3 September 2014

 

Dear Councillor,

In pursuance of the provisions of the Local Government Act, 1993 and the Regulations thereunder, notice is hereby given that a POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING of Penrith City Council is to be held in the Passadena Room, Civic Centre, 601 High Street, Penrith on Monday 8 September 2014 at 7:00PM.

Attention is directed to the statement accompanying this notice of the business proposed to be transacted at the meeting.

Yours faithfully

 

 

Alan Stoneham

General Manager

 

BUSINESS

 

1.           LEAVE OF ABSENCE

 

2.           APOLOGIES

 

3.           CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES

Policy Review Committee Meeting - 11 August 2014.

 

4.           DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

Pecuniary Interest (The Act requires Councillors who declare a pecuniary interest in an item to leave the meeting during discussion of that item)

Non-Pecuniary Conflict of Interest – Significant and Less than Significant (The Code of Conduct requires Councillors who declare a significant non-pecuniary conflict of interest in an item to leave the meeting during discussion of that item)

 

5.           ADDRESSING THE MEETING

 

6.           MAYORAL MINUTES

 

7.           NOTICES OF MOTION TO RESCIND A RESOLUTION

 

8.           NOTICES OF MOTION

 

9.           DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

10.         REQUESTS FOR REPORTS AND MEMORANDUMS

 

11.         URGENT BUSINESS

 

12.         CONFIDENTIAL BUSINESS


POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING

 

Monday 8 September 2014

 

table of contents

 

 

 

 

 

 

meeting calendar

 

 

confirmation of minutes

 

 

DELIVERY program reports

 


Council_Mark_POS_RGB2014 MEETING CALENDAR

January 2014 - December 2014

(adopted by Council on 25/11/13 and amended by Council on 26/5/14)

 

 

 

TIME

JAN

FEB

MAR

APRIL

MAY

JUNE

JULY

AUG

SEPT

OCT

NOV

DEC

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

 

Ordinary Council Meeting

7.30pm

 

3

10&

 

 

 

 

 

 

22^ü

(7.00pm)

 

 

15

(7.00pm)

 

24@

24

28v

26#

23 *

28

25@

29

27

24#+

 

Policy Review Committee

7.00pm

 

 

 

14

12

30

14

11

8

13

10

8

 

10

10

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 v

Meeting at which the draft corporate planning documents (Delivery Program and Operational Plan) are endorsed for exhibition

 *

Meeting at which the draft corporate planning documents (Delivery Program and Operational Plan) are adopted

 #

Meetings at which the Operational Plan quarterly reviews (March and September) are presented

 @

Meetings at which the Delivery Program progress reports (including the Operational Plan quarterly reviews for December and June) are presented

 ^

Election of Mayor/Deputy Mayor

 ü

Meeting at which the 2013-2014 Annual Statements are presented

 

Meeting at which any comments on the 2013-2014 Annual Statements are presented

 +

Meeting at which the Annual Report is presented

&

Extraordinary Meeting

-            Extraordinary Meetings are held as required.

-            Members of the public are invited to observe meetings of the Council (Ordinary and Policy Review Committee).

Should you wish to address Council, please contact the Senior Governance Officer, Glenn Schuil.

 


UNCONFIRMED MINUTES

 OF THE POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING OF PENRITH CITY COUNCIL HELD IN THE PASSADENA ROOM, PENRITH

ON MONDAY 11 AUGUST 2014 AT 7:03PM

PRESENT

His Worship the Mayor, Councillor Ross Fowler OAM, Deputy Mayor, Councillor Jim Aitken OAM and Councillors Bernard Bratusa, Prue Car, Kevin Crameri OAM, Marcus Cornish, Mark Davies, Maurice Girotto, Ben Goldfinch, Jackie Greenow OAM (arrived 7:04pm), Tricia Hitchen, Karen McKeown, John Thain and Michelle Tormey (arrived 7:04pm).

 

LEAVE OF ABSENCE

Leave of Absence was previously granted to Councillor Greg Davies for 11 August 2014.

APOLOGIES

There were no apologies.

 

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES - Policy Review Committee Meeting – 30 June 2014

PRC 39  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Marcus Cornish seconded Councillor Prue Car that the minutes of the Policy Review Committee Meeting of 30 June 2014 be confirmed.

 

Councillors Jackie Greenow OAM and Michelle Tormey arrived at the meeting, the time being 7:04pm. 

 

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES - Policy Review Committee Meeting - 14 July 2014

PRC 40  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Tricia  Hitchen seconded Councillor Maurice Girotto that the minutes of the Policy Review Committee Meeting of 14 July 2014 be confirmed.

 

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

 

There were no declarations of interest.

 

Councillor Prue Car left the meeting, the time being 7:04pm.

 

DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Outcome 1 - We can work close to home

 

1        International Relations Visit - May 2014

Councillor Prue Car returned to the meeting, the time being 7:08pm.

Assistant General Manager, Barry Husking introduced the Report and outlined some of the key highlights from the recent visit.                                                                                                     

PRC 41  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Mark Davies seconded Councillor Marcus Cornish that the information contained in the report on International Relations Visit - May 2014 be received.

 

 


 

Outcome 4 - We have safe, vibrant places

 

2        Our River Plan of Management and Riparian Vegetation Management Plan

Design and Projects Manager, Michael Jackson introduced the report and gave a presentation.        

PRC 42  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Mark Davies seconded Councillor Jim Aitken OAM

That:

1.   The information contained in the report on Our River Plan of Management and Riparian Vegetation Management Plan be received.

2.   The Draft Nepean River “Our River” Plan of Management for Tench Reserve, River Road Reserve and Weir Reserve be endorsed for Public Exhibition.

 

3.   The Draft Nepean River “Our River” Riparian Vegetation Management Plan be endorsed for Public Exhibition.

 

 

Outcome 6 - We're healthy and share strong community spirit

 

3        ClubGRANT Category 3 - Jamison Park Development - Funding Agreement          

PRC 43  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM seconded Councillor Mark Davies

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on ClubGRANT Category 3 - Jamison Park Development - Funding Agreement be received

2.     Council enter into a funding agreement with NSW Government Department of Trade and Investment, Regional Infrastructure and Services for the sum of $934,901 for the purpose of upgrades to Jamison Park, including:

- An all age and ability activity zone

- A new children’s playground

- Sport field upgrades

- Floodlight installation

- Amenity building upgrades/extensions

3.       A further allocation of $601,531from the District Open Space Contributions             Plan be made to this project.

4.       A letter of thanks is sent to the Minister for Hospitality, Gaming and Racing,            Troy Grant MP, for the grant allocation of $934,901 from NSW                                       Government Department of Trade and Investment, Regional Infrastructure                  and Services – ClubGRANTS Fund Category 3.

 

 


 

4        Allocation for the Use of New Sportsgrounds                                                              

PRC 44  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Jim Aitken OAM seconded Councillor Bernard Bratusa

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Allocation for the Use of New Sportsgrounds be received.

2.     Council endorse the Expression of Interest process as detailed in this report for the allocation of new sports grounds.

 

 

5        Lease Arrangements - Nepean District Tennis Association, Penrith Cricket Club, Penrith Rugby Union Football Club                                                                                             

PRC 45  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Bernard Bratusa seconded Councillor Jim Aitken OAM

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Lease Arrangements - Nepean District Tennis Association, Penrith Cricket Club, Penrith Rugby Union Football Club be received

2.     A revised agreement of use for Woodriff Gardens is finalised between Nepean District Tennis Association and Penrith City Council.

3.     The draft licence for use of Andrews Road sportsground by Penrith Rugby Union Football Club is advertised in accordance with the terms of s47a of the Local Government Act 1993 with a further report to be presented to Council.

4.     A licence agreement for use of Howell Oval is finalised with Penrith Cricket Club with a further report to be presented to Council.

5.     A further report be presented to Council on arrangements with Nepean District Tennis Association with respect to future licence and maintenance agreements.

 

6        St Marys Tennis Courts Maintenance and Management                                             

PRC 46  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Prue Car seconded Councillor Bernard Bratusa

That:

1.      The information contained in the report on St Marys Tennis Courts          Maintenance and Management and Management be received.

2.      A report be presented to Council detailing the directions and future plans for the St Marys Tennis Courts.

 

 


URGENT BUSINESS

 

UB 1           Leave of  Absence Request                                                                                    

Councillor Mark Davies requested leave of absence for the period 10 October 2014 to 10 November 2014 inclusive.   

PRC 47  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Marcus Cornish seconded Councillor Jackie Greenow OAM that the matter be brought forward as a matter of urgency.

 

His Worship the Mayor, Councillor Ross Fowler OAM, ruled that the matter was urgent and

should be dealt with at the meeting.

 

PRC 48  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Marcus Cornish seconded Councillor Jackie Greenow OAM that leave of absence be granted to Councillor Mark Davies for the period 10 October 2014 to 10 November 2014 inclusive.

 

 

UB 2           Leave of Absence Request                                                                                     

Councillor Ross Fowler OAM requested leave of absence for the period 14 August 2014 to 24 August 2014 inclusive.

PRC 49  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Jackie Greenow OAM seconded Councillor Karen McKeown that the matter be brought forward as a matter of urgency.

 

His Worship the Mayor, Councillor Ross Fowler OAM, ruled that the matter was urgent and

should be dealt with at the meeting.

 

PRC 50  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Jackie Greenow OAM seconded Councillor Karen McKeown that leave of absence be granted to Councillor Ross Fowler OAM for the period 14 August 2014 to 24 August 2014 inclusive.

 

There being no further business the Chairperson declared the meeting closed the time being 7:46pm.

    


DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

 

Outcome 2 - We plan for our future growth

 

1        Draft Penrith Development Control Plan 2014    

Procedural note: Section 375A of the Local Government Act 1993 requires that a division be called in relation to this matter.                                                                                 1

 

2        Heritage Program Update                                                                                                11

 

 

Outcome 4 - We have safe, vibrant places

 

3        Penrith CBD Corporation Business Plan 2014-15                                                           25

 

4        Neighbourhood Renewal Program - Cambridge Park and Cranebrook Neighbourhood Action Plans                                                                                                                                 30

 

5        South Creek Historic Park Proposal                                                                                45

 

 

 

Outcome 7 - We have confidence in our Council

 

6        2013-14 Year in Review                                                                                                   55

 

 


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


 

 

Outcome 1 - We can work close to home

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


Outcome 2 - We plan for our future growth

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

1        Draft Penrith Development Control Plan 2014  

Procedural note: Section 375A of the Local Government Act 1993 requires that a division be called in relation to this matter.                                                                                 1

 

2        Heritage Program Update                                                                                                11

 

 

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                             8 September 2014

 

 

 

1

Draft Penrith Development Control Plan 2014   

 

Compiled by:               Abdul Cheema, City Planning Coordinator 

Authorised by:            Paul Grimson, City Planning Manager  

 

Outcome

We plan for our future growth

Strategy

Protect the City's natural areas, heritage and character

Service Activity

Maintain a contemporary framework of land use and contribution policies, strategies and statutory plans

     

Procedural note: Section 375A of the Local Government Act 1993 requires that a division be called in relation to this matter.

 

Executive Summary

Currently, Penrith Development Control Plan (DCP) 2006 generally applies across the urban areas of the City while Penrith DCP 2010 applies across the rural areas, industrial areas and St Marys Town Centre.

