9 April 2014

 

Dear Councillor,

In pursuance of the provisions of the Local Government Act, 1993 and the Regulations thereunder, notice is hereby given that a POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING of Penrith City Council is to be held in the Passadena Room, Civic Centre, 601 High Street, Penrith on Monday 14 April 2014 at 7:00PM.

Attention is directed to the statement accompanying this notice of the business proposed to be transacted at the meeting.

Yours faithfully

 

 

Alan Stoneham

General Manager

 

BUSINESS

 

1.           LEAVE OF ABSENCE

 

2.           APOLOGIES

 

3.           CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES

Policy Review Committee Meeting - 10 March 2014.

 

4.           DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

Pecuniary Interest (The Act requires Councillors who declare a pecuniary interest in an item to leave the meeting during discussion of that item)

Non-Pecuniary Conflict of Interest – Significant and Less than Significant (The Code of Conduct requires Councillors who declare a significant non-pecuniary conflict of interest in an item to leave the meeting during discussion of that item)

 

5.           ADDRESSING THE MEETING

 

6.           MAYORAL MINUTES

 

7.           NOTICES OF MOTION TO RESCIND A RESOLUTION

 

8.           NOTICES OF MOTION

 

9.           DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

10.         REQUESTS FOR REPORTS AND MEMORANDUMS

 

11.         URGENT BUSINESS

 

12.         CONFIDENTIAL BUSINESS


POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING

 

Monday 14 April 2014

 

table of contents

 

 

 

 

 

 

meeting calendar

 

 

confirmation of minutes

 

 

DELIVERY program reports

 


Council_Mark_POS_RGB2014 MEETING CALENDAR

January 2014 - December 2014

(adopted by Council on 25/11/13)

 

 

 

TIME

JAN

FEB

MAR

APRIL

MAY

JUNE

JULY

AUG

SEPT

OCT

NOV

DEC

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

 

Ordinary Council Meeting

7.30pm

 

3

10&

 

 

 

 

 

 

22^ü

(7.00pm)

 

 

15

(7.00pm)

 

24@

24

28v

26#

23 *

28

25@

29

27

24#+

 

Policy Review Committee

7.00pm

 

 

 

14

12

16

14

11

8

13

10

8

 

10

10

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 v

Meeting at which the draft corporate planning documents (Delivery Program and Operational Plan) are endorsed for exhibition

 *

Meeting at which the draft corporate planning documents (Delivery Program and Operational Plan) are adopted

 #

Meetings at which the Operational Plan quarterly reviews (March and September) are presented

 @

Meetings at which the Delivery Program progress reports (including the Operational Plan quarterly reviews for December and June) are presented

 ^

Election of Mayor/Deputy Mayor

 ü

Meeting at which the 2013-2014 Annual Statements are presented

 

Meeting at which any comments on the 2013-2014 Annual Statements are presented

 +

Meeting at which the Annual Report is presented

&

Extraordinary Meeting

-            Extraordinary Meetings are held as required.

-            Members of the public are invited to observe meetings of the Council (Ordinary and Policy Review Committee).

Should you wish to address Council, please contact the Senior Governance Officer, Glenn Schuil.

 


UNCONFIRMED MINUTES

 OF THE POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING OF PENRITH CITY COUNCIL HELD IN THE PASSADENA ROOM, PENRITH

ON MONDAY 10 MARCH 2014 AT 7:48PM

PRESENT

His Worship the Mayor, Councillor Ross Fowler OAM, Deputy Mayor, Councillor Jim Aitken OAM and Councillors Bernard Bratusa, Prue Car, Kevin Crameri OAM, Marcus Cornish, Greg Davies, Mark Davies, Maurice Girotto, Ben Goldfinch, Jackie Greenow OAM, Tricia Hitchen, Karen McKeown and John Thain.

 

LEAVE OF ABSENCE

Leave of Absence was previously granted to Councillor Michelle Tormey for the period 4 March 2014 to 11 April 2014 inclusive.

APOLOGIES

There were no apologies.

 

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES - Policy Review Committee Meeting - 10 February 2014

PRC 5  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM seconded Councillor Marcus Cornish that the minutes of the Policy Review Committee Meeting of 10 February 2014 be confirmed.

 

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

 

There were no declarations of interest.

 

DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Outcome 2 - We plan for our future growth

 

1        Wianamatta Regional Park - Management of Macrofauna and Feral and Domestic Animal Strategies, Timing of Regional Park Transfer and Future Development of Central Precinct

Strategic Planning Manager, Paul Grimson introduced the report and invited Mike Patrick, Regional Manager SW Region, Office of Environment and Heritage to give a presentation.

Mr Patrick advised Council as follows:

·       A Plan of Management for the Wianamatta Regional Park was adopted on 15 February 2011;

·       The developer is responsible for  implementing the Macrofauna Management Plan and the Feral and Domestic Animal Management Strategy;

·      A Project Control Group, Chaired by the Department of Planning and Infrastructure and including the Office of Environment and Heritage and Lend Lease has been established to accelerate the transfer of the remaining land;

·       A staged timetable will be provided for handing over the Park as soon as possible.

Councillor Greg Davies left the meeting, the time being 8:21pm.
Councillor Greg Davies returned to the meeting, the time being 8:28pm.                                   

PRC 6  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Prue Car seconded Councillor Maurice Girotto that the information contained in the report on Wianamatta Regional Park - Management of Macrofauna and Feral and Domestic Animal Strategies, Timing of Regional Park Transfer and Future Development of Central Precinct  be received.

 

Outcome 5 - We care about our environment

 

2        Western Sydney Regional Illegal Dumping (WSRID) Squad 2012-2013 Annual Report     

PRC 7  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM seconded Councillor Marcus Cornish

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Western Sydney Regional Illegal Dumping (WSRID) Squad 2012-2013 Annual Report be received.

2.     Council thanks all staff associated and involved with the RID Squad for their efforts.

 

Outcome 6 - We're healthy and share strong community spirit

 

3        Draft Penrith City Centre Public Domain Technical Manual                                       

PRC 8  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Karen McKeown seconded Councillor John Thain

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Draft Penrith City Centre Public Domain Technical Manual be received.

2.     The Draft Penrith City Centre Public Domain Technical Manual be placed on public exhibition for 21 days.

3.     The members of the Access Committee be notified of the exhibition period.

 

4        Theme Park Opportunities in Penrith                                                                             

PRC 9  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Maurice Girotto seconded Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM that the information contained in the report on Theme Park Opportunities in Penrith be received.

 

REQUESTS FOR REPORTS AND MEMORANDUMS

 

RR 1           Development charges - Various Councils                                                            

Councillor Greg Davies requested a report to a future Councillor Briefing providing a comparison of  the development charges by Blacktown City Council, Parramatta City Council and Penrith City Council.

 

 

 

 

 

 

URGENT BUSINESS

 

UB 1           Leave of Absence Request                                                                                     

Councillor Marcus Cornish requested leave of absence for the period 19 April 2014 to 30 April 2014.

PRC 10  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor John Thain seconded Councillor Greg Davies that the matter be brought forward and dealt with as a matter of urgency.

His Worship the Mayor, Councillor Ross Fowler OAM, ruled that the matter was urgent and should be dealt with at the meeting.

PRC 11  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor John Thain seconded Councillor Greg Davies that Councillor Marcus Cornish be granted leave of absence for the period 19 April 2014 to 30 April 2014.

 

There being no further business the Chairperson declared the meeting closed the time being 8:48pm.

    



DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

 

Outcome 2 - We plan for our future growth

 

1        Stage 2 of the City-wide Local Environmental Plan - Werrington Business Park    

Procedural note: Section 375A of the Local Government Act 1993 requires that a division be called in relation to this matter.                                                                                 1

 

2        Planning Policy for Child Care Centres

Procedural note: Section 375A of the Local Government Act 1993 requires that a division be called in relation to this matter.                                                                               15

 

 

Outcome 4 - We have safe, vibrant places

 

3        Penrith CBD Drainage Design Standard & Implementation Strategy                             25

 

Outcome 5 - We care about our environment

 

4        On-site Sewage Management and Grey Water Reuse Policy                                        37

 

Outcome 6 - We're healthy and share strong community spirit

 

5        Draft Keeping of Animals Local Orders Policy                                                                69

 

6        Penrith Homelessness Summit                                                                                        86

 

 

Outcome 7 - We have confidence in our Council

 

7        2014 Australian Local Government Association (ALGA) National General Assembly of Local Government                                                                                                                     96

 

 


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


 

 

Outcome 1 - We can work close to home

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


Outcome 2 - We plan for our future growth

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

1        Stage 2 of the City-wide Local Environmental Plan - Werrington Business Park  

Procedural note: Section 375A of the Local Government Act 1993 requires that a division be called in relation to this matter.                                                                                 1

 

2        Planning Policy for Child Care Centres

Procedural note: Section 375A of the Local Government Act 1993 requires that a division be called in relation to this matter.                                                                               15

 

 

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                      14 April 2014

 

 

 

1

Stage 2 of the City-wide Local Environmental Plan - Werrington Business Park   

 

Compiled by:               Abdul Cheema, City Planning Coordinator

Matthew Rose, Senior Planner

Authorised by:            Paul Grimson, City Planning Manager  

 

Outcome

We plan for our future growth

Strategy

Protect the City's natural areas, heritage and character

Service Activity

Maintain a contemporary framework of land use and contribution policies, strategies and statutory plans

      

Procedural note: Section 375A of the Local Government Act 1993 requires that a division be called in relation to this matter.

 

Executive Summary

This report presents the results of a detailed review of the publicly exhibited planning controls selected to implement the Werrington Business Park in Stage 2 of the City-wide Local Environmental Plan.  Council required this review following its consideration of the submissions it received from the owners of the Werrington Signals Site in response to the public exhibition.

 

The review involved an analysis of alternative planning outcomes, consultation with key stakeholders including the Penrith Business Alliance (leader of PHEP taskforce), the University of Western Sydney (significant landowner) and the owners of the Werrington Signals Site (a component of the Werrington Business Park).  These stakeholders were also given the opportunity to present their views and concerns directly to Council.

 

The report concludes by proposing an alternative planning outcome and outlines the next steps and associated challenges to deliver this outcome through NSW Planning and Infrastructure’s local environmental plan making process.

Background

Since 2005 Council has been preparing a single, City-wide Local Environmental Plan (the City-wide Plan).  The process has been split into two stages.  Stage 1 of the City-wide Plan was completed in 2010 and was published as Penrith Local Environmental Plan 2010 (LEP 2010).  LEP 2010 sets the planning controls for Penrith’s rural and industrial areas and St Mary’s Town Centre.  Stage 2 of the City-wide Plan is currently draft but was adopted by Council and submitted to the New South Wales Government to be made into law in 2013.  Stage 2 of the City-wide Plan contains planning controls for Penrith’s urban areas, including the City Centre and Penrith’s smaller commercial centres.

 

Stage 2 of the City-wide Plan also deals with the planning controls applying to land known as the Werrington Business Park.  The Werrington Business Park is located on the University’s Werrington Campuses (North and South) and part of the site known as the Werrington Signals Site (located on the north east corner of the Great Western Highway and French Street, Werrington).  A location map is provided in Appendix 1.

 

The Werrington Business Park forms part of Council’s response to the challenge of creating employment opportunities in Penrith and Western Sydney (40,000 jobs by 2013).  The Werrington Business Park is also a component of the wider Penrith Health and Education Precinct, a Potential Specialised Precinct identified in the draft Metropolitan Strategy for Sydney that seeks to intensify health and education enterprises linked to the Nepean Hospital, University of Western Sydney (the University) and TAFE Campuses. 

 

Penrith’s communities have also told Council that one of their key priorities is more local jobs.  In response, Council has outlined its commitment, in its Delivery Program 2013-17, to continue its focus on the investment and growth of key commercial centres, including the Penrith Health and Education Precinct.  It is this commitment that has seen Council, the Penrith Business Alliance and the NSW Government work together to elevate the status of the Penrith Health and Education Precinct and advocate to secure commitments for the delivery of necessary infrastructure.

 

The publicly exhibited planning controls for the Health and Education Precinct consist of a suite of commercial, residential and industrial zones, including approximately 80 hectares of land proposed to be zoned B7 Business Park, surrounded by land zoned for educational establishments and residential purposes. 

 

During Council’s adoption of Stage 2 of the City-wide Plan, Council resolved to delay its decision on the land proposed to be zoned B7 Business Park to allow for further analysis of the currently proposed land use zones and to test the suitability of alternative land use zones.  Appendix 2 provides a copy of the land use zones that were placed on public exhibition.  Council required the further analysis to include consultation with relevant stakeholders, including landowners. 

 

Council’s resolution to undertake further work on this matter is in response to a submission made by the owners of the Werrington Signals Site.  That submission sought either a greater range of permissible land uses on that part of the Werrington Signals Site proposed to be zoned B7 Business Park or alternatively a change in the proposed zone to a zone that permitted a greater range of land uses.  The requested land uses included hardware and building supplies, highway service centres and vehicle sales or hire premises.  The submission also requested an increase in the planning control setting the maximum height for buildings.

 

The further analysis is now complete.  Council officers have met with representatives of NSW Planning and Infrastructure, the Penrith Business Alliance, the University and the owners of the Werrington Signals Site and understand the position of each of these stakeholders on this matter.  Each party also presented their views on the proposed planning controls directly to Council.

 

Proposed Planning Controls

The land use zones proposed for the Werrington Business Park (Appendix 2) were placed on public exhibition as part of Stage 2 of the City-wide Plan.  These zones reflect both the NSW Government’s and Council’s strategic aim to deliver significant higher-order employment opportunities that contribute to and benefit from proximity to the Nepean Hospital, the University of Western Sydney, TAFE and other associated educational establishments.

 

The B7 Business Park zone is considered the best zone to implement the results of Council’s detailed planning exercises for the Werrington Enterprise Living and Learning Precinct (the WELL Precinct) and the 2011 Strategic Vision for the Penrith Health and Education Precinct (the HEP).  The Strategic Vision for the HEP was created by a Task Force (of leaders from major health, educational establishments and businesses within the HEP) and was led by the Penrith Business Alliance with support from NSW Department of Premier and Cabinet.

 

Council’s planning for the WELL Precinct sought the creation of quality working, living and learning environments to deliver a viable community energised by the interactions and synergies of adjacent educational establishments and associated employment opportunities.  The WELL Precinct consists of innovative housing to support the needs of the major institutes and local community, adds to the viability of public transport systems, and contributes to the vibrancy and safety of the area.  The WELL Precinct also contains a new Precinct Centre providing shopping, entertainment and social services to new communities, workers and students.

 

The proposed B7 Business Park zone permits a range of permissible land uses that support the core objective of creating higher order employment opportunities in health, cultural and creative enterprises.  The proposed zone also permits land uses to service the day to day needs of workers such as child care centres, food and drink premises, and neighbourhood shops.

 

The B7 Business Park zone is also considered to be the best translation of the current (10(b) Mixed Use – Employment) zone applying to the Werrington Signals Site under Penrith Local Environmental Plan 1998 (Urban Land).

 

The establishment of the Werrington Business Park is a key element within the HEP.  It is intended to be the focus of investment and job creation in the health related research and business sector in Western Sydney.  The location and attributes of the Werrington Business Park, including its proposed size (approximately 80 hectares), presents a significant opportunity to facilitate the delivery of a contemporary business park similar to Macquarie Park (102 hectares), Norwest (100 hectares), Wollongong Innovation Campus (35 hectares) and the proposed Sydney Science Park, Luddenham (200 hectares).  The Werrington Business Park has direct access to key transport and service infrastructure, major institutions such as the University, TAFE and Nepean Hospital.  It is also within the catchments of Penrith City Centre, Kingswood and Claremont Meadows.  St Marys Town Centre is also nearby.

 

The development of the Werrington Business Park is anticipated to occur over the next 5-15 years.  This timeframe is based on observations of the development of Macquarie Park and Norwest which took a similar period of time to become viable, attract investment and fully establish.  Comparisons with established business parks also demonstrated that for the Werrington Business Park to be a success it requires a strong commitment to agreed planning controls, infrastructure planning and government support.  Together, these elements establish the best situation to provide investment certainty which in turn will stimulate the development of the Werrington Business Park.  Council, in conjunction with the key partners, is already aggressively advocating for focussed infrastructure planning and expenditure for Werrington Business Park and the wider HEP.

 

Planning of the Werrington Arterial Road has commenced following the allocation of funding by the NSW Government.  This significant infrastructure project will contribute to the accessibility of the Werrington Business Park.  A significant roll out of residential development in the Caddens Release Area is also underway and will contribute homes for future workers.

 

 

 



 

 

Alternative Planning Outcomes

The following table outlines some of the key matters that need to be taken into account when considering alternative planning outcomes for the Werrington Business Park in its entirety or for the Werrington Signals Site itself.

 

Zone

Considerations

B1 Neighbourhood Centre

Used for neighbourhood centres to provide small scale convenience and service premises to surrounding communities.

B2 Local Centre

Used for local centres that provide a range of commercial, civic, cultural and residential uses that service a wider catchment than neighbourhood centres.

·   Will not deliver the planned business park.

·   Prohibits high technology industries and office premises.

·   Would compete with nearby centres, including the planned WELL Precinct centre.

B3 Commercial Core

Used for major regional centres to provide for a wide range of uses including large-scale retail, office, business, entertainment and community uses.

·   Will not deliver the planned business park

·   Prohibits high technology industries

·   Would compete with Penrith City Centre

·   Applied to land with good access (less than 1km) to a railway station

B4 Mixed Use

Used to provide a wide range of commercial, residential, tourist and visitor, and community uses.

·   Will not deliver the planned business park

·   Prohibits high technology industries

·   Would compete with Penrith City Centre, St Marys Town Centre and the mixed use area around Nepean Hospital

·   Applied to land with good access (less than 1km) to a railway station

·   Permits land uses, including residential, that would dilute efforts to deliver a business park

B5 Business Development

Used to provide for business, warehouse and bulky good retail uses that require a large floor area, allowing uses such as bulky good premises, garden centres, hardware and building supplies, landscaping material supplies, warehouse and distribution centres.

·   Will not deliver the planned business park

·   Prohibits office premises

·   Permits land uses that would dilute efforts to deliver a business park

·   Would compete with business development opportunities delivered along Mulgoa Road in Jamisontown.

B6 Enterprise Corridor

Used to provide for commercial or industrial development along main roads, allowing uses such as hardware and building supplies, garden centres, service stations and warehouse and distribution centres.

·   Will not deliver the planned business park

·   Prohibits office premises

·   Permits land uses that would dilute efforts to deliver a business park

·   Would compete with enterprise corridor opportunities along The Great Western Highway through Claremont Meadows

R1 General Residential

Used to provide for a broad variety of residential densities and housing types including residential flat buildings.

R3 Medium Density Residential

Used to provide for medium density residential accommodation such as town houses.

·   Will not deliver the planned business park

·   Not required to meet housing targets

·   May dilute delivery of the planned mixed-use residential areas east of Penrith City Centre

·   Would increase housing choice and diversity in the area

 

In addition to the above considerations for alternative planning outcomes for the Werrington Business Park, Council has expressed concern over the potential for the business park to be developed primarily with warehouses and distribution centres.  These are seen as very low density forms of employment development that would not align with the higher order and higher density employment opportunities sought for the Werrington Business Park and wider HEP.

 

The Standard Instrument for Local Environmental Plans mandates the permissibility of warehouse and distribution centres in the B5 Business Development, B6 Enterprise Corridor and B7 Business Park zones.  This means that Council does not have the ability to prohibit this particular use in the Werrington Business Park.  We have attempted to address this matter by:

1.       Setting zone objectives for the B7 Business Park zone that seek the delivery of higher order employment opportunities.  These zone objectives need to be considered by those proposing development and by Council before it grants development consent; and

2.       Settling an additional local provision with NSW Planning and Infrastructure that prohibits warehouse and distribution centres unless they are ancillary to a higher order employment use.  This provision also limits the size of the warehouse and distribution centre component of a development to 50% of the gross floor area of the development.

 

This approach is considered to balance the delivery of warehouse and distribution centres required to support the higher order employment uses without undermining efforts to deliver the form and density of employment opportunities envisaged for the Werrington Business Park.

 

Stakeholder Engagement - Penrith Business Alliance

 

Stakeholder Meeting:

The Penrith Business Alliance (the Alliance) supports the retention of the proposed B7 Business Park zone to the entire Werrington Business Park (both of the University’s campuses and the Werrington Signals Site).  The Alliance believes that the delivery of a business park is instrumental to the establishment of the Penrith Health and Education Precinct and would be consistent with the NSW Government’s and Council’s objectives for the Precinct, including the desire to create more and higher order employment opportunities. 

 

The Alliance advised that it believed that the proposed business park had support from major landowners and is a suitable response to the changing market demand for land for employment opportunities.  The Alliance acknowledged that the market is in its infancy but noted that future growth should not be compromised by alternative development outcomes on the basis that they may be viable in the short-term.

 

The Alliance advised that the Werrington Business Park is being considered by the market as the next business park location in Sydney because it meets the desired attributes, including:

·        Size of the land

·        Minimal number of landowners

·        Landowner commitment

·        Access to workforce

·        Access to transport infrastructure

·        Co-location with magnet infrastructure such as Nepean Hospital and nearby educational establishments

 

The Alliance believes that amending the proposed B7 Business Park zone, as it applies to the Werrington Signals Site, for residential or retail purposes could weaken the vision for the Werrington Business Park, undermine the promotion of the business park to the market, limiting investment and its subsequent development. 

 

The Alliance highlighted the risk that zoning the Werrington Signals Site for retail purposes would create direct competition with St Mary’s Town Centre, Kingswood and the planned local centre (on O’Connell Street) within the WELL Precinct.  This competition would dilute efforts to strengthen and secure investment and development in these commercial centres.  The Alliance also identified that a number of ancillary uses supporting the function of a business park were permitted in the B7 Business Park zone, including, hotel accommodation, private hospitals and medical centres, neighbourhood shops, and child care centres.

 

Stakeholder Presentation:

The Penrith Business Alliance outlined its understanding of the regional context to the strategic planning of the Werrington area, identifying the opportunities available and already acted on to increase investment and employment opportunities in the growing health and education employment sectors operating in Penrith.  The Penrith Business Alliance confirmed its support for the retention of the proposed B7 Business Park zone and advised of its concerns that a significant change in the proposed planning controls could undermine the development of Werrington Business Park.


Stakeholder Engagement - The University of Western Sydney

 

Stakeholder Meeting:

The University confirmed its commitment to the concept of the Werrington Business Park and its support for the publicly exhibited planning controls, noting that it is not an appropriate time to change the proposed B7 Business Park zone. 

 

However, the University advised that it was undertaking its own planning investigations into alternative options for its land within the Werrington Business Park and that these investigations initially indicate that even with a reduction in the size of the proposed business park, the desired employment opportunities could still be delivered.  As a result, the University indicated that it may request Council to consider the review and amendment of parts of the proposed B7 Business Park zone once its investigations are complete (anticipated to take 12-18 months).

 

Stakeholder Presentation:

The University provided an update on its growth strategy for its physical and electronic campuses and the proposed marketing campaign for the Werrington Corporate Centre (located within the Werrington Business Park on the University’s southern campus).  The University considers the opportunities presented by the northern campus to include the delivery of an economic corridor along the Great Western Highway and some residential development in the northern part of the campus.  On this basis, the University also advised that it could not support the application of a residential zone to the part of the Werrington Signals Site adjacent to the Great Western Highway.

 

The University also advised that its current focus is on the development of its south campus, centred on the Werrington Corporate Centre, and that its plans for its north campus were long term and had not been fully investigated or settled.  The University confirmed its satisfaction with the proposed B7 Business Park zone, noting its ability to request Council to revisit the planning controls once it had formalised its plans for its north campus. 

Stakeholder Engagement – The Werrington Signals Site

 

Stakeholder Meeting:

The representatives of the owners of the Werrington Signals Site (the Representatives) are concerned with the retention of the proposed B7 Business Park zone (applying to the Werrington Signals Site) and cannot support it.  The Representative’s concerns are centred on their observations that the current market demand for employment opportunities in this location are overpowered by the demand for residential land.  The Representatives also outlined their view that significant capacity for employment opportunities is already available in Penrith City Centre and proposed on the University’s land. 

 

The Representatives highlighted the potential for land use conflicts between the uses permitted in the proposed B7 Business Park, including warehouse and distribution centres and the residential development permitted on the remainder of the Werrington Signals Site.

 

Subsequently, the Representatives submitted that the appropriate and desired zoning for the southern section of the Werrington Signals Site (approximately 7 hectares) is a residential zone.  The Representatives do not consider this amendment to undermine the viability of the Werrington Business Park.  The Representatives also indicated that potential conflicts between the desired residential use of the southern part of the Werrington Signals Site could be managed by zoning the riparian corridor that is present on the site ( running north to south and varying between 40-60 metres wide) E2 Environmental Conservation.  This zone restricts development within the riparian corridor providing natural buffer between land uses.

 

Stakeholder Presentation:

The Representatives presented their view that Council needs to revisit the strategic planning for the Werrington Area to deliver additional residential land.  The Representatives identified that the Werrington Signals Site presents an opportunity to deliver additional residential land without undermining planned and proposed employment opportunities.  The Representatives advised that this suggestion was based on their observations of the current market conditions that are heavily in favour of residential development over the high technology employment opportunities sought for the Werrington Business Park. 

 

The Representatives also raised concerns that the only currently viable employment uses for the Werrington Business Park are warehouse and distribution centres with large floor plates operating twenty-four hours before highlighting the likely land use conflicts with adjacent residential areas.

 

The Representatives confirmed the owner’s preference for an R3 Medium Density Residential zone to be applied to the southern part of the Werrington Signals Site, reiterating their suggestion that the application of an E2 Environmental Conservation zone to the riparian corridor could assist in providing a buffer between the potential residential area and the Werrington Business Park.



Stakeholder Engagement – NSW Planning and Infrastructure

NSW Planning and Infrastructure’s advice focussed on the process that Council would need to follow to implement any amendment to the publicly exhibited B7 Business Park zone.  This advice requires Council to form an opinion on whether any proposed changes to the publicly exhibited planning controls are significant enough to warrant re-exhibition.  The legislation also requires the Minister for Planning and Infrastructure to form an opinion on whether any proposed change to the publicly exhibited zone requires re-exhibition.

 

Selection of Alternative Planning Outcome

The review of alternative planning outcomes and the results of the stakeholder engagement indicate strong support, at this time, for the proposed B7 Business Park zone by a key stakeholder (the Penrith Business Alliance) and the major landowner (the University).  It is therefore recommended that the publicly exhibited B7 Business Park be retained across the University’s land.

 

The representatives of the Werrington Signals Site however, desire a different planning outcome for the Werrington Signals Site and appear to have settled on the application of the R3 Medium Density Residential zone to approximately two thirds of the Werrington Signals Site, with the remainder zoned a mix of E2 Environmental Conservation and B7 Business Park.  Appendix 3 indicates the application of these zones to the Werrington Signals Site.

 

The merits of this alternative outcome need to be explored with the proponents.  Although additional residential development is not required in this location to meet Penrith’s housing targets (25,000 homes by 2031) it would provide infill development of a similar housing stock to adjacent residential areas and a buffer between residential areas and the Werrington Business Park.  The application of E2 Environmental Conservation zone will also assist in the management of the riparian corridor.

 

Delivering the Alternative Planning Outcome

NSW Planning and Infrastructure has advised that Council can either consider the alternative planning outcome for the Werrington Signals Site as a:

1.       Minor change to the publicly exhibited planning controls, adopt the alternative planning outcome and request the Minister for Planning and Infrastructure to amend Stage 2 of the City-wide Plan accordingly; or

2.       Major change to the publicly exhibited planning controls and endorse the public exhibition of the alternative planning outcome. 

 

Option 2 will require council to decide whether it wants to undertake a public exhibition of the alternative planning outcome within the current process for finalising the City-wide Plan or it may wish to consider the deferral of the land.  A deferral would not only provide additional time to undertake the public exhibition, but would isolate the City-wide Plan from further delays and allow Council to consider the matter without the time constraints imposed by the anticipated publication of the City-wide Plan by the middle of the year. 

 

The following matters indicate that the alternative planning outcome could be considered as a minor change to the publicly exhibited planning controls that does not warrant re-exhibition:

·        The size of the Werrington Signals Site subject to the alternative planning outcome (approximately 4.8 hectares),

·        The creation of over 75 hectares of new employment generating land on the University’s campuses,

·        The potential to better manage land use conflicts between the Werrington Business Park and adjacent residential areas,

·        The extension of the adjacent, existing residential area across the Werrington Signals Site would not create land use conflicts,

·        The request of the representatives of the Werrington Signals Site is consistent with the alternative planning outcome.

·        The owners of the Werrington Signals Site are not committed to the delivery of the Werrington Business Park.

·        Assists in the completion of the City-wide Plan.

 

However, Council need to be mindful that the Minister for Planning and Infrastructure is required by the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 (the Act) to make his own decision on whether the alternative planning outcome for the Werrington Signals Site is significant enough to warrant re-exhibition.  Council should also note the University’s objection to the rezoning of the Werrington Signals Site for residential purposes.

 

The Act also requires Council to assess, and if required, justify the alternative planning outcome for the Werrington Signals Site against the local planning directions issued by the Minister for Planning and Infrastructure under Section 117 Directions of the Act.  The most relevant local direction in this instance is 1.1 Business and Industrial Zones which applies to proposals that affect land within an existing or proposed business or industrial zone (including the alteration of any existing business or industrial zone boundary).

 

It is recommended that the Representatives of the owners of the Werrington Signals Site be requested to undertake this assessment and, if required, prepare appropriate justification for the alternative planning outcome.  This would normally be a requirement of a proponent who has requested Council to consider the amendment of land use zones.

Conclusion

The Werrington Business Park is a major component of the NSW Government’s and Council’s commitment to deliver the Penrith Health and Education Precinct.  The publicly exhibited planning controls reflect the NSW Government’s and Council’s strategic direction and detailed planning exercises for the Werrington Business Park, Werrington Enterprise Living and Learning Precinct and the Penrith Health and Education Centre.

 

The B7 Business Park zone currently proposed for the majority of the area offers a wide range of permissible uses that cater both for the core objectives of the zone as well as the day to day support services and needs of the future residents and workforce. Furthermore, the WELL Precinct has planned for the residential, retail, employment and recreational needs of the area and this site should not be seen in isolation.

 

The delivery of the Werrington Business Park is reliant on the settlement of appropriate planning controls within the City-wide Local Environmental Plan which will in turn generate investment in the business park, facilitating its establishment and ongoing development into Sydney’s next employment generating centre.  Significant changes to the publicly exhibited planning controls could create the impression that there is a lack of confidence in the Werrington Business Park and undermine efforts to secure investment.   

 

The delivery of the Werrington Business Park is also reliant on the commitment of all stakeholders.  This commitment is considered to be essential to create certainty to encourage investment in the Werrington Business Park by companies and developers, the delivery of infrastructure by the NSW Government.

 

The realisation of the development permitted by the application of the proposed B7 Business Park zone to the University of Western Sydney’s Werrington campuses is a medium to long term prospect.  It is acknowledged that the market demand for the Werrington Business Park may not immediately manifest, however the proposed B7 Business Park zone proactively position the land to take full advantage of a change in the market when it occurs.  This often requires a degree of patience, commitment and courage to avoid calls for short term ad hoc changes to zones to satisfy owners’ immediate aspirations. The compromise of the future development of the business park by alternative development outcomes on the basis that they may be viable in the short-term does not represent the orderly or economic use of land or reflect NSW Government and Council strategies for the land.

 

The excise of a minor portion of the proposed business park in the form of the proposed application of a residential zone to the Werrington Signals Site will remove a landowner who is not committed to the business park.  The proposed residential zone will also increase housing supply in the immediate area.  The provision of a buffer between the Werrington Business Park and adjacent residential areas is also considered an advantage.

 

It is considered that the most appropriate planning approach at this stage is to change the zone on part of the Werrington signals Site as discussed above and to apply the B7 zone to the rest of the Business Park element of the PHEP through the city-wide LEP.

 

In keeping with intentions of the UWS, detailed master planning of the Business Park can occur over the next 1-2 years. Should that master planning indicate the need for a more fine grained approach to land zonings, this can be achieved either through a separate Planning Proposal or as part of Council’s required regular review of the city-wide plan. 

 

However, it should be noted that making zone changes of this nature post-exhibition will represent a material change to the Planning Proposal which may trigger the Minister for Planning and Infrastructure to require a re-exhibition.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Stage 2 of the City-wide Local Environmental Plan - Werrington Business Park be received

2.     Council endorse the retention of the B7 Business Park zone, supported by the additional local provision controlling warehouse and distribution centres, on the University of Western Sydney’s Werrington Campuses. 

3.     Council request the representatives of the Werrington Signals Site to provide the justification to support the requested planning outcome for the Werrington Signals Site.

