Council_Mark_POS_RGB

5 August 2015

Dear Councillor,

In pursuance of the provisions of the Local Government Act, 1993 and the Regulations thereunder, notice is hereby given that a POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING of Penrith City Council is to be held in the Passadena Room, Civic Centre, 601 High Street, Penrith on Monday 10 August 2015 at 7:00PM.

Attention is directed to the statement accompanying this notice of the business proposed to be transacted at the meeting.

Yours faithfully

 

Alan Stoneham

General Manager

 

BUSINESS

 

1.           LEAVE OF ABSENCE

Leave of absence has been granted to:

Councillor Ben Goldfinch - 10 August 2015 to 18 August 2015 inclusive.

Councillor Greg Davies - 5 August 2015 to 17 August 2015 inclusive.

 

2.           APOLOGIES

 

3.           CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES

Policy Review Committee Meeting - 13 July 2015.

 

4.           DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

Pecuniary Interest (The Act requires Councillors who declare a pecuniary interest in an item to leave the meeting during discussion of that item)

Non-Pecuniary Conflict of Interest – Significant and Less than Significant (The Code of Conduct requires Councillors who declare a significant non-pecuniary conflict of interest in an item to leave the meeting during discussion of that item)

 

5.           ADDRESSING THE MEETING

 

6.           MAYORAL MINUTES

 

7.           NOTICES OF MOTION TO RESCIND A RESOLUTION

 

8.           NOTICES OF MOTION

 

9.           DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

10.         REQUESTS FOR REPORTS AND MEMORANDUMS

 

11.         URGENT BUSINESS

 

12.         CONFIDENTIAL BUSINESS


POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING

 

Monday 10 August 2015

 

table of contents

 

 

 

 

 

 

meeting calendar

 

 

confirmation of minutes

 

 

DELIVERY program reports

 


Council_Mark_POS_RGB2015 MEETING CALENDAR

January 2015 - December 2015

(adopted by Council on 24/11/14 and amended by Council on 25/5/15 & 27/7/15)

 

 

 

TIME

JAN

FEB

MAR

APRIL

MAY

JUNE

JULY

AUG

SEPT

OCT

NOV

DEC

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

 

Ordinary Council Meeting

7.30pm

 

2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

21^ü

(7.00pm)

 

 

14

(7.00pm)

 

23@

23

27v

25#

29*

27

24@

28

26

23#+

 

Policy Review Committee

7.00pm

 

 

 

20

11

22

13

10

14

19

9

7

 

9

9

 

 

 

 

31

 

 

 

 

 

 v

Meeting at which the draft corporate planning documents (Delivery Program and Operational Plan) are endorsed for exhibition

 *

Meeting at which the draft corporate planning documents (Delivery Program and Operational Plan) are adopted

 #

Meetings at which the Operational Plan quarterly reviews (March and September) are presented

 @

Meetings at which the Delivery Program progress reports (including the Operational Plan quarterly reviews for December and June) are presented

 ^

Election of Mayor/Deputy Mayor

 ü

Meeting at which the 2013-2014 Annual Statements are presented

 

Meeting at which any comments on the 2013-2014 Annual Statements are presented

 +

Meeting at which the Annual Report is presented

-            Extraordinary Meetings are held as required.

-            Members of the public are invited to observe meetings of the Council (Ordinary and Policy Review Committee).

Should you wish to address Council, please contact the Senior Governance Officer, Glenn Schuil.

 


UNCONFIRMED MINUTES

 OF THE POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING OF PENRITH CITY COUNCIL HELD IN THE PASSADENA ROOM, PENRITH

ON MONDAY 13 JULY 2015 AT 7:00PM

PRESENT

His Worship the Mayor, Councillor Ross Fowler OAM, Deputy Mayor, Councillor Greg Davies and Councillors Jim Aitken OAM, Bernard Bratusa, Kevin Crameri OAM, Marcus Cornish, Maurice Girotto, Ben Goldfinch, Jackie Greenow OAM, Karen McKeown, John Thain and Michelle Tormey.

 

LEAVE OF ABSENCE

 

Leave of Absence was previously requested by Councillor Tricia Hitchen for the period 11 July 2015 to 17 July 2015.

 

PRC 45  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Jackie Greenow OAM seconded Councillor Marcus Cornish to grant Leave of Absence to Councillor Tricia Hitchen for the period 11 July 2015 to 17 July 2015.

 

APOLOGIES

PRC 46  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Jackie Greenow OAM seconded Councillor Karen McKeown that apologies be received for Councillors Mark Davies and Prue Car MP.

 

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES - Policy Review Committee Meeting - 22 June 2015

PRC 47  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Karen McKeown seconded Councillor Jackie Greenow OAM that the minutes of the Policy Review Committee Meeting of 22 June 2015 be confirmed.

 

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

 

There were no declarations of interest.

 

DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Outcome 6 - We're healthy and share strong community spirit

 

3        The Early Rollout of the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) in the Penrith, Blue Mountains, Hawkesbury and Lithgow LGAs

Community and Cultural Development Manager, Erich Weller introduced the report and invited Mary Hawkins from the National Disability Insurance Agency to give a presentation.

Councillor Jim Aitken OAM left the meeting, the time being 7:15pm.
Councillor Jim Aitken OAM returned to the meeting, the time being 7:17pm.                             

PRC 48  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor John Thain seconded Councillor Jackie Greenow OAM

That:

1.       The information contained in the report on The Early Rollout of the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) in the Penrith, Blue Mountains, Hawkesbury and Lithgow LGAs be received.

2.       Mary Hawkins from the National Disability Insurance Agency be thanked for her presentation on the National Disability Insurance Scheme.

 

ADDRESSING the meeting

 

Robbie Martin

 

Item 2 – Trial Pop Up Park Penrith, Final Evaluation Report

 

Mr Martin, an affected person spoke in support of the recommendation subject to a number of undertakings. Mr Martin spoke about the importance of the design consultation process including the importance of appropriate amenities and the location of them. Mr Martin highlighted that the Trial Park has now served its purpose as a low cost solution and has highlighted the areas which need to be worked on prior to any permanent solution. Some of these included the need for a timeline for completion of the project, a commitment to ongoing maintenance, an ongoing marketing plan and after hours access to the car park from Union Lane.

 

Mr Martin concluded by stating the issues he has raised would need to be thought about and an appropriate ongoing budget and funding source identified to ensure the park remains a place people want to visit.

 

Outcome 4 - We have safe, vibrant places

 

2        Trial Pop Up Park Penrith, Final Evaluation Report                                                     

PRC 49  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Bernard Bratusa

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Trial Pop Up Park Penrith, Final Evaluation Report be received.

2.    The Pop Up Park be retained in its current configuration with ongoing maintenance whilst a new permanent park design is prepared in consultation with local businesses and the Penrith CBD Corporation.

3.    In the interim, negotiations commence with the Penrith CBD Corporation to extend their current events program in the park.

4.    Council commence a design process for a permanent park that is informed by the findings of the consultant’s final review.

5.    The traffic management arrangements specifically outlined in this report are implemented in accordance with the Roads Act 1993.

6.     A further report be presented to Council addressing the consultation process for design and construction, a definitive timeline, information on infrastructure, amenities, lighting, safety and Wi-Fi and the ongoing marketing program plans.

Councillors Marcus Cornish and Kevin Crameri OAM called for a Division.

For

Against

 

Councillor Greg Davies

Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM

Councillor John Thain

Councillor Jim Aitken OAM

Councillor Karen McKeown

Councillor Marcus Cornish

Councillor Michelle Tormey

Councillor Maurice Girotto

Councillor Jackie Greenow OAM

                                                        

Councillor Ben Goldfinch

 

Councillor Bernard Bratusa   

 

Councillor Ross Fowler OAM

 

 

1        Draft Charity Clothing Bins Policy

Councillors Karen McKeown and John Thain left the meeting, the time being 8:04pm.
Councillor Karen McKeown returned to the meeting, the time being 8:04pm.

Councillor John Thain returned to the meeting, the time being 8:05pm.

PRC 50  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor John Thain seconded Councillor Michelle Tormey

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Draft Charity Clothing Bins Policy be received.

2.    Council endorse the process towards adopting the draft policy as a Policy of Council following the initial step of exhibiting it for public comment.

 

There being no further business the Chairperson declared the meeting closed the time being 8:06pm.

    



DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

 

Outcome 1 - We can work close to home

 

1        Growing Tourism in Penrith                                                                                                1

 

Outcome 2 - We plan for our future growth

 

2        Proposed Amendment to Development Control Plan 2014 - E7 Part B (Glenmore Park Stage 2)     

Procedural note: Section 375A of the Local Government Act 1993 requires that a division be called in relation to this matter.                                                                  7

 

Outcome 5 - We care about our environment

 

3        Presentation of the draft Cooling the City Strategy                                                         17

 

Outcome 7 - We have confidence in our Council

 

4        Results of the Community Survey 2015                                                                          27

 

5        Local Government NSW Annual Conference 2015                                                        35

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


Outcome 1 - We can work close to home

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

1        Growing Tourism in Penrith                                                                                                1

 

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                 10 August 2015

 

 

 

1

Growing Tourism in Penrith   

 

Compiled by:               Barbara Magee, Manager - Corporate Communications, Marketing and Customer Service

Authorised by:            Stephen Britten, Chief Governance Officer  

 

Outcome

We can work close to home

Strategy

Diversify the region's economy and attract investment, particularly targeting new and emerging employment sectors

Service Activity

Market the City through campaigns that build on its strengths and identity

      

 

Executive Summary

Marketing Penrith as ‘The Adventure Capital’ is more than just growing visitor numbers. It positions Penrith as a City of the Future complementing the growth and revitalisation of the City Centre, contemporary residential developments throughout the LGA, new and improved infrastructure and the proposed new airport at Badgerys Creek. Attracting high quality events, promoting the city as an adventure playground and having a comprehensive approach to growing the visitor economy is an important part of fulfilling the vision for Penrith City.

 

Following consultation with more than 30 stakeholders including Blue Mountains Tourism, Hawkesbury Tourism, the NSW Business Chamber and a number of local tourism operators, a Destination Management Plan (DMP) for Penrith has produced an audit of tourism product and infrastructure, a roadmap outlining the opportunities and economic benefits of developing a contemporary approach to growing tourism in Penrith and an analysis of opportunities and challenges.

 

This report highlights some of the recommendations from the DMP and also provides an opportunity to bring Councillors up to date on the implementation of Council’s tourism marketing strategy.

 

The NSW Minister for Tourism the Hon Stuart Ayres MP and the Mayor, Councillor Ross Fowler OAM will launch Penrith’s 2015/16 campaign ‘Penrith the Adventure Capital’ at 6pm on Thursday 3 September (venue TBA).

 

The launch will include the new Visit Penrith website, the Penrith Visitor Guide, information touchscreens, Penrith Event Prospectus and the Adventure Capital marketing campaign from September to December 2015.

Background

The Destination Management Plan is an audit of tourism products and accommodation available in Penrith LGA and produces a product gap analysis to show opportunities to grow the visitor economy.

 

The DMP is not meant to be a complacent document telling us how good we are, but one which highlights where we are today and where we need to be to grow annual visitation from the current 1.3M to 2.33M visitors and increase annual visitor spend from $231M to $511M in the next ten years.

 

Alongside the recommendations of the DMP, City Marketing staff are working with Destination NSW, National, State and local media and local tourism operators to continue to profile Penrith as the ‘Adventure Capital’.

 

A range of marketing tools are in the final stages of development and include a new website (www.visitpenrith.com.au) , visitor guide, touch screen technology, event prospectus and guidelines and a comprehensive marketing and advertising campaign to commence in September.

 

Overview

Penrith currently has approximately 1.3 million visitors per annum spending $231M. The majority (78%) are day trippers visiting the LGA for leisure, events, business and visiting friends and family.

 

Domestic overnight visitors account for just over 20% and international visitation is small (1%). Penrith’s tourism industry is primarily associated with visiting friends and family, events and festivals, particularly those associated with sports and recreation.

 

The top five origin markets for day trippers are Sydney, Blue Mountains, Central Coast, Canberra and South Coast. Overnight visitors come from similar areas with the inclusion of the Hunter Valley. International visitors predominantly come from New Zealand and the United Kingdom.

 

The annual output from the local tourism sector is estimated at nearly $410M. Currently the sector accounts for just over 2800 jobs or 4% of total employment.

 

The DMP has identified 60 tourism attraction related experiences and 45 events and festivals (in 2014) in Penrith.

 

The Challenges include:

 

Accommodation Audit:

The report identified a variety of small scale accommodation but highlighted a distinct lack of larger scale or branded properties with only one 4 star branded property (Mercure Penrith).

 

Product Gap Analysis

Many of the issues and gaps identified in the DMP are already being addressed including a new tourism website, signage, revitalisation of the Penrith CBD, lack of linkage with the Blue Mountains and other surrounding LGAs, a strong media base and a targeted marketing strategy.

 

Lack of accommodation this results in Penrith being seen as a drive through rather than a stop and stay destination. The caravan, motorhome and campaign industry is worth $6.5B nationally and the industry is constantly evolving with parks responding to consumer demand. The investigation of the development of a holiday park could improve Penrith’s appeal as a holiday destination.

 

Public transport services and co-ordination  Lack of regular public transport services within the LGA to transport visitors to key tourism attractions, such as Penrith Lakes, Whitewater etc.

 

Inclusion within the ‘Greater Sydney Region’ Stakeholders believed that positioning Penrith as part of the Greater Sydney region has a distinct disadvantage with Penrith being lost as a destination. As part of the newly formed regional strategic alliance, Penrith is working with Blue Mountains and Hawkesbury to promote a regional tourism roadmap exploring opportunities for government funding and co-operative marketing and promotion.

 

Lack of local awareness of the importance of the tourism industry to the local economy  Suggested strategy to promote the estimated value of tourism via direct and indirect spending and how the spending dollar disperses through the Penrith economy.

 

Lack of Planning Zones Designated for Tourism  Investors and developers in tourism look for certainty in areas which offer tourism growth. With a lack of available land in most LGAs in Greater Sydney, a designated area for tourism development in Penrith could be a major selling feature to attract more tourism and related businesses.


The Opportunities include:

 

Creation and Packaging of Semi and Active Adventure Products for the Cruise Industry:  The opportunity exists to capitalise on the strength of the cruise market into Sydney over the October – February period. There is already strong demand from cruise visitors to visit the Three Sisters in the Blue Mountains.

 

Creation of Tourism Product Packages:  For packaging to be effective there is a need for a composite experience to be offered to the consumer helping to extend the visitor stay. We are currently talking to operators about packaging experiences to visitors.

 

Link to Badgerys Creek Airport:  The advantage Penrith has is its ability to develop facilities and infrastructure over the next 5-10 years to grow various tourism products and build a strong visitor profile. Though the establishment of the airport may be a 10-15 year time frame, the opportunity exists now to plan to offer a strong cluster of products which can be easily accessed from the airport.

 

Development of a Central Experience Hub – based on the Queenstown NZ model:

It is important to differentiate the hub experience from the traditional visitor information centre. The hub would offer:

 

·    Ticketing and packaging of different attractions at competitive prices

·    Information sharing ideally through multimedia displays

·    Interactive displays to tell the story of Penrith and the events on offer

·    Offering details on events and other activities

 

Creation of a Destination Caravan Park:  Council staff visited the Big4 Caravan Park at Emu Plains for a site visit. Over the past 15 years this industry has been the fastest growing domestic tourism sector in Australia with caravan and RV registrations increasing by more than 250%.

 

To encourage visitors to stay in Penrith and visit for a holiday the opportunity may exist to create a new family-centric holiday destination park.

 

Development of a Major Caravan/Campervan Service Centre:  Along with the need for more destination parks throughout NSW, research indicates that this pent up demand for a ‘one stop shop’ car caravan/campervan servicing. This opportunity will be raised with the Penrith Progression.

 

Conclusion

It has been 12 months since Council moved from only providing visitor information to proactively marketing the City as a tourism destination. Whilst developing the suite of marketing materials the team has focused on profiling Penrith through print and TV including the Daily Telegraph, Channel 10, Channel 7 (Sydney Weekender) and a number of tourism websites. The team has worked with Destination NSW, our local tourism operators and adjoining local government areas.

A State Government review of Regional Tourism Organisations (RTOs) is currently underway and Penrith is involved in this review along with Blue Mountains City Council.

The Destination Management Plan has consolidated information about Penrith’s current tourism offerings and listed a number of potential opportunities for growth. Already the tourism team has taken the opportunity to work with the 2015 Camping, Caravan and Holiday Expo which attracts approximately 20,000 visitors to Penrith in September.

 

It is important to acknowledge the participation of our tourism operators, the historical societies, accommodation providers, venues, business groups, arts and cultural facilities, tourism representatives and government representatives from surrounding LGAs in the creation of the DMP.

 

Following the launch of our suite of information and marketing tools in September, we look forward to working with all contributors to grow tourism in Penrith. The implementation of an Adventure Capital tourism marketing strategy will start in September. The campaign will drive traffic to the new Visit Penrith website and a number of data gathering methods are in place to evaluate the success of the campaign.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the information contained in the report on Growing Tourism in Penrith be received.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.  


Outcome 2 - We plan for our future growth

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

2        Proposed Amendment to Development Control Plan 2014 - E7 Part B (Glenmore Park Stage 2)  

Procedural note: Section 375A of the Local Government Act 1993 requires that a division be called in relation to this matter.                                                                  7

 

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                 10 August 2015

 

 

 

2

Proposed Amendment to Development Control Plan 2014 - E7 Part B (Glenmore Park Stage 2)   

 

Compiled by:               Alison Butler, Planner

Authorised by:            Paul Grimson, City Planning Manager  

 

Outcome

We plan for our future growth

Strategy

Protect the City's natural areas, heritage and character

Service Activity

Maintain a contemporary framework of land use and contribution policies, strategies and statutory plans

     

Procedural note: Section 375A of the Local Government Act 1993 requires that a division be called in relation to this matter.

 

Executive Summary

At the Policy Review Committee Meeting of 9 March 2015, Council resolved to sponsor the Planning Proposal for Precinct C of Glenmore Park Stage 2 and forward it to the Department of Planning and Environment (DP&E) seeking the issue of a Gateway Determination to commence the Local Environmental Plan (LEP) amendment process. The Planning Proposal was submitted to the DP&E on 15 May 2015. A Gateway determination was received on 29 July 2015 allowing the proposed LEP amendments to proceed. 

 

Chapter E7 (Part B) of Penrith Development Control Plan 2014 (DCP 2014) applies to the land and contains detailed planning controls for development within the Glenmore Park Stage 2 release area. The Mulgoa Creek Catchment controls differ to those in the remaining areas of Glenmore Park Stage 2 in that they provide more generous development controls to respond to the larger lot sizes within this precinct. While these controls will be maintained for the larger lots, as a result of the proposed lot size amendments, new front setback controls must now be developed for the smaller lots within the precinct.

 

It is proposed to exhibit the draft Chapter E7 (Part B) along with the Planning Proposal for Precinct C.

 

It is recommended that Council endorse the public exhibition of an amendment to Development Control Plan 2014 – E7 Part B (Glenmore Park Stage 2) in accordance with the relevant provisions of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 and associated Regulations. A further report will be presented to Council following the public exhibition.

Background

Precinct C is located at the western edge of the Glenmore Park Stage 2 release area, adjacent to the Mulgoa Nature Reserve. Precinct C has been envisaged as providing a transition between the urban areas of the release area and the rural and conservation land to the west. The unique character of this precinct compared to the rest of the release area was communicated through larger minimum lot sizes and specific development controls aimed at creating a large lot, rural residential precinct.

 

At the Policy Review Committee Meeting of 9 March 2015, Council resolved to sponsor the Planning Proposal for Precinct C of Glenmore Park Stage 2. This Planning Proposal seeks to amend the minimum lot sizes applying to Precinct C to allow for a more gradual transition of lot sizes from the urban areas of the release area to the rural and conservation lands to the west.

 

A Gateway determination was received from the DP&E on 29 July 2015 allowing the proposed LEP amendments to proceed. The next steps involved in processing the Planning Proposal are to consult with relevant Public Authorities and commence community consultation. 

 

Development Control Plan

 

Chapter E7 (Part B) of DCP 2014 applies to the land and contains detailed planning controls for development within the Glenmore Park Stage 2 release area. Different development controls apply to detached dwelling development within the two catchments in the release area; Surveyors Creek and Mulgoa Creek. The development controls contained within the Mulgoa Creek Catchment section apply to Precinct C. 

 

The Mulgoa Creek Catchment controls are more generous than those in the remaining areas of Glenmore Park Stage 2 as they respond to the larger lot sizes within this precinct. The current lot size range within the precinct is 750m2 – 2,000m2. The effect of the Planning Proposal is that the lot size range will be amended to 450m2 – 1,000m2.

 

While these controls will be maintained for the larger lots new setback controls must now be developed for the proposed smaller lots within the precinct. This is to ensure that future landowners are provided with controls that allow reasonable development of their site, while still responding to the precinct’s special characteristics. In order to achieve this, it is recommended that the setback controls for smaller lots are reduced slightly to complement the amended lot sizes. The recommended setback controls for the Mulgoa Creek Catchment are outlined in the following table.  

 

Allotment Requirements

Lot size range

450m2 – 1,000m2

Lot Frontage

20m

Principal Private Open Space

Minimum Area

100m2

Minimum Dimension

5m

Minimum Dwelling Setbacks

 

Lots <600m2

600m2-1,000m2

Lots >1,000m2

Front

4.5m

6m

8m

Secondary Frontage

2m

4m

4m

Side

0.9m

0.9m

3m

Rear

Ground Floor

First Floor

 

4m

6m

 

4m

6m

 

8m

Other Requirements

Height

·    Dwellings shall have a maximum height of 2 storeys

 

The lots to which this reduced front setback will apply are located on the inner eastern portion of Precinct C as shown in the image below. A reduction of the setbacks in this location will not have an adverse impact on the overall rural residential character of the precinct as those lots with a direct interface to the rural and conservation lands will still maintain larger setbacks, larger lot frontages, and increased private open space requirements.

 

 

In addition to the new setback requirements, some wording amendments are also recommended to the DCP to update the maximum dwelling yield for Precinct C to 344 dwellings to align with the dwelling yield amendments sought through the Planning Proposal.

 

Proposed consultation strategy

 

It is proposed to exhibit the draft Chapter E7 (Part B) along with the Planning Proposal for Precinct C. The Gateway determination has recommended that the Planning Proposal is placed on public exhibition for a minimum of 28 days. A memo confirming the timeframes for exhibition will be forwarded to all Councillors with further details when these are available. The consultation strategy will include advertisement in the local newspaper and there will be displays in Penrith and St Marys Council offices. Council officers will send individual letters to all adjoining landowners. All public exhibition information will also be available on Council’s web site and an exclusive email address for electronic enquiries and submissions has been set up.

 

Next Steps

Should Council seek to endorse the public exhibition of the draft Chapter E7 of DCP 2014, the following steps will occur:

1.   The amended Chapter E7 (Part B) will be exhibited for 28 days in accordance with the Environmental Planning and Assessment Regulation 2000.

2.   Submissions to the exhibition will be reviewed, and recommendations prepared for Council’s consideration. Chapter E7 (Part B) may be varied or amended to address issues raised in submissions where it is consistent with Council’s agreed policy direction.

3.   A final draft of Chapter E7 (Part B) of DCP 2014 will be presented to Council for consideration and endorsement.

4.   Upon Council endorsement, the final Chapter E7 (Part B) of DCP 2014 will be publicly notified in the local press in accordance with the requirements of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Regulation 2000.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Proposed Amendment to Development Control Plan 2014 - E7 Part B (Glenmore Park Stage 2) be received.

2.    Council endorse the public exhibition of an amendment to Development Control Plan 2014 – E7 Part B (Glenmore Park Stage 2). The amendment is to be exhibited in accordance with the relevant provisions of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 and associated Regulations.

 

3.    The General Manager be delegated authority to make any necessary minor changes required to Development Control Plan 2014 – E7 Part B (Glenmore Park Stage 2) in accordance with Council’s adopted policy position ahead of public exhibition.

4.    A further report be presented to Council following Public Exhibition.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.  


 

 

Outcome 3 - We can get around the City

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


 

 

Outcome 4 - We have safe, vibrant places

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


Outcome 5 - We care about our environment

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

3        Presentation of the draft Cooling the City Strategy                                                         17

 

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                 10 August 2015

 

 

 

3

Presentation of the draft Cooling the City Strategy   

 

Compiled by:               Carmel Hamilton, Sustainability Co-ordinator

Jenny  Guice, Senior Sustainability Planner

Authorised by:            Fiona Plesman, Organisational Performance & Development Manager  

 

Outcome

We care for our environment

Strategy

Minimise risks to our community form natural disasters

Service Activity

Identify opportunities to respond to a changing climate

      

 

Executive Summary

An action in the 2013-17 Delivery Program is to “Develop a Greencover Strategy for the City to reduce the impacts of urban heat islands”. The action is a two year action covering both the 2013-14 and 2014-15 Operational Plans. Work on the development of this strategy commenced early in 2014 with previous updates provided to the Corporate Leadership Team about the development of this Strategy on 21 August and 13 November 2014. The information was presented at a Councillor Briefing on 28 January 2015.

 

The draft Strategy represents the culmination of a significant investment of time and resources, including research and investigation into heat management within the Local Government sector and best practice globally. In addition, three separate consultancy research projects have provided the Penrith specific component of the research for the Strategy. This research was partly funded by the State Government’s Building Resilience to Climate Change program.

 

The purpose of the Strategy is to identify ways to cool our City and region to improve liveability and prioritise protection from heat for people and communities. The objectives of the Strategy are:

 

1.   To maximise community awareness and understanding of the effects of heat and the importance of cooling the Penrith LGA

2.   To encourage greater appreciation of green infrastructure and green spaces in the LGA  and their cooling benefits

3.   To implement the identified actions within the Strategy giving priority to heat vulnerable areas

4.   To identify ways to adapt existing and identify new projects and activities that will work towards cooling the Penrith LGA.

 

Heat mapping and analysis was undertaken in five priority areas that were identified based on a criteria of vulnerability to heat. The areas of focus were Cranebrook, Penrith City, Kingswood, St Marys and Glenmore Park.  Hotspots generally appeared in residential

areas (particularly Glenmore Park), industrial zones (particularly in North St Marys)

and commercial centres (Penrith and St Marys).

 

In general, the research was able to conclude the following:

·    The whole of the Penrith LGA experiences high temperatures

·    Existing vegetation has a significant localised cooling effect

·    Irrigated vegetation is more effective at providing cooling than non-irrigated vegetation.

 

Internal discussions during the development of the draft Strategy have led to a number of collaborative proposals for projects to address heat. This has included a number of funding submissions under the Federal Government’s ‘20 Million Trees’ program for tree planting projects. Another project being implemented is a joint project between Sustainability and Parks looking at the completion of a street tree inventory. This information would feed into Council’s Asset Management System and planning, and would complement the development of a Street Tree Masterplan for the City.

 

Consultation Undertaken to Develop the Strategy

The Sustainability Team has undertaken significant internal and external consultation in the development of the draft Strategy.  External organisations contacted and consulted in the development of the draft Strategy have included:

·    Parramatta City Council

·    City of Sydney Council

·    North Sydney Council

·    City of Melbourne Council

·    City of Brisbane Council

·    Marrickville Council

·    20:20:20 Vision

·    WSROC member councils sustainability group

·    Monash University

·    CSIRO

·    NSW Government Architects Office

·    Meg Caffin, Urban Forester

·    NSW Office of Environment and Heritage

·    University of Western Sydney

·    University of Technology Sydney

 

An internal stakeholder reference group was convened to seek feedback and comment on drafts of the Strategy and actions. This feedback has been incorporated into the current draft Strategy. The internal stakeholder reference group comprised staff representing City Planning, Community and Cultural Development, Design and Projects, Place Management, Recreation, Children’s Services, Development Services, Parks, Environmental Health and Public Domain Amenity and Safety.

 

Council already undertakes a variety of work that aids in cooling the City. Tree planting and landscaping is one of the most successful approaches being taken across the world. Existing programs such as the Great River Walk, The Nepean River Vegetation Management Plan, the re-design of the Civic Arts Precinct, the planting of trees via Council’s Bushcare program, and the design and maintenance of parks, all contribute to cooling of the City. The evidence gathered to support the development of this Strategy will further assist Council in strategically pin-pointing areas where existing programs and funding should be directed to achieve multiple outcomes, including targeted cooling.

 

Council has also recently adopted ‘Penrith Progresssion: A Plan for Action’ which recognises the need for cooling and aligns closely with the purpose and objectives of the draft Strategy. Several actions from Penrith Progression have been included within the draft Cooling the City Strategy as they are directly relevant.

 

While tree planting and other green cover comprises a substantial component of the mitigation discussion in the draft Strategy there are other successful ways to cool the City that are addressed and incorporated including the use of water sensitive urban design, increased reflectivity, street and urban design, and policy and planning controls, particularly for new developments. The implementation of community engagement and education is also seen as an essential component of the Strategy to build community awareness of and support for heat mitigation on public and private land.

 

The draft Strategy draws upon existing works programs, suggestions from across the organisation, as well as recommendations from expert consultants’ reports to make suggestions for implementation of various cooling strategies. Recommended actions for Penrith are included in the “Opportunities for Penrith” section of the Draft Strategy on page 14.

 

Actions are divided into low cost actions that can begin to be implemented immediately within current budgets and work programs, and those where more significant funding will be required with implementation over a longer period of time. Breaking the actions down in this way allows Council to focus on those areas where we can begin to make an immediate impact within the City, while still using this time to actively investigate external funding opportunities, pilot projects and partnerships with other organisations to begin to implement some of the more ambitious projects.  Funding for future actions will need to be considered as part of Council’s Integrated Planning and Reporting program with the development of the next four year Delivery Program and associated capital works program scheduled to take place in mid-2016.

 

Actions have been identified to fall within one of six strategy areas, including:

·    Policy & Planning

·    Community Engagement

·    Green Infrastructure

·    Water Sensitive Urban Design

·    Increased Reflectivity

·    Social

 

Council will also draw upon the evidence gathered and presented in the draft Strategy to seek external grant funding to trial and implement various cooling techniques and programs across the City. This has already occurred with a number of sub-projects recently being successful in receiving funding support via the Federal Government’s ‘20 Million Trees’ program.

 

Interest in the Strategy

There has been significant interest in the development of this Strategy. Penrith City Council is being viewed as a leader in the approach taken to develop this Strategy. A case study about the approach taken by Penrith City Council was included in a recent publication produced by 20:20:20 Vision, City of Melbourne and the Victorian Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning, titled “How to Grow an Urban Forest – A ten-step guide to help Councils save money, time and share practical knowledge”.

 

Sustainability Team members have been invited to present on a number of occasions about the development of the Strategy. This has included:

·    8th Liveable Cities Conference held in Melbourne 6-7 July 2015, co-presented with Institute for Sustainable Futures

·    20:20:20 Vision and City of Melbourne “Urban Forest Masterclass” held in Melbourne on 25 June 2015

·    20:20:20 Vision “Growing the Seeds” National Tour, 13 November 2014

·    “Climate Change Adaptation for Local Government & Public Sector” Conference in Melbourne on 4 December 2014 (nb: invited but did not present at this event)

·    NSW Office of Environment and Heritage and 20:20:20 Vision “Urban Greening in Western Sydney” Masterclass 26 August 2014.

 

There has also been positive media interest in the leadership Penrith City Council is showing by developing the Strategy, and this has included:

·    “Adaptation in Action. Cooling the City Strategy – Penrith City Council”, NSW Climate Adaptation Newsletter produced by the NSW Office of Environment and Heritage 26 June 2015

·    “Battle to Cool Hottest Town”, Sunday Telegraph, 24 May 2015

·    “Penrith Deals with Urban Heat”, Australian Financial Review, 28 May 2015

·    “Deathly Effect of Heatwaves Ignored” Sydney Morning Herald, 21 April 2015

·    “Where’s our Water Fun”, Penrith Press, 10 March 2015

·    “Extreme Heat. Cool down strategy vital for nine areas identified as hotspots” Penrith Press and Daily Telegraph (online), 3 March 2015

·    “Reducing Urban Heat is Critical for Council’s Around Australia” Daily Telegraph (online), 13 November 2014

·    “Penrith’s Shady Problem” Penrith Press, 14 November 2014

 

Comment from Executive Manager - City Planning and Community

The Penrith Progression Action Plan recognises the importance of planning for heat in our cities. One of the five Penrith Progression outcomes focuses on ‘smart growth’, and the City Shaping elements include ‘smart growth and green buildings’, and the ‘green grid’.

 

Smart growth in the City Centre means a compact, transit-oriented, bicycle-friendly, comfortable and walkable urban centre. Smart growth is about making things better for people.

 

Penrith is a hot city in summer months, particularly in our City Centre where the density of buildings, hard surfaces and cars exacerbates heat. Smart growth in the City Centre means active cooling through landscape and design, to improve the comfort and desirability of the place as a destination.

 

Demand for smart and green buildings is growing, particularly from commercial tenants. Owners and investors are beginning to recognise the return on investment.  Our green buildings will save on energy and water, and help improve our working and living environments with natural air, trees, gardens and water features to enhance shade and cooling. They will be adaptable, and designed for longevity and Penrith’s climate.

 

Decentralised utilities also help to build longer term resilience in our buildings, with managed water and energy use, and recycled water to support the landscaped roof and walls.

 

Next Steps

Although there is no specific budget allocation for the implementation of the Strategy, it is anticipated that a number of the priority actions proposed may be able to be progressed through existing work program and budgets, or through upcoming grant opportunities.

 

In addition to opportunities presented by grants internal discussions during the development of the draft Strategy have led to a number of collaborative proposals for projects to address heat.

 

These potential projects and funding opportunities include:

-     A number of tree planting projects proposed by  Environmental Health and Parks, have been submitted in the latest Federal Government’s ‘20 Million Trees’ funding round.

-     Sustainability and Parks are collaborating to have a street tree inventory undertaken, using the i-tree program, in a sample area of heat affected suburbs using existing budgets. Sustainability and Parks are co-funding this project as the information will benefit both areas of Council’s current and future work programs with the information feeding into Council’s Asset Management System and planning, and would complement the development of a Street Tree Masterplan for the City.

-     Sustainability, Place Management and Community and Cultural Development have been discussing a potential collaboration that would seek to encourage community housing providers to make improvements to cooling their housing stock, as well as to educate and engage the community around the issue of heat.

-     Environmental Health and Sustainability teams have submitted an application to the NSW Office of Environment and Heritage Building Resilience to Climate Change Fund to investigate water sensitive urban design as a means of cooling open space in priority areas.

-     Sustainability is working with Engineering Services to participate in the ‘Climate Adapted People Shelter’ bus shelter design competition being implemented in western Sydney by the University of Technology Sydney.

 

Endorsement of the Strategy will provide the impetus for Managers to consider the inclusion of heat mitigation actions in the next Delivery Program, and in the design and maintenance of Council’s assets and programs.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Presentation of the draft Cooling the City Strategy be received.

2.    The Cooling the City Strategy be endorsed.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.  

Draft Cooling the City Strategy

22 Pages

Attachments Included

   


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


 

 

Outcome 6 - We're healthy and share strong community spirit

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


Outcome 7 - We have confidence in our Council

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

4        Results of the Community Survey 2015                                                                          27

 

5        Local Government NSW Annual Conference 2015                                                        35

 

 

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                 10 August 2015

 

 

 

4

Results of the Community Survey 2015   

 

Compiled by:               Carmel Hamilton, Sustainability Co-ordinator

Krystie Race, Sustainability Research Planner

Authorised by:            Fiona Plesman, Organisational Performance & Development Manager  

 

Outcome

We have confidence in our Council

Strategy

Provide opportunities for our community to participate in making decisions about the City's future

Service Activity

Manage Council's corporate planning and engagement program

 

Presenters:                  Michael Di Leo, Acting Executive Director - IRIS Research - Penrith City Council Customer Survey 2015      

 

Executive Summary

This report outlines the results of the Penrith City Council Community Survey 2015.  The full survey report, by IRIS Research, is provided as an attachment to this report. 


A presentation on the survey results will be made by Michael Di Leo, Acting Executive Director of IRIS Research.

Background

Council regularly conducts a City-wide telephone survey of residents of the City to determine their satisfaction with Council’s services.  The survey is now undertaken biannually.

 

Council has conducted this survey in 2003, 2005, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2012 and 2013 to ensure that meaningful comparisons could be drawn from the results, with many questions remaining constant throughout this period of time.  The aim of the survey is to provide Council with an understanding of the perceptions and needs of our local communities regarding a broad range of services and facilities.  In particular, it provides:

·     measurement of the importance of, and satisfaction with, services and facilities provided by Council

·     feedback on the customer service provided by Council staff

·     perceptions about community wellbeing and the ‘feel’ of the City

·     information to help Council identify service priorities for our communities

·     a comparison of Council’s overall satisfaction ratings with other councils.

 

The survey also provides information to report on some indicators in the Community Strategic Plan, Council’s Delivery Program and Annual Report.

Survey Methodology

The survey was conducted during the period of 27 April to 7 May 2015 with 604 telephone surveys collected from a random sample of residents throughout the City.  A sample size of 600 residents provides a maximum sampling error of plus or minus 4% at 95% confidence. Strict sampling procedures ensure that characteristics of selected respondents mirror the overall adult population with a representative distribution across age, gender, ward and defined land areas (e.g. rural, new release and established urban areas). 

 

Respondents were asked to give both an importance and satisfaction rating (using a rating scale of 10 ‘very important’ or ‘very satisfied’ to 0 ‘not important’ or ‘very dissatisfied’) about Council’s external services and facilities.  The survey methodology targets residents’ perception of service provision and Council staff performance.

 

The survey also asked respondents a number of questions regarding their perception and satisfaction in the areas of:

-     community wellbeing

-     safety

-     community pride and feeling connected in their neighbourhood

-     cultural activities and events.

 

Respondents were then asked questions regarding their future vision and aspirations for the Penrith area, including:

-     What do you value most about the Penrith area

-     Thinking of Penrith as a whole, what would you say is the top challenge facing Penrith in the next 10 years

-     Thinking about the next four years, what is your top priority for Penrith Council to focus on?

Key outcomes

The key outcomes from the 2015 survey are summarised under the following seven headings:

a.   Overall Council Performance

b.   Staff Performance

c.   Value for Money

d.   Resident Prioritisation of Council Services and Facilities

e.   Future Vision

f.    Community Pride, Safety and Connectedness

g.   Community Well Being

Each of the following sections will briefly explain the results and comment on implications for Council.  Further discussion will be provided through tonight’s presentation by Michael Di Leo from IRIS Research and in the accompanying report.

a)   Overall Council Performance

Respondents were asked “How would you rate overall satisfaction with the performance of Penrith City Council?” Overall satisfaction with Council’s performance since 2009 is shown in the following graph.

 

The figures on the overall satisfaction with Council’s performance indicate:

·     A positive result for Penrith Council, with residents rating their satisfaction with Council’s overall performance as ‘high’, with 69.7% rating their satisfaction as 7 to 10.

·     This result is statistically similar to that of 2013, but significantly higher than all of the NSW brand scores.

·     Residents living in rural and new release areas were the least satisfied, which is a common trend amongst Council areas that have both urban and rural characteristics.

 

Overall Satisfaction with Council Performance – 2009 to 2015 Comparison Scores

 

 

b)     Staff Performance

To gauge Council’s overall customer service performance, survey respondents who had contact with Council staff within the last 12 months were asked to rate their level of satisfaction.

 

The 2015 results indicate that 81.8% of residents were ‘satisfied’ with the performance of Council staff (i.e. provide a score above the neutral point of 5), and 12.3% were ‘dissatisfied’ (i.e. a score less than 5).  This resulted in a mean score of 7.57 (out of 10) for Council’s staff performance, a small decrease in satisfaction scores compared to the 2013 survey, where a mean score of 7.77 was recorded. The graph below summarises these results.

 

Satisfaction with Council Staff Performance – 2009 to 2015 Comparison Scores

 

 

The reasons why residents were satisfied or dissatisfied are provided in the graph below.

c)   Value for Money

 

The survey asked residents to rate their level of satisfaction with the value they feel they are receiving from their rates.  A score of ‘0’ represents very poor value and ‘10’ represents very good value for money. 

 

The results show that Council continues to deliver good value for rates, with 69.3% of residents indicating they were satisfied (6 or higher out of 10), against 13.2% who indicated that they were dissatisfied (4 or less out of 10). This gave a medium level mean satisfaction score of 6.51, a score statistically unchanged from 2013.

 

Overall satisfaction with Value for Rates Dollar since 2009 is detailed in the following graph.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Overall Satisfaction with Value for Rates Dollar ~ 2009 to 2015 Comparison Scores

 

 

 

d)   Resident Prioritisation of Council Services and Facilities

Residents were asked to rate the importance and their satisfaction with 42 services and facilities that are provided by Penrith City Council. 

 

The survey also provides an in-depth analysis by combining the survey results for both ‘importance’ and ‘satisfaction’.  This indicates areas of ‘priority’ on which Council could focus, by identifying the services where residents place a high level of importance, but lower satisfaction with the level of service provided.

 

The following table shows the Opportunity Matrix, which compares the satisfaction scores against the importance scores for each of the questions about Council’s services and facilities.  It is recommended that more attention needs to be given to the ‘Improve’ quadrant, which represents Higher Importance & Lower Satisfaction.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quadrant (Matrix) Analysis for Council Services and Facilities

 

IMPROVE

Higher importance – lower satisfaction

MAINTAIN

Higher importance – higher satisfaction

 

· Condition of local roads

· Facilities and services for older people

· Facilities and services for youth

· Facilities and services for people with disabilities

· Environmental protection & enforcement

· The health of the Nepean River and creeks

· Council speaking to other levels of government, business and community groups about what the City and residents need

· Balancing the growth of our City whilst enhancing its unique qualities

· Infrastructure and services meet the needs of a growing population 

· Council provides opportunities for residents to participate in planning and to have a say about the City's future

· Council understands the community's needs and expectations 

· Council communicates well with residents

· Council is responsible

 

· Safety of local roads

· Street and public space lighting

· Parks, playgrounds and reserves

· Protection of bushland, natural environment and wildlife

· Food safety and hygiene in local eateries and restaurants

· Supporting and encouraging local industry and business 

· Cleaning of streets and public spaces

· Condition of public spaces

· Graffiti removal

· Household waste and recycling services

· Kerbside pick-up for bulky household waste

NICHE

Lower importance – lower satisfaction

SECONDARY

Lower importance – higher satisfaction

 

· Ease of traffic flow

· Provision of car parking

· Footpaths

· Cleanliness and condition of public toilets

· Cycleways

· Domestic animal control

· Building & development approval process

· Information on Council services and facilities

· Council marketing of the City

 

 

· Condition of cemeteries

· Library services

· Local community festivals and events

· Provision of children's services

· Community buildings, neighbourhood facilities, community halls and centres

· Sporting fields

· Swimming pools and leisure centres

· Level of access to Council services, information and facilities



 

 

 

e)   Future vision

Penrith residents place a high value on the community/family friendly atmosphere; open, green spaces; close proximity of local facilities; and outdoor areas including mountains, bushlands and the Nepean River. This is consistent with 2013 results.

 

The primary concern for residents of the Penrith area is around infrastructure catering for its growing and diverse population, including the new airport; overpopulation/urban sprawl and pollution; traffic flow, congestion and management; and providing local employment. Notably, the increasing impact of population growth and the perceived lack of supporting infrastructure and facilities in terms of parking and roads (traffic flow and congestion) was also a primary concern in 2013. This is clearly an area where the community want appropriate plans, strategies and resources to be allocated.

 

f)    Community Pride, Safety and Connectedness

A number of key indicators of Community Pride, Safety and Connectedness were measured in the survey. 

 

The survey identified that there is a sense of community pride and connectedness with Penrith residents. Penrith residents place a ‘high’ value on the City’s trees and green spaces; natural setting, rural landscapes and built heritage; and feel proud of where they live. Ninety-two percent of residents indicated strong agreement that they can get help from friends, family or neighbours when needed and feel that Council supports the health.

 

Perceptions about community safety, health and wellbeing were also canvassed. Residents rated their level of feeling safe during the day in City’s public spaces, parks, playgrounds and reserves, and their neighbourhoods as ‘high’. There were, however, only ‘low’ levels of agreement with feeling safe in the area at night.

 

In terms of local identity and cultural activities and events, festivals had the highest attendance, with 60% of respondents having participated. There were ‘high’ levels of agreement by residents that creativity and cultural diversity are valued and that new development respects and enhances the identity of our City. 

 

g)   Community Well Being

A number of key indicators of wellbeing were also measured in the survey. In particular, residents were questioned on various aspects of living in the Penrith area, including satisfaction with their level of access, their use of sustainable transport modes, their lifestyle and overall well-being.

 

The figures from community well-being indicated:

·        Nearly one in four residents (22.8%) aged 18 years and above said that they use public transportation to travel to study or work, and more than one in ten residents (13.4%) indicated that they walk or cycle to work. Again, younger residents (18-24 year olds) were more likely to use public transport or to walk or cycle to work or study. Residents expressed high importance in their ability to move in City including all modes of transport, however conveyed lower levels of satisfaction.

·        Three fifths of respondents (59.0%) participate in informal passive recreation such as walking or a picnic, with a further four in ten (43.0%) participating in informal active recreation such as ball games in the park, jogging or swimming. Just over 80% of residents indicated high satisfaction with their access to the City’s public spaces, parks, playgrounds and reserves. Seventy-four percent of residents indicated strong agreement that Council supports the health and wellbeing of our community.

Key drivers for change

In order to positively drive community satisfaction this research has identified a number of areas that require action or further community consultation, and helps to identify which services should be attended to first to give the highest increase in community satisfaction.

 

This analysis identified ‘community engagement’ as the key contributor to overall satisfaction with Council’s performance, followed by ‘community services and events’ and ‘infrastructure and services’. The specific services and facilities that serve as the drivers of ‘community engagement’ include:

 

-     Providing information on Council services & facilities

-     Council marketing of the City

-     Level of access to Council services, information & facilities

-     Council provides opportunities for residents to participate in planning & to have a say about the City's future

-     Council understands the community's needs & expectations

-     Council communicates well with residents

-     Council is responsible

 

Essentially, there must be a continued focus on identifying and implementing strategies that will better inform, engage and involve the community.

Conclusion

The survey results continue to provide useful information on resident perceptions and satisfaction regarding Council services and facilities.  Along with the 2015 Community Engagement Program the results of this survey will help to inform short and long term priority setting, resource allocations, potential service adjustments and enhancements and the Community Strategic Plan, Council’s Delivery Program and Operational Plan. 

 

Council has, in general, been able to maintain a consistently high level of satisfaction in 2015 compared with the 2013 resident survey, particularly in the overall performance of Council’s service and facilities and the overall performance of Council staff.  Results also continue to show that our residents perceive they are receiving value from the amount of rates charged by Council.

 

The surveys will also continue to inform Council regarding priorities, and assist in our focus on continuous improvement and benchmarking.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the information contained in the report on Results of the Community Survey 2015 be received

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.  

Penrith City Council Community Survey 2015

142 Pages

Attachments Included

  


Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                 10 August 2015

 

 

 

5

Local Government NSW Annual Conference 2015   

 

Compiled by:               Adam Beggs, Governance Officer

Authorised by:            Glenn Schuil, Senior Governance Officer  

 

Outcome

We have confidence in our Council

Strategy

Demonstrate transparency and ethical behaviour

Service Activity

Support the Councillors in meeting their statutory obligations and roles as community representatives

      

 

Executive Summary

This report advises Council of a proposed Motion to be raised at the Local Government NSW (LGNSW) Annual Conference to be held at Rosehill Gardens Racecourse, Rosehill from 11-13 October 2015 and seeks endorsement from Council to submit the provided Motion, as detailed, to the Conference. Tonight’s meeting is also another opportunity for Councillors to raise any additional Motions for the Conference. Staff will prepare supporting cases to any additional Motions raised tonight and prepare a report to the Council’s next Ordinary Meeting.

 

The proposed Motion put forward by staff relates to the category of Economic and in particular linking charges to the land.

 

The report recommends that the information be received and the Motion detailed in the report be submitted for inclusion in the 2015 Local Government NSW Annual Conference Business Paper. Tonight’s report is also an opportunity for any further Motions to be put forward by Councillors which would be included in a report to the Council’s next Ordinary Meeting.

 

Local Government NSW (LGNSW) will hold its Annual Conference at Rosehill Gardens Racecourse, Rosehill from 11-13 October 2015.

 

The election of the LGNSW Board took place at the first Annual Conference held at Sydney Town Hall, Sydney in 2013. This included the election of the first LGNSW President, two Vice Presidents and a Treasurer. At this year’s Conference there will be two types of voting, for both motions and election of the Board. Voting delegates were nominated at the Council’s Ordinary Meeting held on 27 July 2015.

 

Over the years, Council has been very successful at influencing the development of State-wide LGA policy, particularly in the areas of planning, the environment, community planning, fire and emergency services, roads and transport and rating policy.

Current Situation

Council’s voting delegates were determined for the LGNSW Conference at the Ordinary Meeting on 27 July 2015. In addition, at this meeting it was determined that up to three (3) Aboriginal observers, nominated by the Deerubbin Local Aboriginal Land Council, will also attend as observers.

Councils have now been requested to identify motions which they believe are causing concern to the Council and/or the community. Councils have been encouraged to suggest an appropriate solution by including either a motion which could be considered by the Conference or notes which might guide delegates to an agreed position. The motions must fall under one of the following categories:

1.   Industrial relations and employment

2.   Economic

3.   Environmental

4.   Governance/Civic Leadership

5.   Social Policy

 

Local Government NSW has advised that the submission of Council’s identified motions or motions and any accompanying notes must be completed and submitted prior to 25 August 2015. Council staff have identified the motion below for the consideration of Council to put forward.

 

ISSUE 1

 

Subject:

Linking Charges to Land

 

Issue Details:

Currently outstanding rates are attached to land.  Often when rates remain unpaid on a property it is a result of the property becoming abandoned and this may lead to other interventions being required by Council.  Examples of this would be clean up orders, demolishing of unsafe structures and removal of waste from the property.  In the event Council is required to complete such works the community ultimately is required to fund the works.  While all efforts may be made to recover these costs from the property owner(s), if the property is sold, there may be circumstances where it is difficult to recover the costs, which could be substantially more than the rates outstanding, because they are not charges on the land. This would leave Council to continue to pursue, at an additional expense, the other costs incurred. This poses an unreasonable burden on the rest of the community to continue to incur costs in trying to recover these costs and potentially allow the owner to depose of the primary asset, the land in question, and not be required to pay these costs at the time of disposal.

 

 

Supporting Case/Motion:

That Local Government NSW call on the NSW State Government to:

 

1.   Amend the Local Government Act 1993 to allow Councils to attach all charges to the land to ensure that they are recoverable upon the transfer of the property.

 

 

Conclusion

It is important to recognise the significant contribution that Council has made to framing policy and advocating for the community through the motions it has raised at previous Local Government Association Conferences. The Delivery Program for 2013-17 identifies Council’s role in monitoring the impact of emerging policies and seeking to influence State and Federal Governments through a strong advocacy role. Council’s attendance and involvement at the Local Government NSW Conference is one of the activities that contribute to achieving these delivery actions.

 

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Local Government NSW Annual Conference 2015 be received.

2.    The Motion detailed in the report be submitted for inclusion in the 2015 Local Government NSW Annual Conference Business Paper prior to 25 August 2015.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.  



 

ATTACHMENTS  

 

 

Date of Meeting:     Monday 10 August 2015

Report Title:            Presentation of the draft Cooling the City Strategy

Attachments:           Draft Cooling the City Strategy



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                               10 August 2015

Attachment 1 - Draft Cooling the City Strategy

 

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ATTACHMENTS  

 

 

Date of Meeting:     Monday 10 August 2015

Report Title:            Results of the Community Survey 2015

Attachments:           Penrith City Council Community Survey 2015



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                               10 August 2015

Attachment 1 - Penrith City Council Community Survey 2015

 

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