 

Council officers have consolidated both of these DCPs, so that one DCP will support Penrith LEP 2010 Amendment 4 (the City-wide Plan) once it is gazetted. This process has required necessary updates to ensure consistency and also to reflect current policy and legislative changes. Furthermore new sections are required to support the special precincts (Penrith Health and Education Precinct and Riverlink Precinct) and certain provisions need to be removed from current LEPs and placed into DCPs to satisfy the requirements of the Standard LEP Template.

 

It is recommended that the Draft Penrith Development Control Plan 2014 be publicly exhibited, in accordance with the relevant provisions of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act, 1979 and associated Regulations. A further report will be presented to Council following the public exhibition.   

Background

Since 2005 Council has been preparing a single, City-wide Local Environmental Plan (the City-wide Plan). The process has been split into two stages.  Stage 1 of the City-wide Plan was completed in 2010 and was published as Penrith Local Environmental Plan 2010 (LEP 2010).  LEP 2010 sets the planning controls for Penrith’s rural and industrial areas and St Marys Town Centre. Stage 2 of the City-wide Plan was adopted by Council at its Ordinary meetings of 25 November 2013, 16 December 2013 and 28 April 2014 and forwarded to the Department of Planning and Environment (DoPE) for the Minister to make the Plan. Stage 2 of the City-wide Plan contains planning controls for Penrith’s urban areas, including the Penrith City Centre and Penrith’s smaller commercial centres. Stage 2 of the City-wide Plan is being progressed as an amendment to the LEP 2010 and will be known as Penrith LEP 2010 Amendment 4.

 

Development Control Plans (DCP) are documents that support the LEP with more detailed planning and design guidelines. In 2005, the State Government introduced an amendment to the Environmental Planning and Assessment (EP&A) Act which limited, to one, the number of Development Control Plans that could apply to any single block of land.  This was intended to make it easier for users to determine the controls applying to development on any individual property. 

 

Although there was no limit placed on the overall number of DCPs a council could adopt, it was generally expected that there would be one primary DCP for a local government area, to complement the requirement for a single LEP. Council complied with this requirement in August 2006, when it adopted Penrith DCP 2006. Later Council adopted Penrith Development Control Plan 2010 to complement Penrith Local Environmental Plan 2010 (Stage 1). 

Discussion

Penrith Development Control Plan (DCP) 2006 generally applies across the urban areas of the City while Penrith DCP 2010 applies across the rural areas, industrial areas and St Marys Town Centre. There are some other stand alone DCPs such as the Penrith City Centre Development Control Plan 2007 and Werrington Mixed-Use Area Development Control Plan that apply to specific areas.

 

When Penrith LEP 2010 Amendment 4 comes into force, Penrith DCP 2006 in most cases will no longer apply to the urban areas. However Penrith DCP 2010 will still continue to apply to the rural areas, the industrial areas and St Marys Town Centre in its current form. Furthermore Penrith City Centre DCP and Werrington Mixed-Use Area DCP will no longer apply to the areas to which they are intended to apply.

 

It is therefore necessary to prepare a DCP that consolidates the controls contained in DCP 2006, DCP 2010, Penrith City Centre DCP and Werrington Mixed-Use Area DCP that will apply to the future Penrith LEP 2010 Amendment 4. This process has required the following:

 

i.    Necessary updates to ensure consistency between both DCPs

ii.    Necessary updates to reflect current policy

iii.   Necessary updates to reflect legislative changes

iv.  A new section on Penrith Health and Education Precinct

v.   A new section on Riverlink Precinct

vi.  Inclusion of certain provisions in the DCP from current LEPs (that could not be

      included in Penrith LEP 2010 Amendment 4 given the requirements of the Standard

      LEP Template)

vii.  Inclusion of the Penrith City Centre Development Control Plan 2007

viii. Inclusion of Werrington Mixed-Use Area Development Control Plan

ix.  Amendment of planning controls that have previously been endorsed by Council such  

      as the Penrith City Centre Parking Controls

x.   Remove those controls that are no longer relevant

xi.  Amendment of planning controls where there is an inconsistency in application

     between various planning instruments

xii. Any other necessary changes.

 

It is emphasised that this work represents a consolidation and “tidy up” of the existing DCPs applying to the City. It does not represent a full policy based review of our DCPs. A full review of the DCPs will be carried out when the new legislation is enacted and the form and content of the new Local Land Use Plans (which will include significant changes to how DCP provisions are crafted and how they operate in relation to permissible land uses) is known. Furthermore the strategic review of residential, employment and open space strategies need to be carried out prior to any major review of the DCP. It should be noted here that section 289A (transitional provisions relating to development control plans) of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Regulation 2000 requires a DCP to be made within 6 months of an LEP being made that is based on the provisions of a standard instrument. If this has not occurred, any other extant DCPs that apply to the land are invalidated. Therefore, it is essential that a consolidated DCP be put in place to support the new City-wide Plan when it is made.

 

This consolidated version of the DCP is basically a translation of the existing DCPs except for necessary changes as described above. The consolidated DCP will cover all areas in the Penrith Local Government Area including areas deferred from or not included in Penrith LEP 2010 Amendment 4. Information on the structure and content of the new DCP (Penrith Development Control 2014) is provided below.

Penrith Development Control Plan 2014

Penrith Development Control Plan 2014 (DCP 2014) has been prepared in accordance with Part 3, Division 6 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 and with Part 3 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Regulation 2000. The DCP has been provided to Councillors under separate cover and will be tabled at the meeting. Council officers will continue to make changes to the draft Penrith Development Control Plan 2014 prior to exhibition, to ensure consistency with Council policy and Penrith LEP 2010 (Amendment 4).

 

Penrith DCP 2014 has been structured to integrate the principles of sustainability into the provisions that guide development across the City. As the single DCP that will apply to the City, the provisions in this document need to cover all development scenarios. Ultimately, the DCP will be available electronically, which will allow users to call up only those controls which are relevant to individual sites and specific proposals. 

 

The plan has been divided into 6 sections – an Introduction, DCP Principles, Citywide controls, Specific landuse controls, Key precincts, and Appendices.

 

Part A contains all the introductory material, including the contents, information on how to use the plan and information on where, within the plan, various controls can be found. 

 

Part B contains the overarching DCP principles, based on the adopted Penrith Sustainability Principles.  It outlines not just the philosophy behind the principles, but how the draft DCP responds to and helps implement those principles. 

 

Part C contains city-wide land use provisions, split into the natural and built environment.  Topics covered include Vegetation Management, Water Management, Land Management, Waste Management, Landscape Design, Culture and Heritage, Public Domain, Advertising and Signage, Transport, Access and Parking, Subdivision, Noise and Vibration, and Infrastructure and Services, as well as overall Site Planning and Design Principles.

 

Part D provides land use based controls for rural land, industrial land, commercial land and residential land.  It also includes a section which covers land uses such as child care centres, health consulting rooms, educational establishments, parent friendly amenities, places of public worship, vehicle repair stations, cemeteries, crematoria and funeral chapels, extractive industries and telecommunication facilities which can locate in a number of different zones. The controls in part D will operate in addition to the city wide controls in Part C. 

 

Part E deals with Key Precincts – areas which are unique or have special characteristics that warrant individual controls. These controls will operate in addition to other parts of the plan, and in some cases they will operate instead of other parts of the plan.  The individual sections make the operation of the controls very clear, and are being written to cover only those issues which make those areas unique.  Key Precincts include:


 

·    Caddens

·    Claremont Meadows Stage 2

·    Cranebrook

Ø Waterside Residential

Ø Waterside Corporate

Ø Cranebrook Neighbourhood Centre

Ø    Cranebrook Rural Residential Development

·    Emu Heights – Blue Mountains Escarpment Siting, Design and Management

·    Emu Plains

Ø Commercial Area

Ø Proposed Road Pattern

·    Erskine Business Park

·    Glenmore Park

Ø Glenmore Park Stage 1

Ø Glenmore Park Stage 2

·    Kingswood

Ø    Land Fronting Morley avenue and the Great Western Highway, Kingswood

Ø Road Pattern

Ø The Knoll

·    Mulgoa Valley

·    Orchard Hills

·    Penrith

Ø Penrith City Centre

Ø Walkways

Ø North Penrith Urban Area

·    Penrith Health and Education Precinct

Ø Hospital Precinct

Ø Business Park Precinct

Ø    South Werrington Urban Village Precinct

·    Riverlink Precinct

Ø Riverlink excluding Panthers

Ø Panthers Penrith Precinct

·    St Clair

Ø Landscaping, Banks Drive/Mamre Rd

Ø South-west St Clair Community Centre

·    St Marys / North St Marys

Ø St Marys Town Centre

Ø Road Pattern

 

Part F is the appendices.  It will include a single dictionary for the entire document, which aligns with the Standard LEP template, information on the DA process and a section on submission requirements.  This section will bring together in one place the information required to be submitted with all development applications and will also include a matrix to make it clear which plans and reports are required under various circumstances.  This should provide a valuable resource to both applicants and staff in determining exactly what information is expected to be submitted, and consequently assessing the completeness of an application.  The appendix will also include a reference to, or, where possible, a copy of all the technical guidelines referred to in the draft DCP.  Keeping this information as an appendix will both provide applicants easy access to it, and allow it to be updated as required.

 

There have been minor changes throughout the DCP 2014 document from what was included in DCP 2010 and DCP 2006. These changes are done to ensure consistency between both DCPs and reflect current policy. Some other major changes made to the DCP are described below:

 

Chapter D2 – Residential Development

 

The changes relating to the residential sections of DCP 2014 have predominantly involved a translation of the existing residential provisions for single dwellings, dual occupancy, town house development and apartment development. The section relating to villa style development has not been carried across from DCP 2006. This has been deleted as a result of merging the 2(c) Residential (Low – medium density) and 2(d) Residential (Medium density) zones into the new R3 Residential Medium Density zone under the Standard Instrument for LEPs. The other key change for residential development is that provisions including minimum landscaped area, building envelope and rear setback controls can no longer be included in the LEP under the Standard Instrument restrictions. These controls will remain the same but they will now appear in the DCP. 

 

A new secondary dwelling section has been drafted to provide specific controls for these developments. Secondary dwelling developments are much smaller in scale than traditional dual occupancy development and have presented specific issues since the adoption of State Environmental Planning Policy (Affordable Rental Housing) 2009. Therefore a new section has been drafted to more closely align these development controls with the State Environmental Planning Policy (Affordable Rental Housing) 2009 and include enhanced compatible design requirements.

 

The single dwellings section has been restructured based on feedback from the Development Services Department. These changes aim to make the document easier to read. New controls of minor significance have been introduced including providing more specific guidance for cut and fill near side boundaries. The new provisions are introduced to address areas where there has been significant problems in the assessment of these applications.

 

Chapter C3 – Water Management

 

The flooding section of this chapter has undergone a minor review and has been updated to bring it in line with recent Policy decisions taken by Council as well as changes in terminology. The changes clarify issues of ambiguity in the application of the controls for development proposals for additions and alterations to dwellings in areas of the LGA affected by flood planning controls.

 

Chapter C10 – Transport Access and Parking

 

This Section of the DCP has largely carried over Council’s existing controls with some revisions made to the Australian Standards, transport corridors and parking rates.  References to Australian Standards and policy documents by the Roads and Maritime Services have been updated where necessary to reflect recent changes. In addition, “Lenore Drive” has been added as a key transport interchange to reflect its role in the Erskine Business Park.

 

The section on roads has been updated to reflect more current practice. In particular, ‘distributor roads’ are now proposed to have a 24.5m road reservation (currently 23.6m), and includes provision for a 3.95m parking provision lane on each side (currently 3.5m on each side) to provide on-road cycle ways to be designed from the lip of gutter. ‘Collector roads’ and ‘Industrial roads’ are also proposed to have a 2% verge on each side for provision of on-street bus stops.

 

The key changes to the parking rates are as follows: 

 

a)   The parking rates for commercial premises (which include business, office and retail premises) have been carried over from the Penrith City Centre LEP 2008. However, the parking rate for business and office premises in the Penrith City Centre will be reduced from 1 space per 60m2 to 1 space per 100m2 to formalise the interim policy that Council adopted at its Policy Review Committee of 18 November 2013.

 

b)   Council’s current position on considering reducing parking rates for business and office premises within 500m of a railway station will be deleted as a result of the reduction in parking rates for business and office premises in the Penrith City Centre from 1 space per 60m2 to 1 space per 100m2. 

 

c)   New parking rates have been proposed for vehicles and car wash facilities in residential flat buildings, as well as for fitness centres (including gyms), any dwelling associated with a health consulting room or medical centre and additional spaces for dual key hotel/motels across the Penrith LGA. 

 

d)   Penrith DCP 2010 and Penrith DCP 2006 in some instances contain different parking rates for the same type of use. In this case, the parking rates in Penrith DCP 2010 have been retained as they are considered to be more contemporary.

 

e)   The parking rates for ‘places of public worship’, ‘pubs/registered clubs’ and ‘restaurants, reception and function rooms’ have been rounded up to ensure that parking rates are only required for whole areas, rather than part areas.

 

f)    The parking rates for ‘vehicle sales or hire premises’ and ‘service stations and convenience stores’ have been reduced to reflect the nature of the development.

 

Chapter E12 – Penrith Health and Education Precinct

 

The Penrith Health and Education Precinct chapter will contain two new sections; the Hospital Precinct and the Business Park Precinct.

 

The Hospital Precinct section applies to land zoned B4 Mixed Use located on the land surrounding the Nepean Hospital. The main objective of this section is to encourage development that supports and develops the centre’s role as a specialised medical precinct. Three character areas have been developed that will inform and guide future development in the precinct. They include a Medical Mixed Use Precinct, Commercial Mixed Use Precinct and a Residential Edge Precinct. The development controls seek to support the character areas by focusing large scale development closer to the hospital and existing medical uses on Derby Street as well as the retail strip on the Great Western Highway. The built form will step down in scale and intensity moving towards the residential land uses to the south and east of the precinct. This transition of built form will be achieved through development controls including boundary setbacks, landscaped areas, street frontage heights, bulk and scale controls and pedestrian through-site links.

 

The Business Park section applies to the land zoned B7 Business Park in Werrington. The main objective of this section is to promote a high quality employment environment that will be attractive to a diverse and innovative range of business and commercial developments. The development controls in the Business Park section seek to respond to this vision by supporting development that achieves a high quality built form while incorporating extensive landscape embellishment, activated street frontages and strong pedestrian through-site links. The development controls will encourage development of a similar form to the Werrington Park Corporate Centre.

 

Both sections are awaiting review by Council’s Urban Design Review Panel. Any recommended changes as a result of this consultation will be considered and incorporated in line with Council’s policy direction.

 

Chapter E13 – Riverlink Precinct

The Riverlink Precinct chapter will contain two new sections; Part A- Riverlink Precinct and Part B - Panthers Penrith Precinct.

 

Part A: Riverlink Precinct

The main objective of this chapter is to create a living, entertainment and working hub with a key focus on the Nepean River. Large parts of the Precinct are in transition and will have a different character in time, whilst others will maintain the existing character.  For this reason sub precinct character strategies have been developed that will inform and guide future development in the precinct. 

Development controls seek to support the character areas by focusing large scale development closer to the City Centre and existing bulky goods uses on Mulgoa Road and Blaikie Road. Development in the CBD Gateway and CBD Riverlink precinct will provide a transition between the Penrith City Centre and the Nepean River by encouraging pedestrian friendly links, active street edges with mixed use buildings.  The Nepean River/Tench Ave controls seek to create an active and vibrant river with foreshore open spaces aimed to draw people to the waterfront.

The built form will be of a high quality, providing visual and landscape amenity whilst maintaining views to the Blue Mountains.  Development will incorporate best practice in terms of sustainability and urban design outcomes in both the public and private domain. The heritage significance of all heritage items and the natural landscape features in the Precinct will be recognised, reinforced and valued. Development controls will ensure a series of open space linkages for active and passive recreation as well as development that captures and enhances the local identity and creates a highly desirable visitor destination.

 

Part B: Panthers Penrith Precinct

In 2010, the Panthers Group submitted an application for the rezoning of its site.  The proposed rezoning was based on a Concept Plan to enable the staged development of a range of land uses within an integrated ‘entertainment, leisure and lifestyle precinct’.  Amendment No.2 to Penrith LEP 2010 was gazetted on 21 June 2013.

 

At the Ordinary Meeting of 22 July 2013, Council adopted a site specific amendment to Development Control Plan (DCP) 2010.  This DCP incorporates specific controls for the Panthers Penrith Precinct to ensure that the intentions of the LEP are reinforced in guiding development of the precinct over the next 20 years. The DCP emphasises the importance of place/precinct and provides flexibility for land uses in a framework of outcomes.

 

Shortly after the new statutory planning instruments for the Panthers Penrith site came into force a detailed review of all aspects of the proposed redevelopment was undertaken by Panthers, in particular the commercial and financial feasibility of the project’s delivery.  This review considered the key elements of the redevelopment contained in the Concept Plan and Council’s statutory documents and identified a range of adjustments considered necessary to achieve a commercially successful outcome and a vibrant, attractive place. 

 

The refined Master Plan proposes a mix of uses within the precinct consistent with those permitted under the amended LEP and aims to respond to the site specific controls established in the DCP.  There is significant alignment between the current DCP for the site and the desired future character of the precinct.  However, an amendment to the DCP is required to accommodate the range of changes proposed by the Master Plan. A discussion of the key adjustments and their relationship to the adopted DCP for the Panthers Precinct is provided below:

 

Managing the development footprint of the Panthers site with respect to its unique flooding characteristics is one of the most critical considerations for redevelopment and urban sustainability on the subject site. Any change to the development footprint in the DCP needs to be consistent with the flood modelling undertaken at the time of rezoning. To provide confidence in the orderly roll out of development on the Panthers site, there is the need to review the refined Master Plan from a strategic floodplain management perspective.  Additional regional flood modelling is required to be undertaken to ensure that the principles defined in the previous approach are protected.  This modelling is currently being undertaken by Panthers.  The aim of this modelling is to confirm that a zero impact can be achieved upstream and downstream from the alterations to the proposed master plan for the site.

 

The internal road network proposed by the revised Master Plan has been reconfigured to focus on improving the access and connectivity to the lake. The key issues in the refined Master Plan associated with the road network include:

 

·    A realigned North – South vehicular street   – The creation of the north-south vehicle connection relates to the permeability within the whole future development of the Riverlink Precinct, as much as within the Panthers Precinct itself. 

·    Partial deletion of Central Link Road – One of the key visual changes in the approach of the refined Master Plan is that it seeks to emphasise the Lake as the key feature of the Precinct and provides a new promenade to the lake frontage to leverage the visual amenity and views to the mountains and connect and activate the adjacent buildings.  Panthers’ view is that the provision of the planned road would be detrimental to this outcome by introducing pedestrian / vehicle conflict and creating a hard barrier between the Club and the activity spaces adjoining the Lake.

·    Removal of on-street parking - The current DCP caters for on-street parking on most internal roads in the Precinct. The refined Master Plan proposes that internal roads not provide on-street parking.  Panthers is of the view that adequate formalised off-street parking will be provided in the proposed multi-decked car park, in off-street parking facilities provided in conjunction with each key facility and in overflow parking arrangements. 

·    The refined Master Plan also proposes to reduce the width of internal street cross sections to reduce the cost of road construction.  Provided it can be demonstrated that adequate capacity will be provided in the formalised facilities as development occurs, the removal of on-street parking and the adoption of appropriate road widths could be supported, with the exception of:

Ø the planned road serving the residential sub-precinct which needs to cater for on-street parking to support visitation and additional vehicle parking for residents; and

Ø the width of Ransley Street should be constructed to its planned width to maintain generous view lines to the Blue Mountains and to present as the key landscaped and activated boulevard into the Precinct.

 

For the most part, the objectives and development controls contained in the current DCP for the Panthers Precinct remain unchanged.   However, the changes proposed by the refined Master Plan are of sufficient significance to require an amendment to the DCP.

Implications for Penrith City Centre Car Parking Contributions

The Penrith City Centre car parking rates were previously specified in the Penrith City Centre LEP 2008. The Standard Instrument Template does not allow these controls to be included in the LEP. Therefore these rates will now be inserted in Penrith DCP 2014. There are implications for the City Centre Civic Improvement Plan (CIP) s94 Plan and car parking delivery as a consequence of these changes.

The City Centre CIP s94 Plan states that “Car parking contributions only apply to a commercial and retail development in which there is an increase in Gross Floor Area and the number of on-site car parking spaces is below the number required in the LEP. The car parking contribution is $17,500 (indexed to current values) for each car parking space that is below the number to be required in the LEP”.

With the removal of the car parking rates from the Penrith City Centre LEP 2008, there will be no provision to charge new development contributions for deficient car parking. In light of this, a letter is being sent to the Minister requesting that the City Centre Civic Improvement Plan (s94 Plan) be amended to refer to the parking rates in the DCP rather than the LEP so that contributions could be charged for deficit car parking in the Penrith City Centre. 

However, if the Minister does not agree to amend the plan, the proponent of a development with deficient car parking would need to:

a.  provide required car parking on-site – up to the maximum number permissible – and deliver deficient car parking either through off-site provision (under their own arrangement and in a manner satisfactory to Council); or

b.  enter into a VPA with Council to deliver the deficient car parking – either by way of a physical delivery mechanism or some other means (e.g. payment to Council for Council to arrange delivery of the deficient car parking or a non-car transport scheme for example). It should be noted here that the White Paper on the new Planning System for NSW proposes prohibiting councils entering into VPAs for those facilities which cannot be subject to contributions. The White paper excluded car parking as a facility funded through development contributions. VPAs may therefore may not provide a parking delivery alternative.

 

Alternatively Council could:

a.   agree to vary/waive the DCP requirement; or

b.   refuse the application for failure to satisfy minimum parking requirements.

Proposed consultation strategy

It is proposed to exhibit the draft Penrith DCP 2014 from October 2014 to November 2014.  The consultation strategy will include advertisement in the Local Newspaper on a weekly basis. There will be displays in Penrith and St Marys council offices. Council officers do not intend to send individual letters to all landowners. However, letters will be sent to landowners in the Riverlink Precinct and Penrith Health and Education Precinct only where a control and zone has been changed (not a direct translation). All public exhibition information will also be available on Council’s web site and an exclusive email address for electronic enquiries and submissions has been set up.

Next Steps

Following endorsement by Council to proceed with the public exhibition of Penrith DCP 2014, the following steps will occur:

 

1.   Council officers will continue to update DCP 2014 based on the policy direction endorsed by Council.

 

2.   DCP 2014 will be exhibited for four (4) weeks in accordance with the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979.

 

3.   Submissions to DCP 2014 exhibition will be reviewed, and recommendations prepared for Council’s consideration.  DCP 2014 may be varied or amended to address issues raised in submissions where it is consistent with Council’s agreed policy directions.

 

4.   The final DCP 2014 will be presented to Council for consideration and endorsement.

         

Conclusion

 

The preparation of draft Penrith DCP 2014 has included a minor review of the content and structure of Penrith DCP 2010 and Penrith DCP 2006. This will assist in making planning information more accessible to residents, developers, business owners, community groups and staff. Draft Penrith DCP 2014 has been developed as an integrated plan, and exhibition of the draft plan will provide an opportunity for the community, including landowners and developers, to provide comments.  This feedback will be used to further improve the draft DCP2014, prior to its presentation to Council for endorsement.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Draft Penrith Development Control Plan 2014 be received.

2.      Further changes be made to the draft Penrith Development Control Plan 2014 prior to exhibition, to ensure consistency with Council policy and Penrith LEP 2010 (Amendment 4).

3.      Draft Penrith Development Control Plan 2014 be publicly exhibited, in accordance with the relevant provisions of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act, 1979 and associated Regulations.

4.      A further report be presented to Council following the Public Exhibition.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report


Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                             8 September 2014

 

 

 

2

Heritage Program Update   

 

Compiled by:               Julie Condon, Development Enquiry Coordinator

Authorised by:            Paul Lemm, Development Services Manager  

 

Outcome

We plan for our future growth

Strategy

Facilitate development that encourages a range of housing types

Service Activity

Facilitate quality development that contributes to a growing regional City

      

 

Executive Summary

Council undertakes a number of initiatives to promote and support the conservation of Heritage within the local government area. Key among these is the operation of a Heritage Advisory Committee, the provision of a Heritage Advisory Service and the management of a Heritage Assistance Fund.

 

The Heritage Advisory Service and the Heritage Assistance Fund are supported by the provision of funding through grants from the NSW Office of Environment and Heritage. This funding is contingent upon Council having in place a Heritage Programme which encapsulates all of Council’s activities and initiatives in heritage management.

 

Council’s Heritage Advisory Committee was established in 1998. It is comprised of Councillors, representatives from the community and representatives from local historical societies, the University of Western Sydney and the Royal Institute of Architects. Three (3) Expressions of interest have been received in response to Council’s advertisement for community representatives on the Committee.

 

Heritage Program

The NSW Office of Environment and Heritage through its Heritage Incentives Program contributes funding to support local councils in their actions to;

 

1.       Identify heritage items, places and areas in the local government area and list them in a local environmental plan

2.       Appoint a Heritage Advisor to assist council, the community and owners of listed items

3.       Introduce a local incentives program fund to provide small grants to encourage local heritage projects

 

The funding is provided through the NSW Heritage Grants program to assist and encourage local councils to develop their capacity and resources to manage their local heritage places. Assessment of the funding level is based on a Council's performance in developing, delivering and reporting on their heritage strategy.

Council has applied for and been successful in gaining funding through a three-year performance agreement based on the implementation of their Heritage Program for 2014–17. The funding which has been offered to Council is

1.       Grants of $1-for-every $2 spent by Council up to $10,000 for heritage assistance fund.

2.       Grants of $1-for-every $3 spent by Council up to $10,000 for heritage advisory service

Approval of the funding is dependent on Council preparing and submitting a three (3) year Heritage Program for the period 2014 – 2017. This program was reported to and adopted by Council’s Heritage Advisory Committee on 26 June 2014 (Appendix No 1.)

The 2014 -2017 Heritage Program is a continuation of the 2011 – 2014 Program and encapsulates all of the initiatives Council undertakes to support and manage its current heritage assets whilst providing leadership and positive stewardship for the City’s heritage. These include the following;

1.       Continue Council’s Heritage Advisory Committee to promote heritage conservation and assist with Council’s heritage program.

2.       Continue the Heritage Advisor Service to assist Council, the community and owners of heritage listed items.

3.       Continue to identify and list heritage items in the Penrith LEP

4.       Continue the Heritage Assistance Fund Program to encourage heritage property owners in the maintenance of their heritage properties.

5.       Manage local heritage in a positive and proactive manner.

6.       Promote Sustainable Development as a tool for heritage conservation.

7.       Present Educational & Promotional Programs.  

8.       Lead by example by properly managing Council owned heritage places.

 

Heritage Grants

In 2013/2014 Council received funding through grants to support its Heritage Assistance Fund and Heritage advisory Service.

 

The Heritage Assistance Fund supported the owners of five (5) Heritage properties in the local government area to undertake a range of works on their premises including painting, replacement of windows, repairing roofs and repointing of stonework. The projects were funded on a dollar for dollar basis and all of them were completed on time and within budget. Council has completed the required reporting to the NSW Office of Environment and Heritage. The Heritage Office has approved the reports and settled the funding based on Council’s expenditure of $20,420. The Heritage Office has reimbursed $10,000 to Council which will be rolled over into the 2014/2015 program. The 2014/2015 program will have a total budget of $22,000 and is currently open for applications.

 

During the 2013/2014 financial year, sixteen (16) Heritage Advisor Days were conducted. An average of six (6) site vists and eight(8) development application referrals were undertaken per day which equates to 96 heritage site visits carried out and advice given on 128 development applications.

 

The total expenditure for the Heritage Advisory Service during 2013–14 was $28,544. As per the funding agreement in place, the Office of Environment and Heritage agreed to reimburse Council 1/3 (or $1 for $2) of the expenditure incurred for the heritage advisor to the maximum of $7,500.

 

Heritage Advisory Committee Community Members

Council resolved on 27 July 1998 to establish a Heritage Advisory Committee to promote heritage conservation in Penrith and act as a “sounding board” for heritage policy and decision making.

 

Council’s Heritage Advisory Committee was established in 1998. It is comprised of Councillors, three (3) representatives from the community and representatives from local historical societies, the University of Western Sydney and the Royal Institute of Architects. The Community representatives are to be appointed by the Council for a period of up to 2 years

 

The community representatives’ position on the Committee is an opportunity for independent members of the public to provide input into the Committee’s activities. These people are required to be able to demonstrate experience in and a commitment to heritage conservation promotion and act independently of any other heritage or community group in their dealings with the Committee.

 

A review of Council’s records indicates that the Committee has not sought new members from the community since 2008. As such, a letter was sent to the owners of Heritage items on 16 May 2014 inviting written expressions of interest to participate on the Committee, by outlining their suitability and demonstrating their commitment to heritage conservation. This invitation was also advertised in the local newspapers.

 

Three (3) expressions of interest were received from community members who have outlined their enthusiasm for the role and previous works on Heritage matters as follows;

 

1.       Dr Allen R Barlow has an extensive background as a teacher and researcher, as well as contribution to humanitarian welfare projects. Dr Barlow is the owner of Emu Hall and is also the owner of a world class collection of antique machinery, amongst a host of other related achievements.

 

2.       Jennine Leonarder-Collins has specialised her career in real estate in luxury homes and has worked closely with the National Trust. Jennine has restored and currently resides at Werrington House and has developed a passion for its history, as well as researching colonial history.

 

3.       Wendy Herne is an academic, who has lived within the Penrith Local Government Area for more than fifty years. Wendy has a strong connection with St Marys and St Clair, and founded the St Clair-Erskine Park Community Safety Association Inc. With a passion for Australian History, her current thesis work focuses on the History of Penrith.

 

The full expressions of interest will be circulated to Councillors under separate cover.

 

All expressions of interest have demonstrated that the candidates would be suitable Committee Members and are passionate about Penrith’s history and management of its Heritage items.

 

Conclusion

Council’s Heritage Program continues to provide a valuable contribution to the Penrith area in managing the City’s heritage assets at a high level. This is demonstrated by the number of requests to access the Heritage Advisory Service, the uptake of opportunities provided through the Heritage Assistance Fund and the level of interest displayed in participating on Council’s Heritage Advisory Committee.

 

Council will continue to work with the NSW Office of Environment and Heritage and the community to support and manage its heritage assets whilst providing leadership and positive stewardship for the City’s heritage.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Heritage Program Update be received.

2.    The 2014 – 2017 Penrith Heritage Program be adopted.

3.    Dr Allen Barlow, Jennine Leonarder-Collins and Wendy Hearne be appointed as Community Representatives on Council’s Heritage Advisory Committee for a term of two (2) years.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.  

Penrith Council Heritage Program 2014-2017

5 Pages

Appendix

  


Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                           8 September 2014

Appendix 1 - Penrith Council Heritage Program 2014-2017

 

PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator

 


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


 

 

Outcome 3 - We can get around the City

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


Outcome 4 - We have safe, vibrant places

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

3        Penrith CBD Corporation Business Plan 2014-15                                                           25

 

4        Neighbourhood Renewal Program - Cambridge Park and Cranebrook Neighbourhood Action Plans                                                                                                                                 30

 

5        South Creek Historic Park Proposal                                                                                45

 

 

 

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                             8 September 2014

 

 

 

3

Penrith CBD Corporation Business Plan 2014-15   

 

Compiled by:               Terry Agar, City Centres Co-ordinator

Authorised by:            Jeni Pollard, Place Manager  

 

Outcome

We have safe, vibrant places

Strategy

Grow and revitalise our centres and neighbourhoods

Service Activity

Support the revitalisation of Penrith City Centre, St Marys Town Centre and other key identified places in the City

 

Presenters:                  Owen Rogers, Chairman - Penrith CBD Corporation - Penrith CBD Corporation Business Plan 2014-15      

 

Executive Summary

The new Penrith City Centre management entity, Penrith CBD Corporation (PCBDC) was officially launched in 2013 and presented their Triennial Business Plan later that year for endorsement by Council. 

 

Twelve months on, the PCBDC has prepared its Annual Operation Report on completion of the first year of their Triennial Business Plan for Council’s consideration. The report outlines the activities, events and marketing strategies undertaken by the PCBDC in its first full year of operation.

 

Further to the Annual Operation Report, the PCBDC has prepared and submitted the Triennial Business Plan (Year 2) 2014-15 for endorsement by Council. An overview of this document will be presented to Council by the Chairman of the Penrith CBD Corporation, Owen Rogers. 

 

The Plan outlines the proposed activities for the Corporation over the coming year in the areas of activation, business improvement, CBD business membership and governance.  It has been developed over some months of discussion and Council officers were consulted in the final drafting of the document. 

 

The development and presentation of the Annual Operation Report and proposed business plan for 2014-15 is consistent with the Deed of Agreement between Council and the PCBDC. 

 

The report requests that Council receive this report and the Annual Operation Report of the organisation and that Council endorse the Triennial Business Plan (Year 2) 2014-15.

 

Background

 

In 2011 Council undertook a review of the management of the Penrith and St Marys centres to determine whether the existing associations’ model was achieving the desired outcomes of economic growth and maintaining the vitality of the centres.  Following this review Council endorsed the creation of a corporation structure led by a board representing a broad range of business and community interests.  The new governance model proposed a working agreement between Council and the corporations which required a commitment to develop a business plan to achieve a range of outcomes. 

 

In late 2012, the process of implementing the findings of the review commenced with the creation of new governance arrangements and the selection of the board members for the two new centres corporations.

 

On 9 September 2013, the newly formed Penrith CBD Corporation presented its Triennial Business Plan to Council for endorsement.  Since this time, the board members have been working on a range of activities and initiatives to support the development and enhance the performance of the Penrith City Centre.

 

The Chairperson of the board of the PCBDC, Owen Rogers will give a brief presentation on the achievements of the last 12 months against the Triennial Business Plan as well as the proposed activities for the next 12 months.

 

Operating Environment

The CDB Corporation is registered with the Australian Securities and Investment Commission (ASIC).  The company was registered as the Penrith City Centre Ltd on 22 February 2013.

 

Council has a Deed of Agreement with the Penrith CBD Corporation that secures ongoing funding for a term of 3 years and, subject to mutually agreed performance outcomes, allows for ongoing renewal.

 

The Deed provides certainty to both parties about the expectations of Council and the autonomy of the Corporation in regard to:

 

·    Scope and objectives

·    Principles and protocols for working together

·    Relationship management structure and processes

·    Dispute resolution procedures

·    Insurance and liability requirements

·    Procedures for termination of the agreement. 

 

A key feature of the Deed is that the Corporation must prepare a draft Triennial Business Plan, including an annual plan which outlines their key activities and strategic directions for the period. Following endorsement of the Triennial Plan, the annual business plan is presented to Council for endorsement, triggering payment of funds.

 

The Deed of Agreement outlines a requirement for the Corporation to consult with Council prior to any proposed changes to their constitution.

 

A formal, independent review of the performance of the Corporation in achieving their business plans will be undertaken in the third year of their agreement and prior to any new agreement being entered in to. To this end, Council has negotiated to withhold 3% of the annual operating funds of the PCBDC for the purpose of undertaking the review and also to support any training that Council requires the board to attend.

 

Triennial Business Plan

The Penrith CBD Corporation prepared a Triennial Business Plan 2013-16 that was subsequently endorsed by Council on 9 September 2013.

 

The Triennial Business Plan adopted a new vision for the Corporation that reflects their desire to develop the City Centre into a prosperous and lively place through collaboration. The PCBDC has a commitment to positive social outcomes for residents as well as enhanced economic outcomes for local businesses as articulated in their vision: 

 

“Activate key initiatives for new, dynamic growth. Create a sense of vibrancy, inspiration and togetherness in delivering economic and socially sustainable motives betterment”

 

This vision is underpinned by its three core outcome principles or values for the Penrith City Centre:

 

·    Activate by encouraging people to explore opportunities for entertainment, leisure and business at all times of the day and evening

·    Rejuvenate the  presentation of the businesses, building and public spaces

·    Populate with additional business customers, visitors and new businesses, and in the long term, more residents.

 

These outcomes are supported by a range of actions that will be undertaken over the next three year within the available and projected budgets. Key proposed actions include:

 

·    Regular entertainment and events in the refurbished Memory Park as well as other public spaces

·    A building facade and business presentation improvement program

·    Assisting new and established businesses to start and grow

·    Liaising with property owners to build trust that will support further investment in the City Centre

·    Promotion of the Corporation’s achievements to property owners, businesses, Council and the community.

 

The Triennial Business Plan also includes a range of contemporary governance actions to promote best practices as a public corporation. 

 

In addition to the Triennial Business Plan, the board were required to submit an annual report on their previous 12 months of operation and a yearly plan detailing a monthly work program to assist the board to manage its responsibilities in an open and transparent way. 

 

Annual Operation Report 2013-14

 

The first year of operation of the PCBDC has been a year of growth for the Corporation as they actively pursue a range of initiatives. The Annual Operation Report contains positive messages regarding the operation of the board and the partnerships developed through the first year of operation. A copy of the Annual Operation Report 2013-14 is attached.

 

It is noted that a number of Directors, Debbie O’Connor, Tiffany Martinez and Paul Morton have resigned due to personal circumstances or changes to their eligibility to remain on the Board. These Directors have been replaced by Ian Hicks, of the HIX Group, Paul Stonebridge of Scentre Group and Vic Shipley of Powersmart Electrical Services. 

 

The Annual Operation Report outlines a range of activities that occurred throughout the year in the following areas of action:

 

1.   Activate

This year the PCBDC ran a number of seasonal events such as the Christmas Tree Lighting and an Easter Adventure Afternoon in the Pop Up Park. Other activities included the Penrith Festival with crowd estimates of 20,000 in attendance.

Marketing was included in this area with a data base established of over 300 businesses and a new website presence for the PCBDC.

 

2.   Rejuvenate

A major component of the work undertaken this year was the Building Improvement Projects with individual businesses as well as with Cottage Lane, NK Centre and Penrith Centre arcades. 

 

3.   Populate

This area is focused on renewing the city centre, to encourage residents and businesses to consider what they may be able to gain from a visit.  The PCBDC phone app was extended to android this year with an accompanying media campaign.  A welcome pack was developed for real estate agents and property owners to promote opportunities for new business in the CBD.

 

4.   Governance

In the first year of operation the board of the PCBDC put considerable effort into systems and processes to support good governance such as meeting processes, board training, data analysis and accounting processes.

 

The Annual Operation Report 2013-14 reflects a wide range of activities, events and marketing approaches taken over the year. This is consistent with the needs of the PCBDC to build their profile with the local businesses and explore opportunities to promote the city centre to local residents, visitors and potential new business operators. 

 

The Operation Report does identify some projects that did not proceed due to changes in the operating environment or budget constraints. These projects included alternative proposals for the maintenance of planter boxes along High Street and the development of a temporary public art installation. It is understood that alternative opportunities have emerged over the 12 month period of the report, resulting in a need to reprioritise these projects.

 

Triennial Business Plan (Year 2) 2014 – 2015

 

Following on from the Annual Operation Report the PCBDC have forwarded a copy of their business plan for next year, the Triennial Business Plan (Year 2). The Plan outlines the proposed activities of the PCBDC under 4 areas, Activate, Business Improvement Plan, CBD Membership and Governance. A copy of the Triennial Business Plan (Year 2) 2014 -2015 is attached.

 

Once again the PCBDC has placed emphasis on a City Centre activation program, maintaining the Penrith Festival as the flagship event for the year supported by a range of seasonal and regularly scheduled activities in Memory Park and the Pop Up Park.

 

The Business Improvement Program will continue to work with property owners to encourage them to invest in property facades and fit outs. The PCBDC proposes that this will be done by zone with a diagram in the Plan (page 5) showing the six zones within the city centre.  The PCBDC have identified a number of KPIs for the next 12 months that includes the development of an improvement plan for each zone including a group meeting with all property owners, with 5 projects to be achieved.

 

The Plan for 2014-15 reflects the strengthening partnership with the Penrith Valley Business Enterprise Centre (BEC) and Nepean Community College with a schedule of training for local businesses proposed. The PCBDC have indicated a KPI of at least five retailers attending the training.

 

A new direction in the Triennial Business Plan for this year is the development of a membership program, Unlock Your Potential. The Plan states that the purpose of the program is to ‘strengthen the ties between retailers, local businesses and ourselves and help them connect together and grow’.  Banners are already displayed around the city centre area to promote the initiative.  Benefits of the program are outlined on page 21 of the Plan and include access to a ‘health check’ for their business to be completed by the BEC, inclusion in the PCBDC phone app and access to other membership deals. It is proposed that as the membership grows, the PCBDC will organise gatherings for members to connect socially. 

 

Last year the PCBDC indicated that one of their actions in the first 12 months will be the development of a financial plan to methodically seek ways to boost the Corporation’s income beyond the existing Business Sub-category rate income. The development of the membership program is a step in this direction.

 

In the area of governance the PCBDC has indicated financial planning, reporting, performance measurement and the development of standard operating procedures as ongoing areas of work with associated KPIs for the board to monitor.

 

Conclusion

At the completion of its first full year of operation, the Penrith CBD Corporation have presented an Annual Operation Report reflecting a wide range of activities, events and marketing strategies that were undertaken in support of the Penrith City Centre.

 

The PCBDC has worked hard to develop stronger partnerships with the BEC and other groups to facilitate programs that strengthen existing businesses as well as supporting new opportunities for start ups within the Penrith City Centre.

 

The development of an approach outlined within the Triennial Business Plan (Year 2) that defines zones within the city centre is consistent with good practice in CBD management and will support greater interest from property owners in collaborative efforts.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Penrith CBD Corporation Business Plan 2014-15 be received.

2.    Council receive the Annual Operation Report 2013-14.

3.    Council endorse the Triennial Business Plan (Year 2) 2014-15 for the Penrith CBD Corporation.

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.  

Penrith CBD Corporation Annual Operation Plan

25 Pages

Attachments Included

2.  

Penrith CBD Corporation Triennial Business Plan

28 Pages

Attachments Included

  


Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                             8 September 2014

 

 

 

4

Neighbourhood Renewal Program - Cambridge Park and Cranebrook Neighbourhood Action Plans   

 

Compiled by:               Heather Chaffey, Neighbourhood Renewal Coordinator 

Authorised by:            Jeni Pollard, Place Manager  

 

Outcome

We have safe, vibrant places

Strategy

Grow and revitalise our centres and neighbourhoods

Service Activity

Engage the community in identified priority established areas of the City

 

Presenters:                  Heather Chaffey - Place Management - Overview of the Cambridge Park and Cranebrook Neighbourhood Action Plans        

 

Executive Summary

This report provides Council with an overview of the Neighbourhood Renewal Program and a brief description of the community engagement processes undertaken in Cambridge Park and Cranebrook in 2013 -14. This report is accompanied by a summary of the community engagement process in both neighbourhoods and is shown in Appendix 1.

 

The Neighbourhood Renewal Program integrates place making and creative community engagement with community development practice and invests in the development of education and employment initiatives. The engagement of local residents by Council is critical to the success of initiatives.

 

Importantly, many of the engagement activities undertaken build positive relationships between Council and residents in some of the more disadvantaged communities. Community engagement facilitates an informed decision making process by Council and partner organisations.

 

The report outlines demographic information on Cambridge Park as well as providing an overview of the key issues to arise from the engagement process in this community. Cambridge Park is a quiet family friendly neighbourhood. Many residents have lived in the neighbourhood for long periods and feel they know their neighbours. Residents are proud of the friendly nature of the neighbourhood and wish to preserve it.

 

Families value local schools and see them as community hubs. Many residents are fond of local parks and playgrounds, viewing open spaces as a valuable local asset. Residents spoke fondly of local shops and churches as well as the local Rugby League Football Club. The Neighbourhood Action Plan responding to resident priorities is found in Appendix 2 of this report.

 

The report goes on to provide a demographic overview of Cranebrook and outline of the key issues identified by residents. Cranebrook is a socio-economically diverse neighbourhood. There is a mix of privately owned acreages, privately owned homes, and private and public rental properties. It is impacted by the introduction of new release areas surrounding an older established neighbourhood.

 

Residents value local schools and community services often reflecting on the ability of these services to bring people together and provide assistance to lower-income households. Children value local parks and playgrounds and would like to see these spaces enhanced. The Neighbourhood Action Plan responding to resident priorities in Cranebrook is found in Appendix 3 of this report.

 

The report provides a description of the highly successful community planning sessions held in both neighbourhoods. These sessions allow residents who have been involved in one or more previous activities to come together, hear the preliminary results of the engagement process, and set priorities for Council’s Neighbourhood Action Plan with Council staff.

 

This report outlines a number of the other activities of the Neighbourhood Renewal Program in 2013-14 including community engagement across the two neighbourhoods as well as the Magnetic Places Neighbourhood Renewal Community Cultural Grants program and related physical infrastructure projects.

 

The report recommends that Council receive the report and endorse the adoption of the Cambridge Park and Cranebrook Neighbourhood Action Plans (Appendix 2 and Appendix 3) as its’ policy for the renewal of these suburbs. The report also seeks Council’s endorsement to proceed with developing a new model for Neighbourhood Renewal in the context of the end of the AREAS special rate initiative in June 2015. 

Background to the Neighbourhood Renewal Program

In 2006 Council endorsed a Neighbourhood Renewal Program to revitalise and enhance selected neighbourhoods. The Neighbourhood Renewal Program is funded for 10 years through the Asset Renewal and Established Areas Strategy (AREAS) special rates initiative.

 

In 2011 Council was able to secure additional funding through a Special Rates Variation to leverage implementation of actions identified in Neighbourhood Action Plans (NAPs). 

 

The development of Cambridge Park and Cranebrook NAPs herald the completion of the agreed approach for producing the plans. It is also timely to note that funding for the Neighbourhood Renewal Program will cease in June 2015.

 

The program is focussed on 12 suburbs and rural localities which are considered to be relatively disadvantaged. The instrument used to determine this is the Australian Bureau of Statistics SEIFA Index of Relative Disadvantage which measures disadvantage across suburbs and regions. SEIFA is an abbreviation of Socio-Economic Index for Areas. These areas are (in alphabetical order) Cambridge Park, Colyton, Cranebrook, Kingswood, Llandilo, Londonderry, North Penrith (including the locality of Kingswood Park), North St Marys, Oxley Park, Penrith suburb, St Marys and Werrington.

 

Neighbourhood Action Plans (NAPs) support a planned and coordinated approach to these identified communities, addressing the complex interplay of social disadvantage, access to economic and cultural participation, older physical infrastructure and generally poorer public amenity as well as reduced civic engagement. NAPs incorporate specific responses by Council that are required to address identified community issues and needs.

 

It is envisaged that in the first instance the NAPs for Cambridge Park and Cranebrook will be implemented over four years. Some actions, such as those where Council agrees to further investigate a resident request, may not progress to implementation unless opportunities arise through external funding sources.

 

Some concerns raised by residents have not translated into recommendations within the NAP for various reasons. These exclusions are discussed later in this report.

 

All statistical information included in the report is based on the 2011 ABS Census information.

 

          IMG_5250.JPG

 

Residents participating in engagement activities and community planning in Cranebrook

 

Cambridge Park

Cambridge Park is one of Penrith’s smaller urban suburbs with a 2011 population of 6,260 people. Between 2006 and 2011 there was a slight increase in the number of residents (188 people) mostly due to infill development with a rise in medium density housing (an increase of 398 dwellings) and a decline in the number of separate houses.

 

According to SEIFA that measures and scores attributes such as  low income, low educational attainment, high unemployment, between 2006 and 2011 Cambridge Park has remained a suburb with a score indicating it experienced a higher level of general disadvantage.

 

 

Diagram showing the suburb boundaries of Cambridge Park

 

There are 3 significant demographic age groups in Cambridge Park, the ‘young workforce’ (25-34 years), ‘parents and homebuilders’ (35 to 49 years) and there has been a notable jump in the number of ‘empty nesters and retirees’ (60-69 years), which increased by 208 people between 2006 and 2011.

 

Significantly, 5.2% of the Cambridge Park population are of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander descent, which is higher than both the Penrith (3%) and NSW (2.5%) averages. This figure represents around 308 residents, of which half are children and young people aged 0 to 19 years.

 

Cambridge Park is a family orientated suburb, with couples with children making up 33% of households. However there is a higher than average number of single parent households (17.5% compared to the Penrith average 14%) and a growing number of lone persons (increasing from the Penrith average 18.5% in 2006 to 19.5% in 2011). Many Cambridge Park households are paying off a mortgage (40%), and some rent (24%).

 

Cambridge Park has lower education levels than the Penrith average, with only 11% of the population having a diploma level qualification or higher, compared to 18% for Penrith. There is a higher percentage of residents with vocational qualifications which has increased by 4% between 2006 and 2011, putting it now above the Penrith average. Level of education can be linked to risk of unemployment, the rate of which in Cambridge Park is slightly higher (6.2%) compared to the Penrith average (5.5%).

 

Other issues for consideration in Cambridge Park are the relatively higher percentage of households on a lower income. In 2011, 20% of households were not connected to the internet and around 7% of households do not have a vehicle.  These statistics may be attributed to older people living alone and lower income families, reflecting that these households have a higher risk of being isolated from services and facilities.

 

Community Engagement in Cambridge Park

 

A number of community engagement activities were undertaken in Cambridge Park including;

 

-     Two Family Fun Days

-     Street surveys

-     Small business survey

-     Focus group with the P&C at Cambridge Park Public School

-     Krump dance workshops at Cambridge Park Public School

-     Youth Pizza Lunch at Cambridge Park High School

-     Seniors Morning Tea

-     NAIDOC event at Cambridge Park Public School

-     Community Planning Session

 

These events and projects are described in greater detail in Appendix 1.

 

Community Planning Session

A community planning session was held at Cambridge Park Community Hall, on Oxford Street in June 2014. This session was well attended with approximately 25 adults and their children gathering to share a meal and discuss the findings of the community engagement process. The group was comprised of long term residents, one couple who had recently moved into the neighbourhood, families and a number of older residents.

 

IMG_7854.JPG       IMG_7864.JPG

 

Residents participate in engagement activities held at Allsopp Oval in Cambridge Park

 

Residents were able to provide further detail on matters which were commonly identified but had been recorded in quite general terms. Residents also discussed and identified key priorities for Council to consider in the development of the Cambridge Park Neighbourhood Action Plan 2014.

 

Resident Priorities in Cambridge Park

 

The key priorities that have emerged in Cambridge Park through the engagement process and in the community planning session are briefly discussed below.

 

Community Priorities in Cambridge Park include:

 

-     Enhancements to playgrounds on Allsopp Oval and Lincoln Park

-     Upgrade amenity of shopping strip on Oxford Street

-     Youth programs

-     Desire for community programs and activities at local community hall and in parks

-     Pathways and cycleway

-     Traffic management – dangerous driving and speeding in some key areas

 

Greater detail on the actions proposed in response to these priorities is included in the Cambridge Park Neighbourhood Action Plan 2014 (Appendix 2).

 

Cranebrook

 

Cranebrook is one of Penrith’s largest suburbs with a population of 14,726 people, increasing by 577 residents between 2006 and 2011. Demographically the suburb is very diverse, incorporating the new release area of Waterside, large blocks along Castlereagh Rd, newer and denser housing in North Cranebrook and significant areas of social housing.

 

Cranebrook has a strong family focus, with nearly half of Cranebrook’s households (44%) consisting of couples with children compared to the Penrith average of 38% which is itself above the NSW average of 32%. Cranebrook also has a large number of single parent households (16%) which is slightly above the Penrith average (14%). Cranebrook has significantly more young people than the Penrith average, with 41% aged 0 to 24 years compared to 36.5% for Penrith. Cranebrook has less older people than other areas of Penrith although these age groups (60 years and over) are increasing. Between 2006 and 2011, the number of residents aged over 50 increased by 769 people while the number of people aged 17 and under dropped by 290 residents.

 

Diagram showing the suburb boundaries of Cranebrook

 

Like Cambridge Park, Cranebrook has a significant Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander community with a higher percentage (4%) than the Penrith (3%) and NSW (2.5%) average. This represents nearly 600 residents of which about 300 (53%) are aged under 19 years old. This is a very important consideration in the future planning for service provision in this suburb.

 

Education levels across Cranebrook are slightly lower than the Penrith average but it’s important to note that this indicator is changing, with increases in the numbers of residents with degrees, diplomas and vocational qualifications. Cranebrook also has a labour participation rate 5% higher than the Penrith average, consistent with its above average levels of full and part time employment.

 

Cranebrook is socio-economically diverse. Within the suburb itself there are divisions and concentrations of disadvantage and it is surrounded by new release areas and established rural residential properties. Therefore it can be difficult to report accurately on the level of disadvantaged experienced by the most vulnerable within this suburb.

 

The diagram below shows where the concentration of disadvantage is located within the suburb. Overall, Cranebrook is about 15 square kilometres, and across the suburb about 53% of households are paying off a mortgage, 18% fully own their home, 15% are renting privately and 9% are in social housing. However the most disadvantaged residents of Cranebrook live in an area of only 1 square kilometre which includes the public housing estate. In this small area only 20% of households are paying off a mortgage, 4% own their own home, 7% are renting privately and 59% are renting through a social housing provider.

 

For example, the overall Cranebrook unemployment rate of 4.8 percent, which is below the Penrith average, increases to 21% in the most disadvantaged area. Similarly, while overall Cranebrook household income shows that 19% earned a high income, and 13% earned a low income, in the small area of Cranebrook around 37% of households are in the lowest income quartile, and this number increased by 66 households between 2006 and 2011.

 

 

Index of Relative Socio-economic Advantage and Disadvantage, 2011, Darker patches indicate higher levels of disadvantage.

 

In this one small area of Cranebrook, 8% (144 people) have a disability, 19% (117 households) have no car, and 31% (172 households) have no internet connection, significantly increasing their risk of isolation from services and facilities.

 

Community Engagement in Cranebrook

 

A number of community engagement activities were undertaken in Cranebrook including;

 

-     2 Family Fun Days

-     Street Surveys

-     Women's Lunch

-     Seniors Lunch

-     Youth Leaders Forum

-     Youth Week

-     Krump at Braddock

-     Foothills BBQ x 2

-     Aboriginal Film Project

-     Community Planning Session

2013 Banner Photos High Res 098.tifIMG_8144

 

Residents and Community Workers participate in engagement activities in Cranebrook

These events and projects are described in greater detail in Appendix 1.

 

Community Planning Session

A community planning session was held at Cranebrook Neighbourhood Centre in June 2014. This session was well attended with approximately 20 adults and their children gathering to share a meal and discuss the findings of the community engagement process. The group was comprised of residents from diverse cultural backgrounds and housing tenure. 

 

Residents were able to provide further detail on matters which were commonly identified but had been recorded in quite general terms. Residents also discussed and identified key priorities for Council to consider in the development of the Cranebrook Neighbourhood Action Plan 2014.

 

IMG_8176.JPG

 

Mum and daughter at Cranebrook Easter Family Fun Day 2014

 

Resident Priorities in Cranebrook

 

The key priorities that have emerged in Cranebrook through the engagement process and in the community planning session are briefly discussed below. Greater detail on the actions proposed in response to these priorities is included in the Cranebrook Neighbourhood Action Plan 2014 (Appendix 3).

