Council_Mark_POS_RGB

17 June 2015

 

Dear Councillor,

In pursuance of the provisions of the Local Government Act, 1993 and the Regulations thereunder, notice is hereby given that a POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING of Penrith City Council is to be held in the Passadena Room, Civic Centre, 601 High Street, Penrith on Monday 22 June 2015 at 7:00PM.

Attention is directed to the statement accompanying this notice of the business proposed to be transacted at the meeting.

Yours faithfully

 

 

Alan Stoneham

General Manager

 

BUSINESS

 

1.           LEAVE OF ABSENCE

Leave of absence has been granted to:

Councillor Greg Davies - 20 June 2015 to 29 June 2015 inclusive.

 

2.           APOLOGIES

 

3.           CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES

Policy Review Committee Meeting - 11 May 2015.

 

4.           DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

Pecuniary Interest (The Act requires Councillors who declare a pecuniary interest in an item to leave the meeting during discussion of that item)

Non-Pecuniary Conflict of Interest – Significant and Less than Significant (The Code of Conduct requires Councillors who declare a significant non-pecuniary conflict of interest in an item to leave the meeting during discussion of that item)

 

5.           ADDRESSING THE MEETING

 

6.           MAYORAL MINUTES

 

7.           NOTICES OF MOTION TO RESCIND A RESOLUTION

 

8.           NOTICES OF MOTION

 

9.           DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

10.         REQUESTS FOR REPORTS AND MEMORANDUMS

 

11.         URGENT BUSINESS

 

12.         CONFIDENTIAL BUSINESS


POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING

 

Monday 22 June 2015

 

table of contents

 

 

 

 

 

 

meeting calendar

 

 

confirmation of minutes

 

 

DELIVERY program reports

 


Council_Mark_POS_RGB2015 MEETING CALENDAR

January 2015 - December 2015

(adopted by Council on 24/11/14 and amended by Council on 25/5/15)

 

 

 

TIME

JAN

FEB

MAR

APRIL

MAY

JUNE

JULY

AUG

SEPT

OCT

NOV

DEC

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

 

Ordinary Council Meeting

7.30pm

 

2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

21^ü

(7.00pm)

 

 

14

(7.00pm)

 

23@

23

27v

25#

29*

27

24@

28

26

23#+

 

Policy Review Committee

7.00pm

 

 

 

20

11

22

13

10

14

19

9

7

 

9

9

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 v

Meeting at which the draft corporate planning documents (Delivery Program and Operational Plan) are endorsed for exhibition

 *

Meeting at which the draft corporate planning documents (Delivery Program and Operational Plan) are adopted

 #

Meetings at which the Operational Plan quarterly reviews (March and September) are presented

 @

Meetings at which the Delivery Program progress reports (including the Operational Plan quarterly reviews for December and June) are presented

 ^

Election of Mayor/Deputy Mayor

 ü

Meeting at which the 2013-2014 Annual Statements are presented

 

Meeting at which any comments on the 2013-2014 Annual Statements are presented

 +

Meeting at which the Annual Report is presented

-            Extraordinary Meetings are held as required.

-            Members of the public are invited to observe meetings of the Council (Ordinary and Policy Review Committee).

Should you wish to address Council, please contact the Senior Governance Officer, Glenn Schuil.

 


UNCONFIRMED MINUTES

 OF THE POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING OF PENRITH CITY COUNCIL HELD IN THE PASSADENA ROOM, PENRITH

ON MONDAY 11 MAY 2015 AT 7:00PM

PRESENT

His Worship the Mayor, Councillor Ross Fowler OAM, Deputy Mayor, Councillor Greg Davies and Councillors Jim Aitken OAM, Bernard Bratusa, Prue Car MP, Kevin Crameri OAM, Marcus Cornish, Mark Davies, Maurice Girotto, Ben Goldfinch, Jackie Greenow OAM, Tricia Hitchen (arrived 7:12pm), Karen McKeown, John Thain and Michelle Tormey.

 

 

APOLOGIES

There were no apologies.

 

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES - Policy Review Committee Meeting - 20 April 2015

PRC 32  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Karen McKeown seconded Councillor Bernard Bratusa that the minutes of the Policy Review Committee Meeting of 20 April 2015 be confirmed.

 

 

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

 

Nil.

 

 

ADDRESSING THE MEETING

 

Joanne Crosthwaite

 

Item 2 –  Western Sydney Airport - Badgerys Creek

 

Ms Crosthwaite, President of No Badgerys Creek Airport Inc, spoke in opposition to the siting of the airport at Badgerys Creek.  Ms Crosthwaite stated that she does not represent a political party but was concerned that Council’s report now appears to support the siting of the airport at Badgerys Creek, and in particular that the report may suggest that noise will not be an issue of concern. Ms Crosthwaite also stated that she believed the community had not been sufficiently consulted and therefore does not understand the issues associated with locating an airport in the proposed area. 

 

PRC 33  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Marcus Cornish seconded Councillor Jim Aitken OAM that an extension of time be granted to enable the speaker to complete her address, the time being 7:10pm.

 

Councillor Tricia Hitchen arrived at the meeting, the time being 7:12pm.

 

Ms Crosthwaite concluded by stating that there are other opportunities for growth for the site rather than an airport and suggested that an infrastructure investment such as high speed rail should be investigated.

 

 

 

 

 

Peter Anderson AM

 

Item 1 –  Planning Proposal - Lots 1-4 Old Bathurst Road, Emu Plains (Cnr Russell Street)

 

Mr Anderson AM, an affected person, spoke in support of the recommendation. Mr Anderson AM stated that he believes there is no need for further industrial land in the Penrith Area and that the site should not be developed due to traffic challenges already being experienced in the area with the location of several service stations, fast food outlets etc servicing already established industrial sites.  Mr Anderson AM also stated that local residents he has spoken with have expressed their concerns in this regard.

 

PRC 34 RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Bernard Bratusa seconded Councillor Marcus Cornish that an extension of time be granted to enable the speaker to complete his address, the time being 7:20pm.

 

Mr Anderson AM concluded by stating that he would be happy to discuss any solutions with Council.

 

 

DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Outcome 2 - We plan for our future growth

 

2        Western Sydney Airport - Badgerys Creek

Assistant General Manager, Craig Butler, introduced the report and gave a brief presentation. 

PRC 35  A MOTION was MOVED by  Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Mark Davies

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Western Sydney Airport - Badgerys Creek be received.

2.     Council support the Federal Government’s decision to build an airport on the Government owned land at Badgerys Creek and seek that the forthcoming EIS for the Badgerys Creek Airport demonstrates that specific design and operational management protocols will be applied to minimise noise impacts.

3.     Council proactively engage with both Federal and State Governments to ensure the airport and associated infrastructure is delivered in a timely and deliberative manner to bring maximum benefits and uplift to Penrith and Western Sydney.

4.     Council undertake the potential actions/advocacy identified in the report.

5.     Council write to the Hon Warren Truss MP, Minister for Infrastructure and Regional Development, Mr Russell Matheson MP, Member for Macarthur, Ms Fiona Scott MP, Member for Lindsay and the Department of Infrastructure and Regional Development advising of Council’s position on the proposed airport.

6.     Council work proactively with Liverpool City Council and the relevant State and Federal Government Departments on the advance planning for the Airport and unlocking the economic potential of the Broader Western Sydney Employment Area and the South West Growth Centre.

7.     Council participate in the proposal for councils to pool their resources and engage consultants in readiness for the release of the EIS, subject to an upper limit of $60,000.

 

An AMENDMENT was moved by Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM seconded Councillor Marcus Cornish

 

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Western Sydney Airport - Badgerys Creek be received.

2.    Council undertake the potential actions/advocacy identified in this report.

3.    Council participate in the proposal for councils to pool their resources and engage consultants in readiness for the release of the EIS, subject to an upper limit of $60,000.

 

The AMENDMENT was PUT.

 

For

Against

 

Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM      

Councillor Prue Car MP

Councillor Michelle Tormey

Councillor Greg Davies

Councillor Marcus Cornish

Councillor John Thain

Councillor Maurice Girotto    

Councillor Karen McKeown

 

Councillor Jackie Greenow OAM

 

Councillor Jim Aitken OAM                     

                            

Councillor Mark Davies

 

Councillor Ben Goldfinch

 

Councillor Tricia Hitchen

 

Councillor Bernard Bratusa   

 

Councillor Ross Fowler OAM

 

The AMENDMENT was LOST.

The MOTION was PUT.

For

Against

 

Councillor Prue Car MP

Councillor Michelle Tormey

Councillor Greg Davies

Councillor Maurice Girotto              

Councillor John Thain

Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM

Councillor Karen McKeown

Councillor Marcus Cornish

Councillor Jackie Greenow OAM

 

Councillor Jim Aitken OAM

 

Councillor Mark Davies

 

Councillor Ben Goldfinch

 

Councillor Tricia Hitchen

 

Councillor Bernard Bratusa   

 

Councillor Ross Fowler OAM

 

 

The MOTION was CARRIED.

 

 

1        Planning Proposal - Lots 1-4 Old Bathurst Road, Emu Plains (Cnr Russell Street)

Executive Officer, Glenn McCarthy introduced the report and invited Shaun Lawer from GHD to give a presentation.

Councillors Marcus Cornish and Michelle Tormey left the meeting, the time being 8:00pm.

Councillors Marcus Cornish and Michelle Tormey returned to the meeting, the time being 8:01pm.

 

Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM left the meeting, the time being 8:05pm.

Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM returned to the meeting, the time being 8:10pm.

PRC 36  A MOTION was moved by Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM seconded Councillor Michelle Tormey

That:

1.    The information contained in this report and the report of Shaun Lawer, Senior Planner, on Planning Proposal - Lots 1-4 Old Bathurst Road, Emu Plains (Cnr Russell Street) be received.

2.    Council request the Minister for Planning to determine that the matter not proceed on the basis that the provisions of the Planning Proposal are inconsistent with Section 117 Direction 4.3 and that the inconsistency is not considered to be of minor significance.

An AMENDMENT was moved by Councillor John Thain seconded Councillor Greg Davies

That:

1.    The information contained in this report and the report of Shaun Lawer, Senior Planner, on Planning Proposal - Lots 1-4 Old Bathurst Road, Emu Plains (Cnr Russell Street) be received.

 

2.    Council request the Minister for Planning to determine the matter.

 

The AMENDMENT was PUT.

 

In accordance with Section 375A of the Local Government Act 1993, a DIVISION was then called with the following result:

For

Against

 

Councillor Marcus Cornish    

Councillor Jackie Greenow OAM

Councillor Ben Goldfinch

Councillor Michelle Tormey

Councillor Mark Davies

Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM

Councillor John Thain

Councillor Bernard Bratusa   

Councillor Greg Davies

Councillor Karen McKeown

Councillor Prue Car MP

Councillor Tricia Hitchen                          

                            

Councillor Jim Aitken OAM

 

Councillor Maurice Girotto    

 

Councillor Ross Fowler OAM

 

The AMENDMENT was LOST.

 

The MOTION was PUT.

 

In accordance with Section 375A of the Local Government Act 1993, a DIVISION was then called with the following result:

For

Against

 

Councillor Jackie Greenow OAM  

Councillor Marcus Cornish

Councillor Michelle Tormey  

Councillor Ben Goldfinch

Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM

Councillor Mark Davies

Councillor Bernard Bratusa   

Councillor John Thain

Councillor Karen McKeown

Councillor Greg Davies

Councillor Tricia Hitchen

Councillor Prue Car MP

Councillor Jim Aitken OAM

                                                        

Councillor Maurice Girotto                       

 

Councillor Ross Fowler OAM

 

 

The MOTION was CARRIED.

 

 

 

Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM left the meeting at 8:30pm and did not return.

Councillor Marcus Cornish left the meeting at 8:30pm and did not return.

 

 

Outcome 7 - We have confidence in our Council

 

3        Council's Fit for the Future submission

Assistant General Manager/CFO, Barry Husking introduced the report and provided a brief overview.

Councillor Jim Aitken OAM left the meeting, the time being 8:33pm.

Councillor Jim Aitken OAM returned to the meeting, the time being 8:34pm.

         

PRC 37  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Bernard Bratusa seconded Councillor Prue Car MP

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Council's Fit for the Future submission be received.

2.    Council endorses the principles of Penrith City Council’s Fit for the Future submission.

3.    Council Officers review the IPART Fit for the Future assessment methodology and provide comment to IPART as discussed in this report.

 

 

URGENT BUSINESS

 

UB 1           Request for Leave of Absence    

Councillor Mark Davies requested Leave of Absence from 15 May 2015 to 26 May 2015 inclusive.

 

PRC 38  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Jackie Greenow OAM seconded Councillor John Thain that the matter be brought forward and dealt with as a matter of urgency.

 

His Worship the Mayor, Councillor Ross Fowler OAM, ruled that the matter was urgent and should be dealt with at the meeting.

 

 

PRC 39  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Jackie Greenow OAM seconded Councillor John Thain that Leave of Absence be granted to Councillor Mark Davies from 15 May 2015 to 26 May 2015 inclusive.

 

 

 

There being no further business the Chairperson declared the meeting closed the time being 8:35pm.

    


DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

  

Outcome 4 - We have safe, vibrant places

 

1        Community Action Plans - a new model for the Penrith Neighbourhood Renewal Program        1

 

2        Neighbourhood Action Plans - a progress report                                                             12

 

 

Outcome 5 - We care about our environment

 

3        Western Sydney Regional Illegal Dumping (RID) Squad Agreement                             25

 

 


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


 

 

Outcome 1 - We can work close to home

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


 

 

Outcome 2 - We plan for our future growth

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


 

 

Outcome 3 - We can get around the City

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


Outcome 4 - We have safe, vibrant places

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

1        Community Action Plans - a new model for the Penrith Neighbourhood Renewal Program        1

 

2        Neighbourhood Action Plans - a progress report                                                             12

 

 

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                      22 June 2015

 

 

 

1

Community Action Plans - a new model for the Penrith Neighbourhood Renewal Program   

 

Compiled by:               Heather Chaffey, Neighbourhood Renewal Coordinator 

Authorised by:            Jeni Pollard, Place Manager  

 

Outcome

We have safe, vibrant places

Strategy

Grow and revitalise our centres and neighbourhoods

Service Activity

Engage the community in identified priority established areas of the City

      

 

Executive Summary

 

The Neighbourhood Renewal Program has been active since 2006 when the Neighbourhood Renewal Coordinator was appointed. The Program has grown with the addition of a Community Engagement Officer and Cultural Development Officer in 2007 and later a part-time Local Enterprise and Employment Officer. 

 

This report will reflect on the evolution of practice in the Neighbourhood Renewal Program, and the use of Neighbourhood Action Plans as an implementation tool. Emerging theoretical influences and a proposed new model for practice are also put forward for the consideration of Council. This new model is based on the experiences of the team over the past 7 years as well as emerging trends in place-based leadership and across local government.

 

A VIP resident from North St Marys

 

The new model will build on the success of the current Neighbourhood Renewal Program and create opportunity for residents and other local stakeholders to increase their participation in decision making about their neighbourhood.

 

If endorsed, the new model could follow this approach in high priority neighbourhoods:

 

a.   Build a local team that includes residents, local business, local community services, schools as well as other local stakeholders,

b.   Support the local team to deliberate on local issues and create a Community Action Plan with local projects aimed at addressing the agreed core issues,

c.   Support the local team to establish an operating structure and a succession plan whereby Council hands over the coordination role over a period of two years,

d.   Council and other members of the team work individually or collectively as appropriate to achieve agreed goals set out in the Community Action Plan,

e.   Council to hand over coordination of the local team or support the team to wrap up following implementation of their Community Action Plan.

 

In the first twelve months it is proposed to pilot the program in Colyton due to the identified social issues in the community and the already strong partnerships with residents and other stakeholders. There is considerable stated desire within this community to participate in local change and willing local services to partner in the pilot.

 

This report recommends that Council receive the information contained in the report on Community Action Plans - a new model for the Penrith Neighbourhood Renewal Program. The report also recommends that Council endorse the proposed new model as outlined for the pilot program in Colyton and that Council receive a further report early in 2016 with an update on progress of the pilot program and a proposed schedule for the roll out of the program across identified areas of the City.

 

Background

 

The Neighbourhood Renewal Program provides an integrated model of community engagement, cultural development and programs supporting access to employment across identified disadvantaged neighbourhoods in Penrith City. The program responds to Council’s long standing emphasis on resourcing older established neighbourhoods and operates within a strengths based framework.

 

The program blends place making and creative community engagement with community cultural development practice and supports education and employment initiatives. It offers funding for community and cultural programs with a focus on place making through the Magnetic Places Neighbourhood Renewal Community Cultural Grants Program.

 

Young participants of the Callisto Playground Enhancement Project Cranebrook 2014 with Mayor, Clr Ross Fowler OAM and Clr John Thain

At its core, Neighbourhood Renewal is about equity and supporting robust and harmonious communities. The focus remains on working with residents to address concerns by identifying strengths and assets in order to build on them as well as the social, economic and physical environment needs. This might include projects typically considered to be within Council’s role such as, parks, roads, rubbish and rates but it has also included community development and economic development projects. 

 

The community engagement process has occurred across 12 neighbourhoods since 2006.  Neighbourhood Action Plans (NAPs) have been produced in collaboration with residents and other stakeholders for each of these 12 priority neighbourhoods.

Why Council has a Neighbourhood Renewal Program

In 2006 Council made a commitment to work towards better coordination of the resources directed towards older established areas of the City. Improved planning processes and an increasing sophistication in our approaches to new release areas had highlighted the disparity experienced by residents in older established areas. Council felt it was important to resource a coordinated approach to these priority areas.

Statistical analysis undertaken by the Neighbourhood Renewal program confirmed a link between socio-economic disadvantage and older established areas of the City.

A further nexus was shown that those older established areas considered to be most disadvantaged were on the whole also receiving less service provision from Council in terms of maintenance spending on footpaths, playgrounds, road networks etc.  It was further hypothesized, that residents from these areas are not receiving equitable access to other city-wide services such as regional sporting facilities, library services, children’s services and cultural facilities. Information gathered through the community engagement work of the Neighbourhood Renewal Program from 2006-2015 supports this hypothesis. 

 

Artists and patrons of RePresenting Colyton 2012

The selection of priority neighbourhoods for Neighbourhood Renewal 2006-2015

The social indicators used to identify areas of relative social advantage and disadvantage are those developed by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) and are known as the Socio-Economic Indexes for Areas (SEIFA). These indexes are used by many organisations for planning purposes, including government departments, local government and market strategists.

The ABS defines relative advantage and disadvantage in relation to people's access to material and social resources, and their ability to participate in society. The variables that make up the SEIFA Index include:

 

·    Educational attainment

·    Income

·    Occupation

·    Wealth

·    Access to services (Internet)

·    Higher % of Indigenous residents and/or residents with lower fluency in English.

 

This last variable is not seen as causal to disadvantage but likely to be associated with disadvantage generally.

 

Descriptions of the demographic characteristics making up each of these indexes are complex and it is important to understand that the scores are relative, that is, they are comparisons between areas of certain identified characteristics.

 

Neighbourhood Renewal Priority Neighbourhoods

 

Based on the SEIFA Index developed from the 2006 Census and confirmed by the 2011 Census, the Neighbourhood Renewal Program has focussed on the following 12 suburbs or localities:

 

·    Cambridge Park

·    Cranebrook

·    Colyton

·    Kingswood

·    Kingswood Park

·    Llandilo

·    Londonderry

·    North St Marys

·    Oxley Park

·    Penrith

·    St Marys

·    Werrington

 

At the time of the 2011 Census, these 12 neighbourhoods fell below the NSW average for advantage and are therefore considered to be relatively disadvantaged.

 

Program Funding

 

The Neighbourhood Renewal Program was funded for 10 years through the Asset Renewal and Established Areas Strategy (AREAS) special rates initiative in 2006. This funding will come to an end in June 2016.

 

In 2011 Council was able to secure additional funding through a Special Rates Variation to leverage implementation of actions identified in Neighbourhood Action Plans. This funding is $240,000 per annum with $50,000 per year allocated to the Magnetic Places grants program.

 

This small but significant funding has leveraged a wide range of capital projects to date including contributions to the footpath network, playground enhancements and small public art and place making projects in collaboration with local residents.

 

With the endorsement of the Cranebrook and Cambridge Park Neighbourhood Action Plans in 2014, the final 2 of 12 plans, there was an opportunity to review the existing program and ensure that it is operating effectively. The Neighbourhood Renewal team have been working to collect feedback on the 369 actions listed and to compile a report on the status of these actions for Council. The Neighbourhood Action Plans – a progress report accompanies this report to the Policy Review Committee Meeting tonight.

 

 

Seniors Morning Tea Cambridge Park 2013

 

 

Fresh eyes and a fresh approach

As Councillors would be aware the Neighbourhood Renewal Program has in the last few years transitioned from sitting within the Community and Cultural Development Department to the Place Management Department. This has resulted in some changes in the structure of the program, a change in some staff positions and an opportunity to review and refresh the program.

Following a highly successful and contested recruitment process the Neighbourhood Renewal Program has a full complement of staff including Heather Chaffey, Program Coordinator, Lila Kennelly, Community Engagement Officer, Donita Hulme, Cultural Engagement Officer and Stephanie Roper, Economic Participation Officer (part time).

The Neighbourhood Renewal team has recently undergone an extensive literature review and workshop process with the Australian Centre for Excellence in Local Government based at the University of Technology Sydney. This process has provided a framework for the team and the Place Manager to critically review the outcomes of the program to date, reflect on industry innovations and to identify strategies for strengthening our contribution to social and economic change in priority neighbourhoods.

As part of this process the team has developed a purpose statement for the program moving ahead.

Neighbourhood Renewal supports positive change by working with people where they live to enhance the wellbeing of their neighbourhood as a healthy, safe and vibrant place.  

The purpose statement provides a clear description to community partners on the aims of the Neighbourhood Renewal Program and aligns the program within the Community Strategic Plan.

 

Further to this, the major recommendations emerging from this review process are discussed below.

 

Students of Llandilo Public School – part of the Llandilo Lanterns Project in 2010

 

Critical analysis of the program to date and recommendations moving forward

 

The program has been very successful both in terms of reach and outcomes. Many successful events and award winning social, cultural and capital programs have been established and acquitted. The strength of the program has clearly lain in the capacity to leverage physical works to enhance the priority neighbourhoods which in many instances, and on feedback from residents, has proved to be highly effective. This has improved how residents have felt about their neighbourhood and how they have felt about Council. 

 

The program has had most impact on matters which Council can take a leading role through our own services and Council controlled resources. Where other stakeholders, such as residents, community services, or State agencies might be better placed to respond to economic and social issues, less progress has been made.

 

Officers involved in the program have observed that there are opportunities for Council to have greater impact on social and economic conditions for residents. Based on this belief, research was undertaken in conjunction with UTS to explore a new, place based model for Neighbourhood Renewal that builds on the existing strengths whilst at the same time working with residents to empower them to make impact within their own community.

 

This place-based leadership approach is influenced by ideas such as Collective Impact (www.collectiveimpactaustralia.com ) and projects such as the Total Place Initiative in the UK (www.localleadership.gov.uk/totalplace ). These examples teach us that we can become more strategic by bringing partners on board to contribute other resources, including the skills and funding of other services, and the skills and self-determined advocacy of residents. This, in theory, will create greater community and resident ownership of the process, outcomes and decision making.

 

 

The New Model - Community Action Plans, ‘Local Teams’ and Public Value

 

The new model will build on the success of the current Neighbourhood Renewal Program and create opportunity for residents and other local stakeholders to increase their participation in decision making about their neighbourhood.

 

If endorsed, the new model could follow this approach in high priority neighbourhoods:

 

a)   Build a local team that includes residents, local business, local community services, schools as well as other local stakeholders,

b)   Support the local team to deliberate on local issues and create a Community Action Plan with local projects aimed at addressing the agreed core issues,

c)   Support the local team to establish an operating structure and a succession plan whereby Council hands over the coordination role over a period of two years,

d)   Council and others members of the team work individually or collectively as appropriate to achieve agreed goals set out in the Community Action Plan,

e)   Council to hand over coordination of the local team or support the team to wrap up following implementation of their Community Action Plan.

 

Central to the development of a new model for Neighbourhood Renewal are a number of concepts. These concepts are:

 

The Local Team

 

A local team is made up of residents, businesses, community services and other community stakeholders. A local team comes together to decide what are the important issues for each community and how they will resolve these issues. Each local team has a ‘backbone’ organisation which in the first instance will be Council.

 

A local team is a collaborative model whereby Council resources are utilised to continue to improve the physical environment, provide community engagement opportunities, and to coordinate stakeholders to work collectively. This approach will make best use of all available resources and to create change by identifying a common agenda and working collaboratively on those issues.

 

The concept of a local team is borrowed from the Total Place Initiative in the UK (www.localleadership.gov.uk/totalplace) and refers to a coalition of stakeholders including Council, business, State agencies such as Health, Police, and family and Community Services as well as Public Schools, local recreational clubs, social and support groups, churches and faith groups, businesses and importantly residents.

 

The local team will work together to map strengths and issues of concern for residents, find potential resources and skills, identify shared objectives and work towards positive change in those areas.

 

The local team in each community would be provided with a detailed demographic profile of their neighbourhood to support decision making and would be supported by the Neighbourhood Renewal team through a facilitated process of identifying shared concerns and objectives for the ‘local team’.

 

Community Action Plans

 

These plans are developed by the local team, focussed on key issues residents would like to see change and clearly indicating who has taken responsibility for leading each action. Some of the actions will be the responsibility of Council but others will be the responsibility of community services, State agencies, residents or other stakeholders.

 

Feedback from residents and community partners has highlighted that it is difficult to influence change through capacity building in a 12 month period. It is recommended that future work, which will develop local teams and Community Action Plans, should be based on three year cycles of establishment (year1), leadership (year 2) and self-determination (year 3).

 

Requests of Council which are considered to be ‘business as usual’ will not be included in the Community Action Plan. These requests and responses will be managed through Council’s existing mechanisms for customer requests and record keeping and will be supported by the Neighbourhood Renewal team including the provision of feedback to residents.

 

 

 

Public Value

 

Public value describes the value that an organisation contributes to society. The term was originally coined to draw a parallel to shareholder value in public management. Local government is uniquely positioned to create public value in neighbourhood renewal communities.

 

The proposed new model is based on leveraging the public value of Council, viewing our Councillors as assets with political legitimacy and considerable influence to advocate on behalf of the community.  Local businesses are also assets and contributors of innovation and employment opportunity and they will also be approached to use their considerable influence and standing to support communities to act on issues of concern.

 

Innovation Zones

 

 

 

Timing of the new model

 

This approach would enable the program to develop local teams in high priority neighbourhoods with one new team starting each year. The Neighbourhood Renewal Program is aiming to move away from each local team at the end of the third year as projects become autonomous or come to a natural end having achieved desired outcomes.

 

Innovative responses to local issues will occur where the political, managerial and community /business realms come together. The Neighbourhood Renewal Program is now seeking more innovative approaches to local issues through resident led action and self-determination, Councillor led advocacy, and by building new connections with business.

 

It is proposed that by effectively engaging business in the ‘local team’ resources and opportunities which have previously not been identified and utilised may open up to create innovative solutions to local issues.  

 

Piloting the proposed new model of service delivery in Colyton – Community Action Plans

 

Having built considerable goodwill in Colyton over recent projects including the enhancement of Kevin Maley Park and various continuing community engagement initiatives, Council’s endorsement is sought to pilot this improved approach to neighbourhood renewal in Colyton.

 

Existing connections with businesses, schools, residents and community services will lend considerable strength to the creation of a ‘local team’ for the purpose of piloting this approach.

 

There are no proposed changes to the staffing structure of the team located in the Place Management Department. Each staff member will contribute to the ‘local team’ whilst retaining the specialities of their various roles; program coordination, community engagement, economic participation and cultural engagement. The new model will work within the current resources and require no additional funding.

 

The Magnetic Places Neighbourhood Renewal Community Cultural Grants program and the Penrith Mayoral Challenge will continue to operate as they have in previous years. A formal review of the Magnetic Places program is currently underway and will inform some minor changes to administrative processes in order to maximise efficiency and capacity building for applicants and staff.

 

Should Council endorse this approach it is recommended that North St Marys would be the next area to be considered for the roll out of the new model.

 

Council will receive a further report early in 2016 with an update on progress of the pilot program and a proposed schedule for the roll out of the program across other identified areas of the City.

 

 

Mayor, Clr Ross Fowler OAM with students participating in this year’s

Mayoral Challenge - Colyton

 

Conclusion

 

The Neighbourhood Renewal Program has generated significant outcomes for Council and for the 12 priority neighbourhoods it has served between 2006 and 2015. It has provided an important avenue for residents to have a say in decisions, which affect their neighbourhood, and to share stories of strength and resilience.

 

The program has produced 12 Neighbourhood Action Plans developed  in collaboration with residents with information gathered through 140 engagement activities, events and projects. Many residents have benefited from its success in the areas of place making, community engagement, community cultural development and employment. The Neighbourhood Renewal team also oversees the  Magnetic Places Community Cultural Grants Program which has delivered 60 events in local communities over recent years. 

 

Having developed the final two of the Neighbourhood Action Plans, endorsed by Council in December 2014, and with a full complement of staff, a timely review of the program has been conducted. This has produced a progress report on the status of Neighbourhood Action Plans and a proposed new model to pilot in Colyton.

 

This report has provided an overview of the history and funding status of the Neighbourhood Renewal Program, some critical analysis of the program from 2006-15, and a summary of the proposed approach moving forward.

 

Important features of this new approach include:

 

·    The transition from Neighbourhood Action Plans (plans of Council) to Community Action Plans (where various stakeholders take responsibility for actions)

·    Local teams – formal structures for the planning, implementation and review of Community Action Plans over three years

·    Council’s role as a ‘backbone organisation’ or driver the process in the first year and building capacity for handover of this role within two years

·    Increased focus on ‘public value’ through opportunities for  involvement of Councillors and local business in community engagement and advocacy

 

The Neighbourhood Renewal Program is set to build on the existing work of the past and move on to a new era. The program is pushing the boundaries of community engagement to build positive narratives of disadvantaged neighbourhoods and to support residents to self-determine and self-advocate by being part of quality civic engagement processes. The work is important, it reflects Council’s commitment to equity and to doing the very best it can for all of its communities. This review period has produced a promising model for future practice, one designed for innovation and empowerment.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Community Action Plans - a new model for the Penrith Neighbourhood Renewal Program be received.

2.    Council endorse the proposed new model as outlined for the pilot program in Colyton.

3.    Council receive a further report early in 2016 with an update on progress of the pilot program and a proposed schedule for the roll out of the program across identified areas of the City.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                      22 June 2015

 

 

 

2

Neighbourhood Action Plans - a progress report   

 

Compiled by:               Heather Chaffey, Neighbourhood Renewal Coordinator 

Authorised by:            Jeni Pollard, Place Manager 

Requested By:            Councillor Prue Car

 

Outcome

We have safe, vibrant places

Strategy

Grow and revitalise our centres and neighbourhoods

Service Activity

Engage the community in identified priority established areas of the City

      

 

Executive Summary

This report provides Council with an update on the progress of all Neighbourhood Action Plans produced by the Neighbourhood Renewal Program since 2007. A comprehensive report is attached (Attachment 1) which provides an update on all of the actions identified in the 12 Neighbourhood Action Plans.

This report provides Council with a summary for each suburb or locality including the number of finalised actions. Where there are actions which remain unfunded these have been highlighted.

Since 2007 approximately 140 community engagement events, activities, and programs have been undertaken by the Neighbourhood Renewal Program. It is estimated that more than 10,000 residents have participated in the various activities and approximately 1000 have made direct submissions which contributed to the development of 12 Neighbourhood Action Plans. Over 70% of the actions included in those plans are now complete or underway.

 

The report recommends that Council receive the report.

Local residents at the opening of the new playground facility at

Jack Jewry Reserve, St Marys

Background

Over the past decade Council has placed increasing emphasis on balancing the resources directed towards planning and implementation in new release areas to that of older established areas of the City. Improved planning processes and increasing sophistication in our approaches to new release areas had further highlighted the disparity experienced by residents in older established areas.

 

The Neighbourhood Renewal Program, funded through the 2006 AREAS Special Rates Initiative, has been active since 2006 when the Neighbourhood Renewal Coordinator was appointed. The program has grown with the addition of a Community Engagement Officer and Cultural Development Officer in 2007 and later a part-time Local Enterprise and Employment Officer.

 

In 2011, the program received additional funds through the Special Rates Variation to facilitate capital works to be undertaken in priority neighbourhoods. The Magnetic Places Community and Cultural Grants Program is also funded through the SRV program.

 

In December 2014, Council endorsed Neighbourhood Action Plans (NAPs) for Cranebrook and Cambridge Park, with a total of 12 NAPs developed since 2007. These plans have supported the delivery of Council services in priority areas by coordinating Council resources for improved outcomes and inviting residents to engage in setting priorities for their local neighbourhood.

 

Significant and creative community engagement has been undertaken across these 12 priority neighbourhoods including events, cultural programs, community development projects, forums and community planning meetings. In addition, considerable support has been provided to partner organisations including many local schools, artists, cultural organisations, faith groups and churches, neighbourhood and youth services, multicultural services, not-for-profit community organisations, TAFE, Job Network Australia Service’s, volunteer groups, and small businesses.

 

Promoting activities in North St Marys

 

At its core, the Neighbourhood Renewal Program is about equity. Its works with residents to identify strengths and assets within the neighbourhood which can be built on and identifies needs within the social, economic, cultural and physical environment of each neighbourhood through the development of Neighbourhood Action Plans.

 

This report assesses the current status of all Neighbourhood Action Plans and provides an indication of actions which are currently underway or which require significant funding in order to proceed.

 

A second report, Community Action Plans – a new model for the Penrith Neighbourhood Renewal Program, accompanies this report to the Policy Review Committee Meeting tonight. The second report will note the success of the program to date, made possible through Special Rate Variation funding and puts forward recommendations for increasing the impact of this valuable program.

 

Neighbourhood Action Plans – Progress by Suburb

Since 2007 approximately 140 community engagement events, activities, and programs have been undertaken by the Neighbourhood Renewal Program. It is estimated that more than 10,000 residents have participated in the various activities, events, and consultations and approximately 1,000 have made direct submissions outlining their aspirations and their ideas for improving their neighbourhood.

 

Each of these activities and conversations has contributed to the development of 12 Neighbourhood Action Plans. As a result of these action plans, Council has endorsed 369 actions to improve the physical, social and economic environment for residents in these communities.

 

Many of these endorsed actions related to the physical environment with the bulk of actions being assigned to and acquitted by the Public Domain and Amenity Department, the Engineering Service Department, the City Parks Department and the City Works Department. These departments have contributed considerably to the improved outcomes for residents in these areas and the goodwill generated.

 

A significant load has also fallen to the Community and Cultural Development Department and the newly formed Place Management Department in the implementation of actions which have a social, economic or place focus. Library Services, Waste and Community protection, Recreation, Development and Environmental Health and City Planning have also taken on actions within various plans.

 

In addition to these actions, the Magnetic Places program has initiated over 60 innovative and highly successful placemaking and activation projects, celebrating creativity, diversity and culture in 12 established neighbourhoods across Penrith City. 

 

Chart 1. Summary of progress against actions for Neighbourhood Action Plans

The chart about shows the status of all actions identified within NAPs as a percentage. Many of these actions are now complete, approximately 65.6%. Some actions were not achievable at the time, such as securing rear to kerb parking on Sydney Street in Oxley Park and this matter will need to be revisited from time to time. A significant number of actions are currently underway and other large scale projects remain unfunded. The table below provides a breakdown of these categories across the 12 Neighbourhood Action Plans.

 

Suburb

Complete

Cannot Proceed

Requires Funding

Action Underway

Ongoing Task

Total

Kingswood Park

34

0

3

0

0

37

Londonderry

25

3

2

0

4

34

Oxley Park

22

3

2

0

5

32

Kingswood

24

0

2

1

2

29

St Marys

27

0

6

1

7

41

Llandilo

20

4

2

1

2

29

Penrith

29

0

2

2

6

39

Colyton

22

1

0

1

3

27

Werrington

12

0

0

3

3

18

North

St Marys

13

0

3

0

4

20

Cranebrook

4

1

4

6

20

35

Cambridge Park

10

0

3

6

9

28

Total

242

12

29

21

65

369

Percentage

65.6%

3.2%

7.8%

5.7%

17.6%

100%

Table 1. Summary of progress against actions by suburb

 

 

Some brief commentary is provided below to summarise progress on each Neighbourhood Action Plan. A detailed account of action taken on all 369 listed actions is attached (Attachment 1).

 

Kingswood Park Neighbourhood Action Plan 2008

Kingswood Park is a quiet and friendly community. It is proud of its open spaces and reserves. Residents are positive about their neighbourhood and there is a sense of community. In this community the engagement activities revealed:

 

·    Concern for the wellbeing of children and young people

·    A desire for quality open space and recreation opportunities

·    Concern about the quality of footpaths and a lack of pram ramps for elderly residents

·    Community concern regarding the perceptions of Kingswood Park.

 

 

Clr Jim Aitken OAM with the staff that worked on the delivery of the new playground in Kingswood Park and cutting the ribbon to launch the playground.

Overall there were 37 recommendations made by the community, 34 of which are complete, representing 92% of resident concerns addressed. One of the recommendations that remain unfunded is for the development of a bike track or youth recreation park in reserve land. 

 

Social issues continue to be a challenge in Kingswood Park with many residents experiencing significant disadvantage. 

 

Londonderry Neighbourhood Action Plan 2009

Londonderry is a friendly and quiet rural community. The residents speak with pride of its community spirit, heritage, open space and peaceful country atmosphere. In this community the engagement activities revealed:

 

·    Concern about the viability of small business

·    Resident interest in improving the local park

·    A lack of local youth programs

·    Concern regarding barriers to employment for local youth

·    Concern about the social isolation of older people.

 

Overall there were 34 recommendations made by the community, 25 of which are complete, representing 74% of resident concerns addressed. One of the recommendations that remains unfunded is a footpath link through to Richmond, with many local young people travelling from Londonderry to school each day.

 

Oxley Park Neighbourhood Action Plan 2009

Oxley Park is a quiet, friendly and increasingly culturally diverse community. Many families have lived in the neighbourhood for more than one generation and have a strong connection to the area. Children and adults value local parks and spaces and speak with pride about their neighbourhood.

 

In this community the engagement activities revealed:

 

·    Resident interest in improving local play spaces and parks

·    Perceived need for family support and youth programs

·    Resident interest in developing programs for Pacific and Aboriginal families

·    Resident concern about the impact of local development

·    Perceived lack of access to public transport.  

 

     

Footpath work on Woodland Avenue, Oxley Park

 

Overall there were 32 recommendations made by the community, 22 of which are complete, representing over 69% of resident concerns addressed. One of the outstanding recommendations that remain unfunded is for a recreation facility such as Skate Park or bike facility for young people.

 

Kingswood Neighbourhood Action Plan 2010

Kingswood is a culturally diverse neighbourhood. Many residents feel that Kingswood is a family-friendly place. It is quiet and affordable. It has lovely parks which residents wish to protect. Kingswood is close to schools, shops, transport, TAFE and the University and residents feel that these attributes make Kingswood a good place to live. In this community the engagement activities revealed:

 

·    Resident concern about alcohol and drug use in public spaces

·    The need for an upgrade of Kingswood Railway Station

·    Resident concerns regarding public safety at local shopping strips and the railway station

·    Local business and resident concern about the viability of local small business

·    Resident interest in improvements to the playground at Wainwright Park

 

Overall there were 29 recommendations made by the community, 24 of which are complete, representing 83% of resident concerns addressed. One of the recommendations that remain unfunded is a MIST treatment managing pedestrian safety on Manning Street during peak school times.

 

    

Clr Mark Davies opens the playground enhancements at Wainwright Park in 2013

 

Social issues continue to be a challenge in Kingswood with many residents experiencing significant disadvantage. 

 

St Marys Neighbourhood Action Plan 2010

St Marys is a culturally diverse and family friendly neighbourhood which boasts a rich local history. Many residents are actively involved in local clubs and associations. Residents are proud of the friendly local culture, local parks and open spaces.  In this community the engagement activities revealed:

 

·    Resident and small business concern regarding public safety in the northern end of Queen Street near the St Marys Railway Station

·    Resident and small business concern regarding the sustainability of businesses along Queen Street

·    Resident concern regarding speeding and pedestrian safety

·    Resident interest in improvements to Victoria Park, Margaret Porter Reserve and Jack Jewry Reserve

 

Overall there were 41 recommendations made by the community, 27 of which are complete, representing 66% of resident concerns addressed. One of the recommendations that remains unfunded is an upgrade to Monfarville Reserve to include passive recreation elements for young people and their families.

 

 

 

 

Works at Jack Jewry Reserve, St Marys and a ‘Reclaim the Park’ event

held with local residents in 2014

 

 

Llandilo Neighbourhood Action Plan 2011

Llandilo residents have a strong community spirit and friendly neighbours that help those in need. In this community the engagement activities revealed:

 

·    Resident concern regarding road signage, the maintenance of  roads and road verges

·    Resident concern and frustration regarding illegal dumping

·    Resident concern about the social isolation of older residents

·    Many women were interested in activities that would support a return to employment

·    Resident requests for improvements to Wilson Park

·    Requests from the school community for improvements to the footpath network near  Llandilo Public School

 

Overall there were 29 recommendations made by the community, 20 of which are complete, representing 69% of resident concerns addressed. One of the remaining unfunded recommendations is improvements to Wilson Park although it is noted that Mario Pace was recently successful in applying for funds for a hard surface court in the park. The Neighbourhood Renewal Program has worked with other departments in Council to support delivery of this community asset. A concept plan will be developed that will consider residents’ concerns regarding visibility of play equipment. The potential use of Wilson Park by local recreational club remains unfunded.

 

Colyton Neighbourhood Action Plan 2012

Colyton is a quiet family orientated neighbourhood, and many residents have lived there for a number of decades. There are many young people living in Colyton. The neighbourhood is increasingly diverse, including a growing Afghan population and a significant number of residents of Aboriginal background. In Colyton the engagement activities revealed:

 

·    The perceived need for a community hub assisting residents to accessing community services

·    Resident concern regarding pedestrian safety and traffic management

·    A desire for a ‘stand out’ park in Colyton

·    Resident and small business concern regarding the amenity of local shopping strips

·    A perceived lack of access to public transport

 

   

The launch of the Colyton Youth Space Project and activities at the ‘Living Well’

project for older residents

 

 

Overall there were 27 recommendations made by the community, 22 of which are complete, representing 81% of resident concerns addressed. Work continues with businesses in the small shopping centre on Hewitt Street to advocate for improvements by the managing agents. There are no remaining unfunded actions for Colyton although significant social issues continue to be a point of discussion with local service providers.

 

Penrith Neighbourhood Action Plan 2012

Penrith is diverse neighbourhood with many families, single and older people living within a compact location. Many people who are living with a disability choose to live in Penrith as it has accessible services. This means pedestrian and wheelchair access should be included as a dot point in some way. In this community the engagement activities revealed:

 

·    Significant resident requests for improvements to disability access within the built environment of Penrith CBD

·    Resident interest in affordable community programs and events for families, children and young people

·    Resident concern regarding perceptions of public safety and amenity

·    A desire for a thriving night time economy to develop in Penrith

 

Overall there were 39 recommendations made by the community, 29 of which are complete, representing 74% of resident concerns addressed. One of the recommendations that remain unfunded is an upgrade to Spence Park including shade over play equipment, places to rest and eat and suggestions for play equipment suited to adolescents. 

 

 

Werrington Neighbourhood Action Plan 2013

Werrington is a family orientated neighbourhood. The neighbourhood is quiet and residents value the open and natural environment. In this community the engagement activities revealed:

·    Resident interest for improvements to Werrington Lakes and to play equipment behind Rance Oval

·    Resident and small business concern regarding antisocial behaviour and public consumption of alcohol

·    Resident and school community requests for a footpath over John Oxley Bridge

·    Resident interest in improvements to the amenity of the shopping strip on Victoria Street

 

Overall there were 18 recommendations made by the community, 12 of which are complete, representing 66% of resident concerns addressed. There are no remaining unfunded actions for Werrington. The Werrington Lakes improvement plan is largely completed with some smaller projects such as signage in the final stages. 

 

            

Artwork in development – trail markers for the educational trail at Werrington Lakes

 

 

North St Marys Neighbourhood Action Plan 2013

North St Marys is a family orientated neighbourhood. Many residents have lived in the neighbourhood for decades and have raised children and grandchildren in the area. Residents are very proud of local institutions such as St Marys North Public School and want to protect local wildlife and enhance local reserves and parks. In this community the engagement activities revealed;

 

·    Concern regarding public use of alcohol and other drugs

·    Requests for urgent upgrades to the Parklawn Place shopping strip

·    Speeding and pedestrian safety around local schools

·    The need for local youth programs

·    Requests to further develop the local footpath network

 

 

                

Work in Tobruk and Warrego Reserve underway and some of our local residents enjoying the custom made basketball tree

Overall there were 20 recommendations made by the community, 13 of which are complete, representing 65% of resident concerns addressed. One of the recommendations that remain unfunded is for a project addressing anti-social behaviour in Poplar Park through engagement and enhancements to the park.

 

Social issues continue to be a challenge in North St Marys with many residents experiencing significant disadvantage. 

 

Cambridge Park Neighbourhood Action Plan 2014

Cambridge Park is a quiet family friendly neighbourhood. Many residents have lived in the neighbourhood for long periods and feel they know their neighbours. Residents are proud of the friendly nature of the neighbourhood and wish to preserve it. Families value local schools and see them as community hubs. Many residents are fond of local parks and playgrounds. In this community the engagement activities revealed:

 

·    Resident requests for improvements to Allsopp Oval and Lincoln Park

·    Resident concern regarding the amenity of the shopping strip on Oxford St

·    Resident interest in the development of local youth programs

·    Resident interest in local community programs and events

·    Resident concern regarding dangerous driving and pedestrian safety

 

Overall there were 28 recommendations made by the community, 10 of which are complete, representing 36% of resident concerns addressed. One of the recommendations that remains unfunded and is also listed under the Werrington Neighbourhood Action Plan is the resurfacing of the ‘snake pit’ skate bowl within the Werrington Lakes precinct. Residents highly value this local resource and many fondly remember their own connection with it as young people.

 

Cranebrook Neighbourhood Action Plan 2014

Cranebrook is a family orientated neighbourhood which has a rich diversity including a significant number of Aboriginal residents. The suburb has high quality open spaces, reserves and recreational facilities, including the skate facility, which residents are proud of and utilise frequently. Residents value local schools and community services often reflecting on the ability of these services to bring people together and provide assistance to lower-income households. Children value local parks and playgrounds and would like to see these spaces enhanced. In this community the engagement activities revealed:

 

·    Deep concern regarding the ongoing cessation of the bus service to the social housing estate

·    Reported difficulty for social housing tenants in negotiating maintenance through Family and Community Services

·    Concern regarding heat management which residents report impacts badly on older residents and small children

·    Resident concern regarding traffic management and congestion on Castlereagh Rd and Parker St

·    Resident requests for improvements to local playgrounds

 

Overall there were 35 recommendations made by the community, 4 (11%) of which are complete and a further 20 (57%) have been incorporated into the ongoing service delivery of the Cranebrook Neighbourhood Advisory Board. One of the recommendations that remain unfunded is for a multipurpose sports court for children, young people and the whole community. As Cranebrook is one of most recently developed NAPs, fewer actions have been completed.

 

Social issues continue to be a challenge in Cranebrook with many residents experiencing significant disadvantage. 

 

Conclusion

The Neighbourhood Renewal Program has created an avenue by which residents in socio-economically disadvantaged neighbourhoods can have a say in the services which Council provides, take active roles in the delivery of local projects and set priorities for action, not only for Council but for broader community stakeholders.

 

This report provides a summary to Council of all of the actions identified to date and the progress against these actions. Whilst not all endorsed actions are complete, some remain outside of available funding and some may simply not be achievable due to factors outside of Council’s control.

 

The program has had considerable success in the delivery of capital projects within the control of Council. Partnerships with various Council departments including City Works, City Parks, Design and Projects and Engineering Services have contributed significantly to improved infrastructure delivery.

 

A great deal of work has been undertaken by other Departments to incorporate additional tasks into their day to day delivery of services including Public Domain, Safety and Amenity, Community and Cultural Development and Waste and Community Protection.

 

Overall the achievements of Council to date have significantly enhanced established areas across the City. Many actions are underway and many more have been completed. The program has had great success in utilising limited resources to leverage the best possible outcome for residents.    

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the information contained in the report on Neighbourhood Action Plans - a progress report be received.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.  

Progress on NAPs 2015

75 Pages

Attachments Included

   


Outcome 5 - We care about our environment

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

3        Western Sydney Regional Illegal Dumping (RID) Squad Agreement                             25

 

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                      22 June 2015

 

 

 

3

Western Sydney Regional Illegal Dumping (RID) Squad Agreement   

 

Compiled by:               Barry Ryan, RID Squad Co-ordinator

Authorised by:            Tracy Chalk, Waste and Community Protection Manager  

 

Outcome

We care for our environment

Strategy

Protect and improve our natural areas, the Nepean River and other waterways

Service Activity

Collaboratively manage illegal dumping across Western Sydney (RID Squad)

 

Presenters:                  Barry Ryan - Coordinator Western Sydney Regional Illegal Dumping Squad - Western Sydney Regional Illegal Dumping (RID) Squad Agreement      

 

Executive Summary

The Western Sydney Regional Illegal Dumping Squad (RID Squad) has been in operation since 1999, initially as a project developed between Western Sydney Councils, NSW EPA and the Western Sydney Waste Board.

 

The RID Squad is primarily a team of investigators who focus on the illegal dumping of waste and have been highly successful in identifying offenders, requiring the clean-up of waste dumped and issuing relevant Infringement notices.

 

The RID Squad is overseen by a Management Committee, of representatives from each member Council, managed by a Host Council (Penrith), and a co-operation agreement signed by the General Manager of each Council provides for the legal framework and operational requirements of the RID Squad, and function of the Committee.

 

The current agreement is due to conclude on 30 June 2015.

 

This report will recommend that Penrith City Council continues as a member of the RID Squad, and confirms the ongoing management of the Squad by Penrith City Council on behalf of the member Councils.

Background

The Western Sydney RID Squad was formed in 1999, as a response to the growing problem of the illegal dumping of waste. The RID Squad is a partnership between the State Government and local councils aimed at addressing the illegal dumping of waste material throughout Western Sydney.

 

Members of the Strategic Alliance include Blacktown, Fairfield, Holroyd, Liverpool, Parramatta, Penrith and The Hills Councils and the NSW Environment Protection Agency (EPA). The EPA provides significant funding to the project to offset operational costs (approximately $60,000 per Council).

 

Penrith City Council’s contribution has been budgeted for in the current Operational Plan process. 

 

Penrith City Council has hosted the RID Squad since its inception and in 2002 Council took over management of the project. A formal funding agreement with the project partners was also developed to manage the Squad.

 

Current Situation

The RID Squad Committee has confirmed that Penrith City Council is the most appropriate Council to continue management of the RID Squad, given the satisfactory performance to date and logistical issues  that would be encountered with relation to the life of the current funding. To manage the RID Squad, Penrith City Council charges a Host Council fee ($65,660 in 2014/2015).

 

The NSW Illegal Dumping Strategy 2014-16 has been developed by the NSW Government to address the issue of illegal dumping and its effects on the community.

The five prevention mechanisms in the strategy include:

1.       Making dumping harder – in most cases illegal dumping takes very little effort. It can take more effort to do the right thing than to dump waste illegally. Local councils and land managers can make access to dumping hot spots difficult by using infrastructure such as lighting, barriers or landscaping.

2.       Increasing the risk of getting caught – the decision to commit a crime is influenced by the perceived risk of getting caught and the perceived benefits of the action. A perceived increase in the likelihood of getting caught will deter some offenders from illegal dumping.

3.       Reducing the rewards by denying the financial benefits – a major motive for illegal dumping is to avoid the cost of legitimate disposal. For businesses that generate large amounts of waste, such as builders, the financial savings from illegal dumping can be substantial. Financial incentives to dump waste legally include getting the price structures right, issuing fines and requiring offenders to clean up dump sites.

4.       Reducing provocations by making legal disposal easier – householders are more likely to be motivated to dump if they perceive that the waste collection service is not efficient or convenient. Individuals may also feel provoked to illegally dump in areas that are not aesthetically pleasing (for example, where other dumping is present), and they may feel their dumped waste will not make a difference. Local councils can curtail illegal dumping in their local government areas by adopting best practice waste collection.

5.       Removing excuses by educating and informing the community – those who dump may find it easy to rationalise and find excuses for their behaviour. These excuses can be removed through targeted education, advertising waste collection and disposal services, keeping areas free of waste and displaying signs at known illegal dumping hot spots. Information is important to make householders and businesses aware of their responsibilities when it comes to proper waste disposal.

In October 2014 significant increases in penalties for illegal dumping were introduced by the NSW Government, including:

·    On-the-spot fines of up to $1,500 for individuals and $5,000 for corporations,

·    Court-imposed penalties of up to $250,000 for individuals and $1 million for corporations in relation to unlawful waste facility offences, and

·    Court-imposed penalties of up to $1 million for individuals and/or seven years imprisonment, and $5 million for corporations in relation to illegal waste disposal that causes serious environmental harm.

The Western Sydney RID Squad is a deterrent program, utilising an autonomous team of specialised investigation officers, targeting the illegal disposal of waste throughout Western Sydney. The Squad is unique in that staff employed by one Council operate across the seven local government areas, providing a service that would otherwise not be able to be afforded by a single local council.

 

Project staff can operate individually, in pairs, or as a team, to tackle specific waste dumping issues in an area, thereby providing a service to the community that otherwise would not be able to be provided by an individual Council.

 

Significant outcomes of the RID Squad project include:

·    It has provided member councils with a significant resource without all the inherent costs

·    Each council is provided with the ability (which occurs during specific operations) to target a specific area or issue with all staff of the Squad

·    The community has benefited from the reduction of illegal dumping

·    The community has also benefited through cost savings derived from the sharing of RID project and staff resources

·    Illegally dumped waste that has been successfully tracked to a responsible person or company is required to be removed by that person or company, thereby saving the community the costs of removal and disposal of the waste

·    The RID Squad has issued a total of over $2.7 million in Penalty Infringement Notices since the commencement of operation

 

Various strategies are used by the staff of the RID Squad to identify illegal dumping sites and offenders, including aerial surveillance using helicopters.

 

With the success of the Western Sydney Regional Illegal Dumping Squad, additional Squads have been formed including the Inner West Squad (covering LGAs including Bankstown, Canterbury, Ashfield, Auburn, Strathfield and Canada Bay Councils) and the Hunter Region Illegal Dumping Squad.

 

In 2014 the RID Squad undertook a re-branding exercise and a new brand for RID Squads was developed through a process and engagement with committee members and marketplace testing.

 

The re-branding exercise has developed a new position for RID Squads in the community through the concept of “RID” not only meaning Regional Illegal Dumping Squad, but also “REPORT ILLEGAL DUMPING 131 555’ to the general public.

 

The NSW EPA, recognising the value of the RID branding, is now managing the brand throughout NSW.

 

New signage and advertising has been developed and is being rolled out at this present time.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Western Sydney Regional Illegal Dumping (RID) Squad Agreement be received.

2.    Penrith City Council continues to be a member of the Western Sydney Illegal Dumping Squad.

3.    Penrith City Council continues to manage the Squad on behalf of the member Councils.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.  


 

 

Outcome 6 - We're healthy and share strong community spirit

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


 

 

Outcome 7 - We have confidence in our Council

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled



 

ATTACHMENTS   

 

 

Date of Meeting:     Monday 22 June 2015

Report Title:            Neighbourhood Action Plans - a progress report

Attachments:           Progress on NAPs 2015



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                                   22 June 2015

Attachment 1 - Progress on NAPs 2015

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator