Council_Mark_POS_RGB

8 July 2015

 

Dear Councillor,

In pursuance of the provisions of the Local Government Act, 1993 and the Regulations thereunder, notice is hereby given that a POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING of Penrith City Council is to be held in the Passadena Room, Civic Centre, 601 High Street, Penrith on Monday 13 July 2015 at 7:00PM.

Attention is directed to the statement accompanying this notice of the business proposed to be transacted at the meeting.

Yours faithfully

 

Alan Stoneham

General Manager

 

BUSINESS

 

1.           LEAVE OF ABSENCE

 

2.           APOLOGIES

 

3.           CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES

Policy Review Committee Meeting - 22 June 2015.

 

4.           DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

Pecuniary Interest (The Act requires Councillors who declare a pecuniary interest in an item to leave the meeting during discussion of that item)

Non-Pecuniary Conflict of Interest – Significant and Less than Significant (The Code of Conduct requires Councillors who declare a significant non-pecuniary conflict of interest in an item to leave the meeting during discussion of that item)

 

5.           ADDRESSING THE MEETING

 

6.           MAYORAL MINUTES

 

7.           NOTICES OF MOTION TO RESCIND A RESOLUTION

 

8.           NOTICES OF MOTION

 

9.           DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

10.         REQUESTS FOR REPORTS AND MEMORANDUMS

 

11.         URGENT BUSINESS

 

12.         CONFIDENTIAL BUSINESS


POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING

 

Monday 13 July 2015

 

table of contents

 

 

 

 

 

 

meeting calendar

 

 

confirmation of minutes

 

 

DELIVERY program reports

 


Council_Mark_POS_RGB2015 MEETING CALENDAR

January 2015 - December 2015

(adopted by Council on 24/11/14 and amended by Council on 25/5/15)

 

 

 

TIME

JAN

FEB

MAR

APRIL

MAY

JUNE

JULY

AUG

SEPT

OCT

NOV

DEC

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

 

Ordinary Council Meeting

7.30pm

 

2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

21^ü

(7.00pm)

 

 

14

(7.00pm)

 

23@

23

27v

25#

29*

27

24@

28

26

23#+

 

Policy Review Committee

7.00pm

 

 

 

20

11

22

13

10

14

19

9

7

 

9

9

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 v

Meeting at which the draft corporate planning documents (Delivery Program and Operational Plan) are endorsed for exhibition

 *

Meeting at which the draft corporate planning documents (Delivery Program and Operational Plan) are adopted

 #

Meetings at which the Operational Plan quarterly reviews (March and September) are presented

 @

Meetings at which the Delivery Program progress reports (including the Operational Plan quarterly reviews for December and June) are presented

 ^

Election of Mayor/Deputy Mayor

 ü

Meeting at which the 2013-2014 Annual Statements are presented

 

Meeting at which any comments on the 2013-2014 Annual Statements are presented

 +

Meeting at which the Annual Report is presented

-            Extraordinary Meetings are held as required.

-            Members of the public are invited to observe meetings of the Council (Ordinary and Policy Review Committee).

Should you wish to address Council, please contact the Senior Governance Officer, Glenn Schuil.

 


UNCONFIRMED MINUTES

 OF THE POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING OF PENRITH CITY COUNCIL HELD IN THE PASSADENA ROOM, PENRITH

ON MONDAY 22 JUNE 2015 AT 7:03PM

PRESENT

His Worship the Mayor, Councillor Ross Fowler OAM and Councillors Jim Aitken OAM, Bernard Bratusa, Prue Car MP, Kevin Crameri OAM, Mark Davies, Maurice Girotto, Jackie Greenow OAM, Tricia Hitchen, Karen McKeown and Michelle Tormey.

 

LEAVE OF ABSENCE

Leave of Absence was previously granted to Councillor Greg Davies for the period 20 June 2015 to 29 June 2015 inclusive.

APOLOGIES

PRC 40  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Jim Aitken OAM seconded Councillor Maurice Girotto that apologies be received from Councillors Marcus Cornish, Ben Goldfinch and John Thain.

 

Councillor Jim Aitken OAM left the meeting, the time being 7:04pm.

 

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES - Policy Review Committee Meeting - 11 May 2015

PRC 41  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Karen McKeown seconded Councillor Jackie Greenow OAM that the minutes of the Policy Review Committee Meeting of 11 May 2015 be confirmed.

 

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

 

Nil.

 

 

DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Outcome 5 - We care about our environment

 

3        Western Sydney Regional Illegal Dumping (RID) Squad Agreement

Executive Manager – Environment & City Development, Wayne Mitchell introduced the report and invited RID Squad Co-ordinator Barry Ryan to give a presentation.

Councillor Jim Aitken OAM returned to the meeting, the time being 7:07pm.

PRC 42  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM seconded Councillor Michelle Tormey

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Western Sydney Regional Illegal Dumping (RID) Squad Agreement be received.

2.    Penrith City Council continues to be a member of the Western Sydney Illegal Dumping Squad.

3.    Penrith City Council continues to manage the Squad on behalf of the member Councils.

 

Outcome 4 - We have safe, vibrant places

 

2        Neighbourhood Action Plans - a progress report

Place Manager, Jeni Pollard introduced the report and gave a presentation.

PRC 43  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Tricia  Hitchen seconded Councillor Mark Davies

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Neighbourhood Action Plans - a progress report be received.

 

2.    A further report be presented to Council regarding potential funding for the unfunded projects within the City.

 

 

1        Community Action Plans - a new model for the Penrith Neighbourhood Renewal Program

Place Manager, Jeni Pollard introduced the report and invited Neighbourhood Renewal Co-ordinator, Heather Chaffey to give a presentation.

 

Councillor Maurice Girotto left the meeting, the time being 7:34pm.

Councillor Maurice Girotto returned to the meeting, the time being 7:37pm.

Councillor Jim Aitken OAM left the meeting at 7:49pm and did not return.

PRC 44  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Mark Davies seconded Councillor Prue Car

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Community Action Plans - a new model for the Penrith Neighbourhood Renewal Program be received.

2.    Council endorse the proposed new model as outlined for the pilot program in Colyton.

3.    Council receive a further report early in 2016 with an update on progress of the pilot program and a proposed schedule for the roll out of the program across identified areas of the City.

4.     A further report be presented to a Councillor Briefing regarding the concepts outlined in this report

 

 

 

 

There being no further business the Chairperson declared the meeting closed the time being 7:50pm.

    


DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

  

Outcome 4 - We have safe, vibrant places

 

1        Draft Charity Clothing Bins Policy                                                                                      1

 

2        Trial Pop Up Park Penrith, Final Evaluation Report                                                           9

 

 

Outcome 6 - We're healthy and share strong community spirit

 

3        The Early Rollout of the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) in the Penrith, Blue Mountains, Hawkesbury and Lithgow LGAs                                                                    22

 

 


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


 

 

Outcome 1 - We can work close to home

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


 

 

Outcome 2 - We plan for our future growth

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


 

 

Outcome 3 - We can get around the City

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


Outcome 4 - We have safe, vibrant places

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

1        Draft Charity Clothing Bins Policy                                                                                      1

 

2        Trial Pop Up Park Penrith, Final Evaluation Report                                                           9

 

 

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                       13 July 2015

 

 

 

1

Draft Charity Clothing Bins Policy   

 

Compiled by:               Murray  Halls, Public Domain Co-ordinator

Authorised by:            Yvonne Perkins, Acting Executive Manager - City Assets  

 

Outcome

We have safe, vibrant places

Strategy

Improve our public spaces and places

Service Activity

Improve levels of public safety and amenity across the City through quality public space maintenance

      

 

Executive Summary

This report informs Council on the development of a draft policy for managing the placement of Charity Clothing Bins on Council owned and managed land.

 

The draft policy formalises existing practice and procedures that have been in operation in the Penrith Local Government Area for some time and also draws on the experience and practice of other Local Government Areas managing charity clothing bins.

 

The draft policy addresses a range of management issues that are impacting on the amenity of bin placement locations across the Penrith LGA.

 

The report recommends that the information contained in the draft Clothing Bins Policy be received and seeks Council’s endorsement to proceed with the process towards adopting the draft policy as a Policy of Council with the initial step of exhibiting it for public comment.

Background

Prior to 1996, there were no Council conditions imposed on the placement of charity clothing bins (bins) on Council owned or managed land.  As a result there was a proliferation of bins from charitable and non-charitable organisations. Some conditions were developed (1998) and formed the basis for a Council “position”, however these conditions were never developed into a policy of Council.

 

Charitable organisations were required to make application to Council on a yearly basis and the approved Council fees and charges paid. This covered the inspections and management of the bins for the 12-month period. Applicants were required to state their contact name and telephone number, Public Liability Insurance Policy number, Office of Charities Registration number, location of the bin(s) and that they agree to abide by Council’s “Conditions for the Control and Placement of Clothing Bins.”

 

Subsequently, Council staff conducted an audit of all clothing bins on Council owned or managed land in September 2006.  This audit confirmed that goods were left near bins, and vandalism occurred at all sites to some extent, with 14 sites confirmed as “problem sites”. 

 

A report was presented to Council’s Ordinary Meeting of 4 December 2006 which advised that approval for bins at the time was only given to those charitable organisations that were approved by the Office of Charities, Department of Gaming and Racing.

 

The Council’s resolution of 4 December 2006 stated:

 

 “the owners of clothing bins in the Penrith area be directed to remove those bins with the highest recorded levels of dumping and vandalism, and continue to monitor the remaining bins.”

 

Following the above resolution of Council, a number of bins were removed from the Penrith LGA .  The remaining bins, owned by The Smith Family and the Aboriginal Children’s Advancement Society continue to be in place on approved Council owned and managed sites across the Local Government Area.

 

Current Situation

In December 2014 Councillors were provided with a memo (copy of memo emailed to Councillors on 8 July 2015) that provided an update from the Public Domain Amenity & Safety Manager regarding the current management challenges that the owners/operators of bins were presenting.

 

At the time a number of complaints from residents were received about some of the bins due to the large amount of illegally dumped household rubbish and unwanted furniture (large and small items) placed around them.

 

In one instance, the complaints received about the rubbish being left around the outside of The Smith Family bins at Glenmore Park, led to a Resident Action Group using social media to communicate their frustrations and concerns with the situation.  This attention resulted in The Smith Family deciding to remove their bins permanently from this location. While this bin location was cleared and inspected daily by The Smith Family it was still difficult to manage in terms of the amount of discarded items being left around the bins.

 

Council also continues to receive requests from charity organisations for the placement of bins across the City, however there are limited locations that are deemed suitable for them.

 

In previous discussions regarding the placement of charity bins, Council has expressed a view that the preferred way forward was to allow various charities access to bin placement locations. In the absence of a formal Council policy, this has been the approach taken. Locations have been identified in accessible places that will be low profile in terms of amenity with less potential for resident concern or complaint. This arrangement has until recently been working well with a number of bins placed across the City.

 

More recently Council has received representations from a range of organisations wanting approval to place charity clothing bins across the City.  Over the past 12 months a number of bins have also been placed on Council property without permission.  This has required Council officers to contact those bin owners regarding the need for Council approval, including the payment of Council’s fees and charges.

 

As a consequence of the above, it was decided that no additional bins would be considered/approved until a policy document was considered by Council.

 

It is acknowledged that charity clothing bins provide a valuable service to the community, raising charitable funds and providing residents with a convenient disposal point for unwanted clothing. They encourage recycling and divert unwanted items from the general waste stream and landfill. 

 

The intent of the draft policy is to ensure that the placement of bins across the City are in accessible and safe locations.  It is also intended that all bins will be required to have appropriate management practices that minimise impact on public space amenity.

 

While suitable locations such as car parks have been identified in the draft policy, there is also discretion for Council to approve other Council controlled locations if deemed appropriate. 

 

The draft policy covers a range of issues including:

 

·    Application process

·    Approvals

·    Fees and Charges

·    Signage and communication

·    Graffiti and damage

·    Location/Site requirements

·    Bins on private property

·    Permissible organisations

·    Banking of bins

·    Operation, Management and Maintenance

·    Investigation of complaints and illegally placed bins.

 

Conclusion

An overview of the current challenges relating to the placement of Charity Clothing Bins on Council owned and managed land has been provided in this report.  The development of a draft policy for the management of Charity Clothing Bins is anticipated to result in enhanced management of bins across the City.   As part of the policy development process, the opportunity to seek public comment on the draft policy is an important step to ensure that the policy is also in keeping with community expectations.   

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Draft Charity Clothing Bins Policy be received.

2.    Council endorse the process towards adopting the draft policy as a Policy of Council following the initial step of exhibiting it for public comment.

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.  

Charity Clothing Bins Policy

5 Pages

Appendix

  


Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                                     13 July 2015

Appendix 1 - Charity Clothing Bins Policy

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                       13 July 2015

 

 

 

2

Trial Pop Up Park Penrith, Final Evaluation Report   

 

Compiled by:               Terry Agar, City Centres Co-ordinator

Authorised by:            Jeni Pollard, Place Manager  

 

Outcome

We have safe, vibrant places

Strategy

Grow and revitalise our centres and neighbourhoods

Service Activity

Work with the community to deliver priority infrastructure and activation projects in identified established areas of the City

      

 

Executive Summary

The 12 month trial of the Pop Up Park was adopted in the Penrith City Centre Public Domain Masterplan on 24 June 2013. Construction of the temporary park was completed in October 2013 with a small amount of funding provided for ongoing activation events.  The mid-term evaluation of the Pop Up Park was reported to the Policy Review Committee meeting on 12 May 2014.  At that time Council resolved to reduce the area of the temporary park and introduce a car parking area.  At the same time Council extended the trial period by 3 months until March 2015 to include the Christmas trading period and summer activities.

 

Urban design and planning consultants, Hames Sharley Pty Ltd were engaged to do a final assessment of the impact of the Trial Triangle Park which is entitled the “Penrith Pop Up Park Review Part 2” (the Final Review).  The report describes the evaluation processes, key outcomes and recommends that the temporary park be retained in its current configuration whilst a new permanent park design is prepared.  Design elements identified by the community to improve the space and documented in the Final Review are suggested for consideration in the new design.

Background

The Penrith City Centre Public Domain Masterplan recommended the establishment of a small park on the road reserve at the western end of High Street, between Riley Street and Henry Street.  In order to “test” the likely success of a permanent park in that location, Council endorsed a recommendation to conduct a 12 month trial of the proposed park through the development of a Pop Up Park, as part of its adoption of the Penrith City Centre Public Domain Masterplan on 24 June 2013.

 

The objectives of the community designed Pop Up Park are:

 

·    To create a unique city centre identity and sense of place that enhances the connection between people and place.

·    Improve the quality of the urban environment to encourage economic growth and support new investment.

·    To meet the current and anticipated demands of the city’s users.

 

Construction of the Pop Up Park was completed in October 2013.  The design was based on community and business ideas generated as part of a collaborative design process. The key design parameters of the project were that it should be simple, low cost and reversible.  The park, as constructed, is shown in Figure 1.  The Pop Up Park was commended by the Planning Institute of Australia (NSW) in their Great Place Award, 2014.

 

Nearmap Park 080214

Figure 1: Trial park concept plan.

 

Council’s Community and Cultural Development Department prepared and implemented an activation program from the park’s opening in October until Christmas 2013.  The Penrith CBD Corporation took over primary responsibility for activation in January 2014 and  continued this role until Christmas 2014.

 

An assessment of the performance of the Pop Up Park was reported to the Policy and Review Committee on 12 May 2014. At that time Council resolved to reduce the area of the temporary park and introduce a car parking area at its eastern end.  Matters such as usage patterns, attitude surveys of users and business owners, as well as traffic impacts formed part of the assessment at that time.

 

At that time of the Policy Review Committee meeting report, Council also resolved to extend the trial period by 4 months until March 2015 to include the Christmas 2014 trading period and summer activities.

 

The eastern end of the park was re-configured to accommodate vehicle parking and provide an area for larger events in June 2014.

 

Urban Design and Planning Consultants, Hames Sharley Pty Ltd were engaged to undertake the mid-term and final assessments of the performance of the Pop Up Park. GHD Pty Ltd was engaged for the mid-term pedestrian and traffic evaluation.  Council officer pedestrian and traffic counts for the nearby road network were reported to the Local Traffic Committee on 2 February 2015.

 

Summary of First Review Findings

 

Urban Design and Planning Consultants, Hames Sharley Pty Ltd were engaged to evaluate the success of the park midway (the First Review) during the trial.  The performance of the park was assessed against the design objectives previously outlined above. The key findings of the first review’s surveys are as follows:

 

·    The community design approach and subsequent activation programming is in line with best practice.

·    People tend to pass through the park along its edges;

·    More people stay and sit in the western end than the eastern end;

·    Half of those surveyed used the park on a weekly basis

·    Half of the businesses surveyed want the park to be made permanent

·    The majority of non-business users want the park to be made permanent

·    The eastern end of the park attracted more negative comments about its amenity

·    The western end of the park attracted more positive comments about its amenity.

·    Most people wanted regular events in the park.

·    The park is highly walkable, but access to it after standard business hours through the arcades could be improved

·    Toilets were considered to be a necessary addition by some.

 

The consultant’s concluded that there were no overwhelming reason to abandon the Pop Up Park prior to the conclusion of the full trial period and that the western end out-performed the eastern end.  In addition, they did not find any reason to reopen the connection between High Street and Henry Street.  They recommended that the trial be continued, with alterations to the eastern end in response to business and community user concerns to improve its functionality.  The modified eastern end of the park is shown in Figure 2.

 

 

Figure 2: Trial Park aerial photo showing the introduction of traffic and car parking.

 

In June 2014, Council responded to the feedback from users and business owners and the consultant’s recommendation to improve the park’s performance.  The eastern end was reopened to vehicle traffic with the introduction of parking spaces for short term parking.  To accommodate larger events in the Pop Up Park, this area may be closed off to traffic and parking for the use of exhibits, stalls, pedestrians etc.

 

This has happened on a number of occasions, including during the lighting of the Christmas Tree held in late 2014. The arrangements worked well with the space fully utilised by market stalls and people, with minimal impact on traffic.

 

Final Independent Review Findings

Urban Design and Planning Consultants, Hames Sharley Pty Ltd were again engaged to evaluate the success of the Pop Up Park at the conclusion of the 16 month trial period (the Final Review).  The performance of the park was assessed against the design objectives previously outlined above and the changes made in response to the First Review.  The Final Review report is provided as Attachment 1.

 

Final Review User and Business Owner Findings

 

The Final Review was based on two sources of information, a survey and public realm toolkit analysis of the place compared to best practice criteria. The survey engaged face to face with 50 park users and 50 businesses.

 

The key findings of the Final Review’s surveys are as follows:

 

·    Park users were more positive about the character of the park than business owners

·    Both users and business owners agree that the park experience could be improved with more shade and seating and public toilets.

·    Both users and business owners would prefer to have events in the park on a weekly or monthly basis

·    Park users would prefer to have events during weekday afternoons in contrast to business owners who would prefer them on the weekends.

·    Both users and business owners would like to see events involving live music, markets and children’s activities in the park.

 

The public realm toolkit analysis benchmarked the place against general best practice for similar places throughout Australia. Performance of the space on these measures between the first and the final review was also assessed.  The key findings are summarised as follows:

 

·    The management of the space and the diversity of businesses fronting it, is rated as ‘good’ and has not changed;

·    The quality of the public domain has declined and needs improvement;

·    The identity of the place has improved;

·    Accessibility to public transport is relatively good, but afterhours access through arcades to car parks remains a problem;

·    The place has remained highly permeable for pedestrians; and

·    Events programming has continued to be problematic since the park’s inception.

 

In relation to the public domain quality, the temporary nature of the place meant that some compromises in the choice of construction material was made to ensure that the trial was low cost.  Unfortunately, this necessitated the laying of grass over existing road surface which has resulted in it wearing badly despite regular watering.  Some of the trees in tubs have not flourished either.

 

Activation events that were initially run by Council and then by the Penrith CBD Corporation have not been as successful as initially hoped.  Despite a modest budget, it is believed that the temporary nature of the construction materials of the trial park has meant there has not been sufficient shade for events during the warmer days.  Successful events, facilitated by the Penrith CBD Corporation such as the Annual Christmas Tree Lighting and an outdoor broadcast from a Sydney radio station have drawn large numbers of people to the Pop Up Park. However smaller events have been hampered by poor weather and less than desirable amenity in the park.

 

The consultants have suggested that a permanent park with shade trees and structures combined with a targeted events program will improve the park’s attractiveness to more people.

 

Traffic and Pedestrian Analysis

 

Pedestrian and traffic counts and observations by Council officers for the nearby road network were reported to the Local Traffic Committee on 2 February 2015.

 

The report stated that the re-configuration of the park to re-introduce parking in the eastern end of the park was undertaken in June 2014 was operating satisfactorily. Traffic movements through High Street, Riley Street and Henry Street were also considered to be operating satisfactorily.

 

In conclusion, the report stated that the Riley and Henry Streets intersection was working well, with no significant delays for either vehicles or pedestrians in any direction.  This situation is consistent with the GHD Traffic and Pedestrian Analysis findings that were presented in the first mid-term report.

 

Procedurally, if Council were to resolve to retain the Pop Up Park in its current configuration until a permanent park is constructed in its place, specific traffic management arrangements would also need to be resolved by Council in accordance with the Roads Act 1993.  The following traffic management arrangements described below and shown in Attachment 2 would be required:

 

“The Pop Up Park, or its permanent replacement, in High Street between Riley Street and Henry Street, Penrith remain restricted to through traffic and the car park at its eastern end, with seven angled parking spaces designated “1/2 Hour Parking 8:30am - 6:00pm Mon - Fri and 8:30am - 12:30pm Sat”, one angled “Disabled Parking” space, two-way aisle, “No Parking” zone, “No Stopping” zones, “Give Way” sign and linemarking, painted driveway, median with double centre lines, left-turn pavement arrow, “One Way” sign and “No Entry” sign, remain in High Street, Penrith, as shown on Attachment 2.”

 

Conclusions and Recommendations

 

The final review made a range of conclusions based on the results of the users and business owners’ surveys.  The majority of respondents have a positive opinion on the benefits of the Pop Up Park and would like to see it established as a permanent facility.  If indeed the park was permanently established, a number of significant amenity issues would need to be addressed in a new park design. 

 

Despite the generally more positive disposition respondents now have towards a park in the current location, some business owners responded that High Street should be reopened to traffic and that the pre-trial park car parking provision should be reinstated.

 

The public realm toolkit analysis found that the identity of the trial park had significantly improved between the first and final reviews.  Although many of the indicators remained ‘good’ between reviews, the quality of the landscape materials declined and after hours pedestrian access through the arcades to the car park remained restricted.  The programming of relevant events was identified as a challenge.

 

The final review recommended that a new permanent park should be developed on the current Pop Up Park site.   Furthermore it recommended that a new design should address the need for more shade, a variety of seating options, events capacity, public toilets, and retention of the eastern car park area as a shared multi-function space. 

 

To support the viability of the new park the final review recommended that Council continue to work with the Penrith CBD Corporation to continue activation of the space with events and outdoor dining; improve evening pedestrian access through arcades and measure the ongoing performance of the park.

 

Landowner Feedback

 

A submission was received from Mr Robbie Martin during the evaluation process outlining his concerns. This submission is in Attachment 3 of this report. A follow up discussion was sought with the Martin family who own a significant property adjoining the Pop Up Park as well as other properties in the vicinity of the Park.  Contact was also made with other property owners through their managing agent.

 

The feedback received was positive regarding the potential development of the park in this location and support was expressed for the park. Similar to the matters raised by park users, concerns were raised regarding the need for public toilet facilities in the vicinity of the park. A resolution of this matter is currently being negotiated and will be the subject of a further report to Council from the Property Department should Council proceed with the development of a permanent park in this location.

 

Another matter raised by property owners was the need for more shade, particularly in summer.  This issue will be addressed through the design process for the development of a permanent park.

 

Place Manager’s Assessment

Over many years, Council has expressed a commitment to revitalising the city centre of Penrith. The decision by Council to seek a special rate variation for city centre and town centre enhancements is a demonstration of this commitment to pushing forward with an active program of place shaping elements.

 

The Penrith City Centre Public Domain Masterplan was developed with significant contribution from businesses and the community. The option of a park located at the western end of the Penrith City Centre, including the closure of High Street was the subject of a special consultation process with businesses from the impacted area, as a component of the Masterplan development.

 

Business owners, property owners and the community have told Council that they want action to support the City Centre and this call has been received and acted upon. The development of the Pop Up Park as a trial has been a conservative and responsible approach, providing Council with an opportunity to test the option for 16 months through a range of seasons and events. 

 

The final survey has revealed that a majority of Pop Up Park users and business owners would like the trial park to be made permanent.  These findings confirm the findings of the first review.

 

The first review documented the limitations of the eastern end of the original trial park.  Council acknowledged these limitations and concerns expressed by business owners over the loss of parking and responded appropriately by re-instating parking as part of a shared area that may be used for larger events in the western end of the park.

 

Council embarked on the trial Pop Up Park to test whether a unique place could be developed in the western end of the city centre to foster business and meet user needs.  The final review assessed a range of impacts that the park has had on users and adjacent business owners.  Pedestrian and traffic movement in the city centre has not been adversely affected by the closure of High Street. The re-instatement of parking after the first review has improved the perception of business owners about the trial park.  The majority of users now support the park and would like to see it established permanently on the site. 

 

A corresponding rise in the identity of the park as a positive asset to the city centre supports this position.  A number of elements currently missing from the current design were identified as being essential for incorporation into a new permanent design.  Importantly, activation of a permanent park through a funded events program will be necessary to ensure its long term viability and relevance to the community.

 

As a place making exercise, the process of constructing a temporary park for a defined time period has been a fruitful endeavour.  Through this process Council has been able to consult broadly with users to establish whether or not a permanent park would be successful without the expenditure of considerable funds. Best practice experience from around the world suggests that this approach of ‘testing’ the impacts, both positive and negative, produce superior, more robust public infrastructure outcomes that benefit communities in the long term.

 

The recognition for the Pop Up Park project through the prestigious Planning Institute of Australia (NSW) Awards program is testament to Council’s innovative approach to trialling changes in public space. The lessons learnt during the Pop Up Park trial will significantly inform the development of a permanent space should Council endorse this approach.  

 

Adoption of this place making model could be considered for other public space proposals that Council is contemplating at minimal cost. Testing of the value of public infrastructure and the opportunity to gain community insights to inform final designs is a cost effective way of ‘reality checking’ such initiatives. 

 

The continuance of the trial park in its current configuration is supported whilst a new design for a permanent park is prepared.  The physical limitations of the current temporary park design should be addressed in the new design.  The ongoing success of the space as a permanent park will, to some extent, be determined by the ‘soft’ infrastructure that Council and the community add to the space.  Ongoing efforts in partnership with the Penrith CBD Corporation will be required to improve the activation of the place through a regular events program, increasing outdoor dining and improving pedestrian access through the arcades during the evening.

 

Next Steps

 

Should Council endorse the retention of a park at the western end of High Street where the Pop Up Park is currently located, a design process will commence. A budget has been allocated to the design and delivery of the park within the context of the City Centre Masterplan that Council’s Finance Working Party endorsed on 17 November, 2014. The total budget allocated, through the Special Rates Variation for the design and delivery of the park including pavement works (up to Riley Street) is up to $2.5 million.

 

  

Financial Services Manager’s Comment

 

The inclusion of the City Centres Renewal and Improvement Program (CCRIP) in the 2011-12 SRV recognised the importance of the two Centres however it was also acknowledged that the planning for what was required and how it would be implemented was not yet complete.  Following detailed investigations and consultation with Councillors an agreed prioritised program was established at the Councillor Briefing held 1 September 2014.  Further to this a strategy to accelerate the delivery of the agreed works was endorsed by the Finance Working Party in November 2014, with the works program and funding strategy being included in the Long Term Financial Plan.  This endorsed strategy included $2.5m to construct a permanent park, pending the final evaluation and Council direction, in the 2016-17 Operational Plan.

 

Conclusion

The Pop Up Park has been a successful process for gaining an insight into the benefits of providing major piece of public infrastructure.  The construction of the Pop Up Park has allowed Council to assess the need and impacts of a permanent facility at minimal cost.  The community has benefitted by being able to express more informed opinion on a potential project that is tangible in its temporary state.

 

The trial of the park has been reasonably successful and, in response, Council should consider constructing a permanent park on the current site. The current Pop Up Park should be retained, in the interim, until a new permanent park can be designed and constructed in its place. The design of a permanent new park will be informed by the findings of this Final Review and, after its construction, will need to be supported by an adequately funded activation program.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Trial Pop Up Park Penrith, Final Evaluation Report be received.

2.    The Pop Up Park be retained in its current configuration with ongoing maintenance whilst a new permanent park design is prepared in consultation with local businesses and the Penrith CBD Corporation.

3.    In the interim, negotiations commence with the Penrith CBD Corporation to extend their current events program in the park.

4.    Council commence a design process for a permanent park that is informed by the findings of the consultant’s final review.

5.    The traffic management arrangements specifically outlined in this report are implemented in accordance with the Roads Act 1993.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.  

Penrith Pop Up Park Review Part 2 (Final Review)

33 Pages

Attachments Included

2.  

Penrith Pop Up Park Traffic Management Plan

1 Page

Attachments Included

3.  

Submission by Mr Robbie Martin

2 Pages

Attachments Included

   


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


 

 

Outcome 5 - We care about our environment

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


Outcome 6 - We're healthy and share strong community spirit

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

3        The Early Rollout of the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) in the Penrith, Blue Mountains, Hawkesbury and Lithgow LGAs                                                                    22

 

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                       13 July 2015

 

 

 

3

The Early Rollout of the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) in the Penrith, Blue Mountains, Hawkesbury and Lithgow LGAs   

 

Compiled by:               Robyn Brookes, Disability Services Officer

Joe Ibbitson, Community Programs Coordinator

Authorised by:            Erich Weller, Community and Cultural Development Manager 

Requested By:            Councillor Ross Fowler OAM

 

Outcome

We are healthy and share strong community spirit

Strategy

Provide opportunities for our community to be healthy and active

Service Activity

Resource and implement social programs that contribute to community wellbeing

 

Presenters:                  Mary Hawkins - National Disability Insurance Agency Provider Engagement - The National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) in Nepean Blue Mountains      

 

Executive Summary

On 19 May 2015, at a forum for disability service providers hosted by the Federal Member for Lindsay, Ms Fiona Scott MP, Senator the Hon. Mitch Fifield, Federal Assistant Minister for Social Services and the Hon. John Ajaka MLC, NSW Minister for Disability Services signed an agreement to begin the early rollout of the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) for young people (0-17yrs) in the Penrith, Blue Mountains, Hawkesbury and Lithgow LGAs from 1 July 2015, one year ahead of schedule. The forum was held at Penrith Panthers and attended by more than 150 representatives from local organisations that work with children and young people with disability in the region.

 

The ‘NDIS Kicks Off’ event was also held at Penrith Panthers in the Exhibition Marquee on 1 July 2015. The event was attended by over 700 registered children with disability, their families and carers. A short-term NDIS shop front for the Nepean Blue Mountains is located in Council’s Community Connections building in Penrith and was officially opened on 1 July 2015 by National Disability Insurance Agency CEO David Bowen and local Western Sydney mother, Erin Kester and her family. The shop front will support children and young people with disability and their families to prepare for the transition to the NDIS in Western Sydney.

 

This report provides background information to tonight’s presentation on the Early Transition to the NDIS by Mary Hawkins from the National Disability Insurance Agency.

 

The report recommends that the information on the Early Rollout of the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) in the Penrith, Blue Mountains, Hawkesbury and Lithgow LGAs be received and that Mary Hawkins from the National Disability Insurance Agency be thanked for her presentation.

Background

A number of key policy milestones and initiatives have occurred in the lead-up to the introduction of the NDIS. Some of these milestones and initiatives include:

 

·    The Australian Government ratified the United Nations Convention on the Rights of People with Disability in July 2008

·    The Council of Australian Governments (COAG) formally endorsed the National Disability Strategy in February 2011

·    As part of the National Disability Strategy the Australian Government commissioned the Productivity Commission to undertake an inquiry into a Long Term Care and Support Scheme for people with disability in Australia

·    The Productivity Commission’s final report on Disability Care and Support was released on 10 August 2011

·    The Federal and State Governments agreed in principle with the recommendation to establish a National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) to provide eligible people experiencing significant and permanent disability with the care and support they need in everyday life

·    On 6 December 2012, in principle agreement was reached between the Australian and New South Wales Governments on arrangements for the full rollout of the NDIS by July 2018

·    The NDIS legislation was passed by the Federal Parliament on 28 March 2013.

 

National Disability Insurance Agency (NDIA) and National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS)

The National Disability Insurance Agency (NDIA) is an independent statutory agency whose role is to implement the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS), which will support a better life for children and adults with a significant and permanent disability and their families and carers.

 

Since 1 July 2013 the NDIS has been trialled in a number of pilot sites. The sites include the Hunter area for children and people up to the age of 65 and South Australia for children aged six and under.

 

Penrith City Council, in collaboration with Hawkesbury and Blue Mountains Councils, Tri Community Exchange Inc., Western Sydney Community Forum, NSW Department of Family and Community Services (FACS) and the National Disability Coordination Program have conducted a number of forums and distributed information to local organisations to provide updates on progress with the NDIS and support their preparation for the changes in funding and service delivery. Forums have been held on 16 September 2014 at Penrith RSL and 12 May 2015 at Springwood Sports Club. Both were attended by over 150 people from a range of organisations providing services to people with disability and older people.

 

Early Roll Out of the NDIS

On 19 May 2015, at a forum for disability service providers hosted by the Federal Member for Lindsay, Ms Fiona Scott MP, Senator the Hon. Mitch Fifield, Federal Assistant Minister for Social Services and the Hon. John Ajaka MLC, NSW Minister for Disability Services signed an agreement to begin the early rollout of the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) for young people (0-17yrs) in the Penrith, Blue Mountains, Hawkesbury and Lithgow LGAs from 1 July 2015, one year ahead of schedule. The forum was held at Penrith Panthers and attended by more than 150 representatives from local organisations that work with children and young people with disability in the region. 

 

The ‘NDIS Kicks Off’ event was also held at the Penrith Panthers in the Exhibition Marquee on 1 July 2015. The event was attended by over 700 registered children with disability, their families and carers. A short-term NDIS shop front for the Nepean Blue Mountains is located in Council’s Community Connections building in Penrith and was officially opened on 1 July 2015 by National Disability Insurance Agency CEO David Bowen and local Western Sydney mother, Erin Kester and her family. The shop front will support children and young people with disability and their families to prepare for the transition to the NDIS in Western Sydney.

 

The rollout will provide early intervention services for up to 2,000 children under the age of 18 from September 2015 in the Penrith, Blue Mountains, Hawkesbury and Lithgow LGAs.

 

From early September the NDIS Shopfront will be located in High Street, Penrith.

 

Council officers continue to have regular contact with representatives from the National Disability Insurance Agency (NDIA) and are providing assistance in the early implementation of the Scheme. The following identifies some of the Council initiatives to support the early rollout:

 

·    Council officers attended the signing of the agreement on Tuesday 19 May at Panthers

·    Assistance in finding suitable temporary premises to facilitate the opening of shopfront facilities from the 1 July start date

·    Council is providing meeting space and venues for ongoing information sessions being held by family support, disability, carer and Aboriginal organisations

·    Council officers met with representatives of the NDIA on Wednesday 27 May to discuss further opportunities to assist

·    Representatives from the NDIA gave a presentation on the NDIS to Council’s Access Committee on 10 June 2015

·    Representatives from the NDIA provided a briefing on the NDIS to the Mayor, Councillor Ross Fowler OAM, and General Manager on 11 June

·    Council’s Children’s Services and Library staff will have stalls at the PossABLE IDEAS EXPO on Friday 24 and Saturday 25 July 2015 at the Penrith Panthers Exhibition Marquee.

 

Tonight, Councillors have the opportunity to receive a presentation on the rollout of the NDIS in the Nepean Blue Mountains from Mary Hawkins, a representative of the NDIA.

 

Summary

An overview of the key milestones and initiatives in the development of the NDIS have been provided in this report as background to the recent announcement of an early rollout of the NDIS for 0-17 year olds and a presentation at tonight’s meeting on the Early Transition to the NDIS in Nepean Blue Mountains by the National Disability Insurance Agency.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.      The information contained in the report on The Early Rollout of the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) in the Penrith, Blue Mountains, Hawkesbury and Lithgow LGAs be received.

2.      Mary Hawkins from the National Disability Insurance Agency be thanked for her presentation on the National Disability Insurance Scheme.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.  


 

 

Outcome 7 - We have confidence in our Council

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled



 

ATTACHMENTS   

 

 

Date of Meeting:     Monday 13 July 2015

Report Title:            Trial Pop Up Park Penrith, Final Evaluation Report

Attachments:           Penrith Pop Up Park Review Part 2 (Final Review)

                                Penrith Pop Up Park Traffic Management Plan

                                Submission by Mr Robbie Martin



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                                     13 July 2015

Attachment 1 - Penrith Pop Up Park Review Part 2 (Final Review)

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                                     13 July 2015

Attachment 2 - Penrith Pop Up Park Traffic Management Plan

 

PDF Creator


Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                                     13 July 2015

Attachment 3 - Submission by Mr Robbie Martin

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator