precinct, potentially more than $100 million in Penrith City Council for current and likely future Plans and $billions in cumulative shortfalls across NSW growth area councils. The previous Premier?s announced changes also suggested that shortfalls could be met by councils seeking increased rate levies from IPART, transferring the burden onto existing and future ratepayers. The consequence of these announced changes on growth area councils include an inequitable and unreasonable levying of existing and future ratepayers to finance the funding shortfall. The alternative to inequitable ratepayer levying is the slashing of essential infrastructure or placing the onus on developers to coordinate facility delivery. All the responses being considered by local government are likely to slow the delivery of new housing. Since the imposition of the cap, the real world application of its impact can be seen in the complex and uncertain mechanisms councils are applying to ensure adequate infrastructure is being delivered. State government financing solutions (the Priority Infrastructure Fund) are grossly inadequate ($50 million spread over two years to fund billions of dollars in infrastructure funding shortfalls). To date, not one dollar has been allocated under this fund and no s94 Plan has been fully reviewed by IPART. The changes were implemented with minimal reference to the affected LGAs or response to their concerns and have serious adverse impacts on councils? prudent physical, social and financial planning for their communities. On this basis, the announcements need to be revoked and reconsidered in consultation with Council and the NSW government needs to recognise and respond to councils? concerns.

__________________________________________________________________________________________

 

MOTION 7

 

From:

Penrith City Council

 

Topic:

Regional Structure Plans

 

Issue:

A successful Regional Structure Plan must be supported by a detailed delivery plan, a long term financial model and commitment at all levels of government.

 

Motion:

That the Local Government Association call on the State Government to prepare Regional Structure Plans to detail the physical and social infrastructure required to meet the objectives of the State Plan respective Regional Strategies.

 

Note:

Regional Strategies identify and reinforce the character, attributes and future of each region and its context and commitments for achieving the objectives of the State Plan.   A significant challenge to achieving the objectives of the State Plan and respective Regional Strategies has been government organisational impediments to the planning, coordination and implementation of regional development.  This is evidenced by limited government/departmental/ agency budgets to fund important and essential physical and social infrastructure.   Sustainable regions require timely and co-ordinated delivery of infrastructure if they are to deliver the objectives of each Regional Strategy.  Preparation of a Structure Plan for each region would coordinate the timely delivery of development and benchmark delivery of Regional Strategy outcomes. It would also confirm and define the connections and interactions between the regions.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.???? The information contained in the report on 2011 Local Government Association of NSW Annual Conference be received.

2.???? The seven motions detailed in the report be submitted for inclusion in the 2011 Local Government Association NSW Conference Business Paper.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report. ?


A City of Opportunities

 

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3??????? Neighbourhood Renewal Program - Llandilo Neighbourhood Action Plan

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Policy Review Committee Meeting ?????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????? 1 August 2011

A City of Opportunities

 

 

3

Neighbourhood Renewal Program - Llandilo Neighbourhood Action Plan???

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Compiled by:?????????????? Katerina Tahija, Acting Community Engagement Officer

Jeni Pollard, Neighbourhood Renewal Programme Coordinator

Authorised by:??????????? Erich Weller, Community and Cultural Development Manager ??

 

Objective

We have access to what we need

Community Outcome

A City with equitable access to services and facilities (7)

Strategic Response

Base the provision of services and facilities on principles of social justice and equity (7.1)

???????

 

Presenters:???????? Jeni Pollard, Neighbourhood Renewal Programme Coordinator and Katerina Tahija, Acting Community Engagement Officer

 

Executive Summary

This report provides Council with a general overview of the Neighbourhood Renewal Program and a description of the community engagement processes undertaken in the Llandilo area for the 2010-11 period. This report is accompanied by a detailed Community Engagement Report and Neighbourhood Action Plan for the Llandilo area. They are Attachments 1 and 2 to this report.

 

Llandilo is a rural area located to the north-east of the Penrith City Centre. The area is considered to be of relative disadvantage according to data provided by the Australian Bureau of Statistics and as such is included in the Neighbourhood Renewal Program. The aim of the Neighbourhood Renewal Program is to work with residents in identified areas to address issues of concern through engagement and collaborative action.

 

The Neighbourhood Renewal Team has actively engaged with a broad cross section of the Llandilo community, through a variety of creative, interesting and focussed activities and events. Each of these engagement processes has assisted in building community connections and positive relationships between Council and the residents. The report gives an overview of each of these activities that have collectively engaged with hundreds of residents over the past 10 months.

 

Further to this, the report then identifies the issues that were most commonly raised through the engagement activities. These issues are grouped under the following themes: community wellbeing, roads and traffic, transport, general amenity (public and private property), and land use and planning. These themes and issues are included in the Llandilo Neighbourhood Action Plan.

 

The residents of Llandilo are proud of their area and their community. The participants in the engagement activities value their surroundings and the many positive aspects of living in a rural community such as knowing their neighbours and the spirit of support for each other.

 

There is no doubt that some of the positive attributes of this area provide a challenge for many residents as isolation from services and poor public transport increasingly becomes an issue as they age. Similarly, whilst many people value their space and larger blocks, a number of residents would like to subdivide their properties and sell a block in order to provide additional support in retirement.

 

Some of the community members of Llandilo expressed that they feel they don?t receive the same level of services that other areas in the City receive and initially it was felt that there was a level of resistance to engage with Council officers. Over time, the engagement process itself was able to break down some of these barriers and positive relationships have been developed with many residents. The capacity of the Neighbourhood Renewal team to address some issues immediately, through the support of the externally funded Northern Rural Areas Community Development Project and other services of Council has strengthened relationships in this community.

 

The report recommends that the information contained in the report be received and that Council endorse the Neighbourhood Action Plan for Llandilo as provided in Attachment 2 to this report.

Background

Over recent years, Council has placed increasing emphasis on balancing the resources directed towards planning and implementation in new release areas to that of older established areas of the City. In 2006 Council endorsed a Neighbourhood Renewal Program to revitalise and enhance selected neighbourhoods, both urban and rural with an approach that integrates community development and cultural development as well as supporting opportunities for local employment and training. The program is funded for 10 years through the Asset Renewal and Established Areas Strategy (AREAS) special rates initiative.

 

Recently, Council was able to secure additional funding through a Special Rates Variation for the implementation of actions identified in Neighbourhood Action Plans. This will be discussed later in the report.

 

The Penrith Neighbourhood Renewal Program is focussed on particular suburbs and rural localities which are considered to be relatively disadvantaged. The instrument used to determine this is the Australian Bureau of Statistics SEIFA Index of Relative Disadvantage which measures disadvantage across suburbs and regions.?

 

The Penrith LGA has 12 suburbs or rural localities considered to be of relative disadvantage compared to the NSW average, as calculated by the Australian Bureau of Statistics.?? These areas are (in alphabetical order) Cambridge Park, Colyton, Cranebrook, Kingswood, Llandilo, Londonderry, North Penrith (including the locality of Kingswood Park), North St Marys, Oxley Park, Penrith suburb, St Marys and Werrington. ?

 

A report was endorsed by Council in July 2008 that outlined a planned approach for implementing the Neighbourhood Renewal Program across these identified areas. The adopted program for 2010-11 included Llandilo. This area is the subject of this report and the Llandilo Neighbourhood Action Plan is provided at Attachment 2 to this report.?

 

The agreed approach to Neighbourhood Renewal is to undertake extensive community engagement, both Council driven and in partnership with key stakeholders to develop a Neighbourhood Action Plan.

 

Neighbourhood Action Plans (NAPs) support a planned and coordinated approach to addressing the complex interplay of social disadvantage, access to economic and cultural participation, older physical infrastructure and generally poorer public amenity as well as reduced civic engagement. NAPs incorporate specific responses required to address identified community issues and needs. Actions for implementation that are included in the NAP are reported to Council through the Operational Plan reporting process. Furthermore, the NAP and progress on implementation are also reported to the community through local activities and via a community newsletter.

 

It is envisaged that in the first instance the NAP for Llandilo will be implemented over four years. Some actions, such as the investigation of the development of a dirt bike track may progress no further unless opportunities arise through external funding sources.

 

This report will outline the methods of engagement undertaken in Llandilo and the results of this engagement process including further actions as identified by residents. The more detailed Community Engagement Report and NAP are provided as attachments to this report.

 

Community Engagement

 

Engaging residents in planning is essential to the sustainability of any work aimed at improving the socio economic outcomes and the physical environment of a neighbourhood. The engagement process aims to identify and build on the strengths of a group of people, in this case residents of a particular community. A strengths focus leads to planning which builds on the positive aspects of a neighbourhood as well as addressing issues raised by local residents.

 

Engagement creates opportunities for residents to influence decisions and planning which directly affects their lives. It can empower residents to take ownership of plans and completed works in their community. The engagement of local residents by Council is critical to the success of Neighbourhood Action Plans.

 

Importantly, many of the engagement activities undertaken build positive relationships between Council and residents in some of the more disadvantaged communities. Community engagement builds an understanding of civic decision making and facilitates an informed decision making process by Council and partner organisations.

 

Llandilo Public School students at the Welcome to Llandilo engagement activity

Llandilo

 

For the purpose of this report Llandilo is located in the northern part of the City of Penrith. Its boundaries are South Creek to the east, Berkshire Park on its northern border, the Lend Lease St Marys development site to the south and Cranebrook on its western border.

 

Llandilo is a rural area with many larger properties where some residents have at different times undertaken horticultural or related industries for an income. The population of Llandilo has very steadily been increasing over the last three census periods with the population increasing 5% from 918 people in 2001 to 964 people in 2006. In the 2006 Census, Llandilo had the largest median household size in the LGA with 3.4 persons per household. Llandilo has a number of distinct population characteristics including a significant number of children 0-14 years and young people 15-19 given the size of the population. Interestingly at the time of the 2006 Census, there were no women over the age of 80 counted in the population but a significant number of men in this age range and above. This is unusual when compared to the rest of the population where women in this age range outnumber men.

 

Nearly 30% of the population of Llandilo speak a language other than English with the majority of these residents speaking Maltese with Italian, Chinese and Croatian speakers also being counted. These languages, other than the Chinese speakers, reflect migration that occurred in the 1950s and 60s. The growth of the Chinese speaking population in Llandilo requires consideration in planning for services. In the 2006 Census 30 people identified as being of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander descent in the Llandilo community.

 

llandilo.png

 

Map of Llandilo area (including area currently known as Jordan Springs

 

Llandilo has been identified as a relatively disadvantaged community according to the ABS SEIFA index reflecting the generally lower levels of educational attainment of residents over 15 years and the lack of skilled employment opportunities. For many families in Llandilo their property is their principal asset.? Household incomes are generally lower and this contributes to disadvantage for some households and particularly older residents.

 

Community engagement activities in Llandilo

Engaging residents in planning is essential to the sustainability of any work aimed at improving the socio economic outcomes and the physical environment of a neighbourhood. The engagement process aims to identify and build on the strengths of a group of people, in this case residents of a particular neighbourhood. A strengths focus leads to planning which builds on the positive aspects of a neighbourhood as well as addressing issues raised by local residents.

 

Engagement creates opportunities for residents to influence decisions and planning which directly affects their lives. It can empower residents to take ownership of plans and completed works in their community. The engagement of local residents by Council is critical to the success of Neighbourhood Action Plans.

 

Engagement includes different methods of involving stakeholders, such as residents or community partners, in developing plans for action in collaboration with Council. Some actions will be specific to Penrith City Council services. Other actions will be target matters for Council advocacy and some will be taken up by community organisations and other Government agencies.

 

Llandilo Youth Event 131compressed.jpg

Parkour activities as part of the Llandilo Youth Event

 

A total of 12 engagement activities were held in the Llandilo community as part of the Neighbourhood Renewal Program. Some activities were conducted with existing community groups and included large community events, residential surveys and listening posts. At all engagement activities, the community were asked to respond to four main questions that focused on what they liked about Llandilo and what areas could be improved.

 

The engagement activities documented below are based on positive partnerships developed between Council's Neighbourhood Renewal team and Llandilo Public School, Nepean Migrant Access and Fusion Western Sydney.

 

The rural nature of Llandilo presented some challenges to engaging with the community. The lack of a local community service organisation which usually facilitates a pathway to connecting with residents provided a challenge to Council officers. While there is a small retail village centre, it is not necessarily a community hub for all members of the community. The lack of information and promotional outlets to reach residents, including that local papers are not delivered to each household, was also a significant challenge.

 

In Llandilo there were 12 engagement activities held in collaboration with the community. The engagement activities aim to connect with local residents in a fun and productive way, within an empowering environment and focus on providing genuine open discussion. Each of the activities in Llandilo was focused on addressing an identified population or interest group. The engagement activities are listed below:

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???? Llandilo Public School P&C- an engagement activity and shared meal with the parents that are actively involved in the school community

???? Chinese Residents Group Activity - an engagement activity and shared meal with local Chinese residents that meet and socialise regularly in a supportive cultural environment

???? Maltese Residents Group Activity ? an engagement activity and shared meal with local Maltese residents who meet and socialise regularly in a supportive cultural environment

???? Berkshire Park, Llandilo, Shanes Park Resident Action group ? an engagement activity and shared meal

???? ?Have your say on local issues?: resident postcard project - a postcard was sent to all households to get an understanding of resident interests and ideas as well as gather contact information

???? Llandilo Public School Lantern and Postcard Project - a facilitated art project with students from Year 5

???? Llandilo Rural Fire Service - an engagement activity and shared meal with the volunteers of the Llandilo RFS

???? Llandilo Community Hall Committee - an engagement activity and shared meal with residents that have an interest in contributing to the management of the community hall

???? Welcome to Llandilo Lantern Launch and Picnic - a school community event to exhibit the students art works and engagement with parents, carers, families and children

???? Llandilo Youth Event -? a youth focussed day of fun and engagement activity

???? Llandilo Resident Survey - a survey distributed to all households inviting resident ideas and interests about living in Llandilo

???? Listening posts ? two listening posts held in the village centre for residents to discuss any issues.

 

A more detailed description of each engagement activity and a summary of the issues raised by residents is included in the attached Llandilo Community Engagement Report (Attachment 1).

 

The information gathered from the engagement activities has been documented in the Neighbourhood Action Plan and is also attached to this report (Attachment 2).

 

Community Planning Session

A Community Planning Session was held at the Llandilo Public School on June 7, 2011. This session brought together a number of residents all of whom had been invited to participate based on prior engagement with Council Officers. The session is structured but designed to be informal and an opportunity for community members to get together, share light refreshments, discuss their community and connect with Council.?

 

Council Officers provided an overview of the demographics of the local community and provided a summary of the methods and results of each engagement activity undertaken in the area. Residents identified a range of priorities for further action as well as on occasions clarifying and providing further detail on particular issues.

 

The community planning session is also an opportunity to identify any major themes or concerns that may not have been identified in the engagement process. Overall the residents validated the issues and concerns already identified.

 

At all engagement activities, including the community planning session, residents are asked to identify the strengths of their community and the things that they believe are important to them. This information assists Council to understand and build on the strengths within each community.

 

All of the engagement activities held in Llandilo and the Community Planning Session were lively, with vigorous and sometimes boisterous discussion. The time spent in Llandilo has given all of the Council officers involved a greater understanding and appreciation of the strengths of this community as well as the issues facing residents in rural communities.

 

Local residents participating at one of 12 engagement activities

 

 

 

Community Strengths

Llandilo is an established rural community that has residents from a range of backgrounds. Some have farmed land for generations and others have more recently established market gardens. Many run a range of home based small businesses that include primary industry, animal services, personal care, retail, IT and many other service based operations. Llandilo provides the appeal of rural living while having convenient access to a regional city.

 

Throughout the engagement activities, residents articulated the enriching value of living in an area that embodied positive community spirit, friendly neighbours, help for those in need and a preferred lifestyle. Many spoke of living on acreage, enjoying fresh air and open spaces as why they have stayed in or why the have moved to the area.

 

Older residents expressed wanting family members to stay close by and young people wanted the opportunity for their children to grow up in the same area they did.?? Children spoke of having lots of space to play, having domestic and farm animals, having friends and family, and going to a local school. Young people valued being able to hang with their friends, having large blocks of land to ?muck around on? and still being close to services that are important to young people.

 

Families spoke of a friendly community where children were safe as neighbours look out for each other. People value that there are small business opportunities, being close to extended family and being close to a range of retail/business districts. Older residents expressed a fondness for old times and the continued preservation of the community rural atmosphere.

 

Community Priorities - Llandilo

The issues raised by residents and other stakeholders in Llandilo can be grouped into five themes. These themes are community well-being, roads and traffic, transport, general amenity of the area (public and private property) and land use.

 

A summary of the issues coming from these themes are:

 

Theme 1 - Community well being

 

Enhancement of Wilson Park

Need for programs and activities for different age groups

Cultural activities for local residents

Improved access to information

Isolation of older residents.

 

Theme 2 - Roads and Traffic

 

Repairs and maintenance of? roads, intersections and road verges

Road signage

Street lighting, particularly intersections

Road flooding hazards

Footpaths

Traffic hazard issues.

 

Theme 3 ? Transport

 

Limited bus timetables

Concerns with school bus routes

Need for bus shelters and bus stop signage

Information on timetables/ routes maps in village centre.

 

Theme 4 - General amenity (public and private property)

 

Dumping of rubbish and household goods in various parts of local area

General litter, especially along road sides

Difficult for older residents to look after their properties.

 

Theme 5 - Land use and planning

 

Planning issues concerned with sub-division, development approvals and a need for further information

Compatible new development needed to benefit local community

Impact of new development needs to be measured such as traffic impacts

Timetable for the completion of the new Rural Fire Service building.

 

Responses to these themes and issues are outlined in the attached Neighbourhood Action Plan for Llandilo (Attachment 2). In some cases, actions will be achievable through the allocation of existing resources or through partnerships with external organisations. Some actions are currently unfunded and others require advocacy from Council to other levels of government.

 

Llandilo Listening post activity

 

 

 

Llandilo - Actions to date

A number of activities have been actioned following the engagement work undertaken in Llandilo.

 

There has been a traffic counter installed on a number of roads in Llandilo that were identified by residents as hazardous to assess the traffic behaviour of drivers.? There has been general mowing and tree trimming on road verges as well as road repairs.

 

There has been an upgrade to the Seventh Avenue pedestrian crossing and improvement to the community hall lighting.

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The Neighbourhood Renewal Program has contributed to the Shanes Park, Llandilo, Berkshire Park community newsletter, providing updates on the Llandilo engagement process and information about Council?s waste services.

 

Council, through the NSW Government funded Northern Rural Areas Community Development Project, have worked on a range of activities that have included Llandilo residents. These activities include a TAFE outreach course for women including computer and first aid classes; a community newsletter developed by the community and supported by Council; inclusion of Llandilo Public School in the Paint the Town Read project and preliminary investigation into setting up an Out of School Hours (OOSH) Service.

 

The history of Llandilo is also being recorded by residents through the ?Life in Llandilo When I was Young Oral history project?. This project is currently underway and involves older residents and local schools. The project is funded by the NSW Government through the Ageing Disability and Home Care agency.

 

Progress on Neighbourhood Action Plans

Along with current engagement activities, and cultural and employment related programs, the Neighbourhood Renewal Program also supports the implementation of a number of actions and activities identified in previous Neighbourhood Action Plans. These NAPs cover Kingswood Park, Londonderry, Oxley Park, Kingswood and St Marys.

 

Many services across Council contribute to the delivery of identified actions and priorities in these communities. Some of the implementation highlights for the past 12 months include:

 

???? The Kingswood Park Action Network continues to deliver a range of activities and programs to support community cohesion and capacity in this community. A variety of services are now being offered at North Penrith Neighbourhood Centre by

Nepean Community and Neighbourhood Services. Activities include family support as well as practical assistance such as Food Bank that offers reduced price items through bulk purchase. An introduction to computer skills course has also been offered as a result of resident feedback.

???? The Public Domain team has successfully negotiated with the managing agents of the Kingswood Park Shopping Centre a solution to illegal dumping on the public reserve behind the shops, enhancing the amenity of this area.?

???? The NSW Government funded Northern Rural Areas Community Development Project has delivered a computer course for residents in the Londonderry area. The course was well attended and at the time of undertaking the SRV consultations in Londonderry a number of residents commented positively on the course being offered locally.

???? A Youth Week event was held for the first time in Londonderry in April this year. The event was organised with the assistance of local brought young people together and raised awareness of the positive contribution that youth make to the local community.

???? Staff in the Community and Cultural Development Department have been working with other community partners to develop a St Marys Mt Druitt Pacific Islander and Maori festival day. The festival, known as ?Rim of Fire? will be held in October 2011 at Ridge Park Hall.

???? The Local Enterprise and Employment Officer developed a partnership with TAFE Outreach to provide a WOW (Work Opportunities for Women) course in Oxley Park Public School. The program focused on women from the Islander communities but was open to all local women.?

???? In partnership with Mission Australia, Council has been supporting regular family gatherings for Aboriginal residents in Oxley Park including school holiday activities. This group is growing in number and participants are becoming more actively involved in planning and promoting activities.?

???? The Kingswood Action Group, supported by Council?s Community Engagement Officer, has facilitated a number of family events this year engaging with the community and offering support and resources where required. The Group is a collaboration of local church and community organisations committed to developing community capacity in Kingswood.

 

 

Community volunteers from the Kingswood Anglican Church support the Kingswood Family Fun Day

 

???? The Neighbourhood Renewal Program in association with Information and Cultural Exchange delivered Optic Stories, a series of visual art workshops for young people at St Marys Corner over the school holidays. Eight participants from St Marys and Llandilo participated in the program. The program was showcased in an event called Hip Hop Projections in Parramatta in May with SBS covering the event and participants from St Marys and Llandilo included in the footage aired on SBS TV. Extremely positive feedback about the workshops has been received from parents of participants who felt their children benefited enormously.

???? The Public Domain and Safety Department have worked across a range of areas to improve lighting in public spaces in response to resident requests. These improvements include additional street lighting in Putland Street St Marys and on the corner of Collins St and the St Marys Corner Community and Cultural Precinct.?

???? The Public Domain team has worked with contractors and Integral Energy to ensure improved turn around times on the removal of graffiti from Integral Energy pads in the St Marys and North St Marys area.?

 

Other activities of the Neighbourhood Renewal Program

In addition to the engagement activities held in Llandilo a range of micro project activities have been supported by the Neighbourhood Renewal Program over the previous 12 months.

 

The Magnetic Places program was successful this year in supporting a range of creative and engaging events across a number of communities. With assistance from the Communications Team at Council the program received a high level of media coverage in the local press.

 

The projects included Amplify Art by Sunnyfield Independence, a day program for people with disabilities. This project has involved a series of art and design workshops with artist David Capra held for participants from Sunnyfield at Penrith Regional Gallery. Participants collaboratively designed and created a sculpture together which was launched in late June 2011 at St Marys Corner, Community and Cultural Precinct. The launch included friends and family of the participants as well as clients of Sunnyfield from a range of locations. The event was a celebration of the artistic work of participants as well as being a lively social gathering.

 

 

??? Participants from Amplify Art discuss their work and share experiences through creative activity

 

The Corner Interactive: St Marys Stories project was developed by CuriousWorks and culminated in an outdoor screening of new media works made by residents of St Marys and students from St Marys Senior High School at St Marys Corner Community and Cultural Precinct. Videos made by project participants were projected onto the outside of buildings at St Marys Corner in the evening during early May. The launch event was attended by participants as well as by other groups at St Marys Corner, some of whom opened their doors for the evening to assist in creating an atmosphere of activity on the precinct.

This project has developed a very positive working partnership between CuriousWorks and St Marys Senior High School, establishing an exciting focus on new media at the school and a strong foundation for new media initiatives between the partners in the future.

 

The Koori Story Exchange project by Information & Cultural Exchange provided training for community leaders and community workers in teaching new media skills to the wider community. This has resulted in employment outcomes for a number of participants involved. Further workshops have resulted in new media training being delivered to young people at Cranebrook Neighbourhood Centre with a very positive response from the community.

 

The Sustaining the Meadow project by St Marys Area Community Development project has included a series of very successful community gardening workshops being held at Claremont Meadows Community Centre. The workshops have been facilitated by local resident Nev Sweeney. Approximately 15 local residents have taken part in the workshops with childcare provided for approximately 8 children at each session. A primary aim of the project includes developing sustainable garden features at the neighbourhood centre for the whole of the community to enjoy. The project has also resulted in a number of new connections between residents and new visitors to the community centre.

 

IMG_0166.JPG

The Hip Hop Home project by Werrington Youth Centre has been a series of workshops for young people to participate in the development of hip hop songs. The workshops gave young people the opportunity to learn about all the steps in the production of a hip hop song, from lyric writing, selecting beats, recording, editing and development of a CD. Young people involved were very positive about their experience.

 

?????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????? Magnetic Places Hip Hop Home

 

 

This year has seen the continuation of the highly successful Artist Community Toolkit Workshops with five varied and interesting workshops presented. Participants have engaged with place making projects from across the globe as well as hearing from a range of local presenters on high quality initiatives that are occurring across the city. The Toolkit Series continues to showcase Penrith artists and places while building skills and capacity in the cultural and community sector.

 

 

Participants in the Artist & Community Toolkit series in March interact with presenter Jordi Pasqual in Barcelona via Skype.

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The Neighbourhood Stories website has been further developed to include all of the Neighbourhood Renewal areas and creative projects from these places. YouTube clips of Magnetic Places 2009-2010 and the Artist Community Toolkit Workshop Series 2010 have been embedded onto the Google map contained on the site.

 

Work continues on the development of local employment, training and enterprise opportunities across a range of areas. This year a number of new initiatives have taken place including the development of a training network for local employment and training related services.

 

A number of Employment Enterprise and Training Networking Breakfasts have been held with the April meeting focusing on the needs of Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CALD) job seekers. Approximately 50 local service provider representatives received presentations by Narelle Wheatland from DEEWR, Centrelink and TAFE representatives and key note speaker Pino Migliorino, Managing Director of Cultural Perspectives. The objective of the event was to not only provide a general networking opportunity but also to share knowledge and information to facilitate a more coordinated approach to service provision for CALD job seekers and service users. This initiative complements work currently being undertaken with the greater St Marys Southern Sudanese community. A report on the results of consultation with this particular community is currently being finalised for presentation to Council.??

 

The Pathways to Employment for Aboriginal residents in the Penrith LGA project is drawing to a conclusion. Conversations have been held with approximately 35 residents around their experiences looking for work or engaging in training. Some of these have been one on one, in pairs or discussions with existing local groups or gatherings of job seekers registered with the same employment service provider. The emphasis of the project has been on engagement with Aboriginal residents and the information that has been collected is interesting and varied, reflecting the diversity of experiences for residents when accessing training or seeking employment. A community feedback session has been held in Penrith with Aboriginal residents that have participated in the project to discuss the information gathered and to discuss possible solutions. A further session is planned for Cranebrook early in the next quarter before a report is prepared for the consideration of Council.

 

A suite of professional development training for local employment services has been well received and attended by local employment and training service providers. The first session Rolling with Resistance focused on developing constructive strategies to work with job seekers who are reluctant to change. The session was filled to capacity. Feedback after the event from attendees revealed that individuals found the content to be extremely relevant and applicable to the work carried out with job seekers. A number of attendees presented what they had learnt at their subsequent organisational team meeting and requests were made to repeat the condensed training session in its entirety.

 

This year Council was successful in receiving an award at the Annual Cultural Awards offered by the Local Government and Shires Association. The award recognised the Neighbourhood Stories St Marys Project and reflects the strength of this project and the approach of Council in engaging residents through creative and innovative practice. The Neighbourhood Stories website continues to be expanded to include all of the Neighbourhood Renewal areas and reflect the diverse range of creative projects being developed across these places and within these communities.

 

Earlier this year, the Australian Centre for Excellence in Local Government (ACELG) approached the Neighbourhood Renewal Program to undertake an evaluation and peer review of the program and community engagement activities. ACELG is focused on disseminating good examples of innovation and better practice in local government, and facilitate and encourage knowledge and experience sharing. ACELG are in the process of developing a range of case studies to promote innovation from across the local government sector nationally.

 

ACELG has engaged the Institute for Sustainable Futures at UTS to develop a case study of the Penrith Neighbourhood Renewal Program. This case study will be the first to be highlighted on an interactive online space called the Information and Knowledge Exchange Network that will provide a range of methods and tools for information exchange, collaboration, mutual learning and shared insights.

 

Conclusion

The Neighbourhood Renewal Program provides an integrated model of community engagement, cultural and employment and enterprise development in disadvantaged communities.? All activities seek to build on the strengths and potential within each community.

 

The Neighbourhood Renewal Program continues to support positive outcomes for residents in older established and disadvantaged communities across Penrith.

 

The Penrith Neighbourhood Renewal Program is focussed on suburbs considered to be of relative disadvantage as measured through the ABS SEIFA Index.? Llandilo is relatively disadvantaged according to the SEIFA index.

 

The engagement process in Llandilo utilised a range of creative and interesting methods, including activities for children and young people, meeting with existing community groups, listening posts and surveys. There was also a specific strategy to meet with culturally and linguistically diverse communities in Llandilo.

 

A community planning session was the last engagement activity and contributed to the final documentation of the resident priorities and concerns. This session supports the development of the Neighbourhood Action Plan (NAP) for this community.? All actions listed in the NAP have been agreed to by the relevant Council officers. Some actions are already underway. The implementation timeframe for each NAP is four years.

 

In addition, community service partners and/or resident volunteers have contributed significantly to the engagement process and have in some instances been involved in initiatives to address social issues identified in Llandilo.

 

Substantial work is continuing in other Neighbourhood Renewal areas and projects are delivering positive outcome for the community. Progress is being made on the actions identified in the NAPS for these areas and the Neighbourhood Renewal Program continues to actively engage with local communities to build capacity and contribute to wellbeing.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.???? The information contained in the report on Neighbourhood Renewal Program - Llandilo Neighbourhood Action Plan be received

2.???? Council endorse the Neighbourhood Action Plan for Llandilo as provided in Attachment 2 to this report.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1. View

Llandilo Community Engagement Report

25 Pages

Attachment

2. View

Llandilo Neighbourhood Action Plan 2011

12 Pages

Attachment

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A Green City

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

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A Liveable City

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK? INTENTIONALLY


A Vibrant City

 

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4??????? Place Making and Public Art Policy

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Policy Review Committee Meeting ?????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????? 1 August 2011

Community Wellbeing

 

 

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Place Making and Public Art Policy???

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Compiled by:?????????????? Karen Harris, Senior Cultural Development Officer

Authorised by:??????????? Erich Weller, Community and Cultural Development Manager ??

Strategic Objective: Enhance community strengths and capacity by supporting collaborative networks and partnerships (23.1)

Strategic Direction: A City with opportunities to engage, participate and connect (23)

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Executive Summary

This report provides an overview of the contribution place making and public art can make to the vitality and identity of contemporary cities.? To assist Council in supporting and encouraging place making and public art in Penrith City the report proposes that Council endorse the public exhibition of a Place Making and Public Art policy to provide guidance to consultants, developers and interested parties. This overview and the draft Place Making and Public Art policy were the subject of a presentation to a Councillor briefing on 23 May 2011.

 

Council aims for high standards of design and sustainability in architecture, urban design and the public domain to enhance the character, distinctiveness and quality of the Penrith City Centre, St Marys Town Centre, other activity centres and meeting places.

 

The draft Place Making and Public Art Policy will support the recognition of Penrith as a distinctive regional city with a unique identity.? The policy summarises the benefits of integrating place making and public art in the evolving character of the City.

 

Place making is a feature of many old as well as contemporary cities.? Public art can support place making and contribute to a vibrant city.? Place making and public art are promoted and resourced by new release area developers as important components in the development of communities not just housing estates. Place making and public art can also be utilised in town centres, established places and key recreation areas.

 

As indicated in the draft policy public art as a tool in place making needs to be used selectively after careful assessment and review of the context, place, available resources and objectives. In addition public art is only one way to achieve place making.? Other ways include landscaping and activation.

 

Implementation of the policy will largely occur from existing Council resources, with key staff assessing the incorporation of place making and public art in specific projects or developments put forward by development proponents. Some major Council projects will also incorporate place making through public art.

 

This policy also complements the section on public art in Council?s Development Control Plan 2010.

 

The draft Place Making and Public Art Policy is provided as Attachment 1 to this report.

 

The briefing paper to Councillors on 23 May 2011 also provided an update on the implementation of the Penrith Cultural Framework and the Cultural Development Action Plan 2007-11.? Some highlights in the implementation of the Plan are provided as Attachment 2 to this report with the full Action Plan status report provided as Attachment 3. A number of continuing cultural development priorities have been highlighted for further focussed work between 2011 and 2014.? These priorities are summarised later in this report.

 

Council?s cultural development agenda as articulated in the Penrith Cultural Framework and Action Plan complement and build on the strengths of the PP&VA Ltd and its regional facilities.

 

The report recommends that the information be received and that Council endorse the exhibition of the Place Making and Public Art policy for public comment for 28 days.

 

Background

The Penrith Cultural Framework and Cultural Development Action Plan 2007-2011 were endorsed by Council for implementation in October 2007.

 

The Penrith Cultural Framework establishes a series of aspirational goals based on a number of themes.? These themes are:

 

???? Culture and Sustainability

???? Culture and Penrith as a Regional City

???? Culture and Social Wellbeing

???? Culture and the Environment

???? Culture and the Economy

???? Culture and Leadership.

 

The Cultural Development Action Plan is based on these themes.

 

The Penrith Cultural Framework and Action Plan are based on an approach that involves the integration of culture into many of the other services of Council, including city and sustainability planning, landscape and urban design, local parks and recreation, and children?s services. In addition, the Framework and Action Plan build on the strengths of the organisations and groups that already provide a foundation for participation in arts and culture in Penrith City.? A list of these organisations and groups is provided at Attachment 5 to this report.

 

Creating a successful partnership between the arts, culture and city renewal and growth requires moving beyond a traditional focus on high or low art, community art, or popular arts.? This partnership requires a focus on how residents experience their city ? their sense of place and identity in its diverse and many expressions, and how residents interact in their neighbourhoods and in public places.? These are critical aspects to providing a leading edge to cultural planning and development, and the place and role of cities in a community and a region.

 

The draft Place Making and Public Art policy provides one key way to support the evolving identity of Penrith City, while at the same time recognising the City?s diverse past.

 

The Community Strategic Plan 2031, Cultural Development and Place Making

In the research and consultation undertaken to support the development of Council?s Community Strategic Plan 2031 residents and stakeholders articulated a number of ideas and aspirations.?

 

These include:

 

???? ?????? As our regional City Centre, Penrith needs a ?heart? and a sense of arrival;

???? ?????? We enjoy doing things in the City, and like not having to travel.? We just want choice ? more things to do on weekends, and different places to go at night for a meal or entertainment;

???? ?????? Hubs for employment and neighbourhood activities in our local centres will support our growing communities;

???? ?????? More arts and cultural activities will help create local employment.? We need more investment in the creative industries sector;

???? ?????? We want to be healthier ? eat well, and be more active;

Penrith Council Community Strategic Plan 2031, page 16, Vibrant City

 

As the Community Strategic Plan states:

 

?Some think that Western Sydney is ?all the same? and doesn?t offer, nor has the capacity to respond to, future opportunities.? Council will need to work on creating a positive perception of the City?s assets ? both its people and places.? To grow in the future, the City needs to appeal to a wider audience and become more cosmopolitan.? It will be important, as this growth unfolds, that Penrith does not lose its unique identity, and that special character that underpins the local community?s sense of place and identity.? Many vibrant cities around the world have demonstrated that a region?s social, cultural and economic strengths come from within.? Encouraging businesses, development and even housing that build on the unique identity of our City is more sustainable over the longer term.

Penrith Council Community Strategic Plan 2031, page 16, Vibrant City

 

This vision for Penrith City is a major focus in the Vibrant City theme of the Community Strategic Plan 2031.

 

Place Making and Public Art Policy

Penrith is recognised as a regional city and the principal service centre for outer Western Sydney and the Central West. To fully realise Penrith?s potential as a principal centre Council recognises that cultural development and creativity are critical to the City?s economic vitality, social equity and environmental sustainability.

 

Council works towards the highest standards of design and sustainability in architecture, urban design and the public domain to contribute to improving and maintaining the character, distinctiveness and quality of the varied urban, rural and natural places across the City.? For the City to maintain and promote its unique identity and cultural vitality a collaborative design approach to integrate place making and public art into the design of the City?s urban environment, public domain, buildings and facilities is required.? This approach will support the contribution of future growth and development of the City to the evolving identity and wellbeing of the people in Penrith.

 

Place making is a feature in many old as well as contemporary cities. ?Public art is a tool that can support place making and contribute to a vibrant city.? Public art can be integrated into features of the public domain such as paving, tree guards, seating or fencing.? Public art might also be temporary and ephemeral.? Public art as a tool in place making also needs to be used selectively after careful assessment and review of the context, place and available resources.

 

Urban street furniture

 

The proposed Place Making and Public Art Policy aims to promote a greater understanding of the benefits of place making and public art in the development of a sustainable and vibrant city. In particular, it provides policy guidelines to assist Council, developers and key stakeholders in their negotiation on the integration of quality place making and public art into significant projects and developments.

 

Ropes Crossing

The Draft Place Making and Public Art Policy is provided as Attachment 1 to this paper.? The benefits to the City of place making and public art are detailed on page 7 of the policy.? In summary these include:

 

???? ?????? engaging local communities in place making and public art processes assists in creating places that reflect a sense of identity and connection, and community pride;

???? ?????? place making and public art can create a sense of arrival and destination, making an impact and influencing the perceptions of residents, visitors and business;

???? ?????? art and design, including in place making, is a creative human response to our physical and social environment and ultimately a form of social expression and evolving identity;

???? ?????? place making and public art can also play a key role in supporting the local economy by creating points of difference for a city, and attracting entrepreneurs and professionals involved in the knowledge economy.

 

The principles of public art have already been endorsed by Council in the Penrith City Council Development Control Plan 2010 in Section 8.5 under the Public Domain.? The draft Place Making and Public Art Policy provides a more detailed policy that can support discussion and negotiation with developers and their consultants on major development proposals.

 

Place making and public art are accepted by new release area developers as important components in the development of communities not just housing estates.? Place making assists in providing new residents with recognisable places in the landscape ? in some cases new residents may also have participated in contributing some of the design ideas.

 

Landcom: Cricket Oval fence designs ? North Penrith

 

This approach can also be utilised in established areas. For example Council?s Neighbourhood Renewal Program, through engaging a designer/artist to work with local children and residents, developed a range of place making and public art elements in the final playground design for the park in Kingswood Park, opposite the primary school.? Design and implementation processes such as these contribute to local community pride, interaction and identity.

 

It is also intended that the draft Place Making and Public Art Policy applies to major Council projects and Council?s leadership will be critical to the success of the collaborative design and implementation approach outlined in the Policy. The Policy will also be supported by technical guidelines that will assist in the implementation of place making and public art projects.

 

A number of Councils in metropolitan Sydney, Newcastle and the Illawarra have had longstanding commitments to place making and public art.? These include the City of Sydney, Parramatta, Liverpool, Newcastle, Wollongong and more recently Blacktown.?

 

Parramatta Pedestrian Bridge

 

It is proposed that Council place the draft Place Making and Public Art Policy on public exhibition for a period of 28 days for public comment.? The draft policy will also be distributed to key stakeholders for comment.

 

Implementation of the Policy

Implementation of the policy will largely occur from existing Council resources, with key staff assessing the incorporation of place making and public art in specific developments and projects put forward by development proponents. More significant Council projects will also include place making and public art.? These elements are a key consideration for any major project design and tender process.? As indicated in the policy, public art as a tool in place making needs to be used selectively after careful assessment and review of the content, place and available resources.

 

Implementation of the policy will focus on new urban places, established neighbourhoods and centres.? The policy also provides the foundation for collaboration between a number of professional disciplines, working collaboratively to plan, design and implement place making and public art initiatives in Penrith City. Opportunities will also be pursued to source external funding for place making projects.

 

This policy complements the section on public art in Council?s Development Control Plan 2010.? Technical guidelines are also being finalised to assist implementation.

 

Pages 8-9 of the Place Making and Public Art Policy provides more detail on implementation.

 

Cultural Planning and Development Challenges

There are a number of challenges to be addressed over the coming years as Penrith evolves and positions itself to respond to the next phase of growth and redevelopment, and a changing economy. Continuing to express the uniqueness of Penrith and its different communities and places will be a key component in supporting community cohesion and providing an environment conducive to the growth of a strong cultural industries sector. Place making and contemporary ideas about the development and use of public space must be considered in a whole of Council and community approach. This will require some of the traditional responses within Council to be reviewed and creative approaches identified and advanced.

 

Penrith City has emerged in Western Sydney as a place where innovative cultural practice is supported. There continue to be many opportunities to enhance the liveability of the City and support the development of Penrith as a regional city through a comprehensive and responsive cultural development agenda. This is a challenge for our organisation as expectations and opportunities sometimes outstrip capacity and resources to respond. Given this context there needs to be an ongoing assessment of priorities and the achievement of quality outcomes.? The continuation and extension of partnerships will be critical in achieving additional leverage to Council?s available resources.?

 

A level of support for existing local cultural and community cultural organisations such as local bands, orchestras, choirs, and drama and heritage groups continues to be a challenge and a priority. Some of these groups, many with extensive community support but in some cases a dwindling membership require a level of support from Council. As with many volunteer organisations, membership is sometimes decreasing and finding people with skills, interest and capacity to participate remains a challenge for these organisations.

 

Cultural Development Priorities for 2011 ? 2014

With Penrith?s continuing growth as a Regional City and the principal centre for outer Western Sydney, there will be a continuing need to position the city as a leader in cultural practice and innovation.

 

The PP&VA Ltd will also make a major contribution to achieving this objective.? The work of Council?s Senior Cultural Development Officer ? City and Neighbourhood Renewal Cultural Development Officer ? Local complements the role of Council?s major cultural facilities.?

 

The following section of the report outlines some of the priorities for the period 2011-2014.

 

Penrith City Centre and St Marys Town Centre

There will be an ongoing demand for creative engagement projects in both the major centres in Penrith City.? Currently, Council and the PP&VA Ltd have received additional Federal Safer Suburbs and ArtsNSW funding to develop a range of cultural and community engagement activities with the young people in the civic arts space ? also known as the ?Mondo?.? This initiative has commenced with the participation of Westfield, and a number of local youth services including Fusion and PCYC.

 

With the 2011/12 Special Rate Variation proceeding there will also be major opportunities for place making in the public domain of the two centres.

 

Place Making and Public Art in the City?s New Release Areas

Council officers are currently finalising negotiations with a number of new release area developers on their proposed place making and public art strategies for their particular developments.? This includes Landcom, Delfin and Stocklands. With expert advice from Council?s Senior Cultural Development Officer and other design staff the strategies will deliver functional, affordable, safe and maintainable place making elements in the respective new release areas.

 

The outcome of the implementation of these strategies will be that these new communities will have a distinctive identity, creative spaces for interaction and activation and a sense of place in the context of the natural and built environment.

 

St Marys Corner Community and Cultural Precinct

To achieve the desired community outcomes from Council?s $6 million investment in the refurbishment of St Marys Corner, continuing focus will be necessary on activation and creative engagement programs.

 

With contributions from the St Marys Corner Community Reference Group, significant progress has been made on activation.? A range of additional partnerships have been forged and these provide extra resources to complement Council?s commitment.

 

Creative Partnerships

Partnerships with organisations such as the Sydney Dance Company, the Sydney Festival, C3 West, the Western Sydney Young People?s Literature Project, Information and Cultural Exchange, and Curious Works new media company provide the City and its residents with the opportunity to engage in different cultural experiences.? Often with a limited resource allocation the City can gain a significant media profile and assist Council in continuing to make and promote a unique identity for Penrith City.

 

Council?s Neighbourhood Renewal Program has also provided leadership in the development of innovative creative partnerships that contribute to capacity building in local neighbourhoods and suburbs.

 

To ensure the City continues to benefit from these partnerships new opportunities will be identified and coordinated.

 

Neighbourhood Renewal Cultural Engagement

As outlined earlier in this paper, the cultural engagement component of the Neighbourhood Renewal Program makes a major contribution to the participation by residents in activities and programs that enliven local neighbourhoods as well as providing local residents with new opportunities that can indeed be life-changing.

 

As Councillors are aware these cultural engagement activities highlight a positive service relationship between Council and residents in disadvantaged neighbourhoods.? The engagement activities also contribute to Neighbourhood Action Plans (NAPs) which incorporate local community priorities for implementation.

 

In 2011 and subsequent years NAPs will be developed for Llandilo, Penrith suburb, Colyton, North St Marys, Werrington, Cranebrook and Cambridge Park.

 

Creative Industries Development

This is one of the greater challenges for the City.? Discussions have been held with the Penrith Business Alliance (PBA) on how to expand the creative industries sector in Penrith City.? The creative industries are closely linked to the knowledge economy and areas of employment growth, including IT, communications, marketing and the service sector more generally.

 

The NSW Government ran a number of workshops in 2010 to support local government in identifying key areas of focus for creative industry growth.? Further work will be required to progress these opportunities.? Leadership from the PBA and partnerships with the private sector will be critical to success.

 

Building Cultural and Creative Capacity

There are a large number of existing cultural organisations that are either based in Penrith City or their focus of activity is in Penrith City. They include local bands, orchestras, theatre companies, choirs, arts and craft groups, as well as heritage organisations.? A list of these organisations and groups is provided as Attachment 4 to this report.

 

These organisations and groups provide pathways for young people to engage in cultural programs, as well as for other residents to continue with cultural interests and pursuits.? These organisations and groups are largely run by volunteers and add richness to the cultural fabric of the City.

 

Council does provide a small subsidy to a number of these organisations. Council officers have recently completed a survey of the contribution these groups make to the City and this will be the subject of a forthcoming report to Council in the first quarter of the 2011/12 year.

 

Council?s Artist + Community Toolkit Series, now in its fourth year, has also made a major contribution to building creative capacity in Penrith City.

 

Conclusion

Council, in the development of its Community Strategic Plan 2031 and the Delivery Program

2009-2013 has, together with the community, identified a Vibrant City as a key goal.? The specific community outcomes are a City with:

 

???? people and places that are inclusive, foster creativity, and celebrate diversity

???? design excellence that respects our local identity

???? opportunities to engage, participate and connect.

 

The proposed Place Making and Public Art Policy will support Council in delivering the above listed community outcomes.

 

By placing the policy on public exhibition for 28 days stakeholders including developers will have the opportunity to provide feedback to Council.? The draft policy will also be distributed to interested parties for comment.

 

After the public comments period Council officers will provide a further report to an Ordinary Meeting on feedback received, an assessment of the feedback and any changes required to the policy.

 

This report also provides Council with an overview of the significant progress that has been achieved in delivering Council?s Vibrant City agenda through the implementation of the Penrith Cultural Framework and Cultural Development Action Plan 2007-11.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.???? The information contained in the report on Place Making and Public Art Policy be received.

2.???? Council support the placing of the draft Place Making and Public Art Policy on 28 day public exhibition.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1. View

Draft Place Making and Public Art Policy

10 Pages

Attachment

2. View

Highlights - Implementation of the Penrith Cultural Development Action Plan - 2007-2011

10 Pages

Attachment

3. View

Cultural Development Action Plan - Status Report

21 Pages

Attachment

4. View

List of Cultural Organisations and Groups

1 Page

Attachment

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ATTACHMENTS???

 

 

Date of Meeting:???????? Monday 1 August 2011

Delivery Program:?????

Issue:??????????????????????????? Base the provision of services and facilities on principles of social justice and equity (7.1)

Report Title:??????????????? Neighbourhood Renewal Program - Llandilo Neighbourhood Action Plan

Attachments:?????????????? Llandilo Community Engagement Report

????????????????????????????????????? Llandilo Neighbourhood Action Plan 2011



Policy Review Committee Meeting??????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????? 1 August 2011

Attachment 1 - Llandilo Community Engagement Report

 

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Policy Review Committee Meeting??????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????? 1 August 2011

Attachment 2 - Llandilo Neighbourhood Action Plan 2011

 

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ATTACHMENTS???

 

 

Date of Meeting:???????? Monday 1 August 2011

Delivery Program:?????

Issue:??????????????????????????? Enhance community strengths and capacity by supporting collaborative networks and partnerships (23.1)

Report Title:??????????????? Place Making and Public Art Policy

Attachments:?????????????? Draft Place Making and Public Art Policy

????????????????????????????????????? Highlights - Implementation of the Penrith Cultural Development Action Plan - 2007-2011

????????????????????????????????????? Cultural Development Action Plan - Status Report

????????????????????????????????????? List of Cultural Organisations and Groups



Policy Review Committee Meeting??????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????? 1 August 2011

Attachment 1 - Draft Place Making and Public Art Policy

 

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Policy Review Committee Meeting??????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????? 1 August 2011

Attachment 2 - Highlights - Implementation of the Penrith Cultural Development Action Plan - 2007-2011

 

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Policy Review Committee Meeting??????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????? 1 August 2011

Attachment 3 - Cultural Development Action Plan - Status Report

 

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Policy Review Committee Meeting??????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????? 1 August 2011

Attachment 4 - List of Cultural Organisations and Groups

 

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