9 October 2013

 

Dear Councillor,

In pursuance of the provisions of the Local Government Act, 1993 and the Regulations thereunder, notice is hereby given that a POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING of Penrith City Council is to be held in the Passadena Room, Civic Centre, 601 High Street, Penrith on Monday 14 October 2013 at 7:00PM.

Attention is directed to the statement accompanying this notice of the business proposed to be transacted at the meeting.

Yours faithfully

 

Alan Stoneham

General Manager

 

BUSINESS

 

1.           LEAVE OF ABSENCE

Leave of absence has been granted to:

Councillor Jim Aitken OAM - 13 October 2013 to 16 October 2013 inclusive.

Councillor Mark Davies - 14 October 2013 to 25 October 2013 inclusive.

 

2.           APOLOGIES

 

3.           CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES

Policy Review Committee Meeting - 9 September 2013.

 

4.           DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

Pecuniary Interest (The Act requires Councillors who declare a pecuniary interest in an item to leave the meeting during discussion of that item)

Non-Pecuniary Conflict of Interest – Significant and Less than Significant (The Code of Conduct requires Councillors who declare a significant non-pecuniary conflict of interest in an item to leave the meeting during discussion of that item)

 

5.           ADDRESSING THE MEETING

 

6.           MAYORAL MINUTES

 

7.           NOTICES OF MOTION TO RESCIND A RESOLUTION

 

8.           NOTICES OF MOTION

 

9.           DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

10.         REQUESTS FOR REPORTS AND MEMORANDUMS

 

11.         URGENT BUSINESS

 

12.         CONFIDENTIAL BUSINESS


POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING

 

Monday 14 October 2013

 

table of contents

 

 

 

 

 

 

meeting calendar

 

 

confirmation of minutes

 

 

DELIVERY program reports

 


Council_Mark_POS_RGB2013 MEETING CALENDAR

January 2013 - December 2013

(adopted by Council 19/11/12)

 

 

 

TIME

JAN

FEB

MAR

APRIL

MAY

JUNE

JULY

AUG

SEPT

OCT

NOV

DEC

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

 

Ordinary Council Meeting

7.30pm

 

4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

23^ü

(7.00pm)

 

 

16

(7.00pm)

 

25@

25

29v

27#

24 *

22

26@

30

21

25#+

 

Policy Review Committee

7.00pm

 

11

11

15

13

17

8

12

9

14

11

9

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 v

Meeting at which the draft corporate planning documents (Community Strategic Plan, Delivery Program, Operational Plan, Resource Strategy) are endorsed for exhibition

 *

Meeting at which the draft corporate planning documents (Community Strategic Plan, Delivery Program, Operational Plan, Resource Strategy) are adopted

 #

Meetings at which the Operational Plan quarterly reviews (March and September) are presented

 @

Meetings at which the Delivery Program progress reports (including the Operational Plan quarterly reviews for June and December) are presented

 ^

Election of Mayor/Deputy Mayor

 ü

Meeting at which the 2012-2013 Annual Statements are presented

 

Meeting at which any comments on the 2012-2013 Annual Statements are presented

 +

Meeting at which the Annual Report is presented

-            Extraordinary Meetings are held as required.

-            Members of the public are invited to observe meetings of the Council (Ordinary and Policy Review Committee).

Should you wish to address Council, please contact the Senior Governance Officer, Glenn Schuil.

 


UNCONFIRMED MINUTES

 OF THE POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING OF PENRITH CITY COUNCIL HELD IN THE PASSADENA ROOM, PENRITH

ON MONDAY 9 SEPTEMBER 2013 AT 7:02PM

PRESENT

His Worship the Mayor, Councillor Mark Davies, Deputy Mayor, Councillor Ross Fowler OAM and Councillors Jim Aitken OAM, Bernard Bratusa (arrived 7.10pm), Kevin Crameri OAM, Marcus Cornish, Greg Davies, Maurice Girotto, Ben Goldfinch, Jackie Greenow OAM, Karen McKeown, John Thain and Michelle Tormey.

 

LEAVE OF ABSENCE

Leave of Absence was previously granted to Councillor Tricia  Hitchen for the period 27 August 2013 to 14 September 2013 inclusive.

APOLOGIES

PRC 42  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor John Thain seconded Councillor Ross Fowler OAM that a apology be received for Councillor Prue Car.

 

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES - Policy Review Committee Meeting - 12 August 2013

PRC 43  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Ben Goldfinch seconded Councillor Marcus Cornish that the minutes of the Policy Review Committee Meeting of 12 August 2013 be confirmed.

 

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

 

Councillor Ben Goldfinch declared a Non-Pecuniary Conflict of Interest – Less than Significant in Item 5 - Model Asbestos Policy for NSW Councils as he holds an Asbestos Removal Licence. Councillor Goldfinch indicated he would stay in the room for consideration of the Item.

 

His Worship the Mayor, Councillor Mark Davies declared a Non-Pecuniary Conflict of Interest – Significant in Item 1 - Rezoning Application RZ12/0001: 17-53 Caddens Road, Kingswood (The Knoll) - Results of Public Exhibition as his parents in law own a property which adjoins the land subject to the Application.

 

DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Outcome 6 - We're healthy and share strong community spirit

 

6        Penrith CBD Corporation Triennial Business Plan

Place Manager, Jeni Pollard introduced the report and invited Owen Rogers, Chairperson of the Penrith CBD Corporation to give a presentation.                                                                         

PRC 44  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Marcus Cornish

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Penrith CBD Corporation Triennial Business Plan be received.

2.     Council write to the Penrith CBD Corporations advising it that the Council supports its draft Triennial Business Plan.

3.     The Council Seal be affixed to the Deed of Agreement referred to in this report.

 

Outcome 2 - We plan for our future growth

 

Having previously declared an interest in Item 1, His Worship the Mayor, Councillor Mark Davies left the meeting, the time being 7:43pm.

 

Deputy Mayor, Councillor Ross Fowler OAM took the Chair for consideration of this Item, the time being 7:43pm.

 

Councillor Marcus Cornish left the meeting, the time being 7:48pm.
Councillor Marcus Cornish returned to the meeting, the time being 7:51pm.

 

1        Rezoning Application RZ12/0001: 17-53 Caddens Road, Kingswood (The Knoll) - Results of Public Exhibition                                                                                                           

PRC 45  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Jim Aitken OAM

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Rezoning Application RZ12/0001: 17-53 Caddens Road, Kingswood (The Knoll) - Results of Public Exhibition be received.

2.     Council endorse the Planning Proposal with the minor amendment to the boundary between the proposed RE1 Public Recreation and R2 Low Density Residential zones as requested by the proponent, Urban Growth NSW.

3.     The Council note that the Planning Proposal, Development Control Plan and Voluntary Planning Agreement will continue to be refined and finalised prior to the publication of the necessary amendments to Penrith Local Environmental Plan 2010 under the Minister for Planning and Infrastructure’s delegated local environmental plan making powers.

4.     Council adopt the draft Development Control Chapter so that it takes effect on the publication of the amendments to Penrith Local Environmental Plan 2010.

5.     The General Manager execute the Voluntary Planning Agreement for the transfer and embellishment of the proposed hill-top park to Council, the upgrade of Caddens Road along the southern boundary of the Site to the intersection with Bringelly Road and all applicable development contributions, once it is publicly notified in accordance with the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 and Environmental Planning and Assessment Regulations 2000.

 

 

 

In accordance with Section 375A of the Local Government Act 1993, a DIVISION was then called with the following result:

For

Against

 

Councillor Greg Davies

Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM

Councillor John Thain

Councillor Michelle Tormey

Councillor Maurice Girotto

 

Councillor Jackie Greenow OAM

                                                        

Councillor Ross Fowler OAM

 

Councillor Ben Goldfinch

 

Councillor Bernard Bratusa   

 

Councillor Jim Aitken OAM

 

Councillor Marcus Cornish

 

Councillor Karen McKeown

 

 

His Worship the Mayor, Councillor Mark Davies returned to the meeting, the time being 8:04pm.

 

2        Rescission of Library Facilities and Glenmore Park Stage 2 Development Contributions Plans                                                                                                                                    

PRC 46  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor John Thain seconded Councillor Greg Davies

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on the Rescission of Library Facilities and Glenmore Park Stage 2 Development Contributions Plans be received.

2.     The Library Facilities Contributions Plan be rescinded and that the Glenmore Park Stage 2 Development Contributions Plan be rescinded upon confirmation that the Voluntary Planning Agreement (VPA) has been registered on the title of all land within Glenmore Park Stage 2 which is subject to the VPA.

3.     Notices appear in the local newspaper advising the community of the rescission of the Plans, in accordance with the requirements of the Environmental Planning & Assessment Act and Regulations.

4.     If any further Library Facilities Plan contributions are received in relation to existing development consents, these be allocated to additional library resources, consistent with those resources described in the Plan.

5.     A further report be brought back to a Policy Review Committee meeting on the reduction in s94 planning contributions of approximately $200,000 per year for Library resources and the effect that will have on the Library service.

In accordance with Section 375A of the Local Government Act 1993, a DIVISION was then called with the following result:

 

 

 

For

Against

 

Councillor Greg Davies

 

Councillor John Thain

 

Councillor Maurice Girotto

 

Councillor Michelle Tormey

 

Councillor Jackie Greenow OAM

                                                        

Councillor Ross Fowler OAM

 

Councillor Ben Goldfinch

 

Councillor Bernard Bratusa   

 

Councillor Jim Aitken OAM

 

Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM

 

Councillor Marcus Cornish

 

Councillor Mark Davies

 

Councillor Karen McKeown

 

 

Outcome 4 - We have safe, vibrant places

 

Councillor Michelle Tormey left the meeting, the time being 8:08pm.

Councillor Ross Fowler OAM left the meeting, the time being 8:09pm.

Councillor Ross Fowler OAM returned to the meeting, the time being 8:11pm.

Councillor Michelle Tormey returned to the meeting, the time being 8:11pm.

 

3        Amendments to the Penrith Valley Cemeteries Policy                                                   

PRC 47  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Marcus Cornish seconded Councillor Karen McKeown

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Amendments to the Penrith Valley Cemeteries Policy be received.

2.     Proposed changes to the Penrith Valley Cemeteries Policy as outlined in the report be adopted. 

 

Outcome 5 - We care about our environment

 

4        Swimming Pool Barrier Inspection Program                                                                  

PRC 48  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Maurice Girotto

That:

1.       The information contained in the report on Swimming Pool Barrier Inspection Program be received.

 

2.       That the enclosed draft Swimming Pool Barrier Inspection Program is placed on public exhibition for 28 days and submissions be invited from the public.

 

3.       That following the period of public exhibition and due consideration and process of any submissions received, the Swimming Pools Inspection Program commences in accordance with the outlined amendments to the Swimming Pools Act 1992 (Act) and the Program.

4.       A copy of the this report be sent to former Councillor Robert Ardill and to the Samuel Morris Foundation.

 

5        Model Asbestos Policy for NSW Councils                                                                       

PRC 49  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor John Thain seconded Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Model Asbestos Policy for NSW Councils be received.

2.     The draft Asbestos Policy be placed on public exhibition for 30 days to seek comment from stakeholders.

 

Outcome 7 - We have confidence in our Council

 

7        2012-13 - Year in Review

The General Manager, Alan Stoneham gave a presentation detailing some of the milestones and highlights that the Council has achieved and delivered to the community over the last year of the 2009-13 delivery program.                                                                                                            

PRC 50  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Ross Fowler OAM seconded Councillor Ben Goldfinch that the information contained in the report on 2012-13 - Year in Review be received.

 

There being no further business the Chairperson declared the meeting closed the time being 9:06pm.

    



DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

 

Outcome 1 - We can work close to home

 

1        Penrith Business Alliance Limited (PBA) 2013-2014 Business Plan                                 1

 

Outcome 2 - We plan for our future growth

 

2        Construction Specification for Civil Works (Working Draft)                                          11

 

3        Stormwater Drainage for Building Developments (Working Draft)                                16

  

Outcome 4 - We have safe, vibrant places

 

4        Neighbourhood Renewal Program  - North St Marys and Werrington Neighbourhood Action Plans                                                                                                                                           23

   

Outcome 7 - We have confidence in our Council

 

5        Draft Policy on the Payment of Expenses and Provision of Facilities to Mayor, Deputy Mayor and Councillors                                                                                                                        69

 

6        Community Survey 2013                                                                                                  93

 

 


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


Outcome 1 - We can work close to home

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

1        Penrith Business Alliance Limited (PBA) 2013-2014 Business Plan                                 1

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                     14 October 2013

 

 

 

1

Penrith Business Alliance Limited (PBA) 2013-2014 Business Plan   

 

Compiled by:               Mark Broderick, Planning Projects Co-ordinator

Authorised by:            Paul Grimson, Strategic Planning Manager   

 

Outcome

We can work close to home

Strategy

Diversify the region's economy and attract investment, particularly targeting new and emerging employment sectors

Service Activity

Build on our partnerships and alliances to achieve shared aspirations for the City's future

 

Presenters:                   Paul Brennan - Penrith Business Alliance - Business Plan

                                      Bijai Kumar - Penrith Business Alliance - Business Plan      

 

Executive Summary

Council’s vision for Penrith is one of a sustainable and prosperous region with a harmony of urban and rural qualities.  Continued and sustainable economic growth is a key component in the delivery of this vision.  The Penrith Business Alliance Limited (PBA) is funded by Council to meet this challenge for the City.

 

The PBA’s focus is on the strategic imperatives required to attract investment and employment opportunities, and promote the growth of Penrith as a Regional City.  Its business plans identify specific actions to achieve the strategic imperatives.  This report presents the PBA’s Business Plan for the 2013/14 Financial Year (the Business Plan).  It provides a précis of the PBA’s stated key achievements over the past 12 months and recommends that Council agree to the Business Plan and provide funding in accordance with the Deed of Agreement.

 

A copy of the Business Plan and covering letter by Mr Paul Brennan, Chairman of the PBA Board, requesting funding in accordance with the Deed of Agreement are attached for the information of Councillors.  The draft Financial Report (prepared by PBA’s auditor) for the 2012-2013 financial year has been circulated separately for the information of Councillors.  The draft Financial Report will be presented for adoption to the PBA Board at its Annual General Meeting on 29 October 2013.  It is intended that the Financial Report will be tabled as a public document under a separate report to Council at its Ordinary Meeting of 25 November 2013 following its adoption by the Board.

 

Paul Brennan, Chairman and Bijai Kumar, Chief Executive Officer of the PBA will present the Alliance’s 2013-2014 Business Plan. 

Background

The PBA was established in 2009, following a review of options available to Council to deliver Citywide economic development and employment services.  The PBA is guided by a Board formed with broad representation from a range of key employment and development sectors.  Council’s representatives on the Board are the Mayor, Councillor Ross Fowler OAM, Councillor Jim Aitken OAM, and Craig Butler, Director.

 

The PBA’s mission is “To promote sustainable economic growth for Penrith as a Regional City through innovation, strategic alliances, enterprise development and investment attraction.”  The PBA is funded from:

1.   A transfer of funds previously allocated to Council’s Economic Development Department,

2.   A special rate targeted at economic development, and

3.   Future developer contributions.

 

The Deed of Agreement between Council and the PBA broadly outlines the ‘deliverables’ the PBA is funded to achieve, with a particular focus on the creation of 40,000 jobs by 2031.  The Deed requires submission to and agreement by Council to the PBA’s annual Business Plan.  The Deed makes provision for half of the funding to be paid when Council endorses the Business Plan, with the balance paid in 6 months.

 

The Deed also requires the PBA to report its performance against the past year’s Business Plan to Council, in support of the request for funding for the following year.

Performance in 2012-2013

The following is a précis of the PBA’s statement of performance for the 2012/13 financial year.  In 2012/13, the PBA’s activities were focused on addressing the following six strategic issues:

·     Penrith Health and Education Precinct, including the proposed Nepean Medical Research Institute (based on Council’s planning framework for the Werrington Enterprise, Learning and Living Precinct);

·     Werrington Business Park and the Werrington Park Corporate Centre;

·     The Penrith Progression - to revitalise the Penrith CBD (based on Council’s Penrith City Centre Strategy);

·     Broader Western Sydney Employment Area (BWSEA);

·     Establishment of a Smart Health Industry Innovation Precinct based on the former Commonwealth Government’s plans to fund nationwide Industry Innovation Precincts; and

·     Other key activities such as Innovation and Enterprise Development and other citywide initiatives such as the NSW Government’s new stadia policy, the inaugural Federal Budget debate and the PBA’s Advocacy program.

 

The PBA’s key achievements in 2012-2013 were:

 

·     Erskine Park Link Road

The PBA lobbied for funding for the commencement of the Link Road resulting in the recently opened four lane divided Link Road costing around $55 million. 

 

·     Penrith Health and Education Precinct (PHEP)

The listing of PHEP as a specialised centre is regarded as a major breakthrough as this will result in State Government support for the activation of planning for the delivery of infrastructure and other services in the PHEP. 

 

·     Werrington Park (UWS North Werrington)

Work conducted by the PBA set the platform for conceiving the concept of an employment catalyst in the form of the Werrington Park Corporate Centre (WPCC) as a precursor to the development of a business park.  This ultimately resulted in the establishment of a PBA-Council-UWS consortium and receipt of a $13.5 million Commonwealth Government grant, under the Suburban Jobs Program advocated by the National Growth Areas Alliance (NGAA), to build the $29 million WPCC.  The building is scheduled to be completed in early 2015.

 

·     Nepean Medical Research Institute (MRI)

A major exercise involving all key players and Council was undertaken last year to apply for Regional Development Australia funding for the MRI.  As a result of lobbying the following outcomes have been achieved with respect to a proposed MRI at Nepean:

The NSW State Minister has provided in principle support for a MRI with Health Infrastructure now involved;

Land has been identified on the hospital environs where a MRI could be built together with accommodation for administrative staff;

The Nepean Blue Mountains Health District Board supports a MRI and is in the process of setting up an entity and governance framework for a MRI.

 

Sydney University has also agreed to set up a virtual link with the Charles Perkins Centre (Medical Research Institute) in Sydney to given medical research a greater presence in the Nepean. 

 

·     Smart Health Industry Innovation Precinct (SHIP)

A submission to set up SHIP was prepared and lodged by PBA with support received from some 25 industry partners across Australia.  PBA also secured a letter of support from Nashville Healthcare Council (NHC) which has been instrumental in making Nashville the healthcare industry capital in the US. 

 

·     Skilling the Future Health Workforces of the PHEP

In February the PBA was awarded a $37,000 grant from the Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations for the “Securing Pathways to Health Jobs” project.  This project funded the employment of two ‘PBA Health Industry Engagement Officers’ to approach local health enterprises to promote opportunities around engaging with students on Industry Training Placements, and various other innovative ways to get health enterprises and students working together on career development.  An industry forum was held on 1 May 2013 for health enterprises to attend and find out about the program.  While the PBA was the grant recipient a number of partners supported the steering project.

 

·     The Penrith Progression (TPP)

Based on national best practice examples of demand led approaches to city revitalisation, the PBA commenced a process for the progressive revitalisation of the Penrith CBD.  This process is widely known as The Penrith Progression.

 

The TPP is soon to launch its 'Registration of Interest' to market to identify investors and others who will be invited to participate in the TPP which will result in an Economic Development Masterplan (EDM) for the centre.

 

Work has commenced on Stage 3 which consists of the following three key elements:

Preparation of an Economic Masterplan,

Preparation of a Place Shaping Framework, and

An Action Plan for implementation of identified catalyst development projects.

 

·     Broader Western Sydney Employment Area (BWSEA)

The PBA has been actively engaged in the planning of BWSEA.  In 2012 the PBA also commissioned a report of the “economic costs of inaction” of the Government not delivering these new employment lands.  This report detailed the extent of the current under supply of employment lands in Western Sydney and what will happen if new employment lands are not planned and delivered in the region by the Government.

 

·     Advocacy Program

The PBA Board has strongly focused on building an Advocacy Program to highlight the key issues affecting Penrith’s growth as a Regional City and opportunities associated with job creation.  PBA’s updated Advocacy Program was developed and launched in August as part of the 2013 Federal election campaign and covers a range of key issues with specific recommendations for consideration by Commonwealth Government.

 

·     Major Developments and Investment Opportunities

A major initiative of the PBA was to prepare and launch a “Major Developments and Investment Opportunities” document that would highlight all the attractions for investing in the City.  The document was launched by the former Prime Minister at a function held at Council and has contributions from all key players involved in major urban development projects in Penrith including Panthers, Urbangrowth NSW, Lend Lease, Nepean Blue Mountains Health District and UWS.

 

·     Submissions

PBA made the following submissions to Government:

Draft Metropolitan Strategy for Sydney

Broader Western Sydney Employment Area draft Structure Plan

A Growth Area Infrastructure Plan (GAIP) for PHEP

Joint submission with Council for an Urban Activation Precinct for Penrith CBD

Joint submission with Council for support and funding of the Penrith Progression

Submission to the Commonwealth (non-compliant) for RDA funding for the Medical Research Institute

Submission to Commonwealth for funding for a Smart Health Industry Innovation Precinct

Contributed to Council submissions to the National Growth Areas Alliance.

 


 

·     Enterprise Development

The Business Forum on Innovation was held in November 2012 with some 110 people, including 80 businesses in attendance.  PBA’s partners at the Forum included Deloitte, Penrith BEC, WSI-TAFE, Department of Industry and Investment and Western Sydney Business Connection.

 

Penrith Business Alliance 2013-2014 Business Plan

The PBA’s program for economic development and job creation is outlined in its Business Plan 2013-2014.  The Plan identifies six Strategic Imperatives:

 

·     The need to build Penrith’s capacity as a Regional City to service an economic catchment of 500,000 people which will rise to 1 million over the next two decades and to provide both local and regional jobs,

·     The need to build a CBD environment for expanded commerce including up-market retail, dining and entertainment; professional and business services; education and training including knowledge creation; and inner city living building on our lifestyle attributes,

·     The need to restructure the Penrith economy to secure a diversification in industry and employment,

·     The need to contain the exodus of over 60% of our local workforce to other job centres by creating more quality local sustainable jobs,

·     The need for a stronger focus on the creation of new economy or knowledge jobs to reinvigorate the retail, entertainment and services sectors through increased spending and to reduce the transfer of local skills, and

·     The need for fully serviced and competitively priced new employment lands to meet the growing needs of industry and to create local jobs.

 

The Business Plan identifies six Strategic Actions for the PBA:

 

·     Forging strong partnership with local businesses and institutions (including Penrith City Council, University of Western Sydney, University of Sydney and the Nepean Blue Mountains Local Health District) to develop and implement shared visions and leverage knowledge and resources for key programs and projects,

·     Strong advocacy through robust research and powerful partnerships to secure State and Federal Government recognition and funding support for key strategic initiatives including priority infrastructure,

·     Strengthening the performance of the CBD through advocating for the re-location of Government departments and agencies, both State and Federal,

·     Strongly focusing on education, training and skilling of the local workforce to increase productivity and support the growth of emerging industries on the back of new technology and the NBN,

·     Empowering local businesses particularly small and medium enterprises to embrace innovation and acquire the knowledge and the tools to compete effectively in the regional, national and international markets, and

·     Better integrating with the Asian market, using the business relationships established by the City of Penrith in countries such as China and Korea and by exploring the emerging opportunities in countries such as India and emerging market of Africa and South America.

 

The key areas of focus for the PBA in 2013-2014 are:

·     Penrith Health and Education Precinct (PHEP)

·     Broader Western Sydney Employment Area (BWSEA)

·     Penrith Lakes

·     Business Development and Relocation

·     Advocacy/ Marketing

·     A Jobs Plan for Western Sydney

·     Enterprise Development and Business Innovation

·     International Relations.

 

Conclusion

Council has had a long standing commitment to increasing the proportion, diversity and sustainability of local jobs.  This emerged from the appreciation that the City had lost ground in terms of its local jobs self-sufficiency.  Today, over 60% of Penrith resident workers commute outside the city on a daily basis for work.  This represents a lost opportunity for the local, state and national economies as the time spent commuting impacts upon productivity.

 

It is apparent that much work still remains for Council, the PBA and others if the adverse jobs self-sufficiency gap between Western and Eastern Sydney is to be closed.

 

Council, in association with the PBA and other stakeholders such as the National Growth Areas Alliance, NSW Property Council, Urban Taskforce and the UDIA, continues to press this dilemma with the State and Federal Governments.  Initiatives such as:

·     expanding WSEA,

·     investing in the development of regional cities such as Penrith,

·     providing the infrastructure necessary to develop the Penrith Health and Education Precinct,

·     delivering the Penrith Lakes Scheme, and

·     improving cross regional transport connections;

are integral to improving the employment circumstances in the City.  Co-ordinated stakeholder advocacy would assist achievement of these outcomes and we are currently working with our partners to identify and promote our common goals.

 

Successive PBA Business Plans have identified the strategic imperatives required to attract investment and employment opportunities to the City, and focused on implementing a number of agreed initiatives.  The 2013-2014 Business Plan identifies the key areas of focus for the organisation over this current year.

 

Based on the budgetary summary in the Business Plan, PBA is seeking $200,000 in advance of its allocation of the 2014-2015 year to meet its operational costs from July to October 2014.  It is noted that the Deed of Agreement with PBA terminates on 30 November 2014.  Prior to this milestone date, Council needs to consider whether it will enter into a further deed of agreement for the continued operation of the PBA in its current form, including the extent of funding to be made available for the ongoing support of the entity.

 

As Council will not consider budget estimates for the 2014-2015 financial year until early in the 2014 calendar year, it may be prudent to defer consideration for the request for the advanced funding until the budget forecasts for the next financial year are reasonably well established.  Therefore it will be recommended that the decision for advance funding be deferred at this point and the current resolution deal only with the agreed funding framework.

 

Accordingly, it is recommended that Council endorse the Penrith Business Alliance 2012-2013 Business Plan and provide funding in accordance with the agreed funding framework set out in the Deed of Agreement.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Penrith Business Alliance Limited (PBA) 2013-2014 Business Plan be received.

2.     Council agree to the Penrith Business Alliance Business Plan for 2013-2014 and provision of the amount of $516,000 (plus GST) to be paid in two separate instalments of $258,000 (plus GST) each, in October 2013 and March 2014, in accordance with the provisions of the Deed of Agreement.

3.     Council defer consideration of the Penrith Business Alliance’s request for an advance of $200,000 from the 2014-15 budget to cover operational expenses from July to October 2014 until early in the 2014 calendar year to coincide with negotiations on the new deed of agreement with the Penrith Business Alliance for its continued operation.

4.     A separate report be submitted to Council’s Ordinary Meeting of 25 November 2013 tabling the Penrith Business Alliance’s Financial Plan once the draft Financial Plan has been considered by the Penrith Business Alliance Board.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1. View

Letter from Penrith Business Alliance

1 Page

Attachment

2. View

Penrith Business Alliance Business Plan 2013-2014

36 Pages

Attachment

   


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


Outcome 2 - We plan for our future growth

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

2        Construction Specification for Civil Works (Working Draft)                                          11

 

3        Stormwater Drainage for Building Developments (Working Draft)                                16

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                     14 October 2013

 

 

 

2

Construction Specification for Civil Works (Working Draft)   

 

Compiled by:               Eric Hausfeld, Development Engineering Co-ordinator

Jacob Strong, Development Engineer

Garry Fletcher, Development Engineering Inspector

Authorised by:            Adam Wilkinson, Engineering Services Manager   

 

Outcome

We plan for our future growth

Strategy

Facilitate development that encourages a range of housing types

Service Activity

Provide engineering advice for development applications, strategic planning and policy development

       

 

Executive Summary

The purpose of this report is to seek Council’s endorsement for the attached Engineering Construction Specification for Civil Works (Working Draft) which is intended to update and replace our current document titled Council’s Engineering Guidelines for Subdivision and Other Development - Part 2: Construction.  The report recommends that the document be endorsed as a working draft and be exhibited to Council’s customers in the construction industry and internal stakeholders for comment before being finalised in early 2014.

Background

Council’s Engineering Guidelines for Subdivision and Other Development - Part 2: Construction was adopted by Council on the 21 April 1997.  These guidelines are called up in the relevant sections of Penrith Development Control Plans 2006 and 2010.

The specification in the form of Engineering Guidelines for Subdivision and Other Development - Part 2: Construction has served Penrith well and has generally delivered on the objective to ensure the delivery of high quality civil assets.  Despite the satisfactory performance of this document the past 16 years has seen many changes in technology, specifications and construction practice and our specification is in need of updating to reflect these changes.  This has resulted in the need to constantly liaise and negotiate with the construction industry in relation to aspects of our construction requirements and to address the growing deficiencies in the document.  These discussions have led to negotiated outcomes which have been accepted and adopted into common practice but are not stipulated in our specification.  This is increasingly becoming an issue, particularly for contractors, during the tendering stage of projects.

Council’s resolution to update the specification in relation to the requirements for FRC pipes, following reports to the Ordinary meeting of 25 March 2013 and Policy Review meeting of 13 May 2013, provided the opportunity to address some other critical construction issues and incorporate them into the amended specification accordingly. 

A copy of Construction Specification for Civil Works (Working Draft) is attached. 

The document forms part of a suite of engineering guidelines, policies and specifications that have been developed or are currently being worked on by the Development Engineering Team, as listed in Table 1.

Table 1

Engineering Guidelines, Policies and Specifications

 

Engineering Guidelines, Policies and Specifications

 

Status

 

 

Engineering Construction Specification for Civil Works (Working Draft)

Working draft prepared - subject of this report.

Guidelines for Engineering Works for Subdivision and Developments Part 1 – Design

Under review subject to replacement.

Standard Engineering Drawings

 

Being finalised.

Stormwater Drainage for Building Developments (Working Draft)

 

Working draft prepared.

Draft Water Sensitive Urban Design Policy

 

Draft prepared by Environmental Health Department

Flood Liable Land Policy

 

Enshrined in Penrith Development Control Plans 2006 and 2010.

Bond Policy

 

Under Development.

Road Naming Policy

 

Under review - subject to replacement

Alternative Materials Approval List

 

Under Development

Current Situation

Council’s construction specification has now been contemporised and updated to address changes in technology, specifications and construction practice. A copy of the construction specification is attached to this report as Attachment 1.

The specification is not intended as a standalone document as it is supported by many other specifications including those prepared by Natspec (AusSpec), and the Roads and Maritime Services as well as Australian Standards.  The intention with the specification is to rely on industry wide specifications and standards wherever possible.

The document has been proposed as a working draft so that it can be appropriately tested in the field.  Informal discussions with various members of the construction industry, over many years, have been critical to the development of the updated specification.  It is intended that the specification will now be exhibited to Council’s customers in the construction industry and internal stakeholders, whilst operating as a working draft.  Any submissions will be addressed prior to the adoption of the final document.

Table 2 highlights a number of key changes that have been incorporated into the specification.

 

Table 2

Key Changes

Specified Item

Changes

Reason

General

Definitions, engineering procedures and amendments table added. References to external standards and specifications updated.

To contemporise the document. To provide better guidance for the construction industry.

Recycled Pavement and Drainage Backfill materials

Specifications added.

To ensure that recycled products installed are fit for purpose and to provide better guidance to the Construction industry in relation to Council’s acceptance of recycled pavement and drainage backfill materials.

FRC Pipes

Collars required

To ensure integrity of future Council assets

Path Paving

Specified to be installed prior to release of the subdivision certificate.

 

 

Specifications modified to accommodate new paving machines.

To ensure paths are provided to level to promote walk ability. To avoid issues with future owners and provide them with certainty on path locations.

To address the different constraints and qualities between hand poured and machine works.

Kerb and gutter profile

Concrete base thickness increased.

To align better with pavement profiles and construction techniques and to limit damage that occurs during construction.

Precast pits

Specifications added to permit high quality precast pits in Council’s future roads.

High quality pits can now be manufactured from specifications on design plans.


 

Specified Item

Changes

Reason

Sign  Installation & Linemarking

Sign installation specification added.

To provide better guidance for Council’s requirements regarding the installation of signs and limit the amount of rectification works that are currently occurring.

Stormwater Outlets

Galvanised steel outlet to replace PVC

Eliminate damage to kerb and provide better quality and consistency.

Compliance documentation

Specifications added including the requirement for CCTV.

To provide better guidance in relation to documentation to be provided at the completion of works.

Standard Drawings

Drawings updated

To provide greater clarity and be consistent with changes made to the specification.

 

The document as presented to Council does not include standard drawings which are currently being finalised.  The standard drawings will be included in the working draft to be exhibited and published on Council’s website.

This specification works in conjunction with Council’s Engineering Guidelines for Subdivision and Other Development - Part 1: Design.  To ensure consistency it is recommended that minor changes be made to Engineering Guidelines for Subdivision and Other Development - Part 1: Design, so that the two documents are compatible.

Conclusion

The Engineering Construction Specification for Civil Works (Working Draft) will provide better guidance and certainty to the development industry and will continue to ensure the delivery of quality civil assets to Council.

It is intended that the specification would be further reviewed periodically to ensure that it remains contemporary and that any identified deficiencies are rectified.

The upgrade to the construction specification is one of the first steps in providing a complete suite of engineering guidelines to better inform the construction industry of Council’s engineering requirements. It is also intended that the construction specification and other engineering guidelines will be placed on a dedicated page on Council’s website to provide a one stop shop for our customers.  The next critical project for the Development Engineering team will be the upgrade of Council’s engineering design guidelines.

 

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Engineering Construction Specification for Civil Works (Working Draft) be received.

2.    Council endorse the Engineering Construction Specification for Civil Works (Working Draft) for the purpose of exhibition and consultation with the industry.

3.    Council endorse minor amendments to be made to Council’s Engineering Guidelines for Subdivision and Other Development - Part 1: Design to ensure consistency between the two documents.

4.    The Engineering Construction Specification for Civil Works (Working Draft) be applied to civil works associated with Development Applications lodged after Council’s endorsement of the document.

5.    At the conclusion of the exhibition a report be presented to Council for adoption of the final document.

6.    References to the Engineering Construction Specification for Civil Works (Working Draft) be updated in the next version of Council’s Development Control Plan.

7.    The final specification be reviewed by Engineering Services and City Works periodically with only substantial amendments to be reported to Council.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1. View

Engineering Construction Specification for Civil Works (Working Draft)

59 Pages

Attachment

  


Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                     14 October 2013

 

 

 

3

Stormwater Drainage for Building Developments (Working Draft)   

 

Compiled by:               Eric Hausfeld, Development Engineering Co-ordinator

Authorised by:            Adam Wilkinson, Engineering Services Manager   

 

Outcome

We plan for our future growth

Strategy

Facilitate development that encourages a range of housing types

Service Activity

Provide engineering advice for development applications, strategic planning and policy development

        

 

Introduction

The purpose of this report is to advise Council of the preparation of a new stormwater policy relating to building development and recommends the formal adoption of the policy.

 

The introduction of the policy seeks to make Council’s decision making around stormwater management issues for building development more transparent resulting in a higher level of customer service, advice and certainty to the development industry.

 

Background

Stormwater management is an important consideration in the assessment of all development applications and can involve complex issues.  In the past Council’s assessment officers have had to deal with many stormwater management issues on a merits basis due to the lack of clear policy and detailed technical guidelines. 

 

Council’s Draft Stormwater (Working Draft)  policy has been developed over several years by the Development Engineering team in an effort to ensure consistency and be in line with contemporary standards.  A related draft on-site detention policy was put together in the late 1990’s but never progressed to formal adoption by Council.  Development of stormwater policy in more recent times has been included in Penrith Development Control Plans as they have been prepared or amended.

 

The first draft of Council’s Stormwater Drainage for Building Developments was prepared in 2012 and circulated to internal stakeholders for comment.  Following amendments associated with submissions from internal stakeholders a second working draft version of the policy was made available earlier this year to open discussions with, and seek preliminary industry feedback.  The draft policy was also made available to stormwater consultants during the pre-lodgement and development application processes.  In this regard the draft policy has been widely used with minimal feedback.  The feedback that we have received has been positive and appreciative of the fact that our policy and technical guidelines have been made available.

 

A copy of Stormwater Drainage for Building Developments (Working Draft) is attached.  The document forms part of a suite of engineering guidelines, policies and specifications that have been developed or are currently being worked on by the Development Engineering Team as listed in Table 1.

Table 1

Engineering Guidelines, Policies and Specifications

 

 

Engineering Guidelines, Policies and Specifications

 

Status

 

 

Engineering Construction Specification for Civil Works (Working Draft)

Working draft prepared.

Guidelines for Engineering Works for Subdivision and Developments Part 1 – Design

Under review subject to replacement.

Standard Engineering Drawings

 

Being finalised.

Stormwater Drainage for Building Developments (Working Draft)

 

Working Draft prepared - subject of this report.

Draft Water Sensitive Urban Design Policy

 

Draft prepared by Environmental Health Department

Flood Liable Land Policy

 

Enshrined in Penrith Development Control Plans 2006 and 2010.

Bond Policy

 

Under Development.

Road Naming Policy

 

Under review subject to replacement

Alternative Materials Approval List

 

Under Development

 

Current Situation

Stormwater Drainage for Building Development (Working Draft) should be considered as a technical document which gives further clarity and detail to the objectives and controls contained within Penrith Development Control Plans 2006 and 2010.  The policy complements Council’s Guidelines for Engineering Works for Subdivisions and Developments Part 1: Design (currently under review) which caters for major trunk drainage works associated with subdivision and other development.  These documents are also required to be read in conjunction with Council’s Draft Water Sensitive Urban Design policy which has recently been placed on exhibition.

 

It is intended to set up a dedicated page on Council’s website to upload this policy and all Council’s engineering policies, specifications and forms so that developers, consultants and contractors can find all Council’s engineering requirements in a one stop shop.

 

The policy as presented is being finalised with additional standard drawings to be added in the appendix of the document.  These drawings are currently being finalised and are expected to be complete at the time of adoption and will be included in the policy prior to placement on the website.

 

 

Conclusion

Stormwater Drainage for Building Developments (Working Draft) will provide better guidance and certainty to the development industry in relation to Council’s requirements for stormwater management.

 

It is intended that the policy will be reviewed periodically to embrace new ideas and technologies and to ensure that it remains contemporary.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Stormwater Drainage for Building Developments (Working Draft) be received.

2.     Council endorse the Stormwater Drainage for Building Development (Working Draft) for the purpose of exhibition and consultation with the industry.

3.     The Stormwater Drainage for Building Developments (Working Draft) be applied to civil works associated with Development Applications lodge after Council’s endorsement of the document. 

4.     References and information in Penrith Development Control Plans 2006 & 2010 and Council’s Guidelines for Engineering Works for Subdivisions and Developments Part 1: Design be updated to be consistent with the adoption of Stormwater Drainage for Building Development (Working Draft).

5.     At the conclusion of the exhibition a report be presented to Council for adoption of the final document.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1. View

Stormwater and Drainage for Building Developments (Working Draft)

58 Pages

Attachment

   


 

 

Outcome 3 - We can get around the City

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


Outcome 4 - We have safe, vibrant places

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

4        Neighbourhood Renewal Program  - North St Marys and Werrington Neighbourhood Action Plans                                                                                                                                           23

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                     14 October 2013

 

 

 

4

Neighbourhood Renewal Program  - North St Marys and Werrington Neighbourhood Action Plans   

 

Compiled by:               Heather Chaffey, Acting Coordinator Neighbourhood Renewal Program

Authorised by:            Jeni Pollard, Place Manager   

 

Outcome

We have safe, vibrant places

Strategy

Grow and revitalise our centres and neighbourhoods

Service Activity

Engage the community in identified priority established areas of the City

 

Presenters:                   Heather Chaffey - Acting Coordinator Neighbourhood Renewal Program - The development of the Neighbourhood Action Plans for North St Marys and Werrington      

 

Executive Summary

This report provides Council with an overview of the Neighbourhood Renewal Program and a brief description of the community engagement processes undertaken in North St Marys and Werrington in 2012-13. This report is accompanied by a more detailed report on the community engagement process and findings and Neighbourhood Action Plans for these suburbs. They are shown as Appendix 1, Appendix 2 and Appendix 3.

 

The Neighbourhood Renewal Program provides an integrated model of community engagement, cultural development and employment and enterprise development across identified disadvantaged neighbourhoods in Penrith City. The program responds to Council’s increasing emphasis on resourcing older established neighbourhoods and operates within a strengths based framework.

 

The program melds place making and creative community engagement with community cultural development practice and invests in the development of local enterprise and employment initiatives.

 

North St Marys is a family orientated neighbourhood. Many residents have lived in the neighbourhood for decades and have raised children and grandchildren in the area. Residents are very proud of local institutions such as St Marys North Public School and want to protect local wildlife and enhance local reserves and parks. During 2012-13 ten engagement activities were conducted in North St Marys, 126 surveys were completed during these events and a further estimated 80 residents participated in focus groups or creative engagement programs.

 

Young men at the North St Marys Family Fun Day

Werrington, like North St Marys, is a family orientated neighbourhood. The neighbourhood is quiet and residents value the open and natural environment. Eleven community engagement activities were conducted in Werrington throughout 2012-13, 76 surveys were completed and approximately 100 other residents participated in focus groups or creative engagement programs.

 

A community planning session was held in both neighbourhoods. These sessions allow residents who have been involved in one or more previous activities to come together, hear the preliminary results of the engagement process and set some priorities for Council’s Neighbourhood Action Plan with Council staff.

 

Communities’ priorities for each neighbourhood, generated during the community planning sessions, are discussed in more detail in the body of this report. These priorities are then incorporated into the Neighbourhood Action Plans for implementation over the period 2014 – 18. Some information about how these plans are negotiated across Council is also provided.

This report also provides an update on progress to date on various endorsed Neighbourhood Action Plans and other activities within the Neighbourhood Renewal Program including the Magnetic Places Neighbourhood Renewal Community Cultural Grants Program and the Artist and Community Toolkit workshop series.

 

The report recommends that Council support the adoption of the North St Marys and Werrington Neighbourhood Action Plans (Appendix 2 and Appendix 3) as its policy for the renewal of these suburbs.

Background to the Neighbourhood Renewal Program

In 2006 Council endorsed a Neighbourhood Renewal Program to revitalise and enhance selected neighbourhoods, both urban and rural with an approach that integrates community and cultural development as well as supporting opportunities for local employment and training. The program seeks to balance resources directed towards planning and implementation in new release areas to that of older established areas of the City. The Neighbourhood Renewal Program is funded for 10 years through the Asset Renewal and Established Areas Strategy (AREAS) special rates initiative.

 

In 2011 Council was able to secure additional funding through a Special Rates Variation to leverage implementation of actions identified in Neighbourhood Action Plans. 

 

The Penrith Neighbourhood Renewal Program is focussed on particular suburbs and rural localities which are considered to be relatively disadvantaged. The instrument used to determine this is the Australian Bureau of Statistics SEIFA Index of Relative Disadvantage which measures disadvantage across suburbs and regions. SEIFA is an abbreviation of Socio-Economic Index for Areas.

 

The program melds place making and creative community engagement with community cultural development practice and invests in the development of local enterprise and employment in priority neighbourhoods. Place making refers to collaborative community processes which create or revitalise gathering places. For the context of this report community engagement refers to the practice of consulting or involving residents in the work of Council in planning the renewal of their neighbourhood. Broadly community cultural development refers to the practice of actively engaging community members in the development of arts and creative or cultural projects based in their local community and reflecting the issues, strengths or ideas generated by those residents.

 

The Penrith LGA has 12 suburbs or rural localities considered to be of relative disadvantage compared to the NSW average, as calculated by the Australian Bureau of Statistics. These areas are (in alphabetical order) Cambridge Park, Colyton, Cranebrook, Kingswood, Llandilo, Londonderry, North Penrith (including the locality of Kingswood Park), North St Marys, Oxley Park, Penrith suburb, St Marys and Werrington.

 

To date Neighbourhood Action Plans have been developed and endorsed by Council for Kingswood Park (North Penrith), Londonderry, Oxley Park, Kingswood, St Marys, Llandilo, Colyton and the suburb of Penrith. This report summarises community engagement work in North St Marys and Werrington and presents proposed Neighbourhood Action Plans for these suburbs.

 

A report was endorsed by Council in 2008 that outlined a planned approach for implementing the Neighbourhood Renewal Program across these identified areas. The adopted program for 2012-13 included North St Marys and Werrington. These neighbourhoods are the subject of this report and the North St Marys Neighbourhood Action Plan 2013 and Colyton Neighbourhood Action Plan 2013 are provided as Appendix 2 and Appendix 3 of this report.

 

The agreed approach to Neighbourhood Renewal is to undertake extensive community engagement, both Council driven and in partnership with key stakeholders to develop a Neighbourhood Action Plan for each identified neighbourhood. Each plan is expected to be implemented over a period of approximately four years.

 

Neighbourhood Action Plans (NAPs) support a planned and coordinated approach to addressing the complex interplay of social disadvantage, access to economic and cultural participation, older physical infrastructure and generally poorer public amenity as well as reduced civic engagement. NAPs incorporate specific responses by Council that are required to address identified community issues and needs. Actions for implementation that are included in the NAP are reported to Council through the Operational Plan reporting process. Furthermore, the NAP and progress on implementation are also reported to the community through local activities and via local community newsletters.

 

It is envisaged that in the first instance the NAPs for North St Marys and Werrington will be implemented over four years. Some actions, such as those actions where Council agrees to further investigate a resident request, may not progress to implementation unless opportunities arise through external funding sources.

 

Some concerns residents have raised have not translated into actions which Council can take on board. Some of these are discussed later in this report.

 

This report will outline the methods of community engagement undertaken in North St Marys and Werrington and the results of this engagement process including resident priorities. The proposed Neighbourhood Action Plans are provided in draft appended to this report. The report recommends Council endorse these plans for implementation in North St Marys and Werrington.

 

All statistical information included in the report is based on the 2011 ABS Census information.

 

Community Engagement

Engaging residents in planning is essential to the sustainability of any work aimed at improving the socio economic and cultural outcomes, as well as the physical environment of a neighbourhood. The engagement process aims to identify and build on the positive aspects of a neighbourhood as well as addressing issues raised by local residents.

 

Engagement creates opportunities for residents to influence decisions and planning which directly affects their lives. It can empower residents to take ownership of plans and completed works in their community. The engagement of local residents by Council is critical to the success of Neighbourhood Action Plans.

 

Importantly, many of the engagement activities undertaken build positive relationships between Council and residents in some of the more disadvantaged communities. Community engagement builds an understanding of civic decision making and facilitates an informed decision making process by Council and partner organisations.

 

North St Marys

North St Marys is located at the eastern side edge of the Penrith LGA and has a population of

3,681 people. There has been little change in the population between the 2006 and 2011 census although there has been some growth in the number of children under 15 years and older people over 65 years. Nearly 6% of the community in North St Marys is of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander descent and 18% of the community speak a language other than English at home.

 

The mural located in the alleyway of Parklawn Place adjacent to St Marys North Public School

about[1].png

 

Census statistics would indicate that there are two key issues for the population of North St Marys that contribute to relative disadvantage in the community. The first of these issues is the levels of education within the community with 51.4% of the population leaving school at Year 10 or below, and 28.1% went on to complete Year 12 or equivalent, compared with 47.0% and 38.2% respectively for Penrith City.

 

The second issue related to household incomes with 7.4% of the households earning a high income, and 27.2% were low income households, compared with 17.1% and 17.0% respectively for Penrith City.

 

The Neighbourhood Renewal Team utilises a survey application ‘iSurvey’ to collect data from residents in North St Marys and Werrington. In both communities this was particularly useful at family events where children are very interested in new technologies and began to participate in the engagement activities by interviewing each other on behalf of Council. This was an interesting development. 126 surveys were completed in North St Marys during this time and approximately 80 other residents contributed information during engagement activities.

 

30% of residents who participated in the Neighbourhood Renewal Community Survey in North St Marys live in social housing, 34.55% rent privately and 33.64% own their own home. A small percentage lives with family or friends.

 

15.62% of survey participants identified as Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander. And 14% of participants were born overseas or have an immediate family member who was born oversees. This reflects the diversity of the neighbourhood.

 

67.3% of respondents were caring for children and a further 13.19% of participants were caring for a parent or other family member. Family and carer responsibilities are important considerations in planning for North St Marys.

 

Many residents were interested in hearing more about services or programs for children (24.14%), young people (14.78%) and families (17.73%). Interestingly 16.26% were interested in attending the community planning session which indicates a strong local interest in civic engagement.

 

Community Engagement in North St Marys

10 engagement activities were undertaken in North St Marys. These included 3 special projects designed to specifically involve older residents, children and young people and local Aboriginal families.

 

These activities are listed below and discussed in detail in Appendix 1.

 

“We raised our family here. The grandchildren are here at the school and the Neighbourhood Centre has been most valuable.”

 

Seniors Stories - Seniors were engaged through a story telling workshop and through surveys at community events.

 

 

 

 

 

       

A local couple who participated in the workshops and filming and children participating in Wearing the Crown workshops at St Marys North Public School

 

Wearing the Crown - children from St Marys North Public School and young people from Chifley College Dunheved Campus explored themes of pride and place in a series of creative workshops producing Hip Hop tracks, video clips, and comic book strips.

 

Family Fun and After School Events - A series of three events were held at North St Marys including a Saturday and two after school events. Families participated in various engagement activities including iSurvey and prioritising exercises.

 

Shopping Centre Resident Surveys - Members of the Neighbourhood Renewal team and the Community and Cultural Development Department set up a stall at the local shops on two occasions to talk with residents and complete surveys with them. This proved useful in meeting elderly and disabled residents.

 

P&C Consultation - The Community Engagement Officer met with the Parents and Citizens Association at St Marys North Public School. This group made a significant contribution and supported many other activities and events.

 

 “The community really care about the school and we really look after it.”

 

Aboriginal Families BBQs - Two small events designed to engage with local Aboriginal families were held in partnership with North St Marys Neighbourhood Centre.

 

Participants exploring digital technology at the Aboriginal Family BBQ

 

 

 

Community Planning Session

A Community Planning Session was held at North St Marys Neighbourhood Centre in June 2013. This session was well attended with approximately 20 adult residents and their children gathering to share a meal and discuss the findings of the community engagement process. Residents were able to provide further detail on matters which were commonly identified but had been recorded in quite general terms. Residents also discussed and identified key priorities for Council to consider in the development of the North St Marys Neighbourhood Action Plan 2013.

 

A few key priorities are briefly discussed below. Greater detail is included in the North St Marys Neighbourhood Action Plan 2013 (Appendix 2).

 

 

Participants at the North St Marys Community Planning Session

 

 

Community Priorities North St Marys

Community Planning Session participants were able to discuss the various strengths and concerns previously raised by the community and have a say in the ‘big ticket items’ they would most like to see change. The following are the priority matters raised;

 

·    Public use of alcohol and other drugs and related broken glass and syringes in public spaces

·    Upgrading Parklawn Place to include a diversity of shops and improved appearance of the shop fronts and pathways etc.

·    Speeding and pedestrian safety around St Marys North Public School

·    Youth programs

·    Several specific requests for footpath

Community priorities set at the family fun afternoon activities in the park also raised the following priority matters;

 

·    Places for children and young people – including engagement in place making

·    Low cost/no cost activities for families in local parks and playgrounds

 

 

Werrington

Werrington is an older, established area located to the north of the main Western railway line. In 2011 the population of Werrington was 3,848 people. Since the 2006 Census there had been a increase of 129 households in the area as a result of redevelopment.

 

werrington map.png

 

Werrington is experiencing population change with more empty nester households, probably in detached housing and young workers moving into the area, probably into units. The percentage of babies and children up to 8 years of age increased since the 2006 Census.

 

In Werrington, 145 people or 3.8% of the population identify as being of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander descent. People of Nepalese and Indian descent are two emerging cultural groups within the Werrington community.

 

According to the 2011 Census, 19.1% of the population owned their dwelling; 33.8% were purchasing, and 39.8% were renting, compared with 26.0%, 42.4% and 26.0% respectively for Penrith City.

 

The housing status of residents who participated in the Neighbourhood Renewal engagement process was quite different in Werrington when compared with North St Marys. 63.77% of survey respondents in Werrington owned their own home (nearly twice that of North St Marys), 20.29% lived in private rental properties and only 8.7% are renting social housing which is less than a third the rate of social housing among respondents in North St Marys.

 

Most survey respondents were born in Australia, 3.49% identified as Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander and interestingly 25.58% were born overseas. This included a wide range of countries of origin including New Zealand, Lebanon and India, among others.

 

71.64% were caring for children and 10.45% are caring for a spouse and 2.99% are caring for a parent or other family member. Those caring for a spouse were predominantly in the 36-45 year old range.

 

Community Engagement in Werrington

iSurvey was again utilised in Werrington. A total of 76 surveys were collected and approximately 150 other residents were engaged through local groups, events, and creative engagement activities.

 

11 engagement activities were undertaken in Werrington, including two special projects engaging children, young people and seniors in sharing their stories of the neighbourhood.

 

These activities are listed below and discussed in detail in Appendix1

 

Werrington Festival - A team of staff from the Neighbourhood Renewal Program and the Community and Cultural Development Department attended the Annual Werrington Festival in both 2012 and 2013.

 

Neighbourhood Renewal team member Cali Vandyk-Dunlevy interviewing a local resident

 

Seniors Stories – Seniors were engaged through a storytelling workshop. The Werrington Troopers were a significant contributor to this event.

 

“Been there 38 years we love it”

Wearing the Crown – Young people from Werrington Youth Centre and children from Werrington Public School participated in the Wearing the Crown project producing a Hip Hop track and video clip as well as a significant body of photographic work.

 

Participants from Wearing the Crown Werrington

 

All of the works from the Wearing the Crown Project will be launched at North St Marys Neighbourhood Centre on October 30, 2013. Elements from the four groups including, Werrington Youth Centre, Werrington Public School, St Marys North Public School and Chifley College Dunheved will be exhibited at the launch.

 

Breakfast at the Park - an early morning family fun day was held on the corner of Parkes Avenue and Rance Oval. Approximately 100 residents attended the event.

 

A Family Fun Day was held next to Arthur Neave Hall on Parkes Avenue. Due to bad weather the event was not as well attended with approximately 60 local residents participating.

 

P&C Consultation - The Community Engagement Officer met with the P&C committee at Werrington Public School. This group provided a great deal of information and supported a number of other events and activities.

 

Survey of Parents at Werrington Public School - the Community Engagement Officer supported by officers from the Community and Cultural Development Department also surveyed families at pick up time at the public school as negotiated with the School.

 

“I love Werrington Public School, the atmosphere and the friendly teachers are really good.”

Business Survey Victoria Rd - the Neighbourhood Renewal team interviewed a number of shop keepers along Victoria Rd.

 

Street Survey - Residents were also interviewed in random street surveys on Victoria Street on two occasions.

 

 

 

 

Community Planning Session

A Community Planning Session was held in Werrington at Arthur Neave Memorial Hall in June 2013. This session was well attended with approximately 15 adult residents and some children gathering to share a meal and discuss the findings of the community engagement process. Residents were able to provide further detail on matters which were commonly identified but had been recorded in quite general terms. Residents also discussed and identified key priorities for Council to consider in the development of the Werrington Action Plan 2013. In Werrington this meeting was considerably important in gathering some more specific information regarding a number of earlier generalised contributions to surveys.

 

A few key priorities are briefly discussed below. Greater detail is included in the Werrington Neighbourhood Action Plan 2013 (Appendix 3).

 

Community Priorities Werrington

Community Planning Session participants were able to discuss the various strengths and concerns previously raised by the community and have a say in the ‘big ticket items’ they would most like to see change. The following are the priority matters raised;

 

·  Upgrade to Werrington Lakes; graffiti removal and maintenance, shade, seating, play areas for young people

·  Upgrade to Rance Oval including new play equipment, seating, shade and seating around basketball courts

·  Facilities/activities/playgrounds for 12-18 year olds

·  General concern regarding vandalism/antisocial behaviour linked to public consumption of alcohol

·  Footpath over John Oxley Avenue bridge and

·  Renewal of shopping strip on Victoria Rd

 

Developing Neighbourhood Action Plans

The Neighbourhood Action Plans for North St Marys (Appendix 2) and Werrington (Appendix 3) were negotiated by the Neighbourhood Renewal Coordinator in partnership with relevant officers, coordinators and managers across Council.

 

All actions listed in the plans have been discussed and drafted in collaboration with relevant staff. Many of the actions require minimal funding and can be achieved within the existing budgets. Some of the actions will require resources to be allocated from within the funds Neighbourhood Renewal secured as part of the Special Rates Initiative in 2011.

 

Generally, Neighbourhood Action Plans are expected to be complete within four years.

 

Highlights on the implementation of existing Neighbourhood Action Plans

Internal partnership focussed on place making in local parks

In the past two years a partnership has emerged between the Parks, Major Projects and Children’s Services Departments and the Neighbourhood Renewal Program. With the benefit of Special Rates Initiative funding in 2011 both the Parks Department and Neighbourhood Renewal Program have been able to address residents requests for the renewal of playground equipment and the creation of unique local places in which the community have been included in informing the design and creating special elements for the site.

 

Wainwright Park

The Kingswood Neighbourhood Action Plan identified Wainwright Park as a significant local park important for many local families and other residents. Many families living in local higher density accommodation utilise the park frequently for play and recreation.

 

Residents had requested, shade, picnic settings and additional seating and a traffic barrier.

 

As part of the partnership between the Parks Department, Children’s Services, Major Projects and the Neighbourhood Renewal Program a Family Fun Day was held in 2012 to consult the local community on the design of these enhancements. Artist Henryk Topolnicki participated in this consultation building small insects and creatures with craft materials as led by local children. Henryk designed a feature post and rail fence including many different native and domestic animals as inspired by the local children.

 

Wainwright 090           Wainwright 018

 

In addition to the feature fence, a shade structure has been installed along with additional seating, a picnic seating and additional planting. The park upgrade was celebrated with a family fun afternoon including an official opening by the Mayor Councillor Mark Davies in September 2013.  

                  

Kevin Maley Park

Similar to Wainwright Park, Kevin Maley Park in Colyton was identified as a significant local site in the community engagement work in Colyton in 2011-12.

 

In early 2013 a family fun day was held to consult local families on the design and installation of new playground equipment and additional elements in Kevin Maley Park. Installation began around June 2013 and was expected to be complete early in the financial year. However, ongoing vandalism and graffiti bombing have meant delays in construction while the Neighbourhood Renewal team and St Clair Youth and Neighbourhood Team have been working on a youth engagement strategy to address to vandalism and graffiti. This program of engagement includes;

 

·  Visiting and discussing the issue with local schools

·  Conducting youth engagement activities in the park and discussing the vandalism and graffiti with young people

·  Writing to surrounding homes and providing information

·  Dropping into the park and discussing the issue with local families and residents

A bike track for young children is currently being completed and seating installed in order to complete the works.

 

Artist Willurei Kirkbright has been engaged to work with 20 students from Bennett Rd Public School on a mural for the pathway in the park which celebrates the biodiversity of local waterways.

 

Development workshops have taken place and the mural will be installed by the artist and children in October 2013 prior to the planned launch of the new playground by the Mayor Councillor Ross Fowler OAM on October 23 2013.

 

Other activities of the Neighbourhood Renewal Program

The Magnetic Places Neighbourhood Renewal Community and Cultural Grants Program

In 2012-13 Council endorsed funding for eight projects through Magnetic Places totalling $48, 000. Throughout 2012-13 approximately eight hundred people directly participated in Magnetic Places activities and events across the City.  Local residents are leading and collaborating with artists, community organisations and businesses to activate community meeting places with priority given to the established areas of the City.

 

Programs receive support from Council officers in the application process and also during the life of the project. Applications received for the 2013-14 funding round included artists, community organisations, cultural organisations and local residents focussed on community engagement and place making across Penrith City.

Council will receive a report on this program on October 21, 2013.

 

Artist and Community Toolkit Workshop Series

The Artists and Community Toolkit is a series of workshops for the professional development of artists, community workers and cultural practitioners working in community cultural development in Penrith.

 

In 2012-13 the workshops included;

-     The Art of Marketing

-     Grant Writing in Practice

-     Place Making with Arts Law Australia

-     Copyright Agency/Viscopy Workshops and

-     ‘On the Money’ Grant Writing Intensive Workshop

 

            

 

Participants in Artist and Community Toolkit workshops

 

Parkes Avenue, Werrington – Youth Consultation

A consultation was held in early July 2013 with young people and youth workers from Werrington Youth Centre as well as some local families at the Parkes Avenue playground in Werrington. Residents who participated in community engagement activities in 2012-13 in Werrington felt strongly about this playground, behind Rance Oval, which has been consistently vandalised over a number of years.

 

As facilities for young people had also been highlighted in the community engagement process, Council felt it important to engage young people in the upgrade of this play ground.

 

However, the young people felt this wasn’t the best site for them. They spend time around the Werrington Lakes and bushland behind the youth centre. They are very interested in sport and recreation and would benefit from adolescent or adult exercise and recreation play equipment. Many young people access the youth centre which is currently operating at capacity.

 

              

Young participants in the Parkes Avenue playground consultation

 

As included in the draft Werrington Neighbourhood Action Plan 2013, the Neighbourhood Renewal Team will continue to support Parks and engage young people and the wider community in the Werrington Lakes upgrade.

 

The playground at Parkes Avenue will be upgraded with equipment suited to young children and families.

 

Park Consultation North St Marys

A neighbourhood park on the corner of Tobruk St and Warrego St is scheduled for a playground upgrade under the Special Rates Initiative of 2011. As part of the partnership between the Parks Department, Children’s Services, Major Projects and the Neighbourhood Renewal Program a Family Fun Day was held in late June 2013 to consult the local community on the design of these enhancements.

 

 

A young local participating in activities aimed at generating ideas for the playground design

 

Approximately 120 residents attended the event including families from St Marys North Public School, older residents, children and young people from surrounding streets. The event provided lots of opportunity for creative engagement in the process. Council staff supported children to dream up their park through various craft activities and adults and children contributed lots of ideas through brainstorm sheets. 

 

A concept plan has been developed by the Major Projects team and will be implemented in 2013-14.

 

Our Communities Project

Councillors may have noticed new banners displayed in Councils foyer in the past week. These banners are a joint project of the Neighbourhood Renewal Program and Community and Cultural Development Department. In the spirit of Councils brand and the City brand the teams engaged professional photographer Mike Chin to photograph a number of local residents.  Participating residents were sourced through various projects supported by the two teams across the community sector. They include families from Llandilo Public School, participants from a local disability arts group, children and young people who regularly access the Mondo Youth Engagement Project, Koori Cup activities run by Nepean Community and Neighbourhood Services and other local contacts including the Mulgoa RFS. All participants are residents of Penrith City.

 

The banners are just the beginning of the project which is designed to promote activities and projects across the two Departments. The images will be used on the Council website and on various other promotional materials.  

 

Cranebrook and Cambridge Park

Community engagement work has commenced in Cranebrook and Cambridge Park including meeting stakeholders, interviewing small businesses in Cambridge Park and planning for projects across the two areas.

 

The Neighbourhood Renewal Team recently provided support to Cranebrook High School with the Maths Deadlies. A program designed to encourage numeracy and literacy in students transitioning to High School and to support their families to feel more comfortable at the High School.

Plans are underway to engage with children and young people at Cranebrook High School and Cambridge Park High School through a series of Krumping workshops. Young people will be encouraged to express aggression in positive ways through dance (Krumping) and to discuss their aspirations and concerns for the neighbourhood. A similar program will be offered to Cambridge Park Public School.

 

The team are discussing a creative project with Braddock Public School and hope to engage children and their families through the project.

 

A women’s lunch in Cranebrook and senior’s lunches in both neighbourhoods are also being planned as well as Family Fun Days in both neighbourhoods.

 

Next steps for Neighbourhood Renewal

Cranebrook and Cambridge Park are the final suburbs listed included in the endorsed schedule for the Neighbourhood Renewal Program. This is an important time for the team to consider the model of service delivery to date.

 

The 2014-15 financial years offers an opportunity to review the progress of Neighbourhood Action Plans for the 12 priority neighbourhoods. It is anticipated that in 2014-15 the Neighbourhood Renewal team will;

 

-  complete the development of Neighbourhood Action Plans for Cranebrook and

          Cambridge Park

-  reviewing progress on existing Neighbourhood Action Plans

-  continue other programs and partnerships such as the Artist and Community Toolkit and Magnetic Places

-  review the Neighbourhood Renewal Program model and report to Council on proposed future directions

-  roll out a series of community engagement events in various priority neighbourhoods gathering information and negotiating actions across Council as appropriate

 

Conclusion

The Neighbourhood Renewal Program provides an integrated model of community engagement and cultural development in older established neighbourhoods. All activities seek to build on the strengths and potential within each community.

 

The Penrith Neighbourhood Renewal Program is focussed on suburbs considered to be of relative disadvantage as measured through the ABS SEIFA Index, including Colyton and Penrith.

 

The engagement process in North St Marys and Werrington utilised a range of creative methods, including storytelling, Hip Hop, photography and comic book development, film, and craft as well as conventional methods such as surveys, interviews, community events and community planning sessions to engage with a broad range of residents in the two priority neighbourhoods. There was a specific strategy to engage Aboriginal families in North St Marys.

 

The community planning sessions held in both neighbourhoods served to provide feedback to the residents as well as provide an opportunity for them to hear each other and set community priorities for Council to consider in its planning. These sessions supported the development of the North St Marys Neighbourhood Action Plan 2013 and Werrington Neighbourhood Action Plan 2013. These plans are provided as Appendix 2 and Appendix 3. All actions within these plans have been carefully negotiated with the relevant Council officers. Some actions are already underway or complete.

 

Substantial work is continuing in other priority neighbourhoods and projects are delivering positive outcomes for the community. Progress is being made on the actions identified in the plans already endorsed by Council in previous years and the Neighbourhood Renewal Program continues to actively engage with local communities to build capacity and contribute to wellbeing.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Neighbourhood Renewal Program  - North St Marys and Werrington Neighbourhood Action Plans be received.

2.     Council endorse the North St Marys Neighbourhood Action Plan 2013 and the Werrington Neighbourhood Action Plan 2013 as provided in Appendix 2 and 3 of this report.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1. View

Community Engagement across North St Marys and Werrington 2012 - 2013

10 Pages

Appendix

2. View

North St Marys NAP 2013

6 Pages

Appendix

3. View

Werrington NAP 2013

5 Pages

Appendix

  


Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                                     14 October 2013

Appendix 1 - Community Engagement across North St Marys and Werrington 2012 - 2013

 











Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                                     14 October 2013

Appendix 2 - North St Marys NAP 2013

 







Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                                     14 October 2013

Appendix 3 - Werrington NAP 2013

 





 


 

 

 

 

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Outcome 5 - We care about our environment

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

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Outcome 6 - We're healthy and share strong community spirit

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

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Outcome 7 - We have confidence in our Council

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

5        Draft Policy on the Payment of Expenses and Provision of Facilities to Mayor, Deputy Mayor and Councillors                                                                                                                        69

 

6        Community Survey 2013                                                                                                  93

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                     14 October 2013

 

 

 

5

Draft Policy on the Payment of Expenses and Provision of Facilities to Mayor, Deputy Mayor and Councillors   

 

Compiled by:               Adam Beggs, Governance Officer

Authorised by:            Glenn Schuil, Senior Governance Officer   

 

Outcome

We have confidence in our Council

Strategy

Demonstrate transparency and ethical behaviour

Service Activity

Ensure that the organisation promotes ethical behaviour, risk management, transparent decision making and meets contemporary governance standards

       

 

Executive Summary

Section 252 of the Local Government Act 1993 (the Act) requires Council to adopt a Policy on the payment of expenses and provision of facilities to the Mayor, Deputy Mayor and Councillors (252 Policy), within 5 months of the end of each financial year.  Section 253 of the Act requires that the Council must give at least 28 days’ public notice of its intention to adopt or amend the policy, unless it is of the opinion that the proposed amendment (s) are not substantial.  However, Council must comply with these provisions of the Act each year, even if it proposes to adopt a Policy that is the same as its existing Policy, or if the proposed amendments are not substantial.

 

Council reviews the Policy based on guidelines and circulars issued by the Division of Local Government (DLG) and other areas that officers deem appropriate. The changes that have been made are provided in Attachment 1 and are highlighted as follows:

 

1.   Existing policy largely consistent with previous guidelines are in normal text

2.   Proposed additions are in bold and italicised text

3.   Amendments to figures, years and Tax Determinations numbers have not been highlighted.

 

The report details the proposed changes that have been made to the policy since last year. The review of the policy this year has only resulted in one proposed wording amendment. The majority of other changes to the policy relate to updating of figures, costs and refinement of text.

 

This report recommends that Council’s current Policy be amended to ensure that it continues to remain  consistent with the Guidelines issued by the DLG, and that the amended Policy is advertised for 28 days in accordance with the Act notifying the public of the Council’s intention to adopt the amended Policy.

 

Council officers will review the draft Policy again after the notification period has concluded, and submit any feedback or substantial changes which may occur back to a Council meeting in November before submitting the policy with the DLG by the due date.

Current Situation

Council is required to adopt its Policy on the Payment of Expenses and Provision of Facilities to Mayor, Deputy Mayor and Councillors by 30 November 2013.

 

The Act provides that the Director General of the DLG may issue Guidelines in relation to the review and adoption of Council’s Section 252 Policy. Council has previously received advice from the DLG that Council’s current policy is a good policy which is largely consistent with the legislation and guidelines.

 

The Guidelines and the advice previously received from the DLG have again been examined to ensure Council’s policy remains contemporary and consistent with the DLG recommendations.  A draft Policy that complies with the Guidelines and the DLG advice can be found in Attachment 1 to tonight’s business paper.  The provisions of Council’s existing 252 Policy have remained largely consistent with the Guidelines and are provided in normal text and proposed additions are in bold and italics. The proposed changes are not seen to be major additions to the existing Policy. The figures in the report and specifically in relation to cost limits relate to 2012 data. When the September 2013 CPI figures are available these figures will be incorporated into the Policy and reported back to the Ordinary Meeting of Council on 25 November 2013. It is expected in most cases the figures will only be required to be amended by a small percentage.

 

The majority of changes to the policy relate to updating of figures, costs and refinement of text. Additional wording has also been included relating to Accommodation while out of the city whilst travelling in a private vehicle (Clause 9.2.2.5) which limits the number of nights of accommodation that can be reimbursed unless otherwise approved by the General Manager or by resolution of Council.

 

Next Steps

Should Council resolve to adopt the Draft Policy it will be placed on public exhibition for 28 days. At the conclusion of this exhibition period, any submission received will be examined and a report will be submitted to the Council’s Ordinary Meeting on 25 November 2013.

 

Conclusion

The Council’s 252 Policy must be reviewed within 5 months of the end of each financial year. Given that Council must give at least 28 days’ public notice of its intention to adopt or amend its Policy, it is considered prudent that Council approves the draft Policy, and then a 28-day public exhibition period will commence.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Draft Policy on the Payment of Expenses and Provision of Facilities to Mayor, Deputy Mayor and Councillors be received

2.     Council advertise for 28 days a public notice of its intention to adopt the amended Policy on the Payment of Expenses and Provision of Facilities to Mayor, Deputy Mayor and Councillors.

3.     A further report be presented to Council at the conclusion of the exhibition period.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1. View

Draft Policy – Payment of Expenses and Provision of Facilities to the Mayor, Deputy Mayor and Councillors

21 Pages

Appendix

  


Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                                     14 October 2013

Appendix 1 - Draft Policy – Payment of Expenses and Provision of Facilities to the Mayor, Deputy Mayor and Councillors

 






















Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                     14 October 2013

 

 

 

6

Community Survey 2013   

 

Compiled by:               Tanya Jackson, Corporate Planning Co-ordinator

Krystie Race, Sustainability Research Planner

Authorised by:            Vicki O’Kelly, Executive Manager - Corporate  

 

Outcome

We have confidence in our Council

Strategy

Provide opportunities for our community to participate in making decisions about the City's future

Service Activity

Manage Council's corporate reporting

       

 

Executive Summary

This report outlines the results of the Penrith City Council Community Survey 2013.  The survey results show significant increases in resident satisfaction across a large number of services and facilities and indicate that the community feels Council is performing well across many areas.

 

Overall, residents rated their satisfaction with Council’s overall performance as ‘moderately high’, with 69% rating their satisfaction between seven and ten. This result is similar to that of 2012 (with an overall score of 6.95), but significantly higher than the NSW brand score of 5.78.

 

Residents also acknowledged an increase in the value for money for their rate dollar since 2012 (moving from a ‘moderate’ rating to a ‘moderately high’, with 64% giving a rating of 7 to 10), and a high level of satisfaction with the performance of Council staff with whom they had direct contact.

The full survey report, by Micromex Research, is provided in Attachment 1.  The report recommends that the information contained in the report be received.

A presentation on the survey results will be made by Stuart Reeve, Managing Director of Micromex Research to CLT and all Managers.

Background

Council regularly conducts a City-wide telephone survey of residents to determine their level of satisfaction with Council’s services. This survey was conducted in 2003, 2005, 2007, 2009, 2011 and 2012. 

 

The aim of the survey is to provide Council with an understanding of the perceptions and needs of our local communities regarding a broad range of services and facilities.  In particular, it provides:

-     measurement of the importance of, and satisfaction with, services and facilities provided by Council

-     feedback on the customer service provided by Council staff

-     perceptions about community wellbeing and the ‘feel’ of the City

-     information to help Council identify service priorities for our communities

-     a comparison of Council’s overall satisfaction ratings with other councils.

 

The survey also provides information to report on some of the indicators in the Community Strategic Plan, Council’s Delivery Program and Annual Report.

Survey Methodology

The survey was conducted between 13 July and 23 July 2013 with 600 telephone surveys collected from a random sample of residents throughout the City.  A sample size of 600 provides a maximum sampling error of plus or minus 4% at 95% confidence. This means that we can be 95% confident that the results are accurate to within 4%. Strict sampling procedures ensure that characteristics of selected respondents mirror the overall adult population with a representative distribution across age, gender, ward and defined land areas (e.g. rural, new release and established urban areas). 

 

Respondents were asked to give both an importance and satisfaction rating (using a rating scale of 10 ‘very important’ or ‘very satisfied’ to 0 ‘not important’ or ‘very dissatisfied’) about Council’s external services and facilities.  The survey methodology targets residents’ perception of service provision and Council staff performance.

 

The survey also asked respondents a number of questions regarding their perception and satisfaction in the areas of:

-     community wellbeing

-     safety

-     community pride and feeling connected in their neighbourhood

-     cultural activities and events.

 

For the first time the respondents were asked the following 3 questions:

1.   What do you value most about the Penrith area?

2.   Thinking of Penrith as a whole, what would you say is the top challenge facing Penrith in the next 10 years?

3.   Thinking about the next four years, what is your top priority for Penrith Council to focus on?

 

This year specific questions were also included on Council’s household waste collection and the use of the 3 bin system.

 

Key outcomes

The key outcomes from the 2013 survey are summarised under the following seven headings:

1.       Overall Council Performance

2.       Staff Performance

3.       Value for Money

4.       Resident Prioritisation of Council Services and Facilities

5.       Future Vision

6.       Community Pride, Safety and Connectedness

7.       Community Well Being

The following sections of this report will briefly explain the results and comment on implications for Council.  Further discussion will be provided through today’s presentation by Stuart Reeve from Micromex Research and in the accompanying report.

 

1.   Overall Council Performance

Respondents were asked “how would you rate overall satisfaction with the performance of Penrith City Council?” Results of this question since 2003 are shown in the graph below.

 

Overall Satisfaction with Council Performance ~ 2003 to 2013 Comparison Scores

 

The figures on the overall satisfaction with Council’s performance indicate:

 

-     all 41 of the services/facilities rated from ‘moderate’ to ‘high’

-     residents rated their satisfaction with Council’s overall performance as ‘moderately high’, with 69% rating their satisfaction between seven and ten

-     this result is similar to that of 2012 (with an overall score of 6.95), but significantly higher than the NSW brand score of 5.78

-     females and those aged 75 and above expressed higher than average levels of satisfaction.

 

2.     Staff Performance

To gauge Council’s overall customer service performance, survey respondents who had contact with Council staff within the last 12 months were asked to rate their level of satisfaction.

 

The 2013 results indicate that 81% of residents were ‘satisfied’ with the performance of Council staff (i.e. provided a score above the neutral point of five).  This is an increase of 0.8% from the 2012 result of 80.2%. The number of ‘dissatisfied’ customers (provided a score less than five) was consistent with 2012, with 15.7% of residents ‘dissatisfied’. The graph below summarises these results.

 

Resident Satisfaction with Council Staff Performance ~ 2013 Survey (n=300)

 

 

The distribution of satisfaction ratings resulted in a mean score of 7.77 (out of 10) for Council’s staff performance.  This represents a small increase in satisfaction scores compared to the 2012 survey, where a mean score of 7.31 was recorded.

 

The reasons why residents were satisfied are provided in the following graph.

 

 

 

 

3.   Value for Money

The survey asked residents to rate their level of satisfaction with the value they feel they are receiving for their rates.  A score of ‘0’represents very poor value and ‘10’ represents very good value for money. 

 

The results show that Council continues to deliver good value for rates, with residents acknowledging an increase in the value they receive for their rate dollar since 2012. The survey showed residents rating the value for money of the rate dollar as ‘moderately high’, with 64% giving a rating of seven to ten. This is a significant increase from the ‘moderate’ rating received in 2012.

 

Overall Satisfaction with Value for Rates Dollar since 2003 is shown in the graph below, which indicates a significant improvement over the last two years.

 

Overall Satisfaction with Value for Rates Dollar ~ 2003 to 2013 Comparison Scores

 

4.   Resident Prioritisation of Council Services and Facilities

Residents were asked to rate the importance of and their satisfaction with 41 services and facilities that are provided by Penrith City Council. 

 

Combining the survey results for both ‘importance’ and ‘satisfaction’ indicates areas of priority on which Council could focus by identifying the services which are considered more important, but which deliver lower levels of satisfaction.

 

The following table shows the Opportunity Matrix, which compares the satisfaction scores against the importance scores for each of the questions about Council’s services and facilities.  More attention needs to be given to the Improve Quadrant, which represents Higher Importance & Lower Satisfaction.

 

Quadrant (Matrix) Analysis for Council Services and Facilities

IMPROVE

Higher importance – lower satisfaction

MAINTAIN

Higher importance – higher satisfaction

 

· Infrastructure and services meet the needs of a growing population 

· Condition of local roads

· Council communicates well with residents

· Safety of local roads

· Council speaking to other levels of government, business and community groups about what the City and residents need

· Council understands the community's needs and expectations 

· Council is responsible

· Environmental protection & enforcement

· Facilities and services for youth

· Council provides opportunities for residents to participate in planning and to have a say about the City's future

· Balancing the growth of our City whilst enhancing its unique qualities

 

· The health of the Nepean River and creeks

· Supporting and encouraging local industry and business  

· Cleaning of streets and public spaces

· Food safety and hygiene in local eateries and restaurants

· Condition of public spaces

· Graffiti removal

· Household waste and recycling services

· Protection of bushland, natural environment and wildlife

· Street and public space lighting

· Information on Council services and facilities

· Parks, playgrounds and reserves

· Domestic animal control

· Kerbside pick-up for bulky household waste

NICHE

Lower importance – lower satisfaction

SECONDARY

Lower importance – higher satisfaction

 

·    Ease of traffic flow

·    Cleanliness and condition of public toilets

·    Provision of car parking

·    Facilities and services for people with disabilities

·    Building & development approval process

·    Facilities and services for older people

·    Footpaths

·    Council marketing of the City

·    Cycleways

 

· Level of access to Council services, information and facilities

· Sporting fields

· Community buildings, neighbourhood facilities, community halls and centres

· Swimming pools and leisure centres

· Provision of children's services

· Local community festivals and events

· Library services

· Condition of cemeteries

 

 

 

 

 

5.       Future vision

Penrith residents place a high value on the community feel and our family friendly atmosphere; open, green spaces; close proximity of local facilities, rural lifestyle and country feel; and outdoor areas including mountains, bushlands and the Nepean River.

 

As Penrith is a Regional City, located on the edge of Sydney, the primary concern for residents of the Penrith area is around the increasing impact of population growth and the perceived lack of supporting infrastructure and facilities, i.e. roads (traffic flow and congestion), open spaces and youth services to support the area. This is clearly an area where the community want appropriate plans, strategies and resources to be allocated.

 

Overall, these messages are consistent with community responses in the extensive engagement program undertaken in 2012 as part of the review of the Community Strategic Plan.

 

6.       Community Pride, Safety and Connectedness

The survey identified that Penrith residents feel a sense of community pride and connectedness. Penrith residents place a ‘very high’ value on the City’s natural setting, rural landscapes and built heritage and feel proud of where they live. When asked if they could get help from friends, family or neighbours, 88% of residents strongly agreed, and feel that Council supports the health of the community.

 

Perceptions about community safety, health and wellbeing were also canvassed. Residents rated their level of feeling safe during the day in City’s public spaces, parks, playgrounds and reserves, and their neighbourhoods as ‘very’ high’ and ‘high’. There were, however, only ‘moderately low’ levels of agreement with feeling safe in the area at night.

 

In terms of local identity and cultural activities and events, festivals had the highest attendance, with almost two thirds of those surveyed having participated in the last 12 months. There were ‘high’ levels of agreement by residents that creativity and cultural diversity are valued and that new development respects and enhances the identity of our City. 

 

7.       Community Well Being

A number of key indicators of wellbeing were also measured in the survey. Residents were questioned on various aspects of living in Penrith, including satisfaction with their level of access, their use of sustainable transport modes, their lifestyle and overall well being.

 

Key points from the survey are:

 

-     Almost one in five residents (19%) aged 18 years and above said that they use public transportation to travel to school or work, with 15% of residents indicating that they walk or cycle to work. These results are similar to those recorded in 2012, with a 4.5% increase for walking or cycling to work. As was the case last year, residents aged 18-34 were more likely to use public transport, walk or cycle to work/study. Residents were highly satisfied with their ability to move in City, including all modes of transport;

-     Over three quarters of residents participate in informal (i.e. walking, picnic) or active passive recreation (i.e. swimming, jogging) and over 50% in an organised sport. Over 85% of residents indicated high to very high satisfaction with their access to the City’s public spaces, parks, playgrounds and reserves and the community and recreation facilities and programs provided. When asked if Council supports the health and well being of our community, 68% of residents strongly agreed.

 

Key drivers for change

This research has identified a number of areas that require action or further community consultation.

 

1.   There must be a continued focus on identifying and implementing strategies that will better inform/engage/involve the community. Council needs to identify and clarify community aspirations in the area of community engagement;

2.   We need to better communicate to residents our position regarding planning for the future, specifically with regard to enhancing and improving local infrastructure;

3.   We need to consult with the community to better understand expectations around ‘cleaning of streets and public spaces’, ‘safety of local roads’ and ‘facilities and services for older people’;

4.   We need to assess community aspirations with regard to ‘household waste and recycling services’ and ‘environmental protection & enforcement’.

 

Conclusion

The community survey continues to provide useful information on resident perceptions and satisfaction regarding Council services and facilities.  As supporting information for the Community Strategic Plan, the Delivery Program and Operational Plan, the survey assists in considering short and long term priority setting, resource allocations and potential service adjustments and enhancements.  The satisfaction ratings are a useful performance monitoring tool, and are included in service specifications.

 

Council has, in general, been able to maintain a consistently high level of satisfaction in 2013 compared with the 2012 resident survey, particularly in the overall performance of Council’s service and facilities (in comparison with other councils) and the overall performance of Council’s staff.  Results also continue to show that our residents perceive they are getting good value for their rate dollar.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the information contained in the report on Community Survey 2013 be received.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1. View

Community Survey Report 2013.

127 Pages

Attachments Included

   


 

ATTACHMENTS   

 

 

Date of Meeting:         Monday 14 October 2013

Delivery Program:      Regional Planning & Advocacy

Issue:                            Build on our partnerships and alliances to achieve shared aspirations for the City's future

Report Title:                Penrith Business Alliance Limited (PBA) 2013-2014 Business Plan

Attachments:               Letter from Penrith Business Alliance

                                      Penrith Business Alliance Business Plan 2013-2014



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                                     14 October 2013

Attachment 1 - Letter from Penrith Business Alliance

 


Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                                     14 October 2013

Attachment 2 - Penrith Business Alliance Business Plan 2013-2014

 

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ATTACHMENTS   

 

 

Date of Meeting:         Monday 14 October 2013

Delivery Program:      Development Engineering

Issue:                            Provide engineering advice for development applications, strategic planning and policy development

Report Title:                Construction Specification for Civil Works (Working Draft)

Attachments:               Engineering Construction Specification for Civil Works (Working Draft)



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                                     14 October 2013

Attachment 1 - Engineering Construction Specification for Civil Works (Working Draft)

 





























































 

ATTACHMENTS   

 

 

Date of Meeting:         Monday 14 October 2013

Delivery Program:      Development Engineering

Issue:                            Provide engineering advice for development applications, strategic planning and policy development

Report Title:                Stormwater Drainage for Building Developments (Working Draft)

Attachments:               Stormwater and Drainage for Building Developments (Working Draft)



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                                     14 October 2013

Attachment 1 - Stormwater and Drainage for Building Developments (Working Draft)

 



























































 

ATTACHMENTS   

 

 

Date of Meeting:         Monday 14 October 2013

Delivery Program:      Corporate Planning

Issue:                            Manage Council's corporate reporting

Report Title:                Community Survey 2013

Attachments:               Community Survey Report 2013.



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                                     14 October 2013

Attachment 1 - Community Survey Report 2013.