25 June 2014

 

Dear Councillor,

In pursuance of the provisions of the Local Government Act, 1993 and the Regulations thereunder, notice is hereby given that a POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING of Penrith City Council is to be held in the Passadena Room, Civic Centre, 601 High Street, Penrith on Monday 30 June 2014 at 7:00PM.

Attention is directed to the statement accompanying this notice of the business proposed to be transacted at the meeting.

Yours faithfully

 

 

Alan Stoneham

General Manager

 

BUSINESS

 

1.           LEAVE OF ABSENCE

Leave of absence has been granted to:

Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM - 10 June 2014 to 25 July 2014 inclusive.

 

2.           APOLOGIES

 

3.           CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES

Policy Review Committee Meeting - 12 May 2014.

 

4.           DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

Pecuniary Interest (The Act requires Councillors who declare a pecuniary interest in an item to leave the meeting during discussion of that item)

Non-Pecuniary Conflict of Interest – Significant and Less than Significant (The Code of Conduct requires Councillors who declare a significant non-pecuniary conflict of interest in an item to leave the meeting during discussion of that item)

 

5.           ADDRESSING THE MEETING

 

6.           MAYORAL MINUTES

 

7.           NOTICES OF MOTION TO RESCIND A RESOLUTION

 

8.           NOTICES OF MOTION

 

9.           DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

10.         REQUESTS FOR REPORTS AND MEMORANDUMS

 

11.         URGENT BUSINESS

 

12.         CONFIDENTIAL BUSINESS


POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING

 

Monday 30 June 2014

 

table of contents

 

 

 

 

 

 

meeting calendar

 

 

confirmation of minutes

 

 

DELIVERY program reports

 


Council_Mark_POS_RGB2014 MEETING CALENDAR

January 2014 - December 2014

(adopted by Council on 25/11/13 and amended by Council on 26/5/14)

 

 

 

TIME

JAN

FEB

MAR

APRIL

MAY

JUNE

JULY

AUG

SEPT

OCT

NOV

DEC

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

 

Ordinary Council Meeting

7.30pm

 

3

10&

 

 

 

 

 

 

22^ü

(7.00pm)

 

 

15

(7.00pm)

 

24@

24

28v

26#

23 *

28

25@

29

27

24#+

 

Policy Review Committee

7.00pm

 

 

 

14

12

30

14

11

8

13

10

8

 

10

10

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 v

Meeting at which the draft corporate planning documents (Delivery Program and Operational Plan) are endorsed for exhibition

 *

Meeting at which the draft corporate planning documents (Delivery Program and Operational Plan) are adopted

 #

Meetings at which the Operational Plan quarterly reviews (March and September) are presented

 @

Meetings at which the Delivery Program progress reports (including the Operational Plan quarterly reviews for December and June) are presented

 ^

Election of Mayor/Deputy Mayor

 ü

Meeting at which the 2013-2014 Annual Statements are presented

 

Meeting at which any comments on the 2013-2014 Annual Statements are presented

 +

Meeting at which the Annual Report is presented

&

Extraordinary Meeting

-            Extraordinary Meetings are held as required.

-            Members of the public are invited to observe meetings of the Council (Ordinary and Policy Review Committee).

Should you wish to address Council, please contact the Senior Governance Officer, Glenn Schuil.

 


UNCONFIRMED MINUTES

 OF THE POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING OF PENRITH CITY COUNCIL HELD IN THE PASSADENA ROOM, PENRITH

ON MONDAY 12 MAY 2014 AT 7:02PM

PRESENT

Councillors Prue Car, Marcus Cornish, Greg Davies, Maurice Girotto, Ben Goldfinch, Jackie Greenow OAM, Tricia Hitchen, Michelle Tormey and John Thain.

 

The General Manager, Alan Stoneham indicated that in the absence of His Worship the Mayor, Councillor Ross Fowler OAM and Deputy Mayor, Councillor Jim Aitken OAM that the Committee would be required to nominate and elect a Chairperson.

 

Procedural Motion


Councillor Greg Davies nominated Councillor John Thain to Chair the Policy Review Committee meeting.

 

PRC 20  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Ben Goldfinch that Councillor John Thain be elected to Chair the Policy Review Committee meeting.

 

Councillor John Thain took the Chair, the time being 7:03pm.

 

LEAVE OF ABSENCE

Leave of Absence was previously granted to Councillor Jim Aitken OAM for the period 10 May 2014 to 23 May 2014 inclusive.

Leave of Absence was previously granted to Councillor Karen McKeown for the period 8 May 2014 to 11 June 2014 inclusive.

Leave of Absence was previously granted to Councillor Ross Fowler OAM for the period 10 May 2014 to 21 May 2014 inclusive.

APOLOGIES

PRC 21  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Jackie Greenow OAM seconded Councillor Tricia  Hitchen that apologies be received for Councillors Kevin Crameri OAM, Bernard Bratusa and Mark Davies.

 

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES - Policy Review Committee Meeting - 14 April 2014

PRC 22  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Marcus Cornish that the minutes of the Policy Review Committee Meeting of 14 April 2014 be confirmed.

 

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

 

Councillor Ben Goldfinch declared a Non-Pecuniary Conflict of Interest – Less than Significant in Item 2 – Domestic Asbestos Disposal as he holds an Asbestos Removal Licence. Councillor Goldfinch indicated he would stay in the room for consideration of this item.

 

 

 

 

DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Outcome 6 - We're healthy and share strong community spirit

 

3        All Weather Athletics Track

Recreation Manager, Andrew Robinson introduced the report and invited Crosbie Lorimer, Director from Clouston Associates to give a presentation.  

PRC 23  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Prue Car seconded Councillor Marcus Cornish

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on All Weather Athletics Track be received.

2.     South Creek Park, incorporating Blair Oval, become the preferred location for an all weather athletics track in the City.

3.     Detailed designs for the development of a district level athletics facility, incorporating an all weather athletics track at Blair Oval, South Creek Park be developed.

4.     Funding opportunities to deliver the project, including current and potential future District Open Space S94 Developer Contributions, as well as grant funding are investigated.

5.     A detailed Business Plan be developed covering on going maintenance costs and potential revenue raising capabilities.

 

Outcome 5 - We care about our environment

 

2        Domestic Asbestos Disposal  

Waste and Community Protection Manager, Tracy Chalk introduced the report and invited Council’s Waste Education Officer, Sarah Callus to give a presentation.                                                   

PRC 24  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Maurice Girotto seconded Councillor Jackie Greenow OAM

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Domestic Asbestos Disposal  be received.

2.     The Waste & Community Protection Manager be authorised to proceed with the Western Sydney Residential Asbestos Disposal Trial in conjunction with the Environment Protection Authority and participating Western Sydney Regional Organisation of Councils.

 

Outcome 4 - We have safe, vibrant places

 

1        Trial Triangle Park Penrith, Mid Term Evaluation Report                                           

PRC 25  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Tricia Hitchen

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Trial Triangle Park Penrith, Mid Term Evaluation Report be received.

2.     The western end of the park remain closed to traffic.

3.     The eastern end of the park is to be reconfigured for the re-introduction of parking and use for special events.

4.     The trial period is extended until March 2015 and at that time a final evaluation report on the performance of the Trial Triangle Park be submitted to Council.

 

There being no further business the Chairperson declared the meeting closed the time being 8:11pm.

    



DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

  

Outcome 4 - We have safe, vibrant places

 

1        Renewable Burial Interment Rights                                                                                    1

 

2        Costs of Community Facilities                                                                                           5

 

3        Dunheved Business Park Revitalisation Strategy                                                            12

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


 

 

Outcome 1 - We can work close to home

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


 

 

Outcome 2 - We plan for our future growth

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


 

 

Outcome 3 - We can get around the City

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


Outcome 4 - We have safe, vibrant places

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

1        Renewable Burial Interment Rights                                                                                    1

 

2        Costs of Community Facilities                                                                                           5

 

3        Dunheved Business Park Revitalisation Strategy                                                            12

 

 

 

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                      30 June 2014

 

 

 

1

Renewable Burial Interment Rights   

 

Compiled by:               Lynda Lowe, Cemeteries Supervisor

Yvonne Perkins, Public Domain Amenity and Safety Manager

Authorised by:            Yvonne Perkins, Public Domain Amenity and Safety Manager 

Requested By:            Councillor Karen McKeown

 

Outcome

We have safe, vibrant places

Strategy

Improve our public spaces and places

Service Activity

Manage and maintain cemeteries under the care and control of Council using adopted Plans of Management

       

 

Executive Summary

The following information is provided in response to a request by Councillor Karen McKeown  at Council’s Ordinary Meeting of 25 November 2013, for information regarding Renewable Interment Rights in NSW and the implications for Penrith City Council.

 

The report discusses the three phased reform program to be undertaken by the NSW State Government including the introduction of the new Cemeteries and Crematoria Act 2013.

 

The report also discusses the sections of the new Act (Sections 47 & 48) that define the type and duration of interment rights including the option to not take up Renewable Burial Interment Rights.

The report recommends that the information contained in the report on Renewable Burial Interment Rights be received; Renewable tenure not be introduced at Cemeteries under the care and control of Penrith City Council; that a further report be provided on the Cemeteries and Crematoria Act 2013 in the second half of 2014 and that the Penrith Cemeteries Policy be reviewed and amended to reflect relevant legislation changes.

Background

In March 2012, the NSW Government approved a three (3) phased reform program concerning the management of cemeteries and crematoria on Crown, local government and private land in NSW. 

 

The NSW Department of Primary Industries, the body responsible for Cemeteries and Crematoria – NSW, advises the following information regarding the three (3) phased program of cemetery reform in NSW.

 

Phase 1 - The restructure of the Crown Cemetery sector.

 

As a result of this first phase of the program there are now four trust boards to manage crown cemeteries in the Sydney Greater Metropolitan Regions where there were formally 17.

 

The four trusts are Rookwood General Cemeteries Trust: Northern Metropolitan Cemeteries Trust: Southern Metropolitan Trust and the Catholic Metropolitan Trust.  As a result of this process there are now four major Crown Cemetery Trusts, led by professional boards, which manage cemeteries on crown land in the Sydney Greater Metropolitan Area.  These changes have led to more cost effective management, strengthened governance, increased transparency and more accountable financial and operational systems.

 

Separate to this, Local Government manages approximately half of all cemeteries in NSW and most of these are managed by relevant Councils under Section 48 of the Local Government Act 1993 including Penrith Cemeteries.

 

Phase 2 – Development of New Cemeteries Legislation

 

Phase two (2) was the development of new Cemeteries and Crematoria legislation passed in November 2013. The Cemeteries and Crematoria Act 2013 is the focus of the Government’s cemetery reforms.  The Act sets up a new body, Cemeteries and Crematoria – NSW, to oversee the management and operation of all cemeteries and crematoria in NSW and to secure the burial needs of communities across the state. The Department of Primary Industry advises that the new body, led by an independent board, has statutory functions and powers enabling it to work with the three cemetery sectors, Crown, Local Government and Private cemeteries, to find solutions to the pressing problem of diminishing cemetery space.

 

Cemeteries and Crematoria NSW will develop strong linkages with the NSW Planning system and establish benchmarks for cemetery space to ensure sufficient land is acquired and allocated so that current and future generations have equitable access to cemetery and crematoria services. Additionally, Cemeteries and Crematoria NSW will be responsible for ensuring that the interment practices and beliefs of all religious and cultural groups are respected and protected. 

 

Given the shortage of suitable land to establish new cemeteries, particularly in the Sydney Metropolitan Region, better use of existing cemetery space has been flagged as crucial  to addressing the issue of diminishing cemetery capacity. The Government’s key initiative in this regard is the implementation of a consistent industry wide approach to renewable interment rights.

 

 

Phase 3 – Implementation of the Cemeteries and Crematoria Act 2013.

 

It is proposed that the Cemeteries and Crematoria Act will be commenced in stages to ensure that thorough implementation plans can be developed prior to legislative requirements coming into force.

 

The first priorities will include the establishment of Cemeteries and Crematoria – NSW, including recruitment and employment of its statutory board and development of regulations and comprehensive implementation guidelines for renewable interment rights. This is discussed in more detail later in this report.

 

A consultative approach is to be maintained as the government moves to the next stage of these reforms and will seek industry and stakeholder views on the establishment of appropriate mechanisms for continuous engagement.

 

Sustainable Burial Practice

Sustainable burial practices, including Renewable Interment Rights were considered as part of the new Act.

 

Renewable interment involves the purchase of a right to inter human remains, and for those remains to be left undisturbed for an initial period of time, 25 years, up to 99 years, with the option of renewing the right for additional subsequent periods. If an interment right is not renewed, the interment site may be re-used after certain requirements within the Act have been met by the cemetery operator.

 

Preliminary advice received from Cemeteries and Crematoria NSW is that renewable interment burial rights will not be forced upon cemetery operators (Council).   It will be up to the individual cemetery operators to ascertain the benefit of introducing such a scheme and apply to the Cemeteries and Crematoria Board – NSW for the introduction of renewable interment rights in each cemetery.

 

Renewal Interment Rights

The Department of Primary Industries advise that:

 

“In NSW, renewable interment rights will be offered on a 99-year basis.  The Act sets out a series of rules and conditions for the operation of renewable rights, while providing sufficient flexibility for cemetery operators to market renewable rights competitively in a largely perpetual market.

 

Renewable interment rights will be offered on a consistent basis by Crown, local government and private cemeteries based on the important principles of choice and non-retrospectivity.

 

Perpetual interment will continue to be available, and there will be no impact on existing rights Under the Act and any existing right that was not granted for a fixed term will be taken to be a perpetual right. While renewable interment rights will be encouraged for new interment sites and in new cemeteries, they will not be allowed in cemetery portions where perpetual interment is required on religious or cultural grounds”.

 

The Cemeteries and Crematoria Act 2013 states:

 

Section 47: Types of Interment Right:

 

The cemetery operator (Council) may grant an interment right entitling the person or persons to whom it is granted the exclusive right of interment in a specified interment site:

(a)  in perpetuity (a "perpetual interment right" ), or

 

(b) for the period an interment right granted under Section 54 remains in force (a
"renewable interment right" ).

 

Section 48: - Duration of Interment Right: 

An interment right remains in force:

(a)  if it is a perpetual interment right - in perpetuity, and

 

(b)  if it is a renewal interment right -until the end of the period commencing on the day on which the interment right is granted and ending on the day the interment right expires under Section 54 (the "statutory renewal period").

 

 

 

 

Current Status of available new sites at Penrith City Council’s operational cemeteries

          Penrith General Cemetery

Lawn Sections

Monumental Sections  

(Catholic, Anglican, Greek, Independent, Salvation Army)

 

Note: There is further potential for additional burial spaces to be developed at Penrith General Cemetery in the future.

 

 

460

 

296

St Marys General Cemetery

Monumental Sections (Catholic & Anglican Only)     

 

 

 

68

Emu Plains General Cemetery

There are no new burial sites available.

 

 

Nil

 

Conclusion

Given the supply of burial plots available, particularly at Penrith General Cemetery, and the option to continue perpetual interment rights, it is considered that renewable tenure is not necessary in cemeteries under the care, control and management of Penrith City Council at this time.

 

Advice and further information in regard to regulating this new scheme is not anticipated to be provided by Cemeteries and Crematoria NSW until the second half of 2014. This will allow time for comprehensive guidelines to be developed and regulations to be prepared.

 

A further report will be provided to Council once more detailed information is available including other aspects of the new Act that may require new reporting requirements. For example, the Act states that a call may be made on cemetery operators to develop Plans of Management for cemeteries such as those prepared and adopted by Council in 2012.

 

The report will also include details regarding a review of the Penrith Cemeteries Policy including amendments to reflect relevant legislation changes.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Renewable Burial Interment Rights be received.

2.     Renewable tenure not be introduced at Cemeteries under the care and control of Penrith Cemeteries.

3.     A further report be provided on the Cemeteries and Crematoria Act 2013 in the second half of 2014.

4.     The Penrith Cemeteries Policy be reviewed and amended to reflect relevant legislative changes.

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                      30 June 2014

 

 

 

2

Costs of Community Facilities   

 

Compiled by:               Michael Jackson, Design and Projects Manager

Authorised by:            David Burns, Executive Manager - City Assets 

Requested By:            Councillor Mark Davies

 

Outcome

We have safe, vibrant places

Strategy

Improve our public spaces and places

Service Activity

Provide designs and plans for Council's parks, buildings, roads and drains

      

 

Executive Summary

On 24 February 2014, Councillor Mark Davies requested a report regarding the costs associated with Community facilities, justifying what may appear to be higher costs than are expected by the lay person or community group committee, particularly those needing to provide matching funds in grant applications.

 

The report which follows illustrates the construction methodologies required in a public building in comparison to accepted practice in standard residential construction.  Competitive tendering and independent Quantity Surveyor analysis have demonstrated that Council achieves a good commercial price for the buildings which it does construct, and due to the more robust design standards used, the ongoing maintenance costs associated with the buildings are much lower than would be expected if they were built to normal residential construction standards.

Background

Council buildings usually cost more than the community expect because they are far more likely to be vandalised than a domestic house which is the type of construction most lay-people are familiar with and that they use as a benchmark for their own cost expectations.  A council building must be designed to accommodate the worst which can be thrown at it as a building will be unattended throughout each night as it stands isolated in a park or playing field.  For this reason Council can’t use typical domestic grade construction. 

 

The interior of a council building is also not expected to be treated as politely as one would expect a domestic house to be treated.  Plasterboard on timber studwork is easily kicked and punched through, quickly destroying interior walls.  Council toilet pans and sinks unfortunately have to withstand people jumping on and kicking at them so the cost of suitably resilient fixtures is much higher than you would use in your home.  Council now has to protect all copper pipe work and electrical wiring inside secure enclosures as copper is increasingly being targeted for theft due to its scrap metal value.

 

In a domestic house, a simple aluminium framed window or hollow timber faced door in a timber frame is suitable to deter an opportunistic thief, but a Council building needs anchored steel frames and steel faced solid doors in order to withstand the attention they will receive from more determined vandals and thieves who arrive with sledge hammers, power tools and blow torches.  An anchored steel frame and door can cost more than 5 times a domestic exterior frame & door.  Canteen facilities have to meet commercial food hygiene standards, so a domestic grade kitchen cabinet and laminate bench top isn’t comparable. 

 

A domestic quality aluminium framed awning often can’t be used for shelter at your local field or be tacked onto the side of an existing building as Councils (and thus ratepayers) can be held financially liable if vandals hurt themselves while destroying or otherwise misusing the facility. Council architects and engineers must factor a gang of vandals into the design of each roof and awning which is something a domestic house roof or awning is not typically designed to support. 

 

These few examples have to be carried across every aspect of a Council building’s design and construction.  And each of these examples adds significantly to the cost of the facility.  Our community can’t afford to rebuild these facilities on a weekly or monthly basis, so Council has to construct them much tougher initially so as to reduce the ongoing costs associated with vandalism, which extends far beyond just nuisance graffiti.

 

One other valid comparison regarding domestic construction is that bathrooms and kitchens are acknowledged as the most expensive rooms within a domestic house.  The other home floor area is by comparison much cheaper to build, without waterproofing, tiling, cabinetry, and plumbing.  A council facility which is either all toilets or is a set of toilets with a kitchen attached, is in effect a collection of only the expensive parts of a domestic house.  Without any of the large and cheaper domestic rooms to reduce the average cost per m2 it needs to be recognised that even at domestic construction rates, a council building would be much more expensive per m2 than an entire house is.

Howell Oval Cricket Pavilion

The largest building project tendered in recent times has been the Howell Oval Cricket Pavilion.  A Function room, change rooms and indoor cricket training facility, twenty (20) tender submissions were received and reported to Council for award on 19 July 2010.  The tender prices ranged from $2,227,942.73 up to $5,011,188.18 ex GST.

 

It was noted that there was a considerable range in tender prices received (from just over $2mil up to $5mil) but there were two other prices within 3% of the awarded price, three additional firms within 10%, and two more within 12%, so the tendered price was deemed competitive and the $5mil price was assessed as unrealistic.  The project was awarded to the lowest priced tenderer who in this instance had also scored highest in the non-price evaluation criteria.

 

Total variations on the project were 7.2% of the contract sum, excluding additional scope that was forecast at the time of award.

 

Latent conditions accounted for 4.2% of the 7.2% variation total. The latent conditions were primarily asbestos concealed under the footings and slabs of existing buildings and geotechnical variations which required modifications to the design of supporting piles. These items could not be reasonably priced into the lump sum as thorough investigation was not possible prior to demolition.

 

Minor scope changes accounted for only 3% of the contract sum and included additional power points, alterations to glazing and roller shutters to better suit client needs and other design issues of a minor nature. 3% variation is well within industry expectation.

Recent Buildings

The majority of recent Council built facilities have been amenities buildings.  These are either stand alone “Toilet blocks” in parks and reserves or larger combined Toilet/Change, Storage and Canteen facilities located at sporting fields.

 

In January 2009 a number of Architectural Consultants where contacted to provide quotes for professional services to assist Council to develop a generic amenities template to be used for the Toilet Replacement programme and general Amenities rollout.  The intent of the template was to provide a generic design that could be repeated with minor adjustments depending on usage requirements and site conditions.

 

To date the following sites have utilised the template for new structures with minor adjustments to accommodate for usage requirements and site conditions.

 

Site

Usage requirements

Werrington Lakes, Werrington

1 x accessible, 2x unisex

Kokoda Park, St Mary’s

1 x accessible, 3 x unisex

Regatta park West, Emu Plains

1 x accessible, 2 x unisex, 1 x ambulant

 

The brief required the amenities to satisfy and include:

1)   Contemporary /unique design

2)   Sustainable with regards to water  and energy savings

3)   Fully accessible, including path and paved area surrounding where reasonable.

4)   Unisex, to assist in being parent and career friendly

5)   Flexible in design to suit demands, e.g.; cubicle design can be added onto as required.

6)   MLak locking system provided to accessible facilities

7)   Appropriately located and well lit

8)   Designed to satisfy Crime Prevention through Environmental Design Objectives.

 

There have been a number of other sites that have altered existing buildings and or used a derivative of the template. These sites include:

 

Site

Usage requirements

Type of

Weir Reserve, Emu Plains

 

1 x accessible,

1 male (3 cubicles),

1 female (3 cubicles)

Alterations and additions

Fowler, Wallacia

1 x accessible,

2 x unisex

Alterations and additions

Tench Reserve, Jamisontown

1 x accessible,

2x unisex, 1 x ambulant

New structure

Factory Road, Jamisontown

1 x accessible,

1 male (3 cubicles),

1 female (3 cubicles)

Alterations and additions

Leonay, Emu Plains

1 x accessible,

1 male (3 cubicles),

1 female (3 cubicles)

New structure

BMX , Blair Oval, St Marys

1 x accessible

1 x ambulant

2 x unisex

New structure

 

Penrith City Council Policies

A number of Council policies have been developed and their requirements have been incorporated into the generic design. These policies include:

 

Penrith Inclusion Plan – People with Disabilities CD 001

1.   Implement standard and clearer Signage

2.   Address lack of Accessible Toilets within the LGA

3.   Urinals within Accessible toilet

4.   Mlak keying system for accessible toilets - restrict use by non access impaired persons.

 

Building Policy - SP024

1.   Incorporate sustainability principles into the design, construction, refurbishment, and ongoing management of Council’s building assets to help ensure they are well designed.

2.   New and refurbished buildings optimise the use of environmentally appropriate materials in construction, and are made to be resource efficient by incorporating materials, fittings and appliances which minimise ongoing energy and water use.

3.   New building projects to incorporate universal design principles, elements that improve the comfort of the end user, generate cost savings, utilise the local economy

4.   Meet all mandatory criteria and at least 30% of the desirable criteria in Council’s Sustainable Building Design Checklist (Appendix 1).

Construction Cost

Tendered construction costs of these amenities are noted below:

 

Location

Toilet Footprint area(m2)

Rate per footprint

($  m2)

Site concrete surrounds

area (m2)

(estimate only)

Total  Building Cost

Total area

(m2)

Rate per total area

(m2)

New Structures

 

Werrington Lakes, Werrington

11

$9,027.27

27

($5,500)

$104,800.00

38

$2,757.89

Kokoda Park, St Mary’s

25

$4,169.96

31

($6,115)

$110,364.00

56

$1,970.79

Regatta park West, Emu Plains

25

$6,382.28

52

($9,580)

$169,137.00

77

$2,196.58

Leonay, Emu Plains

37

$4,513.59

40

($7,600)

$174,603.00

77

$2,267.57

East Lane,

St Marys

20

$8,268.30

56

($10,240)

$175,606.00

76

$2,310.61

Alterations and Additions

 

Weir Reserve, Emu Plains

45

$1,495.48

nil

$67,297.00

45

$1,495.49

Fowler, Wallacia

17

$3,771.41

20

($4,300)

$68,414.82

37

$1,849.05

Factory Road, Jamisontown

55.9

$2,771.41

nil

$132,990.00

55.9

$2,379.07

Note:

The following two amenities, BMX @ St Marys and Tench Reserve, have not been included in the analysis, either due to their deviation from the template and/or additional facilities that cannot clearly define the separation of works. 

Concrete  surrounds @ $165/m2 20MPa SL72  +  Strip footing/beam @$1,000 (nominal)

 

Based on the above tendered prices the average rate for :

-     New structure - toilet footprint only = $5,893.85/m2.

-     New structure total area = $2,267.01/m2.

-     Alterations and additions to existing structure = $2,428.60/m2.

Quantity Surveyor

A Quantity Surveyor had been engaged to prepare a number of pre-tender estimates. Estimates exclude consultant fees, building contingencies, GST.

 

Location

Estimated Construction Cost

Estimate

year

Actual Cost

Rate Total Area

(m2)

Construction

year

Kokoda

$113,300.00

2010

$110,364.00

$1,970.79

2011-2012

Fowler

$84,300.00

2011

$68,414.82

$1,849.05

2010-2011

Leonay

$160,600.00

2012

$174,603.00

$2,267.57

2013

 

Based on the Quantity Surveyor’s estimated prices the average rate for the total area for the new structure on these three projects is approximately $2,107.06/m2.  These three facilities were actually delivered for a marginally lower average rate of $2,078.72/m2.

Additional project costs

The total project cost includes the construction cost plus a number of additional fees including:

Architectural Consultant

Structural Engineer

Electrical Consultants

Hydraulic Consultants

Access consultant

 

Depending on the scale of the project these professional fees vary between 2 – 12% of construction cost, ex GST.  The identified projects have incurred approximately 8% on professional services fees ex GST.

 

Based on the standard template the cost for Professional fees is approximately $15,000 ex GST.  The Authority/approval fees may be required by authorities for various stages of the project.

 

These fees may include:       

Development Application Fees

Construction Certificate Fees

Authority Approval/Fees (Endeavour Energy, Sydney Water etc)

Principle Certifying Authority fees

 

These fees are generally dependent on the construction cost of the project.  Fees for these items may total $10,000.00 ex GST

 

Based on the typical size and complexity of the Council amenities built to date the total fees required for professional fees and additional services generally total $25,000 ex GST

Industry Standard Cost Guides.

The construction industry utilises a number of cost guides.  Rawlinson Australian Construction Handbook Edition 31, 2013 provides a cost guide for Recreational Buildings - Change rooms/Toilet Buildings (single storey, standard construction, basic finishes). Cost for Total Area = $2,595-$2,795/m2 ex GST.  This is above the pricing achieved in Council projects

Industry Alternatives

There are a number of industry alternatives that have been investigated. The following are examples of pre-fabricated amenities buildings which can be delivered to a prepared site:

 

Exeloo

Exeloo has been designing and manufacturing public toilet units for 19 years and have now produced over 900 units that are located across Australia, New Zealand, USA and Canada. Exeloo has a number of models ranging from basic to fully automated. Their service does not provide for the unit to be delivered, installation or crane hire. Their service also does not include installation of services, footing, nor approvals.

 

 

Landmark

Landmark Products were established in 1988, pioneering the manufacture in Australia of park shelters, restrooms, pedestrian bridges, and boardwalk structures engineered specifically for public use. Their park and urban products are used primarily by Government and Parks departments, developers, and Landscape Architects. Landmark has a number of models ranging for basic to fully automated.

 

Industry alternatives vary in the standard of finish which is reflective in the cost. The selection of unit would depend on the site and level of finish required to complement the surrounds, ie/ park or urban centre.  The most basic models for both Landmark & Exeloo have been used here for comparison purpose, and as is illustrated in the pictures below, a more aesthetically pleasing result can be achieved using the typical Amenities Template.

 

To make a true comparison a generic unit (1xaccessible, 1x ambulant, 1x unisex) was used. Taking the construction of the generic unit without site surrounds with a 25 sqm footprint the comparative pricing has indicated that the all up costs associated with both Exeloo and Landmark products would result in a cost difference of only +/-$5,000 ex GST in comparison to a Council designed and built facility.  A difference of this magnitude can be accounted for within tender pricing range and the alternatives all still require extensive site works for provision of slabs and services, so savings would be minimal if they are achieved at all on a case by case basis.

 

100_7592.jpg

Regatta Park West –

Typical Amenities template

Exeloo –

Jupiter model

 

It needs to be noted that the cost associated with site surrounds ie/ verandas, footpaths, linking car park and pedestrian links, are additional to the cost noted above and would vary with the site requirements. These costs are common to all and add to the total project cost.

Conclusion

The cost of Council facilities has been benchmarked favourably to accepted industry standards, by independent Quantity Surveyors and is also regularly tested via tender processes which all point to Council having achieved cost effective pricing for it’s facilities.  Industry alternative prefabricated buildings have also been benchmarked and even the most cost effective options remain directly comparable in price to the Council designed facilities.

 

Public perception of excessive cost is understandable when comparing to domestic brick veneer construction benchmarks, however a true comparison must take into account the impact of vandal proof designs and construction methods which must be applied due to facility location, and lack of overnight occupancy which make a Community facility/Council building much more vulnerable to concerted vandal attack than is allowed for in domestic construction.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the information contained in the report on Costs of Community Facilities be received.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                      30 June 2014

 

 

 

3

Dunheved Business Park Revitalisation Strategy   

 

Compiled by:               Tony Crichton, Senior Environmental Planner

Terry Agar, City Centres Co-ordinator

Authorised by:            Jeni Pollard, Place Manager  

 

Outcome

We have safe, vibrant places

Strategy

Grow and revitalise our centres and neighbourhoods

Service Activity

Work with the community to deliver priority infrastructure and activation projects in identified established areas of the City

      

 

Executive Summary

The Dunheved Business Park (DBP) is one of the major employment precincts within the Penrith LGA and plays a strategic role for business and employment growth in the City.  A alliance between Council and the Penrith Valley Chamber of Commerce was formed to improve the long viability of the DBP through the preparation of a Revitalisation Strategy.

The purpose of the Dunheved Business Park Revitalisation Strategy (the Strategy) is to provide a vision for Council, land owners, business owners, the community and service providers of how the DBP may be developed in the future.   The Strategy’s vision is proposed to be achieved through a range of supporting improvement programs for infrastructure and public domain assets.

The preparation of the Strategy involved wide ranging internal investigations into the state of the current infrastructure and public domain assets.  It was also informed by a survey of businesses on the state of the infrastructure and public domain.  The Strategy proposes infrastructure upgrades of the following assets:

·    roadworks and drainage improvements

·    signage for wayfinding and identity creation,

·    street lighting

·    street trees

·    electricity and telecommunications services

Allied to these proposed infrastructure improvements, will be Council’s continued improvement in the delivery of maintenance and community protection services such as rubbish removal, drain cleaning, road repairs, ranger patrols etc

Implementation of the strategy will take many years and will require additional funding over time. In the shorter term, it is proposed to utilise available recurrent funding within Council’s allocated works program to undertake more minor works.  Advocating to electricity and telecommunications authorities to improve their levels of service is a key action in the Strategy.  Over the medium to longer term, more complex or major works will be the subject of resource bids proposed to Council to secure funds for their implementation.  Opportunities for funding major works will also be pursued through State and Federal grants programs.

The DBP Revitalisation Strategy is based on research into the infrastructure and approach that are required to support and grow a diverse and dynamic place of enterprise.  The programs within the strategy respond to the practical needs of the DBP in a logical systematic way.  Over time the implementation of the Strategy will produce the improvements to the infrastructure and public domain that will result in more intense business activity, economic growth and more jobs.

This report recommends that the information contained in the report on Dunheved Business Park Revitalisation Strategy be received and that the Revitalisation Strategy is adopted as its policy for the ongoing improvement of the business park.

The report further recommends that Council continue to work with the Penrith Valley Chamber of Commerce and the Penrith Business Alliance on the revitalisation of Dunheved Business Park.

Introduction

The DBP is located immediately adjacent to the suburb of St Marys and the main Western Railway Line to Penrith and Sydney.  It is divided into Northern, Southern and Eastern precincts, as illustrated in Figure 1.

 

The draft Dunheved Business Park Revitalisation Strategy (“the Strategy”) has been prepared to guide the ongoing improvement of the infrastructure and public domain of the DBP by Council, service authorities, developers and existing businesses. The Strategy defines a future vision for the DBP and a set of objectives with a supporting framework of actions and investigations to achieve them. 

The initial impetus for revitalisation of DBP originated from discussions between Council and the Penrith Valley Chamber of Commerce (the Chamber) in mid 2009.  Council has demonstrated a long history of upgrades and maintenance in areas such as pavement and kerb and gutter.  However, Council and the Chamber both felt that is was appropriate to seek a comprehensive and strategic approach to revitalise the appearance, public domain and infrastructure of the DBP, with particular emphasis to be given to the North and South precincts.

DBP is one of the major employment precincts within Penrith City and plays a strategic role due to its high employment densities.  DBP has an area of approximately 290 hectares and according to ABS data, employs over 4300 people. Continuing improvements are deemed necessary to attract workers, developers and investors to this place to sustained it in the long-term.

DBP is well placed to take advantage of the future infrastructure expansion that will occur in the next few decades across Western Sydney. One of the drivers for this expansion will be the proposed development of the Badgerys Creek Airport site and the planned major road and rail expansion in this region.  DBP can take advantage of the manufacturing spin offs that will result from this development.

 

Partnership Approach

A partnership was formed with the PVCC to address concerns they had raised about the perceived under investment by all levels of government in the revitalisation of the DBP.  The agreed approach to the improvement of this significant employment area was to jointly prepare an infrastructure revitalisation strategy to methodically assess what needs to be done and how it should be done.  The draft Dunheved Business Park Infrastructure Revitalisation Strategy attached to this report has been prepared in consultation with the PVCC.

A first step in the preparation of the Strategy was a survey of businesses in the North and South Precincts. This survey was jointly funded by the PVCC and the Penrith Business Alliance who also expressed an interest in the results.  Consequently, a survey was undertaken by Council in conjunction with students from UWS. The results of this survey were reported to Council on 24 March 2014.

Together with other research undertaken by Council, the survey provided valuable user information that better informed the preparation of the Strategy.

Vision for Dunheved Business Park

In consultation with the PVCC a future vision for the long term development of the DBP was prepared to assist in providing direction for the preparation of the Strategy.  The vision stated in the Strategy is as follows:

As a major employment area for western Sydney, the Dunheved Business Park will be a sustainable, attractive and dynamic place of industrial enterprise that provides quality jobs, with easy access to its markets.

The vision enables all stakeholders in the DBP to understand what Council and partners are working together to achieve. 

 

Business Survey Key Issues

The results and analysis of the Business Survey (the Survey) were reported to Council on 28 April 2014.  The 211 businesses surveyed nominated following key issues that to be addressed:

·    stormwater drainage improvements

·    signage for way finding and identity

·    electricity supply reliability

·    telecommunications improvements 

·    public transport availability;

·    rubbish dumping

·    safety and security

·    street lighting improvements

·    streetscape improvements

·    additional road access to the northern precinct

 

The survey results and issues identified by the Survey have informed the preparation of this Strategy and the actions recommended by this report. 

 

image002.jpg

 

Figure 1: Dunheved Business Park and Precincts

 

Strategy Components

 

The Dunheved Business Park Revitalisation Strategy proposes a range of infrastructure and public domain improvements. These improvements are identified under a number of themes including:

·    Opportunities and priorities for the revitalisation and upgrade of Council-owned infrastructure

·    Priorities and strategies for revitalisation and upgrade of the public domain

·    Public utilities infrastructure

·    Determine other matters requiring investigation and a place management approach.

 

Not all elements of the DBP Revitalisation Strategy are funded, some elements require adjoining development to go ahead and others will require advocacy to other levels of government. Importantly it is also recognised that significant improvements to the amenity of the business park will be made through the efforts of the property owners and businesses themselves, through their own actions and presentation of their sites.

 

This Revitalisation Strategy is aspirational in approach, many elements will take years to achieve and require the partnership of other levels of government. Council has over many years made improvements to the area and these will continue. Further funding will be sought for a comprehensive ‘way finding’ system that will be developed as a component of the proposed Signage and Estate Entrance Plan.  A Streetscape Improvement Plan is also proposed.

 

The Dunheved Link Road and proposed rail corridor re-development is proposed to be funded by the subdivision and land sales generated by the signing of the draft Planning Agreement.

 

A summary of the key strategies proposed and why they are considered necessary for revitalisation is outlined below.

 

Dunheved Link Road and Rail Corridor

The Dunheved Link Road is a key priority for stimulating the expansion of the Dunheved Business Park and the establishment of new industrial areas on the former ADI site.  The Dunheved Link Road will provide a new direct access between the northern and southern precincts of the DBP.  It will ‘link’ DBP with the future ‘employment’ precincts now owned by Lend Lease (former ADI site) and will enhance the connectivity of both areas to their markets and help grow and sustain jobs.

A Deed of Agreement to facilitate the construction of the Link Road is programmed to be signed this year and the filling of the rail corridor to be completed by the end of 2015. 

 

Roadworks and Resealing

Council’s Roadworks and Resealing Program has overcome a previous backlog of road pavement and kerb works throughout the DBP.  This program will continue with preliminary proposals for work to be done at the following sites:

·    The sealing of roadside parking areas at three sites within Dunheved Circuit, Vallance Street and Power Street. 

·    Kerb and gutter works between Christie Street and Dunheved Circuit along the northern and western side of Links Road potentially to be carried out by developers

·    Footpath paving works to rectify “missing links” within DBP. 

Signage and Estate Entrance Plan

A detailed signage design for way finding and place identity will be prepared to improve navigation to and around the DBP. In general terms the signage design will be based on a hierarchy with entrance walls, lighting and landscaping at major entrances and directional signage at secondary entrances and within the business park. 

Streetscape Improvement

An upgrade to the streetscape and general appearance of the business park will help to enhance the image of the area and encourage new investment.  Street tree planting and landscaping is recognised as a key element in improving the appearance of DBP.  Attractive streetscapes are known to improve property values and encourage civic pride in an area.

 

Other matters

In addition to the four main actions outlined above, there are a number of issues that will require advocacy such power supply and internet issues. Other matters requiring investigation include public transport, dumping and security, parking on turfed footpath areas, and the longer term provision for a Business Park Centre Facility to service employees.

Conclusion

The draft Dunheved Business Park Revitalisation Strategy has been prepared to guide the ongoing improvement of its infrastructure and public domain. The DBP has a unique status as one of the major employment precincts within the Penrith LGA and plays a strategic role for business and employment growth in the City.  The Strategy describes a vision for the future of the place and a program of actions for all stakeholders to improve, it in partnership, in the long term.  Its adoption by Council will facilitate an integrated response to its ongoing improvement.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Dunheved Business Park Revitalisation Strategy be received

2.    Council adopt the Dunheved Business Park Revitalisation Strategy as its policy for the ongoing improvement of the place.

3.    Council continue to work with the Penrith Valley Chamber of Commerce and the Penrith Business Alliance on the revitalisation of Dunheved Business Park.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.  

Dunheved Business Park Revitalisation Strategy

16 Pages

Attachments Included

   


 

 

Outcome 5 - We care about our environment

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


 

 

Outcome 6 - We're healthy and share strong community spirit

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


 

 

Outcome 7 - We have confidence in our Council

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled



 

ATTACHMENTS   

 

 

Date of Meeting:     Monday 30 June 2014

Report Title:            Dunheved Business Park Revitalisation Strategy

Attachments:           Dunheved Business Park Revitalisation Strategy



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                      30 June 2014

Attachment 1 - Dunheved Business Park Revitalisation Strategy

 

BrandMark_POS_CMYK.eps

DBP Cover Image.JPGDunheved Business Park

Revitalisation Strategy

 

 

June 2014

 

 

Council_Mark_POS_CMYK.eps


 

Dunheved Business Park Revitalisation Strategy 

 

Executive Summary

The Dunheved Business Park (DBP) is one of the major employment precincts within Penrith and plays a strategic role for business and employment growth in the City.  It has an area of 290 hectares and employs over 4300 people. A partnership between Council and the Penrith Valley Chamber of Commerce (PVCC) was formed to improve the long-term viability of the DBP.  The first step in this partnership has been to prepare a strategy for improving infrastructure and the general presentation.

The purpose of this Strategy is to provide a vision for Council, land owners, business operators, the community and service providers of how the DBP may be developed in the future.  The Strategy proposes to achieve a vision for DBP as a sustainable and dynamic employment area through a range of supporting revitalisation programs for infrastructure and public domain assets.

The preparation of the Strategy involved wide ranging internal investigations into the state of the current infrastructure and public domain assets.  It was also informed by a survey in July 2013 of 211 businesses in the northern and southern precincts of the DBP seeking their opinions on a range of issues regarding the look and function of the business park.  The survey jointly funded by Council, PVCC and the Penrith Business Alliance (PBA) identified localised flooding, business park identity, electricity outages, telecommunications and security as key issues. To address these and other issues the Strategy proposes infrastructure upgrades of the following assets:

·    roads and drainage 

·    signage for wayfinding and indentity,

·    street lighting

·    street trees as well as

·    electricity and telecommunications services

Allied to these proposed infrastructure improvements, will be Council’s continued improvement in the delivery of maintenance and community protection services such as rubbish removal, drain cleaning, road repairs and responses to litter and illegal dumping. A place management approach is proposed, working with local partners such as the PVCC to bring property owners and business operators together to work collaboratively on improving the amenity of business park.

Implementation of the strategy will be over many years and will require additional funding over time. In the shorter term, it is proposed to utilise available recurrent funding within Council’s allocated works program to undertake more minor works. Advocating to electrical and telecommunications authorities to improve levels of service is a key action identified within the Revitalisation Strategy.  Over the medium to longer term, more complex or major works will be the subject of resourcing bids proposed to Council to secure funds for their implementation.  Opportunities for funding major works will also be pursued through State and Federal grants programs.

The DBP Revitalisation Strategy is based on research into the infrastructure and approach that are required to support and grow a diverse and dynamic place of enterprise.  The programs within the strategy respond to the practical needs of the DBP in a logical and systematic way.  Over time the implementation of the Strategy will produce the improvements to the infrastructure and public domain that will result in more intense business activity, economic growth and the provision of more jobs.

 

1. Vision for Dunheved Business Park

A future vision for the long-term development of the DBP has informed the preparation of this Strategy.  The vision enables all stakeholders in the DBP to understand what Council and partners are working together to achieve.

 

Dunheved Business Park Vision

 

As a major employment area for western Sydney, the Dunheved Business Park will be a sustainable, attractive and dynamic place of industrial enterprise that provides quality jobs, with easy access to its markets.

 

 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 


This vision will be achieved through the offer a small commercial core to facilitate business and provide employee services, as well as being highly accessible by road, public transport, bicycle and on foot. 

 

People will be attracted to invest and work in the business park by its standard of building and landscape design and the cleanliness and safety of its streets.  An ample supply of water, sewerage services, electricity, gas and telecommunications to contemporary standards will be immediately available to new and existing businesses.

 

Businesses will work collaboratively, supporting the vision by being aware of their own presentation and liaising with Council and the Chamber of Commerce to market and promote the DBP. Together with the provision of high quality street lighting, signage and entrance treatments, the business park will be known widely as a leading place of enterprise.

 

2. Background and Context for Strategy

 

The purpose of this Strategy is to provide a rationale for revitalisation of DBP infrastructure and public domain, a mechanism for how it will be achieved and an explanation of particular outcomes for delivery. The Strategy has been developed to attract new businesses to DBP as well as supporting those operators that are currently located in the area.

 

The land that much of Dunheved Business Park is situated on was first developed in 1941 as the St Marys Industrial Estate. Some of the infrastructure on the business park, particularly drainage and street patterns in the north and south precincts were developed at this time and have not been upgraded since.

 

Strategic Employment Context

 

The DBP is located immediately adjacent to the suburb of St Marys and the main Western Railway Line to Penrith and Sydney.  It is divided into Northern, Southern and Eastern precincts, as illustrated in Figure 1.

 

image002.jpg

Figure 1: Dunheved Business Park and Precincts

 

DBP is one of the major employment precincts within Penrith City and plays a strategic role due to its high employment densities.  DBP has an area of approximately 290 hectares and according to ABS data, employs over 4300 people.

 

Council is committed to ensuring the continued growth and viability of this important employment area by supporting a coordinated approach to infrastructure and public domain improvements.

 

DBP is well placed to take advantage of the future infrastructure expansion that will occur in the next few decades across Western Sydney. One of the drivers for this expansion will be the proposed development of the Badgerys Creek Airport site and the planned major road and rail expansion in this region.  DBP can take advantage of the manufacturing spin offs that will result from this development.

 

The initial impetus for revitalisation of DBP originated from discussions between Council and the Penrith Valley Chamber of Commerce (the Chamber) in mid 2009.  Council has demonstrated a long history of upgrades  and maintenance in areas such as pavement and kerb and gutter.  However Council and the Chamber both felt that is was appropriate to seeking a comprehensive and strategic approach to revitalise the appearance, public domain and infrastructure of the DBP with particular emphasis to be given to North and South precincts.

 

3. Dunheved Business Park Survey

Survey Background

 

An important step in the development of the DBP Revitalisation Strategy was a survey to produce a data base of business operators, gain a greater understanding of employment levels across the survey area and seek feedback on a range of Council and other services.

 

The survey area for this project was limited to the northern and southern precincts, as illustrated in Figure 1.  These areas were developed first and reflect a lower level of amenity. The survey demonstrated that approximately 3,000 people are employed in the north and south precincts which includes the undeveloped rail corridor lands (15 ha).  These two areas, with a total area of 244 ha have also been identified as the prime focus of the Dunheved Business Park Revitalisation Strategy.

 

The survey was carried out by students from the University of Western Sydney between March and July 2013 with a total of 211 businesses participating. A report on the DBP survey including a comprehensive analysis was presented to Council on 28 April 2014.

 

Survey Results

 

Initial land use investigations have showed that approximately 80% of DBP has been developed to date.  However, the survey has revealed that a significant number of properties are either vacant, used for storage or include a number unoccupied units.  This is demonstrated by data that indicates that the percentage of North DBP with ‘operating’ businesses (showing signs of active daytime employment) is 51.6%, for South DBP is 53.9% and overall for both North and South DBP is 52.7%. This reflects that there is significant latent employment potential across the DBP.  

 

The results of the survey of DBP provides project partners with an indication  ‘snapshot’ of the health of the place that will inform the development of this Strategy.


 

Key Issues Emerging from Businesses Survey

 

The survey raised the following key issues:

1.  Council-owned infrastructure – drainage, signage and street lighting;

2.  Public utilities infrastructure – power supply, telecommunications and internet and public transport;

3.  Streetscape appearance;

4.  Dumping and security issues and

5.  Entry points to DBP and the need for a second (northern) entrance to the estate.

 

The DBP Survey revealed that there are a number of infrastructure issues of concern to businesses that Council would be in the best position to address. This includes road pavement works, kerb and gutter works, path paving, street lighting, signage and estate entrance treatments, street tree planting and bus shelter infrastructure.

 

The survey not only provided substantial information on businesses, but also allowed officers to gain a better understanding and appreciation of issues and required actions necessary to revitalise DBP.  The results and issues identified by the survey have therefore significantly informed the preparation of the Dunheved Business Park Revitalisation Strategy. 

 

These issues are discussed in more detail in Appendix 1 to this report.  A map showing the location of streets within DBP appears at Figure 2.

 

 

  


 

4. Dunheved Business Park Revitalisation Strategy

Strategy Components

 

The Dunheved Business Park Revitalisation Strategy proposes a range of infrastructure and public domain improvements. These improvements are identified under a number of themes including:

·    Opportunities and priorities for the revitalisation and upgrade of Council-owned infrastructure

·    Priorities and strategies for revitalisation and upgrade of the public domain

·    Public utilities infrastructure

·    Determine other matters requiring investigation and a place management approach.

 

Not all elements of the DBP Revitalisation Strategy are funded, some elements require adjoining development to go ahead and others will require advocacy to other levels of government. Importantly it is also recognised that significant improvements to the amenity of the business park will be made through the efforts of the property owners and businesses themselves, through their own actions and presentation of their sites.

 

This Revitalisation Strategy is aspirational in approach, many elements will take years to achieve and require the partnership of other levels of government. Council has over many years made improvements to the area and these will continue. Further funding will be sought for a comprehensive ‘way finding’ system that will be developed as a component of the proposed Signage and Estate Entrance Plan.  A Streetscape Improvement Plan is also proposed.

 

The Dunheved Link Road and proposed rail corridor re-development is proposed to be funded by the subdivision and land sales generated by the signing of the draft Planning Agreement.

 

A summary of the key strategies proposed and why they are considered necessary for revitalisation is outlined below.

 

Dunheved Link Road and Rail Corridor

 

The Dunheved Link Road has been identified as a key priority for stimulating the expansion of DBP and the new industrial areas on the former ADI site.  The Dunheved Link Road will provide direct access between the northern and southern precincts of the business park.  It will ‘link’ DBP with the future ‘employment’ precincts owned by Lend Lease (former ADI site) and will enhance the viability of both areas and the ability of these estates to grow and sustain jobs.  It is proposed that a new, signalised 4-way intersection will be provided at the intersection of Christie Street and Lee Holm Road to connect with Links Road.

 

Council estimates that the Dunheved Link Road will cost in the order of $8 million, based on preliminary concept designs. The land is 66% owned by companies associated with Lend Lease and 34% owned by Penrith City Council.

Penrith City Council and Lend Lease commenced discussions in 2006 on the development of lands owned by both parties located within the disused rail corridor land located between Christie Street and Dunheved Circuit. 

On 8 November 2010, Council resolved to undertake negotiations with Lend Lease to enter into a Deed of Agreement to enable a funding mechanism for the delivery of the Dunheved Link Road and accordingly profits generated through joint land sales will be applied to the funding of the proposed Link Road.

The Chamber of Commerce, PBA, business operators and Councillors alike have long expressed a desire for an additional second entrance to the estate to be provided at Christie Street and Lee Holm Road.  One of the key issues that emerged from the survey was the need for a second northern entrance to the estate, both for access and safety reasons.

Investigations have commenced to identify opportunities for forward funding of the Link Road as it is nominated for delivery in Council’s Delivery Program 2013-2017.  Council has advocated for the State Government to accelerate construction of the Dunheved Link Road via a grant or an interest-free loan with repayments matched to land sales.  Council officers will continue to ensure that the Dunheved Link Road stays on the Government’s agenda.

Revitalisation of the DBP will be assisted through the filling, re-subdivision and development of Lend Lease corridor land with Council-owned land located between Christie Street and Dunheved Circuit.  It offers the opportunity in the medium term to expand the area of DBP by 15 ha to create a new development precinct with direct frontage to Christie Street.

The Plan proposes to facilitate the delivery of the new link road by preparing a business case which would examine the costs and socio-economic benefits of the project and, in particular, estimates the economic multiplier effects resulting from the project.

It is currently anticipated that the Deed of Agreement will be signed this year and the filling of the rail corridor to be completed by the end of 2015.  The next steps in this project are as follows:

§ Finalise design of signalised intersection with RMS and Lend Lease at Christie Street, Links Road and Lee Holm Road;

§ Finalise and sign Deed of Agreement (Planning Agreement);

§ Fill and subdivide rail corridor lands;

§ Market and sell land;

§ Construct link road.

It is proposed that this work will be funded by the sale of jointly owned lands.

Roadworks and Resealing

 

Road condition and repair are important issues within areas such as DBP with many heavy traffic movements per day. The loads on the roads within and surrounding the area are significant and careful attention is required to ensure that surfaces do not fail and lead to damage of plant and transported materials.

 

Council’s Roadworks and Resealing Program has resulted in the road pavements within DBP being regularly upgraded over the past 40 years. Since investigations commenced in DBP in November 2009, Council’s City Works Department has re-sheeted all remaining roads within DBP so that all 21 roads are now considered to be in good condition.  In addition, Council has completed kerb and gutter works along the northern side of Links Road west to Dunheved Circuit and in the northern end of Vallance Street.  Council has also repaired and re-sheeted roadside parking areas along Power Street between Anne Street and Bent Street.

Figure 2.JPG

Figure 2 

Street Map – Dunheved Business Park

 

This Plan proposes the completion of remaining works:

§ The sealing of roadside parking areas at three sites within Dunheved Circuit, Vallance Street and Power Street.  It is proposed that this is to be funded by the City Works Program over subsequent years,

§ Kerb and gutter works between Christie Street and Dunheved Circuit along the northern and western side of Links Road to be carried out by the developer Lend Lease at the time of construction of the proposed Dunheved Link Road,

§ Footpath paving works are proposed at various identified sites identified by the strategy to connect “missing links” within DBP.  The completion of the remainder of the sites is yet to be fully programmed, as this will be a long-term objective.

These proposed works, along with ongoing timely responses to road maintenance issues will support the revitalisation of the business park.

Signage and Estate Entrance

 

One of the key findings identified in the report on the DBP survey has been the need for identifiable entrances to the business park, with attractive landscaped entrance statements.  In addition to this is the requirement for a second northern entrance to DBP. This approach has been confirmed by feedback to the Chamber.

The Revitalisation Strategy proposes the following work:

§ Installation of new signage to identify entrances to the business park

§ Design and construction of entrance treatments including entrance walls, lighting, landscaping including public art identifying the name of the business park and the four major entrances to DBP.  These sites are located at

-    Christie Street (at the bridge crossing over South/Wianamatta Creek),

-    Forrester Road & Links Road,

-    Christie Street & Lee Holm Road and finally at the proposed future intersection at

-    Christie Street & Links Road – refer to Figure 2 for street map.

·    Installation of signage at two locations

-    Forrester Road & Wordoo Street and

-    Christie Street & Power Street.

This work will require the appointment of a suitably qualified consultant with graphic design experience, enabling detailed cost estimate for future resource bids.

 

Streetscape Improvement

 

Feedback from property owners and businesses through the survey have indicated that an upgrade to the streetscape and general appearance of the business park would enhance the image of the area and encourage new investment.  Street tree planting and well maintained landscaping is recognised as a key element in improving the appearance of DBP.

This Revitalisation Strategy proposes a number of elements that support public domain enhancement including:

§ A selective and staged program of street tree-planting and landscaping that will target the most suitable locations and streets within DBP to establish more presentable streetscapes, within this program Christie Street to be identified as a ‘presentation street’,

§ Tree-planting along the major loop roads within DBP (Links Road, Dunheved Circuit, Lee Holm Road and Power Street).

These works will be the subject of a detailed design and budget proposal that would be further considered by Council.

 

Other Matters for Investigation and Recommended Actions

In addition to the four priority issues outlined above, it is also proposed that a number of other matters are further investigated or referred to other agencies for resolution.

 

The DBP Survey of Businesses identifies three key issues of concern for business and property owners. A number of other matters have also been identified either through discussion with the Chamber or by Council.

 

Drainage Investigation

A primary issue raised concerning Council owned infrastructure is drainage. The drainage network is prone to localised flooding problems and drainage failures during periods of intense or prolonged rain. The drainage network was constructed in the 1940s, explaining the limitations of the current system.

 

Although a major drainage upgrade of the northern and southern precincts would be desirable, it would require significant funding. Council currently prioritises flood studies in residential and commercial areas ahead of industrial areas due to the lower risk profile of industrial areas.

 

As funds become available an audit of existing drainage infrastructure in DBP would contribute to Council’s overall strategy for flood studies within the LGA.

 

Power Supply

Power supply blackouts and fluctuations have been identified as a key concern for local businesses for reasons of loss of operating time and inconvenience.  Power surges cause damage to machinery and computers, resulting in down time for businesses.  Many surveyed felt there was a need for power supply authorities (Endeavour Energy) to better inform businesses during power outages so that operators can make informed decisions about when power will be re-established to sites.

 

Potential loss of business time is an impediment to attracting new operators to the area and it is proposed to actively engage with the energy supply company to address concerns of businesses and support an interim communication strategy.

 

Telecommunications and Internet  

Many of the businesses within the DBP have identified significant level of dissatisfaction with phone and Internet services. Typical issues include complete loss of phone service, noise on the line, intermittent loss of internet connection coupled with slow internet speeds and limited telephone, mobile and internet service in some areas. 

 

This issue will require advocacy with Telstra and appropriate service providers to raise awareness of the concerns and seek a resolution.

 

Public Transport

DBP is currently not well served by public transport, impacting on employment options particularly for younger people. Currently the most frequently used form of transport for work related journeys are by private vehicle. This limits options for people who are reliant on public transport; it also results in many businesses having inadequate provision for car parking with many private vehicles spilling onto the road network or footpath network.

 

Enhanced bus servicing of the business park is the most likely option for improving public transport. The first step is to promote existing bus services to businesses within the area to ensure that they are aware of options for employees. Further to this an investigation into the existing and future demand for bus stops and shelters along Christie Street and Forrester Road is required.

 

Dumping and Security Issues

A number of operators have identified that litter and illegal dumping in the business park contributes to a poor overall amenity. Council has a Litter Management Strategy that applies to all areas of the city.  In DBP a street-sweeper service operates twice per week and a litter pick-up and dumping patrols operate monthly.

 

Businesses require further information and support to understand the importance of reporting illegal dumping quickly, rather than waiting for the dumping patrol, to reduce the impact on the business park. 

 

Unauthorised Parking on Council Footpaths

Parking on footpaths has become a chronic problem on some sites, leading to damage to the footpath network and creating a barrier and safety issue to pedestrians. Anecdotal information supports that the most incidents occur where approved on-site parking areas are used as storage or where particular land uses such as smash repair stations are operating.

 

This issue will be identified to business operators and resolved prior to any street- tree planting programs being initiated.

 

Business Park Centre Facility

An opportunity exists for a centrally-located Business Park Centre Facility to be established on Council-owned land on Christie Street adjacent to the existing footbridge. This facility could potentially include a conference and training facility, convenience store, post office and café/paved meeting place to service the daily needs of local employees.

 

Council will investigate the business case and commercial feasibility of establishing a Business Park Centre Facility or ‘hub’ to service the daily needs of employees on centrally-located Council-owned land fronting Christie Street. This facility would be located to take advantage of existing bus and pedestrian routes. 

 

Truck Parking

Truck parking on streets or vacant land is a chronic issue in DBP. Unauthorised truck and car parking adjacent to Dunheved Circuit occurs frequently and has resulted in significant damage to the reserve near Kommer Place. Workers from nearby factories in lunch breaks also use this reserve.  This requires further investigation now for the possible installation of bollards to prevent unauthorised parking and damage.

 

The provision of a sealed truck parking facility has been raised by a number of business owners within the DBP. This issue requires further investigation including detailed costing.

 

Special Development Projects

Many of the issues raised regarding the amenity of the DBP could be addressed through greater cooperation between business operators. The overall ‘poorly kept’ appearance could be improved through businesses themselves taking greater care in the maintenance of their buildings and surrounds.

 

The DBP will benefit from a greater place management approach, bringing land owners and businesses together to share information and assess their willingness to participate in the revitalisation process.

5. Conclusion

The Dunheved Business Park (DBP) is one of the major employment precincts within Penrith and plays a strategic role for business and employment growth in the City.  The purpose of this Strategy is to provide a vision for Council, land owners, business operators, the community and service providers of how the DBP may be developed in the future.  The Strategy proposes to achieve a vision for DBP as a sustainable and dynamic employment area through a range of supporting revitalisation programs for infrastructure and public domain assets.

 

The Strategy seeks to enhance the streetscape and general appearance of the public domain with the aim to support businesses already located within the business park as well as attracting new development and investment.  Other issues of importance to businesses as identified during a recent survey have been incorporated into the Strategy, including a number of advocacy issues that relate to State and Federal government and utilities providers. 

 

Penrith City Council has undertaken considerable works across DBP with all roads having been resheeted in recent years and considered in good condition. Lighting upgrades have been completed and a number of clean ups organised.  The Revitalisation Strategy builds on these works and the recently completed business survey to bring a coordinated approach to future works and activities.

 

The Penrith Valley Chamber of Commerce has expressed an interest in partnering on future activities within the DBP. The ongoing engagement of business and property owners will be a key consideration in the enhancement and marketing of the park as a sustainable, attractive and dynamic place.


 

Appendix 1

Key Issues Emerging from Businesses Survey

 

The business community nominated five key issues emerging from the survey to be addressed and these are summarised below:

1.   Council-owned infrastructure – drainage, signage and street lighting;

2.   Public utilities infrastructure – power supply, telecommunications and internet and public transport;

3.   Streetscape appearance;

4.   Dumping and security issues and

5.   Entry points to DBP and the need for a second (northern) entrance to the estate.

 

The DBP Survey revealed that the category of infrastructure that Council would be in the best position to address would be those matters under its direct control.  This includes road pavement works, kerb and gutter works, path paving, street lighting, signage and estate entrance treatments, street tree planting and bus shelter infrastructure.

The results and issues identified by the survey have informed the preparation of the Dunheved Business Park Revitalisation Strategy and the actions recommended by this report. 

These issues raised by businesses are summarised below.

 

Council-Owned Infrastructure

Drainage

The primary issue raised concerning Council owned infrastructure is localised flooding problems and drainage failures which can be explained by the limitations of the original drainage network which was constructed in the 1940s.  Although a major drainage upgrade of the northern and southern precincts would be desirable, it would require significant funding from State or Federal Governments, which is presently not available. Furthermore, Council prioritises flood studies in residential and commercial areas ahead of industrial areas due to the lower risk profile of industrial areas.

Any audit of existing drainage infrastructure in DBP must form part of the prioritised drainage works and Council’s overall strategy for flood studies within the LGA.

Signage

Businesses have requested a major upgrade to signage within the business park that clearly indicates the locations of North and South DBP and the access points for these two precincts. 

We recognise that an upgrade to signage and estate entry points within the business park is required to provide for readily identifiable estate entrances with landscaped entrance statements.  A strategy has been prepared to address this issue.

Street Lighting

The third ranked issue for business operators concerning Council infrastructure is street lighting.  Council has now completed street lighting upgrades to a P4 lighting standard for the entire estate including intersections along Christie Street.

Other Issues

The Survey also uncovered some other more minor issues to be addressed including road upgrades, on-street parking, speeding, truck parking.  Council has addressed the first and last issues and the others are addressed in the Survey report.

 

Public Utilities Infrastructure

Power Supply

Power supply blackouts and fluctuations have been identified as the most frequently raised concern by local businesses for reasons of loss of operating time and inconvenience.  Power surges have caused damage to machinery and computers and down time in businesses.  Many surveyed felt there was a need for power supply authorities (Endeavour Energy) to better inform businesses during power outages so that businesses can make informed decisions about when power will be re-established to sites.

Telecommunications and internet

Dissatisfaction with phone and internet was the second most frequently raised issue in relation to utilities.  Typical issues include loss of phone line, noise on the line, loss of internet connection and slow internet speeds and there is limited telephone, mobile and internet service in some areas of the estate. 

Public transport

The third most important issue raised by businesses in relation to State Government services was the lack of public transport especially buses at peak hour and has been identified as an issue for young employees who do not drive.  There is a need to investigate the demand for public transport and options for improving access to public transport and publicising these services to current employees.

Streetscape Improvements

Some survey responses indicated that an upgrade to the streetscape and general appearance of the business park would help to enhance the image of the area and encourage new investment.  This upgrade includes both public domain and private domain where there is a role for both Council and private property owners.  

Survey comments indicate that maintenance of the public domain should includes litter reduction, tree-planting, maintenance of kerb and gutter, footpaths and other infrastructure, maintenance of mown Council nature-strips (footpath areas) and construction of additional Council footpaths. 

Two major Council clean-ups in recent years have signalled Council’s commitment to enhancing the appearance of DBP and the business community has also shown a heightened awareness of the need to mow and remove litter from the footpath areas adjacent to their individual properties.

 

Dumping and security issues

Illegal Dumping

Illegal dumping of rubbish at night is a problem common to the whole of DBP that needs to be managed consistently. 

Security

Business owners, especially those in quieter streets, advised survey staff that break-ins, theft and street racing were a concern.  A multi-pronged approach needs to be adopted to address this problem which may include additional upgraded lighting, weekend police patrols and possibly installation of CCTV could improve security.

Estate Entry Points and Second (Northern) Estate Entrance

One of the key findings of the Survey were requests for identifiable estate entrances with attractive landscaped entrance statements.  There was also strong support for an additional (northern) entrance to the estate.

Estate Entry Points

The main entry to the north side of DBP at Forrester Road and Links Road is very unsightly and respondents suggested that this could benefit from an upgrade.  It was suggested by survey respondents that this entry requires the name, a business directory board and a substantial landscaped entrance statement.

Second (Northern) Estate Entrance

Businesses surveyed indicated that an additional (second) entrance to the northern end of the business park would be of substantial benefit as traffic becomes a problem particularly in the afternoon peak.  Businesses suggested that the construction of a new of a new link road between north and south is a good way to achieve this, but point out that the footbridge or alternative pedestrian/cycleway link should remain as it is used by many employees.

The survey results and issues identified by the Survey have informed the preparation of the Dunheved Business Park Revitalisation Strategy and the actions recommended by this report.