4.     Council endorse the application of R3 Medium Density Residential, E2 Environmental Conservation and B7 Business Park zones to the Werrington Signals Site in accordance with Appendix 3 and, on receipt of the necessary justification from the proponents, submit it to NSW Planning and Infrastructure with a request that it be included in the Planning Proposal delivering Stage 2 of the City-wide Local Environmental Plan.

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.  

Location Map

1 Page

Appendix

2.  

Publicly Exhibited Planning outcome for the Werrington Business Park

1 Page

Appendix

3.  

Alternative Planning Outcome for the Werrington Business Park

1 Page

Appendix

  


Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                                   14 April 2014

Appendix 1 - Location Map

 

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Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                                   14 April 2014

Appendix 2 - Publicly Exhibited Planning outcome for the Werrington Business Park

 

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Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                                   14 April 2014

Appendix 3 - Alternative Planning Outcome for the Werrington Business Park

 

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Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                      14 April 2014

 

 

 

2

Planning Policy for Child Care Centres   

 

Compiled by:               Schandel Jefferys, Senior Planner 

Authorised by:            Paul Grimson, Strategic Planning Manager 

Requested By:            Councillor John Thain

Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM

 

Outcome

We plan for our future growth

Strategy

Protect the City's natural areas, heritage and character

Service Activity

Maintain a contemporary framework of land use and contribution policies, strategies and statutory plans

      

Procedural note: Section 375A of the Local Government Act 1993 requires that a division be called in relation to this matter.

 

Executive Summary

In recent years, Penrith has experienced a significant increase in the demand for child care placements.  This increase stems from both the demographics of the Penrith community as well as recent changes to child care legislation.

The increase in demand for child care placements has seen an increasing number of development applications being considered by Council.  In some cases development proposals for child care centres have presented challenges for Council, through either their location relative to other existing development, or in regard to traffic volumes and safety aspects.

 

While Council’s current framework of local environmental plan (LEP) and development control plan (DCP) provisions provides a robust framework for considering these applications, it is proposed to include some additional provisions in the current review of our DCPs to provide further assistance and confidence for Council when assessing applications for child care centres.

Background

The need for child care placements in Penrith City has significantly increased over recent years.  This growth in demand is likely to continue, resulting in pressure on Council to consider an increased number of development applications for child care centres.   

 

There appears to be two main reasons for the increase in demand.  Firstly, the demographics of the local community and secondly as a result of the recent changes to national child care centre regulations.     

 

Demographics

Penrith remains an area with a higher proportion of children and young people.  The Local Government Area is made up of 76.3% families which is higher than average when compared to the Sydney Statistical Division (an ABS statistical geography which covers the greater metropolitan region and hinterland) of 68.1%.  A critical trend emerging in recent times is the rise of one parent families in Penrith and this is also higher than the average for both Sydney and the Western Sydney Regional Organisation of Councils.  These demographics are fuelling the existing high and increasing demand for child care placements. 

 

Recent Changes to Legislation

In January 2012, the National Quality Framework was introduced across Australia.  This Framework provides early childhood education in Australia with one consistent quality and monitoring system.   The new Framework introduced new staff-to-child ratios, higher staff qualification requirements and a new ratings system. The changes also removed the cap on the size of a child care centre.  Under previous regulations the maximum number of placements in a centre was 90 where now there is no limit.  

 

These changes result in a higher demand on existing child care facilities as well as a demand for new, and in many cases, larger child care facilities.  This will likely see an increase in the number of development applications (DAs) being considered by Council thus placing greater importance on establishing effective local planning policy to be able to deal with these development applications. 

 

At present in Penrith there are some suburbs where there is an oversupply of child care placements where as other areas are experiencing an undersupply.  The provision of child care placements is driven by the market where developers will provide a centre in a location based on their ability to purchase the land, gain planning permission, construct and operate the development.  Unfortunately, the provision of new centres is generally not driven geographically by local community need.  This can result in Council receiving development applications for child care centres in less than ideal locations or close to other child care centres where real or perceived conflicts and heightened impacts can occur. 

 

The rise in these applications being reported to Council has in turn raised questions about the adequacy of Council’s current planning regulations.  This report provides a summary of the current land use regulations for child care centres to assist Councillors when considering these development applications and to understand the key heads of consideration for this type of development. 

 

Current Planning Policy

Section 79C of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act (EP&A Act) 1979 sets out the key matters for consideration when determining DAs.  These include:

 

1.   Relevant planning controls

2.   The likely impacts of the development

3.   The suitability of the site

4.   Submissions

5.   The public interest. 

The reports prepared by the Development Services Department and provided to Councillors are required to address these key matters.  They are discussed in more detail below:

 

Relevant Planning Controls

There are two key aspects of Council’s planning controls which regulate development for the purpose of child care centres.  The LEP initially establishes permissibility of the development in each zone. 

 

The State Government’s LEP Standard Instrument mandates that child care centres are permissible with consent in ten zones within the local government area which are:

 

·    RU5 Village

·    R1 General Residential

·    R3 Medium Density

·    R4 High Density

·    B1 Neighbourhood Centre

·    B2 Local Centre

·    B3 Commercial Core

·    B4 Mixed Use

·    B5 Business Development

·    B7 Business Park.  

 

Penrith’s draft City-wide LEP proposes to permit child care centres in a further six zones being:

 

·    R2 Low Density Residential

·    R5 Large Lot Residential

·    IN2 Light Industrial

·    RE1 Public Recreation

·    RE2 Private Recreation

·    E4 Environmental Living.  

 

While the LEP establishes permissibility of a child care centre, the detailed planning guidelines relating to this form of development are contained in the relevant DCP. 

 

The principal DCPs applying to land in Penrith are DCPs 2006 and 2010.  These DCPs contain detailed development guidelines which state that child care centres will not be supported if:

 

·  Access is from a major road or in close proximity to a major intersection where there may be safety concerns

·  Access is from a local street where there may be impacts on amenity due to traffic and parking. 

There are also further detailed locational controls in the DCPs which aim to ensure child care centres are located and designed to minimise impact on the amenity of the surrounding area particularly in terms of traffic, preventing direct access from a designated road to a child care centre, to ensure provision of safe, convenient and attractive car parking areas and to ensure child care centres are not adversely affected by safety hazards. 

 

The likely impact of the development

The likely impact of development includes all environmental impacts on both the natural and built environment, social and economic impacts. This includes impacts such as traffic movement (e.g. whether a road system in the area can cope with the traffic likely to be generated by a proposed child care centre and how it interacts with existing traffic patterns) and whether the means of access are adequate. 

 

Case law relating to the likely impacts of development establishes the general principle that Council cannot have regard to matters of commercial competition between a proposed development and existing businesses in the locality.   It is not relevant in a planning sense to consider the profitability of the applicant’s business or that of an existing competing business.   

 

 

The suitability of the site

This phrase, referred to in the EP&A Act 1979, operates at a high level of generality as many factors can be relevant to the question of whether a site is suitable for a particular development.  Common considerations include safety factors associated with the land such as topography, road safety, ingress/egress sight distances, road network capacity, flooding, land subsidence, slip, contamination or bushfire threat. 

 

Submissions

While all submissions must be considered, an evaluation has to be made by Council of the reasonableness of the issues raised in submissions.  Again, case law indicates that Council should only consider issues raised in submissions that are factually based regarding the potential adverse effect on the amenity of the locality.  In other words, a fear or concern that is raised in a submission without rational or justified foundation should not be considered in decision making. 

 

The public interest

The term ‘public interest’ is not defined in the EP&A Act and therefore it is difficult to provide a detailed description of public interest consideration predominantly because it will vary significantly from DA to DA.  The concept of public interest is wide and means that when determining DAs the consideration is not just confined to statutory planning instruments.  For instance, community response to a proposed development can be regarded as an aspect of public interest.  Further, the Court has previously upheld that the application of ecologically sustainable development principles is a relevant consideration as an aspect of the public interest. 

 

Review of Planning Policy

P&I Guidelines for preparing an LEP

Planning and Infrastructure (P&I) provide guidance on preparing LEPs using the Standard Instrument and standard clauses under Practice Note PN 11-001.  Under this Practice Note, Council can include additional local clauses in an LEP however they must be relevant planning components of Council’s strategic planning or required under a Section 117 Direction or regional or metropolitan strategy. 

 

It has been suggested that an additional local provision be incorporated into the LEP to ensure child care centres will only be approved where road networks can accommodate additional traffic without causing danger to residents.  However this local provision does not fit the criteria set out by the P&I for the application of additional local clauses. As such, any additional provisions relating to the control of child care centres will need to be provided in the relevant DCP. 

 

Current DCP Controls

The controls contained in the DCP, while not legally binding, are factors to be taken into consideration before a DA is determined. DCP controls provide guidance during the assessment of a DA and can be applied with a degree of flexibility as part of that assessment. 

 

Failure to strictly comply with the standards in a DCP is not, in itself, a reason for refusing an otherwise compliant development.  The key issue is to look at the aims of the DCP.  A development proposal can be approved where there is variation to a DCP control so long as the applicant has demonstrated they are achieving the aims and objectives of the provisions of the DCP.     

 

The current DCP controls require child care centres:

 

·  to be located in close proximity to other community activities and facilities 

·  should not rely on access from a designated road, cul-de-sac or be too close to an intersection

·  should not be within 85m of an approved service station

·  should not be near sex services premises, restricted premises, electricity easements, mobile phone towers

·  should not be located below the flood planning level or on land that cannot be evacuated during a 1 in100 year flood. 

 

Suitable sites for future child care centres are easily identified in new release areas.  With the majority of our new release areas there is a masterplanning phase that occurs up front in the planning process to identify suitable sites for child care centres.  For example in Jordan Springs, although child care centres are permitted across the entire release area a specific parcel of land was set aside from the beginning which was closely connected to the local school and centre.

 

However the complexities arise when trying to find a site in established residential areas due to the existing site constraints and encroachment into an established residential community.  

 

New DCP Controls

From the above summary of the current LEP and DCP controls, it can be seen that Council’s powers to consider DAs for child care centres are wide ranging.  However, Councillors have requested that consideration be given to including some additional controls to provide greater clarity and certainty for both applicants and Council in considering proposals for child care centres. 

 

The work that has been involved in finalising the Stage 2 LEP has been resource intensive and during this time resources have not been sufficient to undertake a concurrent review of DCPs 2006 and 2010.  To support the City-wide LEP when it is published we are intending a two stage process to provide a contemporary City-wide DCP.  In the short term, a mechanical joining of DCPs 2006 and 2010 will occur with minor modifications to provide a proper legal relationship between the LEP and DCP.  The second stage will involve a detailed review of the content of, and the policy platforms which underpin, the DCP.  It is not intended, nor is it appropriate, to undertake that more detailed review until the new format and rules for Local Plans (which will contain the equivalent to DCP provisions) under the proposed changes to the NSW planning system is known. 

 

Given that it may be some time before the detailed review of the DCP provisions can occur, we can take the opportunity to insert some additional provisions relating to child care centres as part of the shorter term mechanical review.  Based on the concerns raised by Councillors, these provisions would cover the following issues in relation to child care centres:

 

·  Vehicle circulation and car parking areas shall be designed to allow the safe drop off and collection of children as well as the safe movement and parking of staff, parents, visitor and service vehicles. 

·  The design of the child care centre must take into account nearby traffic generators, street design and the existing environment for pedestrians and cyclists. 

·  Access driveways should not be located opposite, or in close proximity to road intersections.

·  Safe sight distances must be provided for all points of access to the site. 

Conclusion

With a growing number of child care centre proposals, Councillors have experienced difficulty in assessing these applications due to impacts and competing interests.  The current controls provide the necessary heads of consideration to assess these applications and to approve DAs for child care centres, attach conditions to consents or refuse these proposals. However, to assist with additional clarity further provisions in the short term as part of the mechanical DCP review are recommended. 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Planning Policy for Child Care Centres be received. 

2.     Additional provisions be included in Penrith Development Control Plan to ensure due consideration is given to road network capacity and pedestrian safety when assessing development for child care centres as identified in this report. 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.  


 

 

Outcome 3 - We can get around the City

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


Outcome 4 - We have safe, vibrant places

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

3        Penrith CBD Drainage Design Standard & Implementation Strategy                             25

 

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                      14 April 2014

 

 

 

3

Penrith CBD Drainage Design Standard & Implementation Strategy   

 

Compiled by:               Michael Jackson, Design and Projects Manager

Authorised by:            David Burns, Executive Manager - City Assets  

 

Outcome

We have safe, vibrant places

Strategy

Grow and revitalise our centres and neighbourhoods

Service Activity

Manage the development of master plans and designs for Council's assets and public domain

  

Previous Items:           3- Penrith CBD Drainage Strategy- Councillor Briefing- 16 September 2013    

 

Executive Summary

The CBD Drainage strategy project has resulted in a proposed amendment to the Drainage Design Standard which was adopted in 2006.  The amendment is for two additional Capacity standard categories being Urban Residential within the Penrith CBD Limits with a capacity of 1:10 year ARI and Commercial and Business areas within the Penrith CBD Limits with a capacity of 1:50 year ARI.  The Drainage Design Standard’s existing Blockage allowances are proposed to be supplemented with some additional technical categories also.

 

Drainage solutions to meet these amended standards have been modelled and costed, and Option A4, an underground culvert solution approximately 767m in length stretching from the drainage alignment between Evan and Castlereagh Sts, down Lethbridge St and across to the existing Showground Channel west of Station Street is proposed.  The pipe culvert is sized at approximately 2.1m wide x 1.2m high and with an estimated cost of $7mil.

 

As per the Policy Review Committee report 9 December 2013, an application has been made under LIRS Round 3 for the CBD Drainage Program (borrowings of $5.7m, total project cost of approximately $7m).  If this application is successful it is proposed to undertake detailed design and a tender process for the construction of the full scope of the works.

Background

The Penrith CBD Drainage strategy project has resulted from the combination of a number of projects and events.  The Penrith City Centre Public Domain Masterplan considers the need to re-pave the major streets in the city centre, and it is logical to undertake all relevant drainage works at the same time as a road or pavement is being reconstructed. 

 

Council adopted certain drainage standards of the day. Given that we are now a regional city, the increased development in the CBD, it is appropriate that these standards be revised. Over the years we have gained a greater understanding of the flood risks of the CBD which now help us to be better informed and to adopt a better standard as discussed in this report.

 

In addition, the February 2012 storm event demonstrated that the city centre areas are currently vulnerable to localised flooding and the status of Penrith as a Regional City was examined with regards to appropriate drainage standards, other precedents and damage modelling.

 

    

  Feb 2012: Penrith RSL           Shoe Shed, Union Lane            Cnr Station & High St

 

The process undertaken was split into three main phases:

 

1.   Review of Council’s current commercial areas drainage standard and recommend if a revised standard is required for the CBD of a Regional City through benchmarking with other Regional cities and metropolitan city drainage standards.

2.   Propose, model and cost a number of concept designs for CBD drainage which meet the current and/or recommended drainage standards.

3.   Undertake Damage assessment modelling to determine the cost benefit of any CBD drainage improvements, and to compare the benefits of the current standard against any recommended change to that standard.

 

Phase 1: Drainage Design Standards

Drainage design standards are usually broken down into two parts, Drainage Capacity and Blockage allowances that need to be taken into account.  The level of Blockage allowed for in capacity calculations refers to an assessment of the likely debris which will cover inlets, thus reducing the amount of stormwater able to enter the piped system.  Debris ranges from grass clippings and leaves, to old mattresses, domestic and commercial waste, and other items which might be picked up by stormwater and deposited against the inlets e.g. Rubbish bins, cars and many other unexpected items, regardless of how effective Council’s regular maintenance regimes may be in the area.

 

Council’s current adopted drainage standard for Commercial/Industrial areas (PRC July 2006) allows for a 1:20 year ARI (storm event), with Residential areas designed to 5 yr ARI.  Blockage is broken down into four inlet types with a % figure against each type.

 

Following review of relevant guidelines and benchmarking to other comparable cities, the consultants draft recommendation is for two additional Capacity standard categories being “Penrith CBD Commercial” with a capacity of 1:50 year ARI and “Urban Residential within Penrith CBD” with a capacity of 1:10 year ARI.  The figure below shows the limits of the Penrith CBD as defined for the application of these two new categories.

 

StormWaterPolicyCBD

Figure 1-1 – Penrith CBD Boundary

 

Council’s existing Blockage allowances were found to be consistent with benchmarked cities, however the consultants have proposed the addition of some additional criteria for consideration in the design of major trunk drainage systems.

 

Below is the summary of the recommended Drainage Design Standard for the Penrith CBD.

 

Table 1-1 Recommended Drainage Design Standards for Penrith CBD

 

 

Existing Design Standard

Proposed Design Standard

Drainage Capacity

Urban Residential within the Penrith CBD limits

5 yr ARI

10 yr ARI

Commercial and Business within the Penrith CBD limits

20 yr ARI

50 yr ARI

Commercial, Business and Industrial non CBD areas

20 yr ARI

20 yr ARI

Blockage

Minor System

 

Sag and Continuous Grade – Kerb Inlet

80% Capacity

80% Capacity

Sag and Continuous Grade – Grated

50% Capacity

50% Capacity

Sag – Combination

None Specified

The capacity of a combination inlet should be taken to be the theoretical capacity of the kerb opening with the grate being assumed to be blocked.

Continuous Grade – Combination

90% Capacity

90% Capacity

Major System

 

Stormwater structures with a major diagonal opening width of <6m

None Specified

50% bottom up blockage

Stormwater structures with a major diagonal opening width of >6m

None Specified

25% bottom up blockage

Handrails over structures when overtopping occurs.

None Specified

80% blockage

 

Phase 2: Solution Options

A number of potential solutions have been proposed to address the known and modelled stormwater issues.  It has become evident that the key is not stormwater flows down High St, but instead our CBD flooding issues stem from the large upper catchment which drains down from Parker St/Northern Road to Lethbridge Street just above the RSL.  The stormwater volumes impacting the zone roughly between the RSL and Union Lane behind the “Shoe Shed” quickly became evident as the key area for solutions focus.

 

Figure 2-1 – Catchment and Existing Trunk Drainage

 

A number of options have been assessed at concept level and discounted; these include additional pipework under or around Penrith Plaza and various detention basin options in the Union Lane/Union road car park areas, and also in the Paceway infield.

 


The solutions which were subject to detailed modelling were as follows:

 

Scheme D1 Works Footprint

Scheme A4 Works Footprint

 

Figure 2-2 – Alignment of Options

 

1.   Option A4 – Large scale pipe culvert approximately 767m in length stretching from the drainage alignment between Evan and Castlereagh Sts, down Lethbridge St and across to the existing Showground Channel west of Station Street.  The pipe culvert is sized at approximately 2.1m wide x 1.2m high.

 

2.   Option D1 – A mini dam across Judges Park from Union Lane to Derby St at Station Street.  The height of the wall or embankment would range from 300mm at the Union Lane end up to 630mm at the Station Street end.  Overland flows would be captured as they come west and diverted into the Judges Place parkland area and the land behind the PCYC hall.  Option D1 does not address potential damage caused above Woodriff Street

 

3.   Option A4D1 is a combination of both the underground piped solution A4 and the mini dam D1.

Phase 3: Damage and Cost Benefit

The cost benefit of addressing a higher level of storm event through the piped network or undertaking any major upgrade of existing systems is a complex issue.  Infrastructure solutions do not address all of the potential for stormwater related damage in the CBD or across this total catchment which also contains a significant proportion of non-CBD property, so there is always a potential for damage to still occur.

 

Average Annual Damage (AAD expressed as $/yr) is a calculation based on the number of affected properties, and the severity of that effect, taking into account the probability of each type of storm/flood event.  Below is an economic assessment of the 3 options.

 

Economic Assessment of Options and Scheme Option / Scheme

Average Annual Damages (AAD) ($/yr)

AAD Savings ($/yr)

Benefit (Present Value of AAD Savings)

Cost (Estimated Cost incl GST)

Indicative Benefit Cost Ratio

Existing

$1,367,043

 

 

A4

$1,214,102

$152,941

$3,712,873

$7,006,100

0.53

D1

$1,345,060

$21,983

$533,676

$178,815

2.98

A4D1

$1,200,104

$166,939

$4,052,701

$7,107,300

0.57

Discount Rate

3.5%

Period (Years)

50

 

Figure 3-1 – 50yr ARI Flood Depths – Existing Conditions

 

The three figures which follow show the differences in modelled flood levels during a 50year ARI storm event between the existing situation above and after the installation of the proposed solutions.  Yellow, Blue & Purple colours denote an increase in water levels, while the Brown and Green colours denote reductions in water levels.  Figures 3-3 and 3-4 show that the mini dam wall option D1 causes additional water to be directed south along Station Street, adversely impacting property on Station, Derby .and Reserve Streets.

 

Figure 3-2 – 50yr ARI Flood Level Differences (Option A4 – Existing)

 

Figure 3-3 – 50yr ARI Flood Level Differences (Option D1 – Existing)

 

Figure 3-4 – 50yr ARI Flood Level Differences (Option A4D1 – Existing)

 

Option D1 appears to perform extremely well as it is a very low cost solution to implement.  Option D1’s cost is only 3% of the A4 cost, while the comparative benefit (Present Value of AAD savings) is 14% of the option A4.  It must be noted that based on the modelling, Option D1 will cause additional impact to properties on Derby Street, Station St and Reserve St, while reducing impact on properties in the Union Lane area by a far greater amount. 

 

It is not considered fair or reasonable to implement stormwater solutions which will create additional burden on existing landowners in some areas to the benefit of landowners in other areas, so Option D1 cannot be recommended.  The option combining A4 and D1 (A4D1) also causes impact on Derby Street, Station St and Reserve St properties, so cannot be recommended either.

Conclusion

It is recommended that Option D1 is not implemented as Option D1 does not address 87% of the identified stormwater issue and causes impact on other properties.  It is recommended that Option A4 be developed to Detailed Design stage and tendered for implementation.  Depending on approval of the current LIRS round 3 application it is recommended to implement the entire scheme as a single construction project so as to achieve the benefit of economies of scale and because the benefit of the scheme cannot be realised until it is fully implemented.

 

If the LIRS application is unsuccessful, current annual funding available would result in staged implementation over a 10 year period, so it is recommended that alternate funding via other mechanisms be investigated so as to accelerate that if at all possible.

Engineering Services Manager’s Comments

A detailed Flood Study for the Penrith CBD Catchment is currently been finalised.  This Flood Study includes the entire CBD catchment which is about 340 ha and details all existing flooding problems, flood hazard categorisation and flood damage assessments. It is planned to present the Flood Study to the Floodplain Management Working Party in June 2014.  A Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan for the Penrith CBD Catchment is also scheduled to be commenced in the 2014/15 year. Currently Council is applying for grant funding under the NSW Floodplain Management Program for this study.

 

The Penrith CBD drainage strategies recommended are consistent with the NSW floodplain management principles and these strategies will form part of the Penrith CBD Floodplain Risk Management Plan to be prepared.  

Financial Services Manager’s Comment

Council’s application for Round 3 of the Local Infrastructure Renewal Scheme (LIRS) reported to Council on 9 December 2013 included two projects. The Penrith CBD Drainage program was one of these projects and included a loan of $5.7m to accelerate the works. This loan has been included in the 2013-14 borrowing program, however as reported to Council on 24 March 2014, the loan will not be drawn down until the results of Council’s Round 3 application under the LIRS is known. Successful applications under this round will be eligible for a 3% interest rate subsidy over a loan term not exceeding 10 years.

 

Applications for Round 3 of the LIRS closed on 31 December 2013. Successful applications are expected to be announced before the end of the financial year. If Council is successful in securing the interest rate subsidy for this project, the amount of $5.7m will be included in the 2013-14 borrowing program, and will be drawn down before 30 June 2014.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Penrith CBD Drainage Design Standard & Implementation Strategy be received.

2.     Council’s adopted drainage standard for Urban Residential and Commercial/Industrial areas (PRC July 2006) be amended as per the recommendations in Table 1-1 of the report with specific new categories and standards for Urban Residential within the Penrith CBD Limits and Commercial and Business areas within the Penrith CBD Limits.

3.     Detailed design of Option A4 be approved to be developed for construction tender, with award of tender to be subject to receiving approval of the LIRS Round 3 application.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.  


 

 

 

 

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Outcome 5 - We care about our environment

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

4        On-site Sewage Management and Grey Water Reuse Policy                                        37

 

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                      14 April 2014

 

 

 

4

On-site Sewage Management and Grey Water Reuse Policy   

 

Compiled by:               Adrian Estreich, Team Leader (Environment)

Authorised by:            Anthony Price, Acting Environmental Health Manager  

 

Outcome

We care for our environment

Strategy

Protect and improve our natural areas, the Nepean River and other waterways

Service Activity

Contribute to the protection and enhancement of the City's natural environment

       

 

Executive Summary

Council’s On-Site Sewage Management and Greywater Reuse Policy has been reviewed to ensure it remains contemporary and consistent with best practice to protect public health and the environment. 

 

The revised On-Site Sewage Management and Greywater Reuse Policy was put forward to the Policy Review Committee Meeting on 8 October 2012. Following this meeting the Policy was placed on public exhibition for 30 days.  During the public exhibition, two external and one internal submission were received.

 

The main issues raised in the submissions related to clarification of certain provisions within the Policy and figures used for disposal area calculations. In response, terminology has been clarified where needed and further information has been included to clarify disposal area calculations.

 

The Policy review also needed to consider changes to Australian Standards AS1547:2012 that were updated during the review period.

 

The review looked at further opportunities to streamline the approach to the assessment and regulation of On-Site Sewage Management (OSSM) systems in the City. The revised Policy will make it easier for residents to manage their systems, while ensuring Council continues to meet its legislative obligations to protect public health and the environment. A copy of the revised Policy is attached.

 

This report recommends that the revised On-Site Sewage Management and Greywater Reuse Policy be adopted by Council.

Background

Council’s On-Site Sewage Management and Greywater Reuse Policy has been reviewed to ensure it remains contemporary and consistent with best practice to protect public health and the environment. 

 

A revised draft of the Policy was reported to the Policy Review Committee Meeting on 8 October 2012. At this meeting the Policy Review Committee supported the recommendation to place the revised Policy on public exhibition. 

 

The revised Policy was publicly exhibited between 9 November and 10 December 2012.  During this time, the document was available for viewing at Council’s offices and on Council’s website.  In addition, advertisements were placed in newspapers and correspondence was sent to internal and external stakeholders.

 

Proposed Amendments

It is proposed to streamline the process of renewing Operational Approvals. Systems with a good maintenance history and no significant site constraints will automatically have their Operational Approval renewed without the need for an inspection. This improvement will allow program resources to focus on the following:

 

·   Auditing systems that have a history of failures or defects (where the system has not yet been replaced)

·   Auditing systems that have previously been assigned a high risk classification or are located on properties with site constraints

·   Auditing commercial systems

·   Improving the management of the AWTS service records

·   Auditing systems that have not provided service reports.

 

A number of amendments to the Policy are also proposed to improve the installation application and assessment process. The following outlines the key changes:

 

·    Clarification of the detail required in a Wastewater Assessment Report (formerly a Site and Soil Report). This will make it easier for residents and consultants to understand Council requirements.

·    Buffer distances have been included for native trees and in-ground water tanks.  These buffers assist to protect native vegetation from excessive nutrient loading associated with effluent, and will reduce the possibility of drinking water supply contamination.

·    The requirements for land application systems have been amended to clarify disposal area sizing requirements and to refer applicants to the latest Australian Standards.

·    Specific requirements have been incorporated for dual occupancies (and secondary dwellings), including clarifying who is responsible for system maintenance.

·    Clearer requirements regarding flood affected land to minimise the impact flooding may have on an OSSM system, including the tank, its electrical components and the disposal area.

·    The requirement for systems to be inspected prior to the issue of an Operational Approval has been removed, except for commercial systems.

 

In summary, the review identified program resources would be better focused on systems that are considered to pose a higher risk to public health and the environment. Moving in this direction would also minimise requirements for owners with systems that have a good maintenance history and minimal site constraints.

 

Public Exhibition Submissions

Two submissions were received from environmental consultants that produce Wastewater Assessment Reports. One internal submission was received from Council’s Engineering Services Department. 

 

The main issues raised in the submissions related to clarification of certain provisions within the Policy and figures used for disposal area calculations. In response, terminology has been clarified where needed and further information has been included to clarify disposal area calculations.  The table below outlines the main submission points and the response to each:

 

Submission Issue

Response

Concern about provisions that exempt the need for Wastewater Assessments Reports for some system installation applications

The requirement to submit a Wastewater Assessment Report in support of an installation application only applies to certain properties that cannot meet the requirements of the policy (Section 2.1.1.)  This provision was in the previous version of the Policy (2007) to make the installation application process more affordable for residents.

Under the previous Policy exemptions only applied to systems for single dwellings. This Policy extends the exemption to systems for dual occupancies and secondary dwellings that meet specific controls. It is considered these controls are satisfactory.

Concern about the need for nutrient calculations for absorption bed, trench and mound systems

Council Officers reviewed this section of the Policy and noted that it was not a requirement of the relevant Australian Standard.

As such the requirement for nutrient balance calculations to be included in a Wastewater Assessment Report for absorption bed, trench and mound systems has been removed.

 

Concern in relation to the approval of greywater diversion devices                

The provisions within the Policy reflect the requirements under Clause 75A of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005.  As such there was no need to amend the greywater provisions in the Policy.

Clarification or concern in relation to the calculations for sizing effluent disposal areas

The figures used in the calculations to develop the effluent disposal areas in the Policy (Table 2) are conservative and are based on the Australian Standards, the former Department of Local Government’s Guidelines for On-site Sewage Management for Single Households and the relevant Soil Landscape Map for Penrith. 

To provide further clarity, information has been added to the Policy (Table 2) to advise conservative figures were used to calculate the effluent disposal areas. Applicants can still choose to prepare a Waste Water Assessment Report if they wish to demonstrate that smaller effluent disposal areas are possible.

 

Clarification regarding flood prone land and overland flow paths

Clarification has been provided to the Policy (Section 2.1.7) which now clearly states both mainstream flooding and local overland flow need to be considered during assessment. In addition, all components of a system (including tank/s and effluent disposal areas) are to be addressed during an assessment.

The Policy now also refers to the relevant section of Council’s DCP that provides considerations for development on flood liable land.

Clarification regarding the use of the term ‘land application system’

This was reviewed and reference to ‘land application systems’ has been replaced with ‘absorption beds, trenches and mounds’, or ‘other domestic systems’ where relevant.

 

Conclusion

The On-Site Sewage Management and Greywater Reuse Policy has been reviewed to ensure it remains contemporary and consistent with best practice to protect public health and the environment. 

 

The Policy was placed on public exhibition to seek comment from the relevant stakeholders, including residents, environmental consultants and service agents.  Three submissions were received during the exhibition period, and as a result a number of minor changes have been made to the Policy.

 

The revised Policy will facilitate a streamlined approach to the assessment and regulation of On-site Sewage Management Systems in the City. This will make it easier for residents to manage their systems, and will ensure Council continues to meet its legislative obligations to protect public health and the environment.

 

This report recommends the revised On-Site Sewage Management and Greywater Reuse Policy be adopted by Council.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on On-site Sewage Management and Grey Water Reuse Policy be received.

2.     The revised On-Site Sewage Management and Greywater Reuse Policy be adopted by Council.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.  

On-Site Sewage Management and Greywater Reuse Policy

26 Pages

Appendix

  


Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                                   14 April 2014

Appendix 1 - On-Site Sewage Management and Greywater Reuse Policy

 

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Outcome 6 - We're healthy and share strong community spirit

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

5        Draft Keeping of Animals Local Orders Policy                                                                69

 

6        Penrith Homelessness Summit                                                                                        86

 

 

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                      14 April 2014

 

 

 

5

Draft Keeping of Animals Local Orders Policy   

 

Compiled by:               Anthony Price, Acting Environmental Health Manager

Authorised by:            Wayne Mitchell, Executive Manager - Environment & City Development  

 

Outcome

We are healthy and share strong community spirit

Strategy

Provide opportunities for our community to be healthy and active

Service Activity

Contribute to the health and wellbeing of the City's community

       

 

Executive Summary

Animals are an important part of the community providing benefits such as companionship and social wellbeing. Although, poor management and inappropriate care of animals has the potential to impact on neighbourhood amenity in terms of noise, odours, property damage, health and safety. For these reasons it is important for animal owners and the community to be aware of care, control and management responsibilities.

 

The attached draft Keeping of Animals Local Orders Policy has been prepared in accordance with the Local Government Act. The draft policy specifies criteria (or standards) in relation to the keeping of animals in residential areas that Council Officers will take into consideration when determining if regulatory action is needed, or when answering enquiries.

 

The objectives of the draft policy are:

 

·   To ensure animals kept at residential premises are of an appropriate kind, in appropriate numbers and are kept in satisfactory conditions,

·   To ensure the keeping of animals does not result in unhealthy or unsafe conditions or cause a nuisance to others,

·  To achieve a balance in relation to the rights of property owners and the rights of others to enjoy their properties.

 

It is proposed the attached draft policy be placed on public exhibition for 30 days to allow the community an opportunity to provide comments before the policy is finalised and presented to Council for adoption.

Draft Keeping of Animals Local Orders Policy

Animals are an important part of the community providing benefits such as companionship and social wellbeing. Although, poor management and inappropriate care of animals has the potential to impact on neighbourhood amenity in terms of noise, odours, property damage, health and safety. For these reasons it is important for animal owners and the community to be aware of care, control and management responsibilities.

 

Council often receives enquiries or complaints in relation to the keeping of animals in residential areas such as the condition of premises, impacts on surrounding properties (typically from waste, odour and noise), or in relation to more general nuisance from animal behaviour.

 

Council Officers are called on to make judgments as to whether animals pose any risk to public health or safety, or are causing nuisance. While every effort is made to ensure consistency of the approach in line with regulatory responsibilities, there is an identified need to provide clear guidelines for the community and Council’s Officers in relation to the standards to be applied when responding to enquiries and complaints. As a response, the attached draft Keeping of Animals Local Orders Policy has been prepared in accordance with the Local Government Act. The draft policy specifies criteria (or standards) Council Officers will take into consideration when determining whether or not to issue an Order under section 124 of the Act, and when answering enquiries.

 

The draft policy focuses on the main animals kept within a residential setting as pets, and those animals where Council has a regular regulatory or advisory role. The draft policy includes clear guidelines (or standards) in relation to the keeping of Bees, Birds (caged), Cats, Dogs, Livestock, Poultry, Pigeons, Rabbits, Guinea Pigs and Rodents (rats and mice).

 

The objectives of the draft policy are:

 

·   To ensure animals kept at residential premises are of an appropriate kind, in appropriate numbers and are kept in satisfactory conditions,

·   To ensure the keeping of animals does not result in unhealthy or unsafe conditions or cause a nuisance to others,

·  To achieve a balance in relation to the rights of property owners and the rights of others to enjoy their properties.

 

It is proposed the attached draft policy be placed on public exhibition for 30 days to allow the community an opportunity to provide comments before the policy is finalised and presented to Council for adoption.

 

Conclusion

A draft Keeping of Animals Local Orders Policy has been prepared in accordance with the Local Government Act. The draft policy specifies criteria (or standards) in relation to the keeping of animals in residential areas that Council Officers will take into consideration when determining if regulatory action is needed in relation to complaints, or when answering enquiries.

 

The objectives of the draft policy are:

 

·   To ensure animals kept at residential premises are of an appropriate kind, in appropriate numbers and are kept in satisfactory conditions,

·   To ensure the keeping of animals does not result in unhealthy or unsafe conditions or cause a nuisance to others,

·  To achieve a balance in relation to the rights of property owners and the rights of others to enjoy their properties.

 

It is proposed the attached draft policy be placed on public exhibition for 30 days to allow the community an opportunity to provide comments before the policy is finalised and presented to Council for adoption.

 

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Draft Keeping of Animals Local Orders Policy be received.

2.     The draft Keeping of Animals Local Orders Policy be placed on public exhibition for 30 days to seek comment from the community.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.  

Draft Keeping of Animals Local Orders Policy

14 Pages

Appendix

  


Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                                   14 April 2014

Appendix 1 - Draft Keeping of Animals Local Orders Policy

 

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Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                      14 April 2014

 

 

 

6

Penrith Homelessness Summit   

 

Compiled by:               Vesna Kapetanovic, Community Projects Officer 

Authorised by:            Erich Weller, Community and Cultural Development Manager 

Requested By:            Councillor John Thain

 

Outcome

We are healthy and share strong community spirit

Strategy

Provide opportunities for our community to be healthy and active

Service Activity

Resource and implement social programs that contribute to community wellbeing

       

 

Executive Summary

This report provides an overview of the proposed Penrith Homelessness Summit that will highlight the challenges and needs experienced by people who are homeless in Penrith City and further support a coordinated response to addressing homelessness.

 

While the Federal and State Governments have the principal responsibility for the funding of services that provide accommodation and related support to homeless people, local government can also play an active role.  Penrith City Council has been a major contributor to the Nepean Blacktown Regional Taskforce on Homelessness and has also provided significant support to the homelessness service sector in a range of ways including advocacy to other levels of government, support provided to voluntary services and the development of resources such as the homelessness resource contact card to facilitate effective information and referral for homeless people.

 

The Penrith Homelessness Summit will include the range of support services including volunteer groups, specialist homelessness services, affordable housing organisations and representatives of other levels of government that can advise and develop strategies on how services can be improved. Local business groups will also be invited to attend.

 

The Summit will provide the strategic policy context for services providing support to homeless people, including current Federal and State Government policy as well as regional and local initiatives that are presently having an impact on the service system. Through understanding this context and building on current strengths the Homelessness Summit will deliver productive outcomes such as enhanced collaboration, more effective advocacy and referral, and improved service delivery.

 

There is no available budget for the Penrith Homelessness Summit.

 

The report recommends that the information contained in the report on the Penrith Homelessness Summit be received.

 

Background

Homelessness is a complex social issue that can be understood and defined in various ways.  The widely accepted cultural definition of homelessness includes people who do not have access to stable and conventional accommodation. People moving between temporary forms of shelter or refuges and people living in minimum standard accommodation without security of tenure are also considered within this understanding of homelessness.

 

A state of homelessness may be short term and caused by a crisis, or longer term where a person may experience multiple health or other problems and may require that individual to adapt to a life of homelessness. Homelessness can also be ongoing when a person moves through different forms of insecure accommodation and is unable to access secure stable accommodation.

 

Homeless people are marginalised within the community and are often excluded from participation in social, recreational, cultural and economic life. Homelessness impacts upon a person’s ability to enjoy basic rights and freedoms, including access to safe and secure housing.

 

The circumstances and experiences of homeless people vary and responses to homelessness must be flexible enough to meet diverse and often complex needs. A range of factors can contribute to homelessness.  These include:

 

·    family breakdown

·    domestic violence

·    poverty

·    mental illness

·    substance addiction

·    gambling addiction

·    disability

·    major trauma

 

Sometimes a homeless person or family may experience a number of the above factors. It is also important to note that there are many individuals and families at risk of homelessness.  Through effective early intervention, social support services can in many cases deliver a level of ongoing support to prevent homelessness.

 

Homeless people in Penrith

It is important to note the increase in numbers of people experiencing primary homelessness (this includes people without conventional accommodation, people who are sleeping rough and/or living in improvised dwellings) in Penrith. The 2006 Census indicated that there were 63 people experiencing primary homelessness and in 2011 this number had increased to 69 people.

 

Prior to the 2011 Census, the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) dedicated significant resources to implement a strategy to improve its methodology for counting homeless people in the Census data. The ABS worked closely with a range of service providers, including local government, to improve access for homeless people to complete the Census forms.

 

Current Government Response to Homelessness

The information in this section summarises the current Federal and State policy context and more detailed information is provided in Appendix 1 to this report.

 

The majority of homelessness services, including crisis and medium term accommodation, are funded jointly by the Federal and State Governments.

 

Federal Government

The National Partnership Agreement on Homelessness (NPAH) commenced in January 2009 and expired on 30 June 2013. The NPAH formalises the joint Federal and State commitment to allocating additional resources to reduce homelessness in Australia. During 2013-14 the NPAH is in a one year transitional phase. The transitional NPAH builds on progress made under the five year $1.1 billion National Partnership Agreement on Homelessness which expired on 30 June 2013 and provides for the continuity of homelessness services, supporting states and territories to maintain the same level of service delivery as provided under the 2009-13 NPAH.

 

On 30 March 2014 the Hon Kevin Andrews MP and Federal Minister for Social Services, announced an additional $115 million of funding to extend the NPAH for 2014-15.  The Federal Government has announced it will undertake, together with the States, a review of the NPAH over the next 12 months.

 

State Government

The Going Home Staying Home Program was launched on 10 July 2012 to reform the specialist homelessness services (SHS) system in NSW. The aim of the Going Home Staying Home (GHSH) Reform Program is to build on good practice and innovation in the specialist homelessness service sector consistent with the NPAH agenda and the NSW Government Homelessness Action Plan 2009–2014 that was adopted on 6 August 2009.

 

Some local examples of currently funded SHS include Wentworth Community Housing’s Project 40 that provides outreach and wrap around support as well as some permanent supported housing to chronically homeless people. Platform Youth Accommodation Service provides support and accommodation to young people aged aged 12-25 in the Blue Mountains, Penrith and Hawkesbury areas. Penrith Domestic Violence Service provides refuge accommodation, a transitional housing program, Aboriginal specific accommodation and a support service and resource centre.  This service focuses on the needs of women.

 

The contracts for most of the services funded under the Specialist Homelessness Services (SHS) program ended on 30 June 2013. These service specifications have been extended for another year until June 2014 to allow for the implementation of the Going Home Staying Home reform.

 

The contracting process for SHS for the period 2014 – 2015 commenced on 23 September 2013 and organisations that were intending to re-apply for funding were invited to submit to the Prequalification Scheme that closed on 18 October 2013. Organisations were required to demonstrate in the Prequalification Scheme their ability to deliver specialist homelessness prior to tendering for future services.

In the second stage of the contracting approach, NSW Family and Community Services (FACS) selected organisations from the Prequalification Scheme to bid for services. The state wide tender application phase for 2014 - 2017 opened on 27 November 2013 and closed on 7 February 2014.

 

The tender evaluation process is underway with the completion of assessment expected in May 2014. It is important to note that the NSW Government has extended this time frame once already. In making a decision on the timing of the Homelessness Summit, it will be important that the successful SHS are operational and able to participate in the Summit.

 

The Nepean Blacktown Regional Taskforce on Homelessness

The Nepean Blacktown Regional Taskforce on Homelessness, covering the Penrith, Blue Mountains, Hawkesbury and Blacktown Local Government Areas, was established in October 2009 to assist in providing a structured regional and local response to addressing homelessness. Council became a signatory to the Taskforce Memorandum of Understanding in 2009 and has continued to play a key role in various strategies and projects such as the Homelessness Street Count in May 2010, the quarterly homeless outreach service hubs and a joint Taskforce and University of Western Sydney homelessness research partnership project. Councillor Karen McKeown is Council’s representative on the Taskforce and the Community and Cultural Development Department officers also attend as participants.

 

In bringing together Commonwealth, State and Local Government agencies, community service providers, consumer representatives and the business sectors, the Taskforce has provided a base from which issues can be raised and innovative and collaborative solutions developed to address the needs of and challenges for homeless people in Penrith and surrounding LGAs. The Taskforce undertakes its work recognising that homelessness is a whole of community challenge and requires participating organisations to play an active role in achieving positive outcomes for people experiencing homelessness.  The Taskforce is currently finalising a Regional Action Plan with the goal to solve, rather than manage homelessness.

 

Council’s Achievements

Council has been proactive in responding to issues regarding homelessness in Penrith City and has developed and implemented its own Protocol for Service Delivery to People Experiencing Homelessness (the Protocol). The Protocol ensures that Council officers are supported in responding to and working with homeless people through an agreed process for customer service to homeless people. This Protocol was adopted by Council at its Ordinary Meeting on 21 March 2011 and has encouraged a responsive and quality service to homeless people through clarifying staff roles, responsibilities and obligations that maintain a safe environment for the whole community. The Protocol applies to Council service delivery in public places including Council facilities such as libraries, neighbourhood centres, the Ripples Penrith Leisure Centre as well as parks and open space.

 

Council has coordinated a number of training sessions on the Protocol for Council officers who work in these areas.  Evaluation of the training confirmed that Council staff felt more confident in working with homeless people including making referrals to other services as a result of having completed the training.

 

Council is also involved in the quarterly outreach service hubs for rough sleepers. These hubs are coordinated by Project 40 and have been hosted by Council in the Quarterdeck meeting facility at Ripples Penrith Leisure Centre. Council provides support to this event which is well attended by a range of community organisations and government agencies that provide specialised services to homeless people. These hubs are accessed by approximately 15-25 rough sleepers on each occasion and services have reported that they are working with some different people each time. A small number of homeless people attending the hubs have been housed in permanent accommodation.

 

Council has also provided specialised support to volunteer groups that are providing free meals and basic resources to homeless people. Some of these groups are new to the service system and have required additional support to ensure their service meets with Council requirements, such as seeking formal approval to operate a service in a public space and food safety and handling regulations. A specialised training package was developed and delivered to some volunteer service providers to provide an overview of the existing community service system to enable these volunteers to make referrals to funded services for additional support.  More information on the volunteer service sector is provided in the next section of this report.

 

The Volunteer Service Sector

There are number of services based in the Penrith City Centre that are operated by volunteer groups or associations. Volunteer services undertake an important role in providing ongoing and flexible support to homeless people. These services include the provision of hot and/or portable meals, food hampers, clothing and information and referral. These services complement the government funded service sector as they are not bound by government funding frameworks or service specifications and are sometimes able to respond to community issues in more flexible way. This situation is similar to other local government areas in Sydney.  

 

It has been noted that the number of voluntary services has increased as the incidence of homelessness and risk of homelessness has grown. These recently established services complement those provided by Vinnie’s Van and other services operating in the Penrith City Centre such as the Penrith Community Kitchen.

 

Some voluntary services also receive government funding to operate different aspects of their service; this for example may include the distribution of energy vouchers, the delivery of training programs and support to clients with fines and work development orders.  Some volunteer services might also grow over time and manage and allocate accommodation to homeless people.

 

The Penrith Homelessness Summit

The objective of this Summit is to bring together the diverse groups and organisations in the service sector and community to discuss issues regarding homelessness in Penrith and further contribute to a coordinated and collaborative response. This Summit will build on the existing networking amongst organisations that provide homelessness support including voluntary services to improve referral pathways.  Consultation will take place during the Summit to identify and develop solutions to some of the current challenges impacting upon our community and that contribute to homelessness. 

 

A number of presenters will be invited to provide information to participants, for example this may include government representatives, representatives from Nepean Blacktown Regional Taskforce on Homelessness, as well as local homelessness specialist services and workers from innovative projects. It is expected the volunteer sector will also actively contribute, share their perspectives and support more integrated service responses.

 

It is intended that a facilitator be engaged to conduct the Summit and work with participants in smaller themed workshops to ensure that all attendees have an opportunity to contribute to collaborative responses. Council officers will resource these small workshop groups.

 

It is envisaged that the Summit workshops will explore issues such as advocacy, social inclusion and the immediate support required by homeless people, and government and community collaboration. These workshops will assist in developing and advancing practical and effective solutions to address homelessness.

 

The facilitator will also be responsible for documenting the Summit and providing a final report on the Summit including an evaluation of the Summit as well as recommendations.

 

A resource and information pack will be compiled and provided to all attendees. This pack will include information from Centrelink, Council’s homelessness resource cards, Wentworth Community Housing directory/resource booklet and other relevant resources.  This resource pack will also assist service collaboration and more effective service referrals.

 

Scheduling

It is proposed that the Summit be held in late August to accommodate the current NSW Government Going Home, Staying Home tender process taking place with homelessness specialist services. Services are understandably experiencing some uncertainty regarding the future of their services. The outcomes of the tender process will be known in May 2014 and a transition process will need to occur to ensure seamless service delivery for clients of existing services.

 

The timing of the Summit will take place on a weekday morning. Because of the time constraints on service providers it is preferable that the Summit be a half-day.  More than 60 participants could be expected to attend. 

 

The proposed venue for the Summit is the Joan Sutherland Performing Arts Centre as it is able to accommodate the main proceedings in the Malcolm Borland Foyer and have break out space in the meeting rooms for the smaller themed workshops.

 

Resourcing

There is no budget available to hold the Penrith Homelessness Summit.

 

It is estimated that the cost of holding the Summit will be approximately $6,000.  Costs will include the engagement of a facilitator, promotion, venue hire, some catering and the resource packs.  Child care may also be required.

 

It is expected that a number of the homelessness service providers will also be able to provide some in-kind support including running the small workshops and contributing material for the resource packs.

 

Conclusion

The Penrith Homelessness Summit provides an opportunity for Council to continue to demonstrate leadership in assisting the homelessness service sector, including voluntary services, to develop innovative responses to the many daily issues experienced by homeless people and people at risk of homelessness.

 

The report outlines the broad approach and the timing of the Summit.

 

The engagement of an external lead facilitator for the Summit will enable Council officers to support the small themed workshops which will ensure that the participants will all have an opportunity to contribute their perspectives.  It is expected that increased service collaboration and more effective advocacy to other levels of government will result from the Summit.  Most importantly the Summit will lead to improved services for homeless people and people at risk of homelessness.

 

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the information contained in the report on the Penrith Homelessness Summit be received.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.  

Current Government Response to Homelessness

2 Pages

Appendix

  


Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                                   14 April 2014

Appendix 1 - Current Government Response to Homelessness

 

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Outcome 7 - We have confidence in our Council

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

7        2014 Australian Local Government Association (ALGA) National General Assembly of Local Government                                                                                                                     96

 

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                      14 April 2014

 

 

 

7

2014 Australian Local Government Association (ALGA) National General Assembly of Local Government   

 

Compiled by:               Adam Beggs, Governance Officer

Authorised by:            Glenn Schuil, Senior Governance Officer  

 

Outcome

We have confidence in our Council

Strategy

Demonstrate transparency and ethical behaviour

Service Activity

Ensure that the organisation promotes ethical behaviour, risk management, transparent decision making and meets contemporary governance standards

       

 

Executive Summary

A report was presented to the Council’s Ordinary Meeting on 24 February 2014 advising the Council of the upcoming 2014 Australian Local Government Association (ALGA) National General Assembly (NGA). In that report, Councillors were advised of the proposed Theme for the NGA which is Getting Down to Business.

 

At this Meeting the Council resolved that His Worship the Mayor, Councillor Ross Fowler OAM would be the Council’s voting delegate for the NGA.

 

Council has in previous years put forward a number of motions to the NGA and other than the outcome of a motion put forward last year these are now adopted positions of both the State and Federal Local Government Associations; most recently support for the Constitutional Recognition of Local Government and that a fixed percentage of the Federal taxation revenue is provided to local government via the Financial Assistance Grant (FAG).

 

Last year Council put forward a motion that was carried relating to the development of an equitable, long term strategy for waste disposal that would not impact on a single community.

 

Any proposed motions to the NGA are required to be submitted to the ALGA by Thursday 17 April 2014.The Council’s staff are not proposing to submit a motion to the NGA this year, however, in the event that a Councillor proposes a motion at tonight’s meeting, this will be prepared and submitted by the due date.

 

Council staff have consulted with the National Growth Areas Alliance (NGAA) and are aware of a suggested motion being put forward by Wyndham City Council.  It is recommended that Council consider supporting this motion when the full details are known prior to the Assembly.

Background

The 2014 National General Assembly of Local Government will be held in Canberra from 15-18 June 2014.

 

The 2014 National General Assembly, which is sponsored by the Australian Local Government Association (ALGA), will have as its theme, “Getting Down to Business”.

 

 

 

 

Submitting Motions

To enhance the quality of outcomes from this year’s National General Assembly and to ensure that motions are relevant to local government nationally, the ALGA Board is calling for motions under the theme of “Getting Down to Business”.

 

To be eligible for inclusion in the National General Assembly business paper, motions must:

 

1.   Fall under the NGA theme

2.   Be relevant to the work of local government nationally; and

3.   Complement or build on the policy objectives of state or territory associations.

 

Motions must also fall under the themes identified in the Background Paper (Appendix 1) which broadly covers issues such as:

 

·    National Fiscal Settings

·    The Commonwealth National Commission of Audit

·    Regulation Reform

·    What Business is Local Government in

·    Regulation Reduction

·    National Commission of Audit

 

The Council’s staff have considered the theme of the NGA this year and are not proposing any new motions which are not already adopted positions of both the State and Federal Local Government Associations.

 

The NGAA was consulted for suggested motions. The NGAA advocates at a Federal level for more affirmative acknowledgement of the consequences and the opportunities of the high population growth that is experienced in the outer metropolitan urban area, in both a policy and a financial sense. The NGAA has suggested that a motion be framed along the lines of:

 

    That the Federal and State Governments:

 

·    ensure that population growth is front and centre in its policymaking and investment decisions;

·    ensure that Infrastructure Australia has a focus on population growth and the projects required to unlock its potential;

·    provide incentives to investors to develop the businesses and infrastructure that will drive the productivity gains.

 

One of the Victorian members of NGAA, Wyndham City Council, is drafting a motion in accordance with the above. It is recommended that Penrith City Council consider supporting the motion when the details are known.

 

If a proposed motion is adopted at tonight’s meeting Council staff will prepare a motion by the submission deadline of 17 April 2014.

 

Delegates

At the Ordinary Meeting held on 24 February 2014 the Council resolved that His Worship the Mayor, Councillor Ross Fowler OAM would be the Council’s voting delegate for the NGA. At that meeting the Council also resolved that Councillors Jim Aitken OAM, Tricia Hitchen, Marcus Cornish and Michelle Tormey and any other interested Councillors attend as observers at the 2014 National General Assembly of Local Government.

Outcome of 2013 Motions

Council put forward one motion last year which was carried and read as follows:

 

That the National General Assembly request Federal and State Governments to develop an

equitable, long-term strategy for waste disposal needs nationally that will not impact on a

single community. The Strategy should also provide clear guidelines for industry and local

government on the regulatory management processes and options available for the disposal of hazardous and restricted solid waste in all states and territories, including addressing the issue of instances where there is only one waste facility licensed to accept Restricted Solid Waste in a particular state.

 

At this stage no response has been provided to Council on the outcome of this motion. ALGA staff have been contacted and have undertaken to provide Council staff with an update of the actions taken in regard to this motion. Once this information has been received it will be forwarded to the Council.

 

Conclusion

Should Councillors put forward any motions to tonight’s meeting, Council Officers will prepare the motion and submit it to the ALGA by the submission deadline of 17 April 2014.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on 2014 Australian Local Government Association (ALGA) National General Assembly of Local Government be received.

2.     If the Council wishes to raise a motion tonight for submission to the NGA this be compiled and submitted by the due date of 17 April 2014.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.  

National General Assembly - Background Paper

13 Pages

Appendix

  


Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                                   14 April 2014

Appendix 1 - National General Assembly - Background Paper