 

Community Priorities in Cranebrook

 

-     Public transport - accessible transport and closure of bus service Pendock Rd

-     Maintenance of social housing properties and difficulties negotiating maintenance

-     Heat management

-     Traffic management – congestion, speeding and dangerous driving

-     Upgrades to local playgrounds

-     Activities and services for children and families

 

Developing Neighbourhood Action Plans

The Neighbourhood Action Plans for Cambridge Park (Appendix 2) and Cranebrook (Appendix 3) were negotiated in partnership with relevant officers, coordinators and managers across Council. In addition, this year actions have also been negotiated with the Cranebrook Neighbourhood Advisory Board and Werrington Community Project Inc. Actions attributed to the Cranebrook NAB and WCPI will be supported by the Community and Cultural Development and Place Management Departments.

 

IMG_9085     IMG_9046

Residents participating in the Cranebrook Community Planning Session

 

Many of the actions require minimal funding and can be achieved within the existing budgets. Some of the actions will require resources to be allocated from the funds Neighbourhood Renewal secured as part of the Special Rates Initiative in 2011.

 

Generally, Neighbourhood Action Plans are expected to be completed within four years.

 

Resident requests not included in the Cambridge Park Neighbourhood Action Plan

A number of residents requested increased maintenance of Allsop Oval and surrounding streets in windy periods.  Allsop Oval is generally well maintained by the Parks Department and it is understood that this request is primarily about the maintenance of private property and is considered a private matter. Council and the SES can provide assistance to residents in the case of serious storm damage.

 

The provision of After School Care services at Cambridge Park Public School was raised on a number of occasions. The school is currently investigating options for a Before & After School Care service as well as other community programs such as a breakfast program.  Council currently provides B&A Services as well as Vacation Care at Rainbow Cottage, Trinity Drive Cambridge Gardens. This service provides a bus pick up from Cambridge Park Public School.  Council will continue to support the school as it takes leadership in programming for its families.

best sistersgif

Sisters - Cambridge Park Public School.

 

 

 

Resident requests not included in the Cranebrook Neighbourhood Action Plan

In Cranebrook, some residents requested renewal of the existing play equipment in Koolyangarra Reserve. The current equipment is not due for renewal but residents and local services report frequent and serious vandalism occurring in the Reserve.  The site has extremely poor surveillance opportunities and it is not considered that installation of new equipment will resolve the issues reported in this area.

 

The Community and Cultural Development Department and Place Management Department will continue to work with stakeholders to address antisocial behaviour in the space and consider a planning response as noted in action 3.1 of the Cranebrook Neighbourhood Action Plan 2014.  The issues being experienced at Koolyangarra Reserve are more complex than a need for new equipment and a collaborative response with the community will need to be discussed and worked towards.

 

Council notes the significant issue of rental stress for older residents living on a pension in the Cranebrook community. This issue was raised by both social housing and private rental tenants and reflects low income levels of many of residents. Council will seek opportunities to advocate regarding affordable housing for pensioners.

 

Residents are concerned about the impact of new developments on traffic congestion on the Northern Rd, Mulgoa Rd, and Castlereagh Rd. This concern is noted but there is limited capacity to address the issue through the NAP process.

 

Residents requested that Hindmarsh Rd be resurfaced and others expressed concern regarding a dip in Hindmarsh Rd between Middleton Drive and Hillside CCT. Council notes that Hindmarsh Rd was resurfaced from Boundary Rd to Middleton Drive in 2012 and the dip in the road is drainage related.

 

Residents requested Council install a path to connect existing pathways through the tree corridor between Sherringham Rd and Pendock Rd, behind Muncaster Pl and Ravenglass Place.  Council officers have investigated this request and at this time it is considered to be a low priority as it would be an expensive undertaking due to the length of the path required and the community benefit sought. The site is subject to frequent dumping and other antisocial behaviour.

 

Residents request the development of a playground in reserve land off Boundary Road, near the corner of Boundary Road and Enterprise Road, including play areas for young children and fitness equipment suited to families. This site is a drainage reserve and is not suitable as a playground. There is no playground proposed for this site at this time.

 

 

Highlights from other activities of the Neighbourhood Renewal Program

 

Local Government Arts and Culture Award

 

In May 2014 the Neighbourhood Renewal Team was invited to present at the 2014 Local Government Arts and Culture Awards and Summit as part of the Vivid Festival in Sydney. The team were awarded for Community Participation in Arts and Culture: Young People for Wearing the Crown a project which engaged 140 children and young people across Werrington and North St Marys during 2012 and 2013 in the development of the North St Marys and Werrington Neighbourhood Action Plans.   

 

Magical Play Spaces

 

The Magical Play Spaces initiative has focussed on three parks in the east of the City including:

 

·    Warrego Reserve, North St Marys

·    Jack Jewry Reserve, St Marys

·    Kevin Maley Reserve, Colyton.

 

This project has engaged three artists to create public artworks with functional elements for each playground. The project is intended to inspire the imagination, providing opportunities for local residents, especially children and young people, to participate in creating the work in their neighbourhood.

 

Artist Henryk Topiniki has designed, fabricated and installed a basketball tree in collaboration with children at Warrego Reserve North St Marys.

 

IMG_9653

 

Henryk has also developed seating for Jack Jewry Reserve incorporating design ideas and motifs developed in collaboration with local families. These beautiful functional pieces will be installed in early September.

 

Diamando Koutsellis, a local ceramics artist, has undertaken an extensive participatory process to develop a mosaic seating area in Warrego Reserve. Diamando collaboratively designed the work and hand pressed the tiles with children and young people who live near the reserve.

 

Artist Graham Chalcroft has developed a ‘magical guardians’ work with young people at Kevin Maley Reserve in Colyton. The work represents the ideas of local young people who participated in a series of design workshops with Graham. The work will be installed in September and October 2014.  The guardians are like gargoyles are intended to look over the park and protect those within it. 

 

This year the Neighbourhood Renewal team has also worked closely with the Parks Department, Public Domain, Safety and Amenity Department and local community organisations to address antisocial behaviour in Jack Jewry Reserve in St Marys and Kevin Maley Park in Colyton. Efforts have included a series of youth recreation afternoons in Kevin Maley Park and a youth week event organised by young people in Colyton

 

Magnetic Places Neighbourhood Renewal Community and Cultural Grants Program

 

In 2013-14 Council endorsed funding for seven projects through Magnetic Places totalling $43,500. Many residents participated in Magnetic Places activities and events across the City.  Local residents are leading and collaborating with artists, community organisations and businesses to activate community meeting places with priority given to the established areas of the City.

 

Magnetic Places Eflyer02 

The Magnetic Places e-flier for 2014 calling for submissions

 

Programs receive support from Council officers in the application process and also during the life of the project. Applications received for the 2014-15 funding round included artists, community organisations, cultural organisations and local residents focussed on community engagement and place making across Penrith City.

This year, the photographer Mike Chin was invited to document each of the Magnetic Places projects resulting in a range of beautiful images of people and places within our neighbourhoods. These images have been used extensively this year to promote the program.

Council will receive a report on this program early next quarter.

 

Werrington Lakes

 

During the consultation process in Werrington during 2012 and 2013, Werrington Lakes was identified as an important community asset to residents, particularly families and young people.

 

The Community Engagement Officer has been supporting the Parks Department with proposed enhancements to Werrington Lakes through conducting creative community engagement activities and liaising with residents and other stakeholders on behalf of Council.

 

This work included a Family Fun Day in December 2013 and a Resident Led Tour of the lake and surrounding park land in February 2014. These events allowed the team to gather information on the ideas and usage of the space from various stakeholders including local families, young people, sporting groups, and older residents.

 

The team have maintained ongoing correspondence and advocacy as part of this project, providing information to residents and ensuring the data collected has been represented in the development of plans. It is expected that the Parks Department will complete planned works by the end of 2014.

 

Artist and Community Toolkit

 

The Artists and Community Toolkit is an ongoing series of workshops that are designed to build capacity with local artists and community groups to respond to community ideas and initiatives.

 

Throughout the year workshops are held on a variety of topics. Highlights this year included an information session on funding opportunities with Community Partnerships and the new Artists with Disability Program.

 

Most recently a workshop was held in June 2014 at Cranebrook Neighbourhood Centre for Aboriginal artists with Patricia Adjei, Indigenous Communications Coordinator and Legal Officer from the Copyright Agency. At this workshop, local Aboriginal artist Janice Bruny, shared her practical experiences. The workshop looked in depth at copyright for Aboriginal artists, resale royalties and Indigenous Cultural Intellectual Property Rights.

 

Callisto Drive Playground Enhancement Project

 

In April 2014 young people representing the Indigenous Leadership Group and Student Representative Council of Cranebrook High School presented their ideas for building a stronger neighbourhood in Cranebrook to a panel of local leaders including the Mayor, Councillor Ross Fowler OAM.

 

Many of the young people spoke about perceived stigma associated with living in Cranebrook and expressed a desire for a renewal of public spaces such as parks and playgrounds. Supported by the Mayor, Councillor Fowler OAM and the Neighbourhood Renewal Team the young leaders have prepared a concept for the enhancement of the Callisto Drive playground and made a submission to Councils Operational Plan on 23 June 2014.

 

With the Operational Plan adopted the young people are now working in collaboration with the Neighbourhood Renewal Team, Parks Department and Design and Major Projects Department to design and document the delivery of the enhanced ground. Young people will also create a public art work for the space.

 

IMG_9007

Vicki Cotter and Michaela Price, Cranebrook High School, sitting with their student colleagues before

presenting to Council, June 2014

 

 

Other Projects

 

A number of small but significant physical infrastructure projects have been delivered throughout the year according to resident priorities established with NAPs. Many of these have been delivered through the City Works Department and include footpath works in Kalang Avenue and Camira Street, St Marys and John Oxley Avenue, Werrington.

 

Next steps for Neighbourhood Renewal

                                                                                                                       

As the agreed approach to developing Neighbourhood Action Plans is now complete and funding for the Neighbourhood Renewal Program ceases in June 2015, with endorsement from Council, the team will begin to develop a proposed new model based on current practice and the critical observations from the team and other stakeholders.   

 

This proposal will be developed in consultation with Councillors and other departments, as well as community partners and funding bodies such as NSW Family and Community Services.  A report outlining the approach and possible funding scenarios will be presented early in the next quarter for Council’s consideration.

 

Conclusion

 

The Neighbourhood Renewal Program provides an integrated model of community engagement and cultural development in older established neighbourhoods. All activities seek to build on the strengths and assets within each community.

 

The Penrith Neighbourhood Renewal Program is focussed on suburbs considered to be of relative disadvantage as measured through the ABS SEIFA Index, including Cambridge Park and Cranebrook.

 

The engagement process in Cambridge Park and Cranebrook utilised a range of creative methods, including dance and hip hop workshops, film, and craft as well as conventional methods such as surveys, interviews, community events and community planning sessions to engage with a broad range of residents in the two priority neighbourhoods. There was a specific strategy to engage Aboriginal residents in both neighbourhoods.

 

The community planning sessions served to provide feedback to the residents and provide an opportunity for them to hear each other and set community priorities for Council to consider in its planning. These sessions supported the development of the Cambridge Park Neighbourhood Action Plan 2014 and Cranebrook Neighbourhood Action Plan 2014. Importantly the Cranebrook NAP has also been negotiated with the Cranebrook Neighbourhood Advisory Board. These plans are provided as Appendix 2 and Appendix 3. All actions within these plans have been carefully negotiated with the relevant Council officers. Where appropriate, some actions are already underway or completed.

 

Substantial work is continuing in other priority neighbourhoods and projects are delivering positive outcomes for the community. Progress is being made on the actions identified in the plans already endorsed by Council in previous years and the Neighbourhood Renewal Program continues to actively engage with local communities to build capacity and contribute to wellbeing.

 

Finally, funding for the Neighbourhood Renewal Program will cease in June 2015. The Neighbourhood Renewal Program team will be leading a process of review and development of a new model over coming months to continue this valuable program for Penrith City Council.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Neighbourhood Renewal Program - Cambridge Park and Cranebrook Neighbourhood Action Plans be received.

2.    Council endorse the Cambridge Park Neighbourhood Action Plan 2014 and the Cranebrook Neighbourhood Action Plan 2014 as provided.

3.    Council endorse that a proposal for a new model for Neighbourhood Renewal commence.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.  

Community Engagement

4 Pages

Attachments Included

2.  

Cambridge Park Neighbourhood Action Plan 2014

6 Pages

Attachments Included

3.  

Cranebrook Neighbourhood Action Plan 2014

8 Pages

Attachments Included

  


Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                             8 September 2014

 

 

 

5

South Creek Historic Park Proposal   

 

Compiled by:               Michael Jackson, Design and Projects Manager

Authorised by:            David Burns, Executive Manager - City Assets  

 

Outcome

We have safe, vibrant places

Strategy

Improve our public spaces and places

Service Activity

Manage the development of master plans and designs for Council's assets and public domain

 

Presenters:                  Michael Jackson - Design & Projects Manager - South Creek Park      

 

Executive Summary

A review of the South Creek Historic Park proposal was requested as part of the resolution concerning the construction of the new Bennet Wagon enclosure.  The review has been undertaken in consultation with the St Marys District and Historical Society and recommends that the Historic Park proposal be set aside, while historical interpretation opportunities are maximised and the recreation trail concept be retained.

Background

In November 1983 an application for Bicentennial Endorsement was made by Penrith City Council for the South Creek Historic Park project.  The Council submission was created with the assistance of retired Council surveyor and engineer, Mr L Stapleton, and Mrs E Stapleton of the St Marys Historical Society as it was then known.  The submission noted that Council resolved on 21 July 1983 that they would proceed with landscaping of the park, and provide assistance to the South Creek Park Development Committee for the development of the historical village should appropriate grant funds become available.  A copy of the submission is attached.

 

The proposal envisaged a Historic Park of approximately 5km in length linking the working farm of Mamre to the King family’s property of Dunheved, following the approximate alignment of South Creek.  Central to the park concept was a reconstructed historic village at South Creek Park, adjacent to the Great Western Highway.

 

The historic village was to build upon the proposed reconstruction of a Blacksmiths Shop and the Bennett Wagon enclosure on the site, along with a relocated CWA Hall.  The intent was to relocate or recreate other buildings of historic significance, including the Post Office, so as to “show the way of life of the early farmers, townspeople and tradesmen”.  The land on the western side of the creek opposite the current park was proposed to be a model farm.

 

The park would also be the ‘focus for trails to Mamre House and Dunheved – these trails would cater for horse-riding, walking and “fun and fitness”’.

Current Status

The Bicentennial application was not successful in securing funding at the time; however progress was made on the recreation of the Blacksmiths Shop which was built on the site as planned.  Unfortunately the relocated CWA Hall was later destroyed by fire and the bricks from the St Marys Post Office disappeared after being transported to a stockpile site for future reconstruction.  South Creek Park remains a pleasant space with trees around its street boundaries providing a visual barrier to the traffic on the Great Western Highway and Charles Hackett Drive, and some large trees within the park providing shelter to a number of picnic tables. 

 

The Park features an amphitheatre shaped bank down to the creek edge and the nearest public amenities infrastructure is located in Victoria Park diagonally opposite, accessed by crossing Charles Hackett Drive and the Great Western Highway at signalised intersections.  The Victoria Park amenities are scheduled for replacement in 2014/15 and will now be retained in a location relatively close to the signalised intersection.

 

The park is currently used for passive recreation and is also visited by individuals and groups who view the Blacksmiths Shop recreation and the Bennett wagon.  The groups are often guided by volunteer members of the St Marys & District Historical Society and include classes from the local schools.

 

The concept of a path from Mamre to Dunheved along South Creek is noted in Council’s PATHS strategy document.  The shared path (bicycle and pedestrian use) shown in that document runs from the M4 through to Dunheved, so only a small section south from the M4 to Mamre Homestead is missing from that strategy.  The PATHS strategy has very limited funding compared to its scope and this trail is not currently prioritised.

 

The current adopted master plan for the Gipps St site has a connection to the edge of South Creek and also includes a pathway along South Creek, while the RMS Shared Path program is currently funding construction of shared path infrastructure from St Marys to Penrith along the southern side of the Great Western Highway.  The RMS funded project is proposing a dedicated shared path bridge across South Creek on the southern side of the highway and tendering for that bridge construction has commenced.

 

South Creek Park currently uses a large section of the old road alignment of Charles Hackett Drive as a parking area.  This area is already offering a relatively large number of off street car spaces and potential coach access in comparison to other parks of its size.

Review of Proposal

The concept of relocating or recreating historic buildings is one that has fallen from favour since 1983, however there are already two significant attractions on site which creates the opportunity for interpretation and learning which can elaborate on many of the other significant places nearby and provide a focus for tours and heritage appreciation. 

 

A recreation trail from Mamre to Dunheved through the park is consistent with the PATHS strategy; however it is not currently prioritised.

 

Park users must rely on amenities in Victoria Park where there are also Heritage items and interpretation so the two parks can conceivably work in concert. There are already three amenities located in the immediate area (Kokoda Park, West Lane & Victoria Park).  Additional amenities in South Creek Park are not currently planned or budgeted.

 

Council has commenced construction for an enlarged Bennett Wagon enclosure in South Creek Park which would house the two additional wagons currently owned by Council.  In conjunction with that project, a new interpretation opportunity will deliver a contemporary response to the original 1983 proposal.  The combined structure which houses the additional two wagons and a learning/interpretation function offers a comprehensive response to this opportunity.

Historical Society Comments

The draft of this report has been discussed with the St Marys & District Historical Society (The Society) who noted their general concurrence with the content and recommendations of this report.  The Society had planned to occupy the former CWA Hall on the site which would have provided some opportunity to staff the proposed Historic Village, and with their subsequent accommodation at the St Marys Corner site, a contemporary proposal would have to be very different.  The Society noted that they are volunteers and are only ‘opened’ during limited periods per week, which is not suited to the concept of staffing a model village open to the public on an extensive ongoing basis.

 

During our review meeting, the Society members also mentioned a number of more general amenity issues which were felt to be of benefit to future park usage.  These are listed below along with comments from the relevant Council department managers:

 

-    Provision of additional tables, a BBQ facility and rubbish bins in the park.

-    Response - Additional tables and bins can be installed as required in response to the level of facility utilisation. At this stage there are no plans to install a BBQ facility on this site. A new BBQ is being installed at Victoria Park as part of upgrade works.

-    Provision of exercise or playground equipment in the park, possibly linked as a pause point on the Heritage/Recreation trail concept.

-    Response - No playground equipment is proposed for the site. Playground equipment is being upgraded in Victoria Park as part of upgrade works. Two playgrounds in such close proximity would not generally be supported.

-    Response - A future exercise station linked to the recreation Path concept could have merit in light of emerging trends towards this equipment offering, but would be considered in context of the various recreation sites along that proposed future recreation pathway.

-    Provision of Dog waste bag dispenser and appropriate bins

-    Dog dispenser bags can be provided along with bins as above.

-    Provision of warning signage regarding Magpies

-    Magpies signs are placed in response to community concerns during the breeding season – August to September. If there is an issue at this site a sign can be installed until the breeding season has concluded.

-    Vegetation management and weed clearing along the entire South Creek riparian corridor

-    Council has very limited resources to undertake this work. Grant funding has enabled some weed removal and revegetation to be undertaken along the corridor in previous years. Management along the corridor is further complicated by the fact that the subject land is under the control of multiple public and private land owners.

 

The above park amenity items will be noted for inclusion in future planning and budget setting.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on South Creek Historic Park Proposal be received.

2.    The new wagon enclosure include broader St Marys Heritage interpretation signage.

3.    The Recreation Trail remain in the PATHS strategy with an option to be considered to extend south from the M4 to Mamre Homestead.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.  

South Creek Historic Park  Application for Bicentennial Endorsement, PCC, November 1983

15 Pages

Attachments Included

   


 

 

Outcome 5 - We care about our environment

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


 

 

Outcome 6 - We're healthy and share strong community spirit

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


Outcome 7 - We have confidence in our Council

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

6        2013-14 Year in Review                                                                                                   55

 

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                             8 September 2014

 

 

 

6

2013-14 Year in Review   

 

Compiled by:               Allegra Zakis, Corporate Planning Co-ordinator

Authorised by:            Fiona Plesman, Organisational Performance and Development Manager  

 

Outcome

We have confidence in our Council

Strategy

Provide opportunities for our community to participate in making decisions about the City's future

Service Activity

Manage Council's corporate reporting

 

Presenter:                    Alan Stoneham - General Manager - Penrith City Council - 2013-14 Year in Review      

 

Executive Summary

The Organisational Performance Report – June 2014 was adopted at Council’s Ordinary Meeting on 25 August 2014.  The June 2014 Report showed 98% of Councils 124 service activities as on target, 85% of 79 actions, 77% of 151 capital projects and 87% of 106 operating projects were ‘on target’ or ‘completed’.

 

The June 2014 Organisational Performance Report outlined Council’s financial position as sound and with a surplus of $34,216 for 2014-15 noting that Council’s financial position demonstrates strong financial management and has been achieved after allowing for a number of transfers to Reserves.

 

The General Manager seeks the opportunity to present to the Policy Review Committee an overview of the achievements and challenges that lie ahead in the delivery of the City Strategic Plan and Delivery Program.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the information contained in the report on 2013-14 Year in Review be received.

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.  



 

ATTACHMENTS   

 

 

Date of Meeting:     Monday 8 September 2014

Report Title:            Penrith CBD Corporation Business Plan 2014-15

Attachments:           Penrith CBD Corporation Annual Operation Plan

                                Penrith CBD Corporation Triennial Business Plan



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                           8 September 2014

Attachment 1 - Penrith CBD Corporation Annual Operation Plan

 

PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                           8 September 2014

Attachment 2 - Penrith CBD Corporation Triennial Business Plan

 

PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator



 

ATTACHMENTS   

 

 

Date of Meeting:     Monday 8 September 2014

Report Title:            Neighbourhood Renewal Program - Cambridge Park and Cranebrook Neighbourhood Action Plans

Attachments:           Community Engagement

                                Cambridge Park Neighbourhood Action Plan 2014

                                Cranebrook Neighbourhood Action Plan 2014



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                           8 September 2014

Attachment 1 - Community Engagement

 

PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                           8 September 2014

Attachment 2 - Cambridge Park Neighbourhood Action Plan 2014

 

PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                           8 September 2014

Attachment 3 - Cranebrook Neighbourhood Action Plan 2014

 

PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


 

ATTACHMENTS   

 

 

Date of Meeting:     Monday 8 September 2014

Report Title:            South Creek Historic Park Proposal

Attachments:           South Creek Historic Park  Application for Bicentennial Endorsement, PCC, November 1983



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                           8 September 2014

Attachment 1 - South Creek Historic Park  Application for Bicentennial Endorsement, PCC, November 1983

 

PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator