Council_Mark_POS_RGB

26 August 2015

 

Dear Councillor,

In pursuance of the provisions of the Local Government Act, 1993 and the Regulations thereunder, notice is hereby given that a POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING of Penrith City Council is to be held in the Passadena Room, Civic Centre, 601 High Street, Penrith on Monday 31 August 2015 at 7:00PM.

Attention is directed to the statement accompanying this notice of the business proposed to be transacted at the meeting.

Yours faithfully

Alan Stoneham

General Manager

 

BUSINESS

 

1.           LEAVE OF ABSENCE

Leave of absence has been granted to:

Councillor Jim Aitken OAM - 24 August 2015 to 4 September 2015 inclusive.

 

2.           APOLOGIES

 

3.           CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES

Policy Review Committee Meeting - 10 August 2015.

 

4.           DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

Pecuniary Interest (The Act requires Councillors who declare a pecuniary interest in an item to leave the meeting during discussion of that item)

Non-Pecuniary Conflict of Interest – Significant and Less than Significant (The Code of Conduct requires Councillors who declare a significant non-pecuniary conflict of interest in an item to leave the meeting during discussion of that item)

 

5.           ADDRESSING THE MEETING

 

6.           MAYORAL MINUTES

 

7.           NOTICES OF MOTION TO RESCIND A RESOLUTION

 

8.           NOTICES OF MOTION

 

9.           DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

10.         REQUESTS FOR REPORTS AND MEMORANDUMS

 

11.         URGENT BUSINESS

 

12.         CONFIDENTIAL BUSINESS


POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING

 

Monday 31 August 2015

 

table of contents

 

 

 

 

 

 

meeting calendar

 

 

confirmation of minutes

 

 

DELIVERY program reports

 


Council_Mark_POS_RGB2015 MEETING CALENDAR

January 2015 - December 2015

(adopted by Council on 24/11/14 and amended by Council on 25/5/15 & 27/7/15)

 

 

 

TIME

JAN

FEB

MAR

APRIL

MAY

JUNE

JULY

AUG

SEPT

OCT

NOV

DEC

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

 

Ordinary Council Meeting

7.30pm

 

2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

21^ü

(7.00pm)

 

 

14

(7.00pm)

 

23@

23

27v

25#

29*

27

24@

28

26

23#+

 

Policy Review Committee

7.00pm

 

 

 

20

11

22

13

10

14

19

9

7

 

9

9

 

 

 

 

31

 

 

 

 

 

 v

Meeting at which the draft corporate planning documents (Delivery Program and Operational Plan) are endorsed for exhibition

 *

Meeting at which the draft corporate planning documents (Delivery Program and Operational Plan) are adopted

 #

Meetings at which the Operational Plan quarterly reviews (March and September) are presented

 @

Meetings at which the Delivery Program progress reports (including the Operational Plan quarterly reviews for December and June) are presented

 ^

Election of Mayor/Deputy Mayor

 ü

Meeting at which the 2013-2014 Annual Statements are presented

 

Meeting at which any comments on the 2013-2014 Annual Statements are presented

 +

Meeting at which the Annual Report is presented

-            Extraordinary Meetings are held as required.

-            Members of the public are invited to observe meetings of the Council (Ordinary and Policy Review Committee).

Should you wish to address Council, please contact the Senior Governance Officer, Glenn Schuil.

 


UNCONFIRMED MINUTES

 OF THE POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING OF PENRITH CITY COUNCIL HELD IN THE PASSADENA ROOM, PENRITH

ON MONDAY 10 AUGUST 2015 AT 7:05PM

PRESENT

His Worship the Mayor, Councillor Ross Fowler OAM and Councillors Jim Aitken OAM, Bernard Bratusa, Prue Car MP (arrived 7:07pm), Kevin Crameri OAM, Marcus Cornish, Maurice Girotto, Jackie Greenow OAM, Tricia Hitchen, Karen McKeown, John Thain and Michelle Tormey.

 

LEAVE OF ABSENCE

Leave of Absence was previously granted to Councillor Ben Goldfinch for the period 10 August 2015 to 18 August 2015 inclusive.

Leave of Absence was previously granted to Councillor Greg Davies for the period 5 August 2015 to 17 August 2015 inclusive.

APOLOGIES

PRC 51  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Karen McKeown seconded Councillor Jackie Greenow OAM that an apology from Councillor Mark Davies be accepted.

 

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES - Policy Review Committee Meeting - 13 July 2015

PRC 52  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Karen McKeown seconded Councillor Jackie Greenow OAM that the minutes of the Policy Review Committee Meeting of 13 July 2015 be confirmed.

 

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

 

Councillor Karen McKeown declared a Non-Pecuniary Conflict of Interest – Significant in Confidential Item 2 – Jolly Street, Castlereagh – Development Matter as her son was employed by a company owned by the owner of the subject property. Councillor Karen McKeown stated that she would not participate in any debate on this matter and that she would leave the meeting during consideration of this item.

 

Councillor Prue Car MP arrived at the meeting, the time being 7:07 pm.

 

 

DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Outcome 7 - We have confidence in our Council

 

4        Results of the Community Survey 2015

Sustainability Coordinator, Carmel Hamilton introduced the report and invited, Michael Di Leo, Acting Executive Director – IRIS Research to give a presentation.

Councillor Jim Aitken OAM left the meeting, the time being 7:20pm.
Councillor Jim Aitken OAM returned to the meeting, the time being 7:23pm.

Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM left the meeting, the time being 7:23pm.
Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM returned to the meeting, the time being 7:25pm.

PRC 53  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor John Thain seconded Councillor Karen McKeown that the information contained in the report on Results of the Community Survey 2015 be received.

 

Outcome 1 - We can work close to home

 

1        Growing Tourism in Penrith

Corporate Communications, Marketing and Customer Service Manager, Barbara Magee introduced the report and gave a presentation.                                                                            

PRC 54  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM seconded Councillor Bernard Bratusa that the information contained in the report on Growing Tourism in Penrith be received.

 

Councillor Prue Car MP left the meeting and did not return, the time being 8:05pm.

 

Outcome 5 - We care about our environment

 

3        Presentation of the draft Cooling the City Strategy

Sustainability Coordinator, Carmel Hamilton introduced the report and invited, Senior Sustainability Planner, Jenny Guice to give a presentation.

                                                                                                                                                      

PRC 55  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Karen McKeown seconded Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Presentation of the draft Cooling the City Strategy be received.

2.    The Cooling the City Strategy be endorsed.

 

Outcome 2 - We plan for our future growth

 

2        Proposed Amendment to Development Control Plan 2014 - E7 Part B (Glenmore Park Stage 2)                                                                                                                      

PRC 56  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Bernard Bratusa seconded Councillor Jackie Greenow OAM

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Proposed Amendment to Development Control Plan 2014 - E7 Part B (Glenmore Park Stage 2) be received.

2.    Council endorse the public exhibition of an amendment to Development Control Plan 2014 – E7 Part B (Glenmore Park Stage 2). The amendment is to be exhibited in accordance with the relevant provisions of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 and associated Regulations.

 

3.    The General Manager be delegated authority to make any necessary minor changes required to Development Control Plan 2014 – E7 Part B (Glenmore Park Stage 2) in accordance with Council’s adopted policy position ahead of public exhibition.

4.    A further report be presented to Council following Public Exhibition.

In accordance with Section 375A of the Local Government Act 1993, a DIVISION was then called with the following result:

For

Against

 

Councillor Jim Aitken OAM

Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM

Councillor Marcus Cornish

Councillor Maurice Girotto    

Councillor Bernard Bratusa

Councillor Michelle Tormey

Councillor Jackie Greenow OAM

Councillor Karen McKeown            

Councillor Ross Fowler OAM         

 

Councillor Tricia Hitchen

 

Councillor John Thain

 

 

5        Local Government NSW Annual Conference 2015                                                       

PRC 57  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor John Thain seconded Councillor Jackie Greenow OAM

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Local Government NSW Annual Conference 2015 be received

2.    The Motion detailed in the report be submitted for inclusion in the 2015 Local Government NSW Annual Conference Business Paper prior to 25 August 2015.

 

REQUESTS FOR REPORTS AND MEMORANDUMS

 

RR 1           Fifth Avenue, Llandilo - Road Condition      

Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM requested a memo reply to all Councillors advising on the results of the Council’s staff investigation into the condition of the road at Fifth Avenue, Llandilo and provide information on the way we fix pot holes including an audit of the roads in Llandilo and Berkshire Park.

 

RR 2           Badgerys Creek Airport - Update        

Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM requested an urgent report to Council concerning whether the Labor and Liberal Party still support the airport as a 24 hour airport and without rail. In addition, the report is to include information about the selection of our consultant to review the EIS, and obtaining a map which shows the flight paths.

 

Having previously declared a Non-Pecuniary Conflict of Interest – Significant in Confidential Item 2 – Jolly Street, Castlereagh – Development Matter Councillor Karen McKeown left the Chamber for consideration of this Item, and did not return, the time being 8:26 pm.

 


 

 

confidential business

 

1        Presence of the Public

 

PRC 58  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM seconded Councillor Bernard Bratusa that the press and public be excluded from the meeting to deal with the following matter the time being 8:26pm.

 

2        Jolly Street, Castlereagh – Development Matter                                                           

 

This item has been referred to committee of the whole as the report refers to the personal hardship of a resident or ratepayer and discussion of the matter in open meeting would be, on balance, contrary to the public interest.

 

The meeting moved out of confidential session at 8:38 pm and the General Manager reported that after excluding the press and public from the meeting, the Policy Review Committee met in confidential session from 8:26pm to 8:38pm to consider a personal matter.

 

The General Manager reported that while in confidential session, the Committee resolved the confidential business as follows:

 

CONFIDENTIAL BUSINESS

 

2        Jolly Street, Castlereagh – Development Matter   

PRC 59  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM seconded Councillor Bernard Bratusa that the information provided by Councillor Crameri OAM be received.

 

 

 

There being no further business the Chairperson declared the meeting closed the time being 8:40pm.

    


DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

 

Outcome 2 - We plan for our future growth

 

1        Western Sydney Airport, Badgerys Creek                                                                         1

 

Outcome 5 - We care about our environment

 

2        Draft Community Gardens Policy and Guidelines                                                           11

 

Outcome 6 - We're healthy and share strong community spirit

 

3        Penrith Affordable Housing Project                                                                                  17

 

Outcome 7 - We have confidence in our Council

 

4        Sustainability Initiatives - draft policy, strategy and targets                                             25

 

 


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


 

 

Outcome 1 - We can work close to home

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


Outcome 2 - We plan for our future growth

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

1        Western Sydney Airport, Badgerys Creek                                                                         1

 

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                 31 August 2015

 

 

 

1

Western Sydney Airport, Badgerys Creek   

 

Compiled by:               Elizabeth Hanlon, Senior Planner

Authorised by:            Ruth Goldsmith, Executive Manager - City Planning and Community 

Requested By:            Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM

 

Outcome

We plan for our future growth

Strategy

Protect the City's natural areas, heritage and character

Service Activity

Undertake priority planning projects and statutory processes that contribute to Penrith's role as a Regional City

      

 

Executive Summary

Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM requested an urgent report on whether the Labor and Liberal Party still support the proposed Western Sydney Airport as a 24 hour airport and without rail. The report also provides information on three other matters requested by Councillor Cramer OAM, and recommends that the information be received.

Background

At Council’s Policy Review Committee meeting of 10 August 2015, Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM requested an urgent report on whether the Labor and Liberal Party still support the airport as a 24 hour airport and without rail.  Councillor Crameri OAM also requested information on the selection of a consultant to review the EIS and on obtaining a map which shows the flight paths.

 

Further, at the Extraordinary Meeting of Council on 9 June 2015, Councillor Crameri OAM requested that Council investigate and provide a response regarding a recent video on Channel 9 showing a plane allegedly dumping fuel over the Blue Mountains.

Current Situation

Labor and Liberal Party Positions

As this was requested as an urgent report, the information below is based on statements made at a conference on the proposed Western Sydney Airport in May 2015, and in media reports since the Federal Government’s announcement in April 2014. For a clearer understanding of the Labor and Liberal Party positions on a 24 hour airport, without rail at the time of its opening, letters have been sent directly to the Parties, seeking their advice.

 

The Federal Coalition Government has indicated that there are no plans to place a curfew on the proposed Western Sydney Airport, although the Member for Lindsay, Ms Fiona Scott MP, has stated that she does not support a 24 hour airport. The Federal Coalition Government has also indicated that the proposed airport would not have a rail link at the time of its opening, stating that “The first public transport to and from the airport will be buses provided through an efficient road network.  Rail is a longer-term requirement."

 

The NSW Coalition Government also supports the proposed airport, however, has not outlined a position on a potential curfew. In relation to rail, the Premier, the Hon Mike Baird MP, has said “It’s roads first, the airport second and then rail”.

 

The Federal Opposition Leader, Mr Bill Shorten MP, supports an airport at Badgerys Creek, but with a curfew. Shadow Minister for Infrastructure and Transport, Mr Anthony Albanese MP, has indicated that there needs to be substantial investment in infrastructure to support the airport “not just in roads but also in rail". The State Opposition leader, Mr Luke Foley MP, supports an airport with a curfew, as well as a rail connection at the time of the airport’s opening.

 

Review of Environmental Impact Statement (EIS)

At its Ordinary meeting of 25 May 2015, Council resolved to “participate in the proposal for councils to pool their resources and engage consultants in readiness for the release of the EIS, subject to an upper limit of $60,000”. The benefits of pooling resources are that a more detailed and expert analysis can be done, with councils not having to compete for the same expertise. There are also considerable cost savings for our communities as councils are not undertaking separate reviews and duplicating the efforts of other councils. The structure of the proposal, however, allows councils to draw from the expert analysis to develop their individual submissions.

 

The proposal is being administered by WSROC. A Steering Committee, chaired by WSROC / MACROC is comprised of officers from each of the contributing councils. The Steering Committee’s role is to coordinate the appointment and management of consultants for the peer review of the draft EIS, and to engage a project manager to oversee this work.

 

Based on the advice of the Steering Committee, WSROC has appointed WSP | Parsons Brinckerhoff (PB) as the project manager. The Steering Committee has also identified the need to undertake a peer review of the technical studies relating to the following nine environmental issues:

·    Aviation planning / flight path analysis

·    Noise and vibration – aircraft noise

·    Air quality

·    Traffic and transport

·    Economic, employment and social issues

·    Human health risks

·    Noise and vibration – ground noise

·    Groundwater and surface water / flooding, and

·    Biodiversity.

 

At the time of writing this report, the Steering Committee is considering responses from the consultants identified as having the appropriate technical expertise for each of the nine issues. It is anticipated that a decision on the preferred consultants will be finalised by the end of August.

 

Map of Flight Paths

Councillors were advised, by memorandum dated 17 August 2015, that Council officers had made a request to the Department of Infrastructure and Regional Development (DIRD) regarding proposed flight paths and noise impacts of the proposed airport, particularly on properties in St Clair, St Marys and Claremont Meadows. The request was very clear that Council is seeking this information in advance of the release of the draft EIS. The memorandum provided the DIRD’s response, including the following comments:

 

“The draft EIS which will be released later this year will include noise contours based on indicative flight paths developed by Airservices Australia.

 

Based on these indicative flight paths, we have commissioned acoustic technical specialists to prepare Australian Noise Exposure Contours (ANECs) as well as N60 and N70 contours for the initial stage and longer term development of the airport. The noise contours to be presented in the EIS will provide the community with greater clarity around the potential noise impacts of the proposed airport. Flight paths will be refined closer to operations commencing in the mid-2020s to ensure data is up to date and reflective of airspace operations in the Sydney basin.

 

The draft EIS will be released for public exhibition later in 2015. As part of the public exhibition period, the public and interested stakeholders will have the opportunity to provide feedback on the flight paths and noise contours. Comments received during the public exhibition period will then be taken into account in finalising the EIS.”

 

It is clear from the DIRD’s response that the requested information will not be provided in advance of the release of the draft EIS. While this is not unexpected, given the information is likely to be sensitive and would not be accompanied by the full context or analysis provided through an EIS, Council officers will continue to explore opportunities for information on flight paths and other aspects of the EIS as early as possible.

 

Alleged Fuel Dumping

In relation to the video on Channel 9 showing a plane allegedly dumping fuel over the Blue Mountains, Council officers understand that flight QF93 en-route from Melbourne to Los Angeles on 2 June 2015 made a forced landing at Sydney Airport due to a mechanical failure.  Media articles (on Channel 7 and Facebook) suggest that fuel was dumped prior to the landing, although Council officers have been unable to verify this information.

 

A request was made to the Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA) for further information, however, there has been no response to date.  Council officers are currently following up this request and will provide further advice to Council if new information is provided by CASA. 

Conclusion

Letters have been sent directly to the Federal and State Labor and Liberal Party parties, seeking clarification on their position on a proposed 24 hour airport at Badgerys Creek, and without rail at the time of its opening. Councillors will be advised when responses to the letters are received. 

 

Councillors will also be advised of the selected consultants for the peer review of the draft EIS and technical studies when a decision is made, as well as any new information received from CASA on the alleged fuel dumping.

 

Council officers will continue to explore opportunities for information on flight paths and other aspects of the EIS for the proposed airport, in advance of its release later this year.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the information contained in the report on Western Sydney Airport, Badgerys Creek be received.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.  


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


 

 

Outcome 3 - We can get around the City

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


 

 

Outcome 4 - We have safe, vibrant places

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


Outcome 5 - We care about our environment

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

2        Draft Community Gardens Policy and Guidelines                                                           11

 

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                 31 August 2015

 

 

 

2

Draft Community Gardens Policy and Guidelines   

 

Compiled by:               Carmel Hamilton, Sustainability Co-ordinator

Jennifer Moses, Sustainability Research Planner

Authorised by:            Fiona Plesman, Organisational Performance & Development Manager  

 

Outcome

We care for our environment

Strategy

Support our communities to live more sustainably and use resources wisely

Service Activity

Implement a coordinated program of community engagement activities

      

 

Executive Summary

An action in the 2013-17 Delivery Program is to ‘Develop a policy and guidelines for the development of community gardens within the City’.

 

A draft policy has been developed with input from a cross departmental working group and is included as an attachment to this report. The purpose of the draft policy is to outline Council’s support for community gardens while also clarifying the roles of Council and community groups, particularly in the case of those who apply for gardens on Council owned or managed land. 

 

Background

An action in the 2013-17 Delivery Program is to ‘Develop a policy and guidelines for the development of community gardens within the City’.

 

Community gardens are widely recognised as being more than a source of food for the community, with economic, social and environmental benefits. They play a part in encouraging community development, sustainability education and enhancing social interaction. Importantly, community gardens also have a role to play in reducing the City’s ecological footprint. Our research has shown that food is a significant component of our ecological footprint, which means it’s an area where we can make a significant improvement by encouraging the community to grow their own food, and become more aware about where their food comes from.

 

Community gardens have been established in many local government areas across Australia. In Sydney, community gardens are well established in many Council areas including the City of Sydney, Marrickville, Blue Mountains, Blacktown, Camden and Ashfield.

 

Within the Penrith LGA two community gardening schemes are currently in operation and are listed below:

 

·      Mamre Farm – Small plots rented to refugee families or larger community groups for a nominal fee. 

·      St Marys Fusion Hub – Community garden suited for individuals and small community groups.

 

The history of community gardens in the Penrith area involves a number of gardens that have been started but that are no longer operational.  In the past, Council has supported the development of community gardens, including at Cranebrook, Cook Parade in St Clair and the Erskine Park Community Centre and Hall which have ceased to operate due to a lack of ongoing community participation. 

 

There continues to be steady interest from the community in food gardening, with a steady stream of inquiries relating specifically to community gardening. Requests for advice and assistance are received by a number of departments within Council, including Parks, Sustainability, and Community and Cultural Development. In the past, these requests have been dealt with by staff from across these areas, usually in consultation with each other to ensure that consistent responses are being provided to the community.

 

In general, people tend to be seeking information on existing community gardens that they may be able to join, or information on how to establish a community gardening group. The development of a policy to set a clear framework for community gardens is seen as an important first step in supporting and encouraging our community in this area.

 

It is also important to recognise that community gardening has strong links to a number of other projects being undertaken across the organisation to build skills in food production, encourage people to grow their own food and to become more aware of their food choices.

 

Research

The first step in the development of the draft policy involved researching current best practice in local government from a number of councils across NSW. All councils when compiling their policy and guidelines appear to draw heavily on comprehensive work done by the Australian City Farms and Community Gardens Network as well as the Community Gardening in South Australia Resource Kit.  

 

In researching community gardens it was found that the most successful community garden models had several points in common which included:

 

A bottom up approach to establishing a community garden:  the bottom-up approach is generally considered to be the preferred community garden model as it indicates strong community interest.  Councils gave preference to sites located in high density areas.

 

Governance:  generally policies require garden groups to become incorporated, or required the group to have an agreement with or be auspiced by an incorporated organisation.

 

Clear council role:  very limited council involvement, apart from the basic management responsibilities for land under council ownership or management, initial training and workshops, promotion, advice regarding design and management, and funding.  Day to day management was primarily found to be the responsibility of the garden group.

 

Land ownership:  the majority of gardens reviewed were located on council land or Crown Land managed by council, with a community land classification often being required as a site selection condition.

 

Funding:  prospective garden groups need to be financially sustainable and not rely solely on council for ongoing financial assistance.  Funding from councils was primarily undertaken as part of a broader grant application process and subject to council budgetary constraints.

 

Process for selection, application and assessment:  key features are site selection criteria, accompanied by a clear application and assessment process.  These matters form the basis of the policy and guidelines to ensure that both council and any prospective garden group clearly understand what processes must be followed.

 

Insurance and licensing:  public liability insurance and licensing periods are included in most policies.

 

Consultation

The Community Gardens Reference Group provided valuable input to the development of the draft Community Gardens Policy and Guidelines and included staff from Parks, Property Development, Community and Cultural Development, Place Management, Environmental Health, Development Services, Risk and Sustainability.

 

Policy and Guidelines

The draft policy sets out Council’s roles and responsibilities; the process of establishing a community garden on Council owned or managed land; considerations for planning a community garden; and verge or footpath gardening.  The purpose of the Draft Community Gardens Policy is to:

·      Outline Council’s approach to the establishment and support of community gardens on both public and private land; and

·      Clarify the roles of Council and community groups, particularly in the case of those who apply for community gardens on Council owned or managed land.

 

A community garden is defined in the draft policy as a “not-for-profit, community managed places that provide an opportunity for food production and other gardening activities, in an inclusive community based setting, for the benefit of members in the local community.”

 

Within the draft Policy, Council’s role is to facilitate and promote community gardens that are sustainably managed by the community.  Council has adopted a community development approach to facilitating community gardens in which gardening groups manage the gardens themselves.  This approach leads to increased community ownership which can assist in the ongoing sustainability and success of a community garden, and minimises the resources that will be required from Council.  In terms of community ownership and management this is representative of established best practice for community gardening.

 

The draft guidelines have been developed to support the Policy by providing community groups guidance on how to plan, design and establish a community garden on Council owned or managed land as well as provide suggestions on how to manage and maintain it in the long term.  The inclusion of site selection and assessment criteria and a clear application and assessment process ensures that both Council and any prospective garden group clearly understand what processes must be followed.  This reduces the level of confusion and establishes clear areas of responsibility.  The guidelines also emphasise the amount of dedication and commitment that is required by a community garden group in order to make a success of a community garden so that prospective groups are aware of what will be required. 

 

Our discussions with other councils confirmed that council run community gardens are resource intensive and require a substantial commitment in terms of funding, time and insurance with some councils now moving away from this approach. This approach is considered to be beyond the capability of Council at the present time.  It is recognised that any proposed community garden on Council owned or managed land will require a level of Council support in terms of initial community liaison in terms of finding an appropriate site and guidance through the application process as well as community consultation.  It is envisaged that this support will be coordinated through the Community Gardens Reference Group, with the Sustainability Team the first contact point for interested members of the community.

 

 

 

Possible Garden Locations

A number of Council owned lands have had a preliminary assessment to determine their suitability in terms of future community gardens. A listing of these sites is included below. This provides interested groups with some preliminary advice on where it may be possible to look to establish community gardens in the future.

 

·    Jamisontown Children’s Centre – 70 Glenbrook Street, Jamisontown

·    Robinson Park – 15 Romsley Road, Jamisontown

·    Mazepa Avenue and Hilliger Road Reserve – 205a Parker Street, South Penrith

·    Jamison Park – 252-308 Jamison Road, South Penrith

·    Burcher Park – Lot 57 Hornseywood Drive, Penrith

·    Spence Park – 142 Derby Street, Penrith

·    Devon Park – 20 Devon Road, Cambridge Park

·    Pacific and Phoenix Reserve – 27a Phoenix Crescent, Erskine Park

·    Gilmour Street Reserve – 13 Turner Street, Colyton

·    Brian King Park – 34-38 Braddon Street, Oxley Park

·    Bennett Park – King Street and Stapleton Parade, St Marys

·    St Marys Children’s Centre – 7 Collins Street, St Marys

·    Jack Jewry Reserve – 5 Merinda Street, North St Marys

·    Redstone Place and Pinecreek Circuit Reserve – 24a Pinecreek Circuit, St Clair

·    Gumbirra Children’s Centre – 97a Cook Parade, St Clair

·    Yoorami Children’s Centre - 7-11 Cottage Street, Werrington

 

 

Education and Engagement

The policy and guidelines need not stand alone but rather should be seen as part of a more comprehensive program of education and engagement around food and food gardening. It is proposed to develop a stronger online presence linking not only the policy and guidelines on community gardens but other related information that may be of interest, including opportunities to volunteer for programs such as Bushcare. Information on established community gardens will also be provided.

 

Information on Council’s workshops, fact sheets and other resources will be available so that we can cater for the range of levels of interest from beginner gardeners right through to committed people looking to grow a group and establish a community garden. Information for schools and children’s centres will also be made available to encourage food gardening linked to the curriculum.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Draft Community Gardens Policy and Guidelines be received.

2.    The draft Community Gardens Policy and Guidelines be endorsed by Council.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.  

Draft Community Gardens Policy

4 Pages

Attachments Included

2.  

Draft Community Gardens Guidelines

32 Pages

Attachments Included

   


Outcome 6 - We're healthy and share strong community spirit

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

3        Penrith Affordable Housing Project                                                                                  17

 

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                 31 August 2015

 

 

 

3

Penrith Affordable Housing Project   

 

Compiled by:               Teresa Luk-Leung, Social Planning Co-ordinator

Authorised by:            Erich Weller, Community and Cultural Development Manager  

 

Outcome

We are healthy and share strong community spirit

Strategy

Encourage social connections and promote inclusion in our community

Service Activity

Develop effective responses to the social impacts of growth, redevelopment and change

      

 

Executive Summary

Council has identified the importance of the affordability of housing in contributing to a diverse and sustainable community.  This includes both housing for purchase as well as for rental.  To support the delivery of affordable housing Council has required major new urban release areas to have a range of dwellings, including smaller dwellings on compact lots and more recently apartments.  These smaller dwellings are more likely to be affordable for first home buyers.

 

Council is also facilitating the delivery of additional long term affordable rental housing stock in the City through contributions to Council by major new urban release area developers under voluntary planning agreements.

 

At the Policy Review Committee (PRC) of 3 December 2012, Council endorsed entering into an agreement with Housing NSW (Centre for Affordable Housing) to facilitate the delivery of long term affordable rental housing in the City utilising the contributions from these urban release area developers. Housing NSW has since become an agency of the NSW Department of Family and Community Services.

 

By 2013, Council had collected approximately $1.13 million of contributions for the provision of long term affordable rental housing for very low and low income households. In July of the same year, the Department of Family and Community Services - Housing commenced a select tender process for the Penrith Affordable Housing Project.  

 

Wentworth Community Housing (WCH), a regional not-for-profit community housing provider based in Penrith, won the tender.  The Penrith Affordable Housing Project will deliver 24 long term affordable rental and social housing dwellings through Council’s contribution of $1.13 million which was matched by the State Government, WCH’s own borrowings and reserves, and Federal National Rental Affordability Scheme (NRAS) funds.  Council’s interest only relates to this Stage 1 project. With some of the available funds WCH purchased a block of land from the NSW Land and Housing Corporation at 11-15 Phillip Street, St Marys for this project.

 

After further negotiation with the NSW Department of Family and Community Services – Housing, WCH was able to obtain additional capital funding and add a second stage to the project.  The second stage will deliver 25 affordable rental and social housing dwellings.  All the units will be owned and managed by Wentworth Community Housing.

 

The development application for the project (Stage 1 and 2) was approved in late May 2015 by the Sydney West Joint Regional Planning Panel.  The Penrith Affordable Housing Project (Stage 1) is expected to be completed by July 2016.

 

To enable the transfer of Council’s affordable housing contributions to the NSW Department of Family and Community Services – Housing a Deed of Agreement has been finalised with input from Council’s Senior Legal Officer and the Department.

 

The report recommends that the information contained in the report on the Penrith Affordable Housing Project be received; and that Council authorise the General Manager to execute the Deed of Agreement between Council and the NSW Department of Family and Community Services (Housing Agency) as provided in Attachment 1 to this report.

 

Background

Council has identified the importance of the affordability of housing in contributing to a diverse and sustainable community.  This includes both housing for purchase as well as for rental.  Council acknowledges that the Federal and State Governments have principal responsibility for the delivery of sustainable affordable rental housing outcomes.   However Council can play a facilitation role and exercise leverage through collaboration and working with other levels of government to achieve affordable housing outcomes for the City.

 

In June 2005, Council adopted the “Sustainability Blueprint for Urban Release Areas”.  The Blueprint is a policy document and a guide for Council, developers and relevant stakeholders involved in the planning and development of new urban release areas within the City of Penrith.  The Blueprint states that “a minimum of 3% of all residential allotments to be provided for the purpose of affordable housing.”  Alternatively, an appropriate monetary contribution to provide affordable housing units elsewhere within the City of Penrith is possible.  This policy can only be progressed through negotiated voluntary planning agreements between Council and major new urban release area developers.

 

This benchmark of 3% was adapted from the NSW Government requirement that Lend Lease allocate 3% of lots developed at the St Marys Urban Release Area (Ropes Crossing Jordan Springs and the Central Precinct) for affordable housing.

 

Council successfully negotiated monetary contributions for long term affordable rental housing for very low and low income households as part of voluntary planning agreements with the developers of Glenmore Park Stage 2, Urban Growth (the Caddens release), and the University of Western Sydney (the South Werrington Urban Village).  By 2013 Council had collected $1.13 million in contributions and Table 1 below summarises these contributions.

 

Table 1

 

New Urban Areas

 

Landowners/Developers

Amount of Contributions

Amount of Contributions received

Glenmore Park Stage 2

Multiple Landowners

$1,000,000

$528,000

Caddens

UrbanGrowth

$337,000

$337,000

 

South Werrington Urban Village

University of Western Sydney

$250,000

$265,000

Total

 

$1,587,000.00

$1,130,000.00

  Note: The original agreed contributions are indexed up to the date on which the contributions are paid.

 

Council also signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with the then NSW Department of Housing in June 2005.  The Memorandum identified a number of priority projects and matters that the two organisations agreed to focus on.  One of these matters is affordable rental housing and the MOU makes specific reference to Council and the Department working together to “retain and develop new affordable housing opportunities”.  The MOU makes reference to the support the Centre for Affordable Housing can provide to Council in identifying and developing affordable housing opportunities.

 

At Council’s Policy Review Committee meeting on 3 December 2012 Council endorsed entering into an agreement with Housing NSW (Centre for Affordable Housing) to facilitate the delivery of long term affordable rental housing in Penrith City. Housing NSW has since become an agency of the NSW Department of Family and Community Services.

 

The Centre for Affordable Housing was a business unit of Housing NSW whose key role was to assist local government, community housing providers and other non-government organisations, and the private sector to deliver affordable housing in NSW.  By working with the Centre, Council has been able to access the expert advice, assistance and professional support which have been crucial to the successful delivery of the Penrith Affordable Housing Project.  This collaboration has also minimised the administrative, legal and tender process tasks Council would have needed to undertake if it did not have the Centre’s involvement in the Penrith Affordable Housing Project.

 

The functions of Housing NSW and the Centre have been absorbed into the NSW Department of Family and Community Services - Housing.

 

Penrith Affordable Housing Project

 

By mid 2013 Council had collected $1.13 million in affordable housing contributions from the new urban area developments listed in Table 1 above. At the same time, the NSW Department of Family and Community Services (FACS) advised Council that it would also contribute $1.13 million to the Penrith Affordable Housing Project. 

 

In July 2013, FACS conducted a tender for the Penrith Affordable Housing Project.  In late 2013, Council was notified that Wentworth Community Housing (WCH), a regional not-for-profit community housing provider based in Penrith won the tender for the Penrith Affordable Housing Project. WCH was also successful in its application for Federal National Rental Affordability Scheme (NRAS) funding for 24 dwellings. The tender requires WCH to deliver 24 long term affordable rental and social housing dwellings. This is Stage 1 of the project and Council’s interest only relates to this stage.

 

With some of the available funds WCH purchased a block of land from the NSW Land and Housing Corporation at 11-15 Phillip Street, St Marys for this project.  At the same time as negotiating the purchase of the property WCH were also able to successfully apply for further NSW Government capital contributions to the project, and with further equity and borrowings by WCH, a second stage of the project was agreed between WCH and FACS.

 

Two stages of the project are summarised in Table 2 below.

 

Table 2

 

 

1 Bedroom

2 Bedrooms

Total Units

Source of Funding

Stage 1

8 units – 3 social housing and 5 affordable housing units

16 units – 1 social housing and 15 affordable housing units

24

Penrith Council Affordable Housing Contribution; NSW government capital contribution; NRAS funding and WCH’s own equity and debt.

Stage 2

10 units – 2 social housing and 8 affordable housing units

15 units- 9 social housing and 6 affordable housing units

25

NSW government capital contribution and WCH‘s own equity and debt.

 

The development application for Stage 1 and Stage 2 of the project was approved by the Sydney West Joint Regional Planning Panel in late May 2015. The Penrith Affordable Housing Project (Stage 1) is expected to be completed by July 2016.  All 49 units will be owned and managed by Wentworth Community Housing.

 

Next Steps

 

To enable the payment of Council’s $1.13 million affordable housing contribution to the NSW Department of Family and Community Services for the project, a Deed of Agreement has been finalised with input from Council’s Senior Legal Officer and FACS.  Council’s $1.13 million funds will be managed by FACS as part of the contract and funding package with WCH for the delivery of the Penrith Affordable Housing Project (Stage 1) in St Marys.

 

Council’s Senior Legal Officer is satisfied with the terms and conditions included in the Deed of Agreement.  The agreement will protect the interests of Council and ensure that the 24 units of affordable rental housing will be made available in perpetuity for low and very low income households in Penrith City. 

 

After the signing of the Deed of Agreement, discussions will be held with the NSW Department of Family and Community Services and Wentworth Community Housing to issue a joint press release for the project.  Correspondence will also be forwarded to the NSW Department of Family and Community Services – Housing, and the Federal Department of Social Services thanking them for their financial contribution and support of the Penrith Affordable Housing Project, as well as to the developers who made affordable housing contributions to the project.

 

Conclusion

 

The collaboration between Council and the NSW Department of Family and Community Services – Housing plus the financial contributions from both the Federal and State Governments has enabled Council to successfully advance its affordable housing agenda.  It has provided Council an excellent opportunity to access the NSW Family and Community Services – Housing‘s development expertise and the funding leverage from both the State and Federal Governments to maximise the number of long term affordable rental housing units for low and very low income households that will be delivered through the Penrith Affordable Housing Project.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Penrith Affordable Housing Project be received.

2.    Council authorise the General Manager to execute the Deed of Agreement between Council and the NSW Department of Family and Community Services (Housing Agency) as provided in Attachment 1 to this report.

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.  

Deed of Agreement between Penrith City Council and Department of Family Services (Housing Agency)

11 Pages

Attachments Included

   


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


Outcome 7 - We have confidence in our Council

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

4        Sustainability Initiatives - draft policy, strategy and targets                                             25

 

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                 31 August 2015

 

 

 

4

Sustainability Initiatives - draft policy, strategy and targets   

 

Compiled by:               Carmel Hamilton, Sustainability Co-ordinator

Authorised by:            Fiona Plesman, Organisational Performance & Development Manager  

 

Outcome

We have confidence in our Council

Strategy

Ensure our finances and assets are sustainable and services are delivered efficiently

Service Activity

Identify ways to use resources more efficiently

      

 

Executive Summary

A key aspect of corporate sustainability is the development and adoption of a corporate sustainability policy to guide our efforts and attention over coming years. A sustainability policy will provide clear direction to the organisation to ensure that sustainability remains a key consideration and is effectively mainstreamed into our operations, activities and decision making processes.

 

The policy includes an associated strategy, with both documents reflecting Council’s strong history in sustainability. Together they provide a platform for the next stage of sustainability which is more reflective of the quadruple bottom line and the placement of sustainability as an area of corporate focus.

 

Associated draft sustainability targets are also presented today as part of the overall corporate sustainability package. The adoption of targets is an important way of continuing to encourage resource efficiency within the organisation and the transition to more sustainable sources of energy and water into the future. Previous targets have been effective in driving improvements in energy and water efficiency.

 

The draft sustainability policy, strategy and targets are tabled today for endorsement by Council. 

Development of the Policy

Following adoption of the corporate definition of sustainability by the organisation and the implementation of the corporate engagement program Think, Act, Share, there was recognition that a policy was needed as the next step in the sustainability program. 

 

The draft policy was developed based on research and review of the sustainability policies of other local governments and organisations from across Australia, and is considered to reflect current industry best practice.

 

The draft policy and accompanying strategy are included as attachments to this report for consideration.

 

The strategy provides the detail on how the draft policy will be implemented through a coordinated program of activities undertaken primarily by the Sustainability Team, but working closely with staff from across the organisation. The Strategy looks at the four focus areas from the Policy:

 

·    Advance the Liveability of the City

·    Leadership

·    Business Innovation and Resource Efficiency

·    Support Sustainable Practice

 

Actions are proposed to be identified against each for delivery over a time frame up to the end of the next Delivery Program 2017-21 and can be undertaken within the existing Sustainability service.

Sustainability Targets

The draft policy also makes reference to the establishment of corporate sustainability targets, and reporting against these targets to the organisation and community. A review of our existing targets has been undertaken and suggested targets are outlined later in the report. These draft sustainability targets would sit alongside the policy, providing further clarification and information on Council’s commitment to sustainability.

Review of Existing Targets

Council has invested considerable effort towards improving the energy and water efficiency of our assets and operations. Guidance has been provided through a number of adopted water and energy management plans, as well as the adoption of targets to reduce consumption and in the case of energy, associated emissions.

 

A large number of energy and water projects have now been implemented, with associated monetary savings of over $5million since 2002.

 

Our previously adopted targets are outlined below.  These targets were adopted in 2005 and were developed as part of Council’s participation in the International Council for Local Environmental Initiatives (ICLEI) programs which now no longer exist.

 

Council’s adopted water target was to reduce Council’s corporate water consumption by 15% by 2011 based on 2001-02 levels. Council was able to meet the corporate water target, and has continued to maintain this achievement, with 2013-14 achieving a reduction of 17.5% on the baseline year.

 

In terms of emissions Council adopted a target to stabilise per capita emissions by 2010 with a 25% reduction by 2015, based on 1995 levels

 

Achievement of the emissions reduction goal has not been as straightforward and this goal expired at the end of the 2014-15 financial year. Emissions figures for 2014-15 are not yet available, however emissions from the 2013-14 financial year show an increase in emissions of 55% compared to the baseline year.

 

It is important to note that the 1995 baseline year gives a deceptively low emissions level of 14,414 tonnes CO2e. This is primarily due to the small number of assets (63) that were included in this baseline year, compared with 243 assets and facilities in 2013-14. Given that this data was only available in hardcopy archived invoices a complete emissions picture of Council’s operations for the baseline year has never been possible.

 

Despite this it is still important to discuss the need for new corporate sustainability targets as a way of continuing to encourage energy and water efficiency within the organisation and the transition to more sustainable sources of energy and water.

 

It is proposed to use the 2010-11 financial year as the baseline year for future targets as the methodology for calculating our consumption and emissions, as well as the sites included, has been consistent since this time.

 

Significant effort and attention across the organisation has seen energy consumption decrease slightly since 2010-11, while emissions over the same period of time have decreased by 25%.

 

The ongoing growth in Council’s asset base over time means that overall energy efficiency has improved over the last several years as emissions and consumption have been reduced despite an ongoing growth in assets and infrastructure.  Future targets will need to contend with projected future population growth and the increasing demand for services by our community. 

Suggested Targets

The suggested targets are the result of internal consultation to help ensure the targets are achievable and realistic, while still set at a high enough level to encourage innovation and drive operational improvements.

 

It is recognised that significant improvements have been made to the efficiency of Council’s operations in terms of both water and energy management with a broad range of projects implemented across the majority of Council’s sites.

 

The following targets are suggested for adoption by Council.

 

·    10% of Council’s electricity supplied from low carbon sources by 2030

 

Currently 0.7% of Council’s electricity use is supplied via solar power from 21 rooftop solar systems, with the largest being the 40kW system installed at the Glenmore Park Family Precinct. We have just commenced the purchase of 10% accredited GreenPower for our major electricity sites at an additional cost of $22,931, which is the equivalent of 4% of our current electricity consumption. Combined with our existing installed solar the purchase of GreenPower is expected to result in almost 5% of our electricity coming from low carbon sources in the 2015-16 financial year.

 

In terms of Council’s ability to achieve the proposed target it is possible to directly purchase enough accredited GreenPower to account for 10% of our electricity by increasing the major sites purchase from 10% to 34%. At current contract rates this would cost an additional $82,000 each year.

 

A better approach is likely to be the implementation of a mix of projects that will increase the amount of installed renewable energy on council facilities, along with the purchase of accredited GreenPower.  Following adoption of a target it is proposed to develop a comprehensive ‘Energy Action Plan’ to provide a range of projects for implementation over the next five years with corresponding cost benefit analysis.  

 

For example, Council is currently investigating the installation of three large scale photovoltaic solar systems on the Civic Centre, the Joan Sutherland Performing Arts Centre and the Depot. Combined these sites would have a capacity of 239kW and produce around 1.4% of our current electricity consumption (319MWh per annum). Initial analysis indicates a simple payback period of between 5 and 7 years for this investment.

 

A range of other council owned facilities are considered suitable for rooftop solar and would be investigated for feasibility as part of the preparation of the Energy Action Plan, such as the Lewers Gallery, Queen Street Centre and St Clair Recreation and Leisure Centre.

 

It is important to note that ongoing improvements to renewable energy technology, along with the advent of innovative funding models such as power purchase agreements should act to improve the cost effectiveness of renewable energy projects into the future. 

 

·    40% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by 2030 based on 2010-11 levels

 

There has already been a decrease in emissions of 25.4% since the identified base line year of 2010-11, requiring a further 14.6% reduction in the remaining 15 years until 2030. This decrease has primarily been the result of improved waste management by the organisation, as well as a change to the emissions coefficient as the electricity supply in NSW has become less carbon intensive. 

 

The purchase of 10% accredited GreenPower for Council’s major sites in 2015-16, as outlined earlier, will achieve savings equivalent to 4.3% of the proposed target. In addition, completion of the street lighting upgrade project which is currently underway is expected to achieve emissions savings of 2%.

 

Similarly, the proposal to install solar photovoltaic systems at the Civic Centre, Joan Sutherland Performing Arts Centre and the Depot (239kW) would be expected to achieve savings equivalent to 1.7% of the proposed emissions target.

 

These projects, along with other opportunities across Council’s facilities will be considered in the development of an ‘Energy Action Plan’ to provide a range of projects for implementation over the next five years.

 

Following adoption of a target it is proposed that emissions reductions projects would also be included within the ‘Energy Action Plan’ with corresponding cost benefit analysis.  

 

Despite Council’s extensive emissions reduction projects to date there is still potential for further emissions reductions due to efficiency improvements as outdated equipment is updated as part of our ongoing asset renewal projects. In addition new technologies will continue to become commercially available to further drive improvements in this area, and the emissions coefficient is likely to improve as the electricity supply becomes less carbon intensive over time.

 

·    Maximise opportunities for sustainable water sources

 

Currently we have rainwater tanks installed on 18% of facilities (39) though in most cases these tanks are used for garden watering and have not been plumbed for use within the facility (e.g. for toilet flushing). Recycled water is also in use at 4 of our playing fields, accounting for 9% of total water usage.

 

The current absence of water restrictions, along with the relatively cheap cost of potable water has resulted in the absence of a significant driver to achieve further improvements to Council’s water efficiency, and the pursuit of alternative water sources such as sewer mining, rainwater tanks and stormwater harvesting.

 

Given Australia’s climatic cycle it is likely that we will experience a significant drought again in the future, with water efficiency and harvesting once again becoming a focus of operations. As a result a specific target has not been set, however a more general target is proposed to encourage the use of sustainable water sources into the future.

Next Steps

Following adoption of targets it is proposed to develop an Energy Action Plan to provide a five year plan towards achieving the targets. The plan would outline the range of projects to be undertaken by Council to meet our targets, along with a cost benefit analysis of each.

 

There is also an opportunity to work with Hawkesbury and Blue Mountains Councils under the Strategic Alliance to discuss opportunities for collaboration in this area. Initial discussions have been positive, however neither council has current energy or water targets in place.

Funding of Projects

It is recognised that there is limited opportunity within existing operational budgets to fund energy and water improvement projects, however the Sustainability Revolving Fund can be leveraged to fund or assist with funding those projects with a financial return. In addition, grant opportunities will also be pursued where they become available to assist with the implementation of energy and water related projects.

 

Significant improvements to operational efficiency can also be achieved through the upgrade and renewal of existing assets as older, less efficient equipment is replaced with new energy efficient models and this should continue to be a key consideration in the selection of plant and equipment.

 

Where new facilities or assets are being designed and constructed it is important that energy and water efficiency and sources are considered as part of the process in line with Council’s adopted ‘Buildings Policy’ and industry best practice. This will help to ensure that opportunities to maximise water and energy efficiency and sustainability are incorporated at an early stage, with minimum additional cost to the project.

Comment from Financial Services Manager

The new targets being recommended by this report will require some additional investment by Council to achieve.  As identified the Sustainability Revolving Fund will be a major component in developing projects to achieve these targets and the projected balance of the reserve as at 30 June 2016 is $491,924.  These funds present a significant opportunity to leverage current sustainability project funds and asset renewal programs to assist in achieving the targets.  Additional funds outside of these existing programs will need to be considered alongside other priorities in the development of each year’s Operational Plan.

Comment from City Works Manager

The suggested targets within the reports are supported. Additional funding will be required to implement several of the suggested projects, however there is scope for efficiency improvements to continue to be made as part of ongoing asset renewal and replacement projects.

 

Measurement of the targets should be reported in relation to Penrith’s growth in both residential and industrial areas and the number of assets included in the assessment. The efficiency of facilities should also be considered in terms of changes to capacity and utilisation rates.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Sustainability Initiatives - draft policy, strategy and targets be received.

2.    The Sustainability Policy, Strategy and associated targets by endorsed by Council.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.  

Draft Sustainability Policy

2 Pages

Attachments Included

2.  

Draft Sustainability Strategy

4 Pages

Attachments Included

   


 

ATTACHMENTS  

 

 

Date of Meeting:     Monday 31 August 2015

Report Title:            Draft Community Gardens Policy and Guidelines

Attachments:           Draft Community Gardens Policy

                                Draft Community Gardens Guidelines



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                               31 August 2015

Attachment 1 - Draft Community Gardens Policy

 

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Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                               31 August 2015

Attachment 2 - Draft Community Gardens Guidelines

 

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ATTACHMENTS  

 

 

Date of Meeting:     Monday 31 August 2015

Report Title:            Penrith Affordable Housing Project

Attachments:           Deed of Agreement between Penrith City Council and Department of Family Services (Housing Agency)



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                               31 August 2015

Attachment 1 - Deed of Agreement between Penrith City Council and Department of Family Services (Housing Agency)

 

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ATTACHMENTS  

 

 

Date of Meeting:     Monday 31 August 2015

Report Title:            Sustainability Initiatives - draft policy, strategy and targets

Attachments:           Draft Sustainability Policy

                                Draft Sustainability Strategy



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                               31 August 2015

Attachment 1 - Draft Sustainability Policy

 

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Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                               31 August 2015

Attachment 2 - Draft Sustainability Strategy

 

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