Council_Mark_POS_RGB

9 September 2015

 

Dear Councillor,

In pursuance of the provisions of the Local Government Act, 1993 and the Regulations thereunder, notice is hereby given that a POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING of Penrith City Council is to be held in the Passadena Room, Civic Centre, 601 High Street, Penrith on Monday 14 September 2015 at 7:00PM.

Attention is directed to the statement accompanying this notice of the business proposed to be transacted at the meeting.

Yours faithfully

 

 

Alan Stoneham

General Manager

 

BUSINESS

 

1.           LEAVE OF ABSENCE

Leave of absence has been requested by:

Councillor Tricia Hitchen – 14 September 2015 to 28 September 2015 inclusive.

 

2.           APOLOGIES

 

3.           CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES

Policy Review Committee Meeting - 31 August 2015.

 

4.           DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

Pecuniary Interest (The Act requires Councillors who declare a pecuniary interest in an item to leave the meeting during discussion of that item)

Non-Pecuniary Conflict of Interest – Significant and Less than Significant (The Code of Conduct requires Councillors who declare a significant non-pecuniary conflict of interest in an item to leave the meeting during discussion of that item)

 

5.           ADDRESSING THE MEETING

 

6.           MAYORAL MINUTES

 

7.           NOTICES OF MOTION TO RESCIND A RESOLUTION

 

8.           NOTICES OF MOTION

 

9.           DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

10.         REQUESTS FOR REPORTS AND MEMORANDUMS

 

11.         URGENT BUSINESS

 

12.         CONFIDENTIAL BUSINESS


POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING

 

Monday 14 September 2015

 

table of contents

 

 

 

 

 

 

meeting calendar

 

 

confirmation of minutes

 

 

DELIVERY program reports

 


Council_Mark_POS_RGB2015 MEETING CALENDAR

January 2015 - December 2015

(adopted by Council on 24/11/14 and amended by Council on 25/5/15 & 27/7/15)

 

 

 

TIME

JAN

FEB

MAR

APRIL

MAY

JUNE

JULY

AUG

SEPT

OCT

NOV

DEC

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

 

Ordinary Council Meeting

7.30pm

 

2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

21^ü

(7.00pm)

 

 

14

(7.00pm)

 

23@

23

27v

25#

29*

27

24@

28

26

23#+

 

Policy Review Committee

7.00pm

 

 

 

20

11

22

13

10

14

19

9

7

 

9

9

 

 

 

 

31

 

 

 

 

 

 v

Meeting at which the draft corporate planning documents (Delivery Program and Operational Plan) are endorsed for exhibition

 *

Meeting at which the draft corporate planning documents (Delivery Program and Operational Plan) are adopted

 #

Meetings at which the Operational Plan quarterly reviews (March and September) are presented

 @

Meetings at which the Delivery Program progress reports (including the Operational Plan quarterly reviews for December and June) are presented

 ^

Election of Mayor/Deputy Mayor

 ü

Meeting at which the 2013-2014 Annual Statements are presented

 

Meeting at which any comments on the 2013-2014 Annual Statements are presented

 +

Meeting at which the Annual Report is presented

-            Extraordinary Meetings are held as required.

-            Members of the public are invited to observe meetings of the Council (Ordinary and Policy Review Committee).

Should you wish to address Council, please contact the Senior Governance Officer, Glenn Schuil.

 


UNCONFIRMED MINUTES

 OF THE POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING OF PENRITH CITY COUNCIL HELD IN THE PASSADENA ROOM, PENRITH

ON MONDAY 31 AUGUST 2015 AT 7:00PM

PRESENT

His Worship the Mayor, Councillor Ross Fowler OAM, Deputy Mayor, Councillor Greg Davies and Councillors Prue Car MP (arrived 7:02pm), Kevin Crameri OAM, Marcus Cornish, Maurice Girotto, Jackie Greenow OAM, Karen McKeown, John Thain and Michelle Tormey.

 

LEAVE OF ABSENCE

Leave of Absence was previously granted to Councillor Jim Aitken OAM for the period 24 August 2015 to 4 September 2015 inclusive.

APOLOGIES

PRC 60  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Karen McKeown seconded Councillor Jackie Greenow OAM that apologies be received for Councillors Bernard Bratusa, Ben Goldfinch, Mark Davies and Tricia Hitchen.

 

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES - Policy Review Committee Meeting - 10 August 2015

PRC 61  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Michelle Tormey that the minutes of the Policy Review Committee Meeting of 10 August 2015 be confirmed.

 

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

 

Councillor Michelle Tormey declared a Non-Pecuniary Conflict of Interest – Less Than Significant in Item 3 - Penrith Affordable Housing Project as Wentworth Community Housing is her landlord.

 

Councillor Prue Car MP arrived at the meeting, the time being 7:02pm.

 

DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Outcome 2 - We plan for our future growth

 

1        Western Sydney Airport, Badgerys Creek                                                                     

A MOTION was MOVED by Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM seconded Councillor Maurice Girotto

That the information contained in the report on Western Sydney Airport, Badgerys Creek be received.

PRC 62 An AMENDMENT was MOVED by Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Prue Car MP

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Western Sydney Airport, Badgerys Creek be received.

2.    Council note the position it adopted on 25 May 2015 regarding the Badgerys Creek Airport.

The AMENDMENT was PUT.

Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM called for a DIVISION.

For

Against

Councillor John Thain

Councillor Maurice Girotto

Councillor Prue Car MP

Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM

Councillor Jackie Greenow OAM

Councillor Michelle Tormey

Councillor Karen McKeown

Councillor Marcus Cornish

Councillor Greg Davies

 

Councillor Ross Fowler OAM

 

The AMENDMENT was CARRIED and on becoming the SUBSTANTIVE MOTION was also CARRIED.

Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM called for a DIVISION.

For

Against

Councillor John Thain

Councillor Maurice Girotto

Councillor Prue Car MP

Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM

Councillor Jackie Greenow OAM

Councillor Michelle Tormey

Councillor Karen McKeown

Councillor Marcus Cornish

Councillor Greg Davies

 

Councillor Ross Fowler OAM

 

 

Outcome 5 - We care about our environment

 

2        Draft Community Gardens Policy and Guidelines

The Organisational Performance and Development Manager, Fiona Plesman introduced the report and invited Sustainability Co-ordinator Carmel Hamilton to give a presentation.              

PRC 63  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Michelle Tormey seconded Councillor Prue Car MP

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Draft Community Gardens Policy and Guidelines be received.

2.     The draft Community Gardens Policy and Guidelines be endorsed by Council.

 

Outcome 6 - We're healthy and share strong community spirit

 

3        Penrith Affordable Housing Project

The Community and Cultural Development Manager, Erich Weller introduced the report and gave a presentation.                                                                                                                      

PRC 64  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor John Thain seconded Councillor Jackie Greenow OAM

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Penrith Affordable Housing Project be received.

2.     Council authorise the General Manager to execute the Deed of Agreement between Council and the NSW Department of Family and Community Services (Housing Agency) as provided in Attachment 1 to this report.

3.     The Council invite the new CEO of Wentworth Community Housing to present to a Council Policy Review Committee Meeting on the Organisation’s vision, plans and directions.

4.     Council thank the Community and Cultural Development Manager, Erich Weller for developing the policy on Affordable Housing.

 

 

Outcome 7 - We have confidence in our Council

 

4        Sustainability Initiatives - draft policy, strategy and targets

The Organisational Performance and Development Manager, Fiona Plesman introduced the report and invited Sustainability Co-ordinator Carmel Hamilton to give a presentation.              

PRC 65  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Karen McKeown seconded Councillor Michelle Tormey

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Sustainability Initiatives - draft policy, strategy and targets be received.

2.     The Sustainability Policy, Strategy and associated targets by endorsed by Council.

 

There being no further business the Chairperson declared the meeting closed the time being 8:12pm.

    



DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

 

Outcome 2 - We plan for our future growth

 

1        Rezoning Application (RZ15/0001) - 88-89 Nepean Gorge Drive, Mulgoa (Owner) Angas Securities Limited (as Mortgagee in Possession)    

Procedural note: Section 375A of the Local Government Act 1993 requires that a division be called in relation to this matter.                                                                  1

 

2        City-wide Advocacy Program                                                                                            6

 

 

Outcome 4 - We have safe, vibrant places

 

3        Penrith CBD Corporation Business Plan 2015-16                                                           15

 

Outcome 7 - We have confidence in our Council

 

4        2014-15 Year in Review                                                                                                   27

 

5        Draft Policy on the Payment of Expenses and Provision of Facilities to Mayor, Deputy Mayor and Councillors                                                                                                     42

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


 

 

Outcome 1 - We can work close to home

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


Outcome 2 - We plan for our future growth

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

1        Rezoning Application (RZ15/0001) - 88-89 Nepean Gorge Drive, Mulgoa (Owner) Angas Securities Limited (as Mortgagee in Possession)  

Procedural note: Section 375A of the Local Government Act 1993 requires that a division be called in relation to this matter.                                                                  1

 

2        City-wide Advocacy Program                                                                                            6

 

 

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                           14 September 2015

 

 

 

1

Rezoning Application (RZ15/0001) - 88-89 Nepean Gorge Drive, Mulgoa (Owner) Angas Securities Limited (as Mortgagee in Possession)   

 

Compiled by:               Matthew Rose, Senior Planner

Authorised by:            Wayne Mitchell, Executive Manager - Environment & City Development  

 

Outcome

We plan for our future growth

Strategy

Protect the City's natural areas, heritage and character

Service Activity

Undertake priority planning projects and statutory processes that contribute to Penrith's role as a Regional City

     

Procedural note: Section 375A of the Local Government Act 1993 requires that a division be called in relation to this matter.

 

Executive Summary

This report provides the results of the review of Rezoning Application RZ15/0001 for 88-89 Nepean Gorge Drive, Mulgoa (Lot 1 DP 549247) (also known as the Western Precinct of the Fernhill Estate, Mulgoa).  This rezoning application seeks a reduction in the subdivision control from 10 hectares to 2 hectares to facilitate the subdivision of the application site to support a proposed Biobanking Agreement.  The proposed subdivision consists of 15 rural-residential lots with a minimum lot size of 2 hectares and a residual lot of approximately 70 hectares to accommodate the proposed Biobank Site.

 

The rezoning application is considered to have sufficient merit for Council to consider the sponsor of a Planning Proposal that delivers the outcomes proposed in the rezoning application and some additional measures to support the proposed Biobanking Agreement.  The sponsor and submission of a Planning Proposal to the Department of Planning and Environment’s Gateway Process will allow Council to undertake community consultation on the Planning Proposal, consider submissions received in response to such an exhibition, and determine whether or not to amend the planning controls.

Background

The application site, 88-89 Nepean Gorge Drive, Mulgoa (the Site), is approximately 111 hectares in size.  The Site is also referred to and is previously known as the Western Precinct of the Fernhill Estate, Mulgoa (the Estate).  Attachment 1 provides the Site’s location.

 

The Site contains a significant biodiversity resource that provides good quality and connected habitat for a wide range of fauna (including threatened fauna).  The Site is also part of a network of high quality habitat transitioning from the higher elevation forests and habitats found in the Blue Mountains to the lowland grassy woodlands of the Cumberland Plain.

 

Penrith Local Environmental Plan 2010 (LEP 2010) zones the Site E3 Environmental Management and applies a subdivision control setting the minimum lot size for subdivision at 10 hectares.  These controls permit, with Council’s development consent, the subdivision of the Site into 11 10-hectare lots.  The subdivision control originated in (the now repealed) Sydney Regional Environmental Plan No. 13 – Mulgoa Valley that was published in 1987.

 

The rezoning application is the latest in a series of proposals for the Estate.  These proposals have included rezoning applications and development applications and have generally sought to subdivide parts of the Estate to provide additional rural-residential lots and to use parts of the Estate to host a variety of events and functions.  None of the applications seeking additional subdivision have been progressed.  However, Council is still considering the 2014 development application seeking consent for the subdivision of the Site into 11 10-hectare lots.

 

The Rezoning Application

Rezoning Application RZ15/0001 (the Application) has been made by the AE Design Partnership for Angas Securities Ltd, the mortgagee in possession of the Site.

 

The Application seeks the amendment of LEP 2010 to reduce the current subdivision control from 10 hectares to 2 hectares.  This amendment is sought to facilitate the subdivision of the Site into a number of lots consisting of one large lot of approximately 70 hectares containing a significant portion of the biodiversity resource, and a number of rural-residential lots with a minimum lot size of 2 hectares.  The applicants have provided an indicative layout (Attachment 2) showing the location of 15 rural-residential lots.  The Applicants propose to use the NSW Government’s Biodiversity Banking and Offsets Scheme (the Biobanking Scheme) to provide a Biobank Site on the largest lot.  Attachment 3 provides the indicative location of the proposed Biobank Site.

 

The Biobanking Scheme is a market-based scheme managed by the NSW Government and designed to help address the loss of biodiversity, including threatened species in New South Wales.  The Biobanking Scheme enables credits to be generated by landowners who commit to protect and enhance the biodiversity on their land through a Biobanking Agreement.  These credits can then be sold to offset the impacts on biodiversity likely to occur as a result of development, generating funds for the management of the Biobank Site.

 

The Application is supported by recent ecology and bushfire assessments, but the remainder of the technical documents were prepared in support of earlier applications.  These consisted of traffic, stormwater, contamination, heritage, social, and infrastructure assessments.

 

Review of the Application

The subdivision of the Site under current subdivision controls (minimum lot size of 10 hectares) would result in the fragmentation of the biodiversity resource, increasing the number of land owners responsible for its management.  It could also result in increased pressure to undertake permitted development that impacts on the resource.  Such development might include dual occupancies, extensive agriculture and associated development such as tennis courts, swimming pools, and farm buildings.

 

The proposed reconfiguration of the currently permissible entitlement (11 10-hectare lots) into a number of smaller lots (no less than 2 hectares) allows a significant portion of the biodiversity resource to be captured within a single lot.  This is considered to be a positive outcome as it will result in a single owner and manager for the resource.  The proposal to create a Biobank Site will further protect the biodiversity resource by removing development opportunities and providing the funds and plans to appropriately manage and enhance it.

 

The proposed lot size and layout is generally consistent with existing lot patterns in the immediate vicinity of the Site.  The majority of lots in Nepean Gorge Drive (east of the Site) and Fairlight and River Park Roads (south of the Site) are approximately 2 hectares.  However, the location and size of any future rural-residential lots would need to respond to environmental constraints such as bushfires and watercourses and ensure that adequate space is available for on-site sewage systems to function efficiently.

 

The exact location, size and number of rural-residential lots will be determined as any Planning Proposal delivering the proposed amendment to the planning controls (in LEP 2010) progresses through the Department of Planning and Environment’s Gateway Process and eventually in a development application.

 

The applicant has stated its intention to progress its application for the proposed Biobanking Agreement once a Planning Proposal delivering the outcomes proposed in the rezoning application has been sponsored by Council.  The applicant has also advised that it anticipates the determination of its application prior to any amendment of the current planning controls.

 

However, at this time there is no Biobanking Agreement in place, nor has an application been made.  In addition, the mitigation suggested to manage the impact of development on the biodiversity resource located outside of the proposed Biobank Site is limited to the offset (or retirement of credits) provided by the proposed Biobanking Agreement.  With no such agreement in place or application made, there is some uncertainty that sufficient offsets (or credits) can be created to fully mitigate impacts associated with development of the proposed rural-residential lots.

 

To respond to this situation it is recommended that:

1.       The land use zone applying to the proposed Biobank Site be amended to E2 Environmental Conservation and the subdivision control be amended to prevent its future subdivision.  These controls will ensure that a significant portion of the biodiversity resource is appropriately protected from future development.  This lot will need to be attached to or consolidated with one of the proposed rural-residential lots to ensure its retention in private ownership.

2.       The Natural Resources Sensitive Land designation is retained for the Site.  This designation applies planning controls that require any development to be located and designed to avoid or minimise impacts on biodiversity, wildlife habitats, waterways and riparian land.

3.       A Preliminary Biobanking Assessment is prepared prior to any community consultation on a Planning Proposal.  This document will confirm the offsets available from the proposed Biobank Site.

 

The technical documents submitted with the Application indicate the following:

1.       There are no soil or geotechnical limitations that would restrict appropriate residential development.

2.       The Site has a low risk of contamination and is not likely to present an unacceptable risk of contamination with respect to residential land use.

3.       Impacts on adjacent heritage items and places can be avoided.

4.       The traffic likely to be generated by the proposed lots can be accommodated in the existing road network, subject to improvements.

5.       Stormwater generated by the development can be appropriately managed.

6.       Vegetated riparian or buffer zones can be provided for existing watercourses.

7.       Any future subdivision could comply with the requirements of Planning for Bushfire Protection.

 

However, these documents were prepared in support of earlier applications for the Estate and need to be updated prior to any community consultation on a Planning Proposal.

 

Proposed Next Steps

The Application has sufficient merit that a Planning Proposal delivering the requested amendment to LEP 2010 as well as the additional amendments recommended to protect the biodiversity resource should be sponsored for submission to the Department of Planning and Environment’s (the Department) Gateway Process.

 

This will allow Council, subject to any Gateway Determination issued by the Department, to:

1.       Undertake community consultation  on the Planning Proposal (public exhibition of 28 days);

2.       Require the preparation of a Preliminary Biobanking Assessment and the refinement of supporting technical documents;

3.       Consider the community’s submissions on the Planning Proposal; and

4.       Determine whether or not to amend LEP 2010 to deliver the requested (or similar) outcome.

 

A draft Planning Proposal is provided as Attachment 4.

 

To expedite any amendment of LEP 2010, it is also recommended that Council request the Minister for Planning to delegate his plan making authority to Council.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Rezoning Application (RZ15/0001) - 88-89 Nepean Gorge Drive, Mulgoa (Owner) Angas Securities Limited (as Mortgagee in Possession) be received.

2.    The Planning Proposal provided as Attachment 4 be sponsored for submission to the Department of Planning and Environment’s Gateway Process.

3.    The Minister for Planning be requested to delegate his authority for Council to finalise and make the proposed amendment to Penrith Local Environmental Plan 2010.

4.    Consultation with New South Wales Government Agencies be undertaken in accordance with any Gateway Determination issued by the Department of Planning and Environment.

5.    The Planning Proposal be placed on public exhibition in accordance with any Gateway Determination issued by the Department of Planning and Environment.

6.    A report be presented to Council on the submissions received during the public exhibition.

 

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.  

Site Location

2 Pages

Attachments Included

2.  

Indicative Layout

1 Page

Attachments Included

3.  

Proposed Biobank Site

1 Page

Attachments Included

4.  

Draft Planning Proposal

58 Pages

Attachments Included

  


Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                           14 September 2015

 

 

 

2

City-wide Advocacy Program   

 

Compiled by:               Wendy  Connell, Planner

Rachel Pagitz, Communications Officer

Authorised by:            Paul Grimson, City Planning Manager  

 

Outcome

We plan for our future growth

Strategy

Ensure services, facilities and infrastructure meet the needs of a growing population

Service Activity

Develop and implement a program of advocacy that targets the delivery of key infrastructure and regional employment growth

      

 

Executive Summary

In May this year, we briefed Councillors on the strategies used to advocate for the City during the 2015 State Election campaign and reflected on its success.

 

It is timely to consider Council’s citywide advocacy campaign priorities for the next 12 to 24 months based on this experience, the outcomes from a recent review of advocacy as well as emerging issues.

 

Background

While we have had some success in advocacy, especially via the last State Election, it is important to identify the focus for the coming 12-24 months. Amongst other opportunities, this period will include the next Federal Election as well as State and Federal budgets. The purpose of this report is to seek endorsement to our approach to advocacy over that timeframe and the advocacy priorities that Council wishes to take forward in a number of ways.

 

Approach to advocacy

In 2014, to assist in Council’s advocacy efforts and to ensure ongoing success, an external review of the current advocacy approach was undertaken. The review examined the current approach and programs in terms of detail, actions, support, resources, systems and effectiveness. 

 

The project comprised two stages:

 

Stage 1 involved initial research to examine contemporary literature and best practice approach to advocacy taken by other councils, industry groups etc. 

 

Stage 2 of the project sought to challenge and explore to test both the current and alternate ways to advocate for the City’s needs and aspirations.

 

The review highlighted a number of key fundamentals:

·    That only a short list of Council’s ‘highest level’ advocacy goals or projects (ie priorities) should be identified and campaigned on at one time.  This has the greatest appeal to decision makers/representatives and would allow resources to be focused on the most important projects.

·    That what is being sought by each of the advocacy priorities included in Council’s program needs to be very clearly articulated.

·    That the need for the project or outcome has to be thoroughly demonstrated by evidence.

·    That a thorough and integrated strategy needs to be developed for each of the projects or outcomes that sets out key actions, audiences, staged goals, timeframes, accountabilities and reporting requirements.

·    That each project or outcome needs to resonate with candidates / representatives / decision makers and can be seen to contribute to the Government achieving its objectives.

·    That we should “take the community with us” through active engagement for key issues to demonstrate the extent of popular support to decision makers.

 

These key fundamentals were applied to our advocacy efforts for the recent State Government Election where possible.

 

Advocacy Priorities

As a starting point in discussion on which items should be identified as our key advocacy priorities, we have been mindful of:

·    The items remaining from the State Election campaign that did not receive a commitment to funding or implementation,

·    The items remaining from Council’s current advocacy program that was adopted in 2013, that have likewise not been subject to funding or delivery commitments to date,

·    Major emerging issues, and

·    The looming Federal Government Election.

 

Taking into account the key fundamentals identified in the advocacy review and Council’s previous expression of its priorities, we have initially arranged current and emerging advocacy items into a hierarchy. The following categories were used:

·    Advocacy completed,

·    Watch and Monitor,

·    Flagship Priorities, and

·    Business as usual. 

 

 

Advocacy completed

This category relates to projects that have been delivered, are at an advanced stage of delivery or for which funds have been received or “locked in”.

 

Watch and Monitor

This category relates to projects where Government commitments have been announced but detailed planning and delivery are still some time off.  Further advocacy may be required to ensure that delivery meets Council’s expectations.

 

Flagship Priorities

This category includes projects that have already been identified by Council as key priorities and/or have the potential to be major region or City shaping projects.  Each of these projects will play an important role in stimulating Penrith’s growth and prosperity into the future. These are the items that it is proposed that the Advocacy Team campaign on.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The following Flagship Priorities are recommended.

 

 

Project

Growth Arc related advocacy

·    Public Transport Links to Growth Centres

·    Passenger Rail Link connecting the Main Southern and Western Lines and serving the Western Sydney Employment Area in advance of airport operations

·    Outer Sydney Orbital and Freight Rail Corridors

·    Broader Western Sydney Employment Area (timely integrated land use, transport and economic development planning and key infrastructure delivery)

Western Sydney Airport related advocacy - from Council’s resolutions relating to:

·    A seat at the table – to influence the planning of the airport and surrounding area

·    Connections – roads and trains

·    Looking after our health and environment

·    Noise (including amendment to the Sydney Airport Curfew Act 1995)

·    Jobs and economic development

·    Knowledge and skills

·    Providing an airport of the 21st Century

Penrith City Centre Regional City Productivity improvements incorporating:

·    City Park and Central Square – staged approach (including decked carpark gap funding as Stage 1 to unlock key sites – subject to current Council investigations)

·    Transfer of ownership from Department of Defence of the Multi User Depot site at North Penrith to Council

Penrith Lakes

Our River Masterplan

Regional Cities Fund

 

 

Business as usual

This category relates to projects that can be appropriately advocated through the portfolios and programs of Council’s relevant Departments.  It also applies to some projects that might be elevated to “flagship priorities” in time but are currently still under investigation and project development. “Business as usual” items will be actioned by the appropriate Council manager/s and reported on through 6 monthly Organisational Performance reporting.

 

The attached table identifies how all advocacy items have been initially allocated to the above categories and a status update is provided for each project for Councillors’ information.

 

In addition, Council will maintain a focus on regional advocacy – advocacy for the region in partnership with WSU, WSI, WSROC, Committee for Sydney, NGAA (National and State members as separate groups), and the West Sub-region councils through our Strategic Regional Alliance.

 

Council officers will also pursue opportunistic advocacy.  Council needs to be able to respond expeditiously and appropriately to opportunities to advocate on particular items or issues in cases such as upcoming elections, grant programs, ministerial visits or the like.

 

Next Steps

The Advocacy Team will develop and implement detailed campaigns for each “Flagship Priority” project to pursue over the next 12 to 24 months.

 

In coming weeks we will also be discussing with key industry and advocacy partners, an approach to identifying specific advocacy priorities and campaign approaches for the upcoming Federal Election.  This is important to provide sufficient lead time to ensure that candidates are fully aware of our priorities ahead of election platform formulation.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on City-wide Advocacy Program be received.

2.    Council endorse the Flagship Priorities identified in this report as the basis for major advocacy campaigning over the next two years.

3.    Council officers continue to advocate for the issues identified as “Business as Usual” on a regular basis, and as specific opportunities arise, through our current programs and Departmental portfolios.

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.  

Advocacy Project Status and community information sheets

44 Pages

Attachments Included

   


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


 

 

Outcome 3 - We can get around the City

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


Outcome 4 - We have safe, vibrant places

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

3        Penrith CBD Corporation Business Plan 2015-16                                                           15

 

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                           14 September 2015

 

 

 

3

Penrith CBD Corporation Business Plan 2015-16   

 

Compiled by:               Terry Agar, City Centres Co-ordinator

Authorised by:            Jeni Pollard, Place Manager  

 

Outcome

We have safe, vibrant places

Strategy

Grow and revitalise our centres and neighbourhoods

Service Activity

Work with the community to deliver priority infrastructure and activation projects in identified established areas of the City

      

 

Presenter:                    Owen Rogers, Chairperson, Penrith CBD Corporation – Penrith CBD Corporation Operations Plan 2014-15 & Penrith CBD Corporation Plan 2015-16

Executive Summary

The new Penrith City Centre management entity, Penrith CBD Corporation (PCBDC) was officially launched in 2013 and presented their Triennial Business Plan later that year for endorsement by Council.  The PCBDC has now prepared its Annual Operation Report (2014-15) and a Business Plan for the final year of their Triennial Business Plan (2015-16) for Council’s consideration.

 

The report outlines the activities, events and marketing strategies undertaken by the PCBDC in its second full year of operation and the proposed activities it wishes to pursue during 2015-16.  The endorsement of Council for the third year of its Triennial Business Plan is being sought by the Corporation.

 

An overview of the operation of the Corporation and its plan for the current financial year will be presented to Council by the Chairperson, Owen Rogers. 

 

The Business Plan outlines the proposed activities for the Corporation over the coming year in the areas of activation, business improvement, CBD business membership and governance.  It has been developed over some months of discussion and Council officers were consulted in the final drafting of the document. 

 

The development and presentation of the Annual Operation Report and proposed business plan for 2015-16 is consistent with the Deed of Agreement between Council and the PCBDC. 

 

The report requests that Council receive this report and the Annual Operation Report of the organisation and that Council endorse the Triennial Business Plan (Year 3) 2015-16.

 

Background

In 2011 Council undertook a review of the management of the Penrith and St Marys centres to determine whether the existing associations’ model was achieving the desired outcomes to support economic growth and maintain the vitality of the centres.  Following this review Council endorsed the creation of a corporation structure led by a board representing a broad range of business and community interests.  The new governance model proposed a working agreement between Council and the corporations which required a commitment to develop a business plan to achieve a range of outcomes. 

 

In late 2012, the process of implementing the findings of the review commenced with the creation of new governance arrangements and the selection of the board members for the two new centres corporations.

 

On 9 September 2013, the newly formed Penrith CBD Corporation (PCBDC) presented its Triennial Business Plan to Council for endorsement.  Since this time, the board members have been working on a range of activities and initiatives to support the development and enhance the performance of the Penrith City Centre.

 

The Chairperson of the PCBDC, Owen Rogers will give a brief presentation on the achievements of the last 12 months against the Triennial Business Plan as well as the proposed activities for the next 12 months.

 

Operating Environment

The Penrith CBD Corporation is registered with the Australian Securities and Investment Commission (ASIC).  The company was registered by Council as the Penrith City Centre Ltd on 22 February 2013.

 

Council has a Deed of Agreement with the Penrith CBD Corporation that secures ongoing funding for a term of 3 years and, subject to mutually agreed performance outcomes, allows for ongoing renewal.

 

The Deed provides certainty to both parties about the expectations of Council and the autonomy of the Corporation in regard to:

 

·    Scope and objectives

·    Principles and protocols for working together

·    Relationship management structure and processes

·    Dispute resolution procedures

·    Insurance and liability requirements

·    Procedures for termination of the agreement. 

 

A key feature of the Deed is that the Corporation must prepare a draft Triennial Business Plan, including an annual plan which outlines their key activities and strategic directions for the period. Following endorsement of the Triennial Plan, the annual business plan is presented to Council for endorsement, triggering payment of funds.

 

The Deed of Agreement outlines a requirement for the Corporation to consult with Council prior to any proposed changes to their constitution.

 

A formal, independent review of the performance of the Corporation in achieving their business plans will be undertaken in the third year of their agreement and prior to any new agreement being commenced. To this end, Council has negotiated to withhold 3% of the annual operating funds of the PCBDC for the purpose of undertaking the review and also to support any corporation training that the board members may attend. The independent review is programmed to commence prior to the completion of the existing Deed of Agreement and will involve extensive consultation with the Corporation.

 

Triennial Business Plan

The Penrith CBD Corporation prepared a Triennial Business Plan 2013-16 that was subsequently endorsed by Council on 9 September 2013.

 

The Triennial Business Plan adopted a new vision for the Corporation that reflects their desire to develop the City Centre into a prosperous and lively place through collaboration. The PCBDC has a commitment to positive social outcomes for residents as well as enhanced economic outcomes for local businesses as articulated in their vision: 

 

“Activate key initiatives for new, dynamic growth. Create a sense of vibrancy, inspiration and togetherness in delivering economic and socially sustainable motives betterment”

 

This vision is underpinned by its three core outcome principles or values for the Penrith City Centre:

 

·    Activate by encouraging people to explore opportunities for entertainment, leisure and business at all times of the day and evening

·    Rejuvenate the  presentation of the businesses, building and public spaces

·    Populate with additional business customers, visitors and new businesses, and in the long term, more residents.

 

These outcomes are supported by a range of actions that will be undertaken over the next three year within the available and projected budgets. Key proposed actions include:

 

·    Regular entertainment and events in the refurbished Memory Park as well as other public spaces

·    A building facade and business presentation improvement program

·    Assisting new and established businesses to start and grow

·    Liaising with property owners to build trust that will support further investment in the City Centre

·    Promotion of the Corporation’s achievements to property owners, businesses, Council and the community.

 

The Triennial Business Plan also includes a range of contemporary governance actions to promote best practice as a public corporation. 

 

In addition to the Triennial Business Plan, the Board was required to submit an annual report on its previous 12 months of operation and a yearly plan detailing a monthly work program to assist the Board to manage its responsibilities in an open and transparent way. 

 

Annual Operation Report 2014-15

The third year of operation of the PCBDC has continued the growth of the previous two years for the Corporation as they actively pursue a range of initiatives. The Annual Operation Report contains positive messages regarding the operation of the Board and the partnerships developed through the second year of operation. A copy of the Annual Operation Report 2014-15 is at Attachment 1.

 

Membership of the Board was stable over the 2014-15 period which has supported continuity in the governance of the organisation.  It is noted that Councillor Bernard Bratusa retired from the Board in mid-June and that Councillor Tricia Hitchen was endorsed by Council as the delegated Council representative later that same month.

 

The Annual Operation Report outlines a range of activities that occurred throughout the 2014-15 year in the following areas of action:

 

 

 

 

1.   Activate

A broad range of annual and seasonal events were held.  The annual Penrith Festival attracted large numbers of people to the City. This year the advent of the Poppy Park was a significant attractor of people to the City Centre as part of the Festival activities.

The seasonal events such as the Christmas Tree Lighting, Easter in the Pop Up Park, Biggest Morning Tea and twilight markets have all contributed to making  Penrith a more vibrant place.

Branding and marketing is a key component to bring people to the City Centre. Building the business email database, regular website and Facebook updates, pole banner changes and a Christmas promotions booklet have been significant achievements in raising awareness about what is on offer.

 

2.   Rejuvenate

More business improvement projects occurred this year than last year.  Seventeen shopfront or building improvement projects were completed, far in excess of the Business Plan goal of 5 projects. Key sites include Calokerinos Arcade, 818 Variety Store and 495 High Street. It is noted that the Corporation itself moved to a shop front address in the Calokerinos Arcade which has greatly enhanced their accessibility and presence in the City Centre.

 

3.   CBD Membership

A focus on creating a membership base of businesses to increase “ownership” of the Corporation’s operations commenced with 75 businesses becoming members. Membership fees provide a small source of income.  A key focus was on the distribution of a ‘Welcome Pack’ to new businesses and potential members, a marketing campaign for new members, adding a members only area on the website and social networking events. 

 

4.   Governance

In the first 2 years of operation the Board of the PCBDC put considerable effort into systems and processes to support good governance such as meeting processes, board training, data collection and analysis and accounting processes. The financial statement for 2014-15 can be found at Attachment 2 to this report.  It has been assessed by Financial Services and is considered to be satisfactory with all expenditure and income in line with expectations. At 30 June 2015, the Corporation held a net equity of $9,838.

 

The Annual Operation Report 2014-15 reflects a wide range of activities, events and marketing approaches taken over the year. This is consistent with the needs of the PCBDC to continue to build their profile with the local businesses and explore opportunities to promote the City Centre to local residents, visitors and potential new business operators.

 

Triennial Business Plan (Year 3) 2015 – 2016

Following on from the Annual Operation Report the PCBDC have forwarded a copy of their business plan for next year, the Triennial Business Plan (Year 3). The Plan outlines the proposed activities of the PCBDC under 4 areas, Activate, Business Improvement Plan, CBD Membership and Governance. The actions under each area have an objective, a descriptive statement of how it is going to be achieved and performance indicators.  A copy of the Triennial Business Plan (Year 3) 2015 -2016 is at Attachment 3.

 

Similar to the last two plans, the PCBDC has placed emphasis on a City Centre activation program, maintaining the Penrith Festival as the flagship event for the year supported by a range of seasonal and regularly scheduled activities in Memory Park and the Pop Up Park.

 

The Business Improvement Program will continue to work with property owners to encourage them to invest in improving property facades and fit outs. The PCBDC proposes that this will be done on a precinct basis with a target of doing 10 projects this year.  Supporting and promoting this program will be a branding and marketing campaign highlighting the successes of the program. 

 

Allied to the Business Improvement Program, is a collaboration with the Penrith Business Enterprise Centre to assist businesses with training and information for their business development.

 

An initiative in this year’s Business Improvement Program is an action to stimulate the night time economy with the trial of a summer evening café project in collaboration with businesses.

 

The strong emphasis on the new Membership Program continues this year with a campaign to increase the membership by 25% and provide a regular newsletter and networking meetings.  This will be supported by a continuation of the ‘Welcome Pack” and “Marketing Pack” provision to new businesses promoting the benefits of membership.

 

In the area of governance, continued financial planning, reporting, performance measurement and the development of standard operating procedures for open and transparent reporting back to the board is proposed.

 

Place Manager’s Comment

The Penrith CBD Corporation have delivered a comprehensive annual report that reflects their strong emphasis on the branding and marketing of the City Centre through a program of events. 

 

The continuation of the Membership Program is supported as a way to develop cohesion between different businesses and to boost the Corporation’s income beyond the existing Business Sub-category rate income.

 

The proposed night time economy trial of a summer evening café project in collaboration with businesses aligns with Council’s interest in achieving a more vibrant and active evening economy in the City Centre over the coming years.  This is a welcome project proposal.

 

In future plans, it is recommended that consideration be given to being explicit about the types and number of events to be run, so that the public has a better understanding of the upcoming program of events in the City Centre. This could be advertised through the PCBDC website. This will assist individual businesses in the City Centre that may be interested to plan their own marketing and promotions over the coming year.

 

The monitoring of the performance of the Corporation will be a key focus of the independent review process early in 2016.  Some guidance for the Corporation from this review will assist in improving the measurement of its considerable success.  It will also assist the Board by providing context for the allocation of its resources over time.

 

 

 

 

Conclusion

At the completion of its second year of operation, the Penrith CBD Corporation have presented an Annual Operation Report documenting the wide range of activities, events and marketing strategies that were undertaken in support of the Penrith City Centre.

 

The PCBDC has worked hard to develop stronger partnerships with the BEC and other groups to facilitate programs that strengthen existing businesses as well as supporting opportunities for new businesses within the Penrith City Centre.

 

The planned programs described in the Triennial Business Plan (Year 3) are relevant to and support ongoing development of the Penrith City Centre Economy.   The continuation of programs such as the events and marketing program, together with the membership program are a sound response to creating a positive relationship between the Corporation, business and the community. 

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Penrith CBD Corporation Business Plan 2015-16 be received.

2.    Council receive the Annual Operation Report 2014-15.

3.    Council endorse the Triennial Business Plan (Year 3) 2015-16 for the Penrith CBD Corporation.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.  

Annual Operations Report 2014-2015 penrith CBD Corporation

38 Pages

Attachments Included

2.  

Penrith CBD Corporation Ltd Financial Report 30 June 2015

24 Pages

Attachments Included

3.  

Penrith CBD Corporation Triennial Business Plan Year 3 2014-16

27 Pages

Attachments Included

   


 

 

Outcome 5 - We care about our environment

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


 

 

Outcome 6 - We're healthy and share strong community spirit

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


Outcome 7 - We have confidence in our Council

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

4        2014-15 Year in Review                                                                                                   27

 

5        Draft Policy on the Payment of Expenses and Provision of Facilities to Mayor, Deputy Mayor and Councillors                                                                                                     42

 

 

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                           14 September 2015

 

 

 

4

2014-15 Year in Review   

 

Compiled by:               Samantha Sutherland, Corporate Planning Officer

Fiona Plesman, Organisational Performance & Development Manager

Authorised by:            Alan Stoneham, General Manager  

 

Outcome

We have confidence in our Council

Strategy

Demonstrate transparency and ethical behaviour

Service Activity

Manage Council's reporting system and meeting processes

      

 

Executive Summary

This report outlines Council’s key achievements and highlights for 2014-15, the second year of Council’s Delivery Program 2013-17. The report is grouped into a number of key sections and the report will be accompanied by a presentation from the Assistant General Managers. 

 

Council has received or been shortlisted for 6 awards across a broad range of operations including planning excellence, sustainability and risk management.  We launched our new advocacy program – Build a better Penrith – in January and we are already seeing results as the State Government has committed to provide funding towards 9 projects including the widening of Mulgoa Road from Andrews Road to the Glenmore Parkway. 

 

Our partnerships are flourishing, with a successful delegation from Penrith to Fujieda and Hakusan in late October, and a delegation from Xicheng District to Penrith in March, at which they presented us with a gift of a statue.  Closer to home, 88% of our Children’s Services received a rating of ‘Meeting’ or ‘Exceeding’ the National Quality Standards and we ran numerous community building programs through our Neighbourhood Renewal and Place Management teams. 

 

We continued to maintain and improve our large asset base, including new playgrounds, new floodlights, new kitchens, reconstruction or resurfacing of playing fields, new roads and pathways and resheeting and refurbishing existing roads. Additionally during 2014-15 new assets to the value of $24m were added to Council’s asset portfolio. Ongoing maintenance of these assets will be managed within our existing capacity and supported by the Continuous Improvement Program and other productivity initiatives.

 

We ran 78 Civic, Community and Cultural events covering everything from the centenary of Anzac Day to an exhibition of Korean Folk Art paintings.  We also ran education programs in a diversity of areas including stormwater education, quit smoking, healthy lunchboxes and digital media. 

 

The consultation and collaboration phase of the Penrith Progression continued through July to December, with the Plan for Action launched in February. This provides the direction for investment and chance to realise the potential of Penrith City Centre.  Our new release areas of Thornton, Glenmore Park Stage 2, Caddens and Jordan Springs continue to deliver housing and employment opportunities and in May 2015 Council resolved to accept the Federal Government’s decision to build an airport at Badgerys Creek subject to the application of a curfew and the provision of supporting infrastructure. 

 

Stage 2 of the city wide LEP was published in late February bringing with it an increase in large scale development applications.  Council continues to work on broader regional planning issues, particularly infrastructure delivery, with the State Government and the National Growth Areas Alliance. This work has seen commitments to upgrading major roads including the intersection of Mulgoa Road, Castlereagh Road, Jane Street and High Street; planning for the widening of Mulgoa Road and stage 1 of the Werrington Arterial. 

 

Council’s Fit for the Future submission was lodged with IPART on 27 June, outlining that we meet 3 of the 7 benchmarks now and will implement improvements to meet the remainder by 2018-19.  Many of the actions in our Improvement Plan arose from the Capacity Review which started in July and has continued throughout the year, looking at service delivery, priority setting, asset management and procurement.  Council’s ICT strategy was endorsed in January and is already delivering significant benefits. 

 

Further details on all these achievements and many more appear in the remainder of this report and will be the subject of the presentation to tonight’s meeting. 

 

 

2014-15 Year in Review

The Community Plan, Delivery Program and Operational Plan provide a solid blueprint for the City’s future. The Delivery Program sets out Council’s four year program of works, to achieve the community’s long-term goals and aspirations for the City.  The Operational Plan outlines Council’s activities for the current year.

 

Council directly manages 44 services which are responsible for delivering Council’s work program. It is important to recognise Council’s internal services which support the provision of services directly to our community along with council’s Controlled entities that deliver a further 3 services.

 

In terms of service delivery Council has continued to manage and maintain:

·    over 1,250 hectares of open space

·    105 sporting facilities (4 Skate parks, 132 grass sporting fields, 65 netball courts, 43 tennis courts, 36 cricket wickets, 13 run up surfaces)

·    St Marys  and Penrith Ripples Leisure Centres, Penrith Whitewater Centre, Joan Sutherland Performing Arts Centre and Penrith Regional Gallery, through the controlled entity model

·    402 parks comprising 14 district parks, 32 neighbourhood parks,  70 local parks and 286 pocket parks

·    142 playground sites

·    775,000m2 landscaping and gardens

·    45 hectares of natural areas maintained and coordination of 9 volunteer bush care groups

·    51 community centres (12), neighbourhood centres (23), youth centres (2), senior centres (2), and halls (12).

·    Administration and operational buildings 25

·    3 central (1) and branch (2) libraries

·    3 operational cemeteries and 2 heritage cemeteries

·    28 public toilets

·    11 SES and bushfire sheds

·    approximately 1,062 km of road, 599 km of footpaths, 1,510 km of kerb and gutter and 162 car parks

·    98 Bridges, 204 bus shelters

·    1,041 items of road furniture

·    Shops, Offices and residential property

32 Commercial Leases

12 Retail Leases

32 Community Leases/Licences

5 Residential Leases

26 Misc. Leases/Licences

·    27 Children’s Centres offering long day care, preschool, before and after school care, vacation care and occasional care services for children.

 

In terms of development and regulatory services Council has:

·    delivered 1,192 residential lots and 68 strata lots through subdivision approvals

·    determined 1,474 development applications, completed 495 construction certificates, determined 33 complying development certificates, and undertook 2,650 building inspections during construction

·    issued 49 engineering approvals including construction certificates for subdivision works in urban release areas and in the order of 1500 compliance inspections for subdivision works

·    inspected over 872 retail food premise inspections

·    53,500 sqm of graffiti has been removed by Council staff and contractors

·    removed 50,000 square metres of invasive weed species and planted over 5,000 indigenous species

·    removed 488 tonnes of waste from the stormwater drainage system,

·    investigated 1,200 incidents of illegal dumping

·    delivered an increase in dog re-homing rates to 95%  (i.e. returned to owners, sold or sent to a rescue organisation).

A more detailed overview of the Organisation’s achievements for 2014-15 follows.

 

1.       Awards

Council’s work has been acknowledged through a number of awards.

·    Council and consultants Place Partners were awarded a Commendation for the Trial Park (High Street Penrith) in the Planning Institute Australia's 2014 Awards for Planning Excellence (NSW) ('Great Place Award' category).

·    The 2013-14 Annual Report was awarded a Silver Award in the Australasian Reporting Awards.  This is the second year in a row our Annual Report has won a Silver Award reflecting the ongoing commitment to quality reporting to the community.

·    Two Risk Management Excellence Awards were received in 2014 (Westpool and UIP Member's Choice).

·    Council was shortlisted as a finalist in the Local Government Excellence Awards in the category of Excellence in Environmental Leadership and Sustainability for its community engagement program.

 

2.       Advocacy and City Partnerships

Advocacy

The Council’s advocacy program Build a better Penrith was launched in January 2015. The program identified 16 priority projects to build, grow and connect our City, and attract investment.

 

Council has played an active advocacy role, with the development of submissions on a range of topics that are relevant to the region. In response to these the Federal and State Governments jointly announced in October 2014 a commitment of $70 million funding for Stage 1 of the Werrington Arterial as part of the Western Sydney Infrastructure Plan, which is considered a key transport infrastructure project for the region, and a commitment to upgrade The Northern Road. Council continues to push for rail infrastructure via the South West Rail Link extension to meet the western line which will not only connect Penrith to the new second airport, but also the adjacent employment lands creating smart-job precincts.

 

Council’s State election advocacy earlier this year was also instrumental in securing commitment for the expansion of the commuter car park at Penrith Station, detailed planning for the widening of Mulgoa Road and increased express train services on the western line. Council co-funded a Deloitte’s report into arts and cultural funding shortfalls in Western Sydney in partnership with Parramatta and Liverpool councils and the Western Sydney Business Chamber. As a direct result, the State Government announced $7.5 million over four years to support artists and cultural organisations in Western Sydney.

 

The $30 million Werrington Park Corporate Centre was officially opened on 16 April 2015. The Centre was a joint project between the University of Western Sydney, Penrith Business Alliance and Penrith City Council, with Federal Government funding under the Suburban Jobs Program.

 

Partnerships

Our partnerships and alliances with our international partners continue to flourish following a successful visit to Fujieda and Hakusan in late October, early November 2014 to commemorate the 30th and 25th anniversaries respectively of the signing of the agreements between the cities.

 

A new education initiative between Penrith and Fujieda was undertaken that saw Fujieda Elementary School and Llandilo Public School join together in a formal school-to-school partnership to explore each other’s culture, mainly through technology including video chats. Another new initiative, still in its very early stages has seen connections established between the Penrith RSL Junior Rugby Club and the Hakusan City Rugby Football Association with a view to undertaking sporting exchanges between the clubs in the future.

 

A highly successful Mayoral delegation from Xicheng District, Peoples Republic of China visited Penrith in March 2015. The highlight of the visit was the presentation of a memorial statue to the citizens of Penrith demonstrating the esteem in which Xicheng holds the relationship with Penrith. The statue has been permanently situated in one of the gardens in the Civic Centre precinct and also includes interpretive signage that explains the relationship between Penrith and Xicheng and the significance of the statue. Also while the delegation was in Penrith they met with local business representatives to look for opportunities for new business collaborations between the two cities.

 

As a result of the relationship between Penrith and Gangseo-gu, Korea, an exhibition of Korean Folk Art paintings titled “Best Wishes” was launched at the Penrith Regional Gallery and the annual Korean Flag Raising ceremony was held in October in conjunction with the Korean Consul General commemorating Korean Foundation Day during Korean Week.

 

29 Kinjo University students visited Penrith in March 2015 for four days to learn about childcare operations in Australia. This biennial program has proven very successful and continues to grow with this year’s visit being the largest to date. During the visit the Kinjo college students visited four local children’s centres to learn more about how they operate.

 

A number of activities were facilitated between Lachlan Shire and Penrith Performing and Visual Arts (PP&VA) including Condobolin High School students participating in the 2014 Flannofest at the Joan Sutherland Performing Arts Centre and the River to River exhibition at the Penrith Regional Gallery that featured Aboriginal artworks from Lachlan Shire. Also as part of the “On the Road” cultural program the production of “Twinkle Twinkle” was taken to Lachlan and included workshops, rehearsals and performances with children across the Shire. Condobolin High School also participated in the annual Victor Change Science Awards presentation and discussions were held between the two councils to discuss the direction of the relationship and potential future projects and initiatives. One staff exchange visit was also undertaken with a Lachlan Shire staff member spending one week in Penrith Council’s building and development team to enhancing their skills and knowledge, and a number of Penrith staff visiting Lachlan to assist in the preparation of the 203-14 Financial Statements and later in the year their Fit for the Future submission.

 

3.       Children’s services

Our child care services continue to deliver a quality service with 21 of the 26 services receiving a rating of Meeting or Exceeding the National Quality Framework standards which is above the national average.

 

Over the year there has been building and playground upgrades at four of our services; Jamisontown, Stepping Stones, Platypus Playground and Kindana Children's Centres.

Federal and State funding was secured for; gap funding of $215,347 to replace Child Care Links funding; Indigenous Advancement Federal funding of $154,500; and State funding of $63,368 for children with a disability.

 

To promote health and wellbeing through-out our services, the Munch and Move program was implemented at 18 Long Day Care Centres.

 

An increase in the number of children from an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander backgrounds attending a Council children's service has been seen and utilisation rates for Before School Care and After School Care were well above target.

 

4.       Community building and facilities

A number of community buildings and facilities have benefited from a range of improvements and upgrades including:

·    access to the Joan Sutherland Performing Arts Centre has been improved with the installation of two sets of automatic doors

·    roofing upgrades completed at the Whitewater Stadium

·    the roof has been replaced at Wallacia Hall

·    canteen upgrades have been completed at Hunter Fields, Emu Plains and at The Kingsway, St Marys

·    the toilet at Judges Place has been refurbished and the exterior of the Judges Place car park has been repainted

·    further LED lighting installations have been undertaken at the Civic Centre

·    power supply upgrading to support ongoing conduct of civic events including Poppy Park

·    completion of a new public toilet facility at East Lane, St Marys in August 2014

·    a new public toilet facility at Victoria Park, St Marys

·    a new toilet facility within Penrith Cemetery, Kingswood

 

5.       Community engagement

Community Safety

Council held 6 Community Safety information evenings for new residents at Jordan Springs. These forums provided an opportunity for local residents to raise safety concerns with Community Safety staff and local police. Additionally 2 information-stall sessions were held at the Jordan Springs Shopping Centre in response to some resident concerns for safety. Information sessions were also held for local seniors at the Colyton Neighbourhood Centre and at Autumnleaf Community Centre, St Clair.

Place Management

 

Werrington

The community of Werrington has participated in a number of community engagement activities relating to upgrades to Werrington Lakes which were completed in 2014. To complement the success of these enhancements and in line with community feedback the Neighbourhood Renewal team has coordinated two public art processes during the April-June 2015 quarter with installation completed in July 2015.

 

The Neighbourhood Renewal team has also been working with young people who frequent the Werrington Youth Centre and have been developing a mural artwork with local artist Sharline Spice Bezzina.

 

Hello Colyton

The third and final Hello Colyton event held in Barr and Bass Park Colyton was a highlight in June with over 100 residents attending. Children and adults came together to play soccer, build kites and lanterns, as well as contributing ideas for the redevelopment of the park as part of the Penrith Mayoral Challenge.

 

Magnetic Place Program

Two outstanding events were held this quarter in the Magnetic Place Program:

·    Art in the Park – a Visual Picnic in Wainwright Park, Kingswood for 150 people from the local community

·    Every Face Has A Place where arts organisation, The Song Room, partnered with the school to deliver a unique project that offered parents the opportunity to connect with each other, develop new skills and co-create a permanent artwork.

Education programs

A variety of educational programs and activities were undertaken including:

·    The Stormwater Education Program engaged 16 primary schools and around 1327 students on water conservation issues and the impact of stormwater pollution on waterways through interactive workshops run by Keep NSW Beautiful. Student kits were distributed to all participants to further the learning outcomes. A Stormwater presentation was also delivered to Year 11 Geography students. Catchment Tours continued with 8 schools participating over the year, resulting in around 2,400 native trees being planted in our local reserves across the City.

·    Obesity Summit - Over 100 people attended this forum and there was considerable media interest. Council presented at the Forum on work conducted in the community to promote healthy eating. A range of attendees were interested in building on the connections made at the summit between community, clinicians and academics.

·    Two healthy lunch box sessions were conducted in conjunction with the Cancer Council NSW at Castlereagh and St Marys reaching 39 parents. This program is aimed at parents of kindergarten children as they start school. This session shows parents what foods the Cancer Council recommends for the lunch box to maximise health and concentration at school.

·    As part of the Food Safety Program a successful Healthier Food Business seminar was held at St Marys in October 2014. The seminar provided information on food safety and allergies, choosing healthy oils and recycling to reduce costs.  It was also an opportunity for business owners/operators to network with other food businesses. Feedback was very positive from the participants.

 

6.       Cultural Arts

A range of cultural arts initiatives took place such as:

·    Urban Heat Islands - Sustainability, Education and Creativity project

In partnership with Nepean Arts and Design Centre, Kingswood – Western Sydney Institute TAFE the Urban Heat Islands - Sustainability, Education and Creativity project was completed. The project highlighted sustainability challenges in current forms of urban development.

·    The Art West – Art Exhibition St Marys

A St Marys Area Community Development Project, supported by Council. The exhibition organised in partnerships with University 3rd Age and the Nepean Potters saw 100 exhibits.

·    Exhibition of Korean Folk Art paintings

An exhibition of Korean Folk Art paintings titled “Best Wishes” was launched at the Penrith Regional Gallery.

·    Water: the Source of Life

Council ran its sixth annual community Environmental Photography Competition to celebrate National Water Week and Biodiversity Month.  Over 160 high quality entries were received covering this year's theme “Water: the Source of Life

 

7.       Environmental management, health and community protection

Cumberland Woodlands

A community information session was held in February to inform people about the Cranebrook Wetland and Bushland Restoration Project. This was attended by about 25 interested local residents who wanted to find out more about the project and to learn how they could get involved. Clean-up Australia Day was held in the Bushland areas along Soling Crescent in March where approximately 6 large bags of litter and dumped rubbish were collected by local volunteers. Approximately 2 tonnes of dumped rubbish has already been removed by the bush regeneration contractors from across the site.

 

Bush regeneration contractors continue to work at the Cranebrook site undertaking weed removal and bush regeneration in the Cumberland Plain Woodland and the Freshwater Wetland. There has been significant work on managing the Class 4 noxious weed Blackberry, Woody Weeds and African Lovegrass. The works being undertaken will benefit threatened species including the Cumberland Plain Land Snail and the Spiked Rice Flower by improving the quality and amount of available habitat.

 

Work continues to protect and improve the biodiversity of the City. This involves the assessment of development that has the potential to impact on biodiversity values, communication with both internal and external stakeholders on biodiversity related issues and the development of educational resources for engagement with staff and the community.

 

Waterways

A Catchment Monitoring Program was undertaken in the Dunheved Industrial Estate. The samples collected through this program are analysed with data being used to assess land use impacts on waterways and identify any potential sources of pollution. This program integrates with Council's Stormwater Education initiatives to increase water health awareness within the LGA area.

 

A stormwater pollution prevention brochure was developed to raise awareness of appropriate waste disposal practices for food shops in the City and was distributed at a Food Business Seminar in October.

 

Construction has commenced for the Andrews Road bio-retention project and is expected to be completed in mid 2015. The project will result in improved stormwater quality in the Penrith Lakes Catchment

 

Illegal Dumping

Over 810 investigations of illegal dumping of waste have been undertaken across Western Sydney, the majority of which is domestic waste including furniture, electrical items, and household rubbish.

 

8.       Events and launches

A comprehensive program with 78 Civic and Community events were delivered during the year that helped showcase the City. 

Citizenship ceremonies

Nine citizenship ceremonies were held that saw 637 people become new Australian citizens.

Activating the River

·    Two music by the river events

·    Four Sunday sister events

July

·    NAIDOC Week

·    Council held a Civic function celebrating the theme Serving Country: Centenary and Beyond acknowledging and honouring the Aboriginal Men and women who served in the Australian armed forces.

·    The Jamison Park Family Gathering was held on Friday 11 July as part of NAIDOC Week.

·    Queens Birthday Honours
An Afternoon Tea was held to honour of the 2014 Queens Birthday Award Recipients

·    Mayors Cup in association with Penrith Harness Racing Club

·    175th Anniversary of the Anglican Parish of Penrith and St Stephens church.

·    Bicentenary - Building of the Road - William Cox
A re-enactment march from Regatta Park to the Arms of Australia Inn Museum, formal ceremonies and celebration activities held at the Arms of Australia Inn Museum.

August

·    Wallabies Civic Reception
Meet and Greet and signing with the Australian Rugby Union team the Wallabies to end their Bush to Bledesloe Cup promotion.

·    Dinner with the US Consul General, Hugo Llorens followed by a Gala Concert featuring Yvonne Kenny AM and Simon Tedeschi

September

·    Homelessness Summit held at the Joan Sutherland Performing Arts Centre

·    2014 Nepean Disability Expo

October

·    Welcome to Korean Delegation and annual Korean Flag raising ceremony

November

·    2014-15 Community Assistance Program Cheque Presentation

·    Ripples 20 Year Anniversary Celebration

·    White Ribbon Day – the nationwide campaign to speak out against violence against women.

·    Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute School Science Awards
Presentation of the 2014 Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute Science Awards. Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute presents awards for achievement in science to nominated Year 11 students

December

·    International Day of People with Disability

·    A celebration of Jessica Fox’s achievements throughout 2014

·    Glenmore Park Entrance Park - Public Art Launch

·    Youth Week and Seniors Week Mayoral Cheque Presentations

January

·    2015 Australia Day

Dinner and presentation to recognise the contributions of the 2014 Australia Day Award Recipients.

Free event featuring live entertainment and fireworks held at the Sydney International Regatta Centre

February

·    Penrith Valley Chamber of Commerce, 2015 Tuesday Networking Series Launch

·    2015 Panthers Season Launch

·    Civic Reception for the participants in the World Driver Championship, Penrith Paceway

March

·    International Women’s Day 2015

·    Senior's Week

·    ‘Harmony In Action’ Forum – Official Harmony Day event 2015
An initiative of the Penrith Multicultural Interagency, representatives from the Refugee Council of Australia, the Muslim Women’s Association, the Asylum Seeker Resource Centre spoke on the day along with performances by local cultural groups to celebrate and showcase our vibrant multicultural community.

April

·    Dinner hosted in partnership with Rowing Australia to welcome visiting international guests from the Sydney International Rowing Regatta.

·    Mrs, Ms, Miss Australia Quest Afternoon Tea - For Ovarian Cancer Research

·    Official Opening of Home Front - 100 Year Commemoration of the Gallipoli Campaign Exhibition

·    Outdoor Cinemas - Cinema in the park is run in conjunction with our series of pop up events to activate live sites.

·    Launch of the Australians At War Kiosk located in the Civic Centre

·    Recognition of the 125th Anniversary of the Foundation Stone being laid for the Prospect Electricity Building

May

·    Primary School Leaders Reception to recognise the achievements of primary school leaders in the Penrith LGA.

·    Relay for Life, Howell Oval

·    Naming of Roger Nethercote Park, Morello Terrace, Caddens

·    Western Sydney Light Years Ahead Project Launch

June

·    Evening of Celebration - Long Serving Staff Recognition (20 Years)

·    Bicentenary of Penrith - Ghost Investigation
Celebrating the Bicentenary of Penrith through Community Ghost Investigations at Historical Buildings in the area. Arms of Australia Inn

·    Philippine Flag Raising Ceremony for the 117th Philippine Independence Day.

 

9.       Major projects

·    The Andrews Road Bio retention wetland ($1.3m) was a significant project which aims to improve storm water quality from a large catchment which drains to the Penrith Lakes.  The project was completed in June and will be fully activated after the initial plant establishment period. 

·    The Shared Path bridge ($1.5m) over South Creek at St Marys is an important link in the cycleway/shared use path connection between the St Marys Town Centre and Penrith CBD along the Great Western Highway. The 74m concrete structure was funded by RMS.

·    Through the Western Sydney Infrastructure Program, Local Roads Package, the Federal Government and RMS offered Council $1.1m to develop design concepts & funding proposals for the upgrade of important road infrastructure on both the Northern and Erskine Park Roads.  Applications for construction funding on the identified projects have now been lodged.

·    Peachtree Creek Bank Stabilisation project in Weir Reserve has halted dangerous erosion on the sheer banks and items of indigenous heritage were identified which were assessed and after consultation, have now been accepted into the Australian Museum collection.

·    Council’s collection of three historic Bennett Wagons have been accommodated in a purpose built enclosure at South Creek Park, St Marys. These important items of St Marys’ industrial heritage have been housed in a unique structure using recycled materials and including a large outdoor learning area.

·    A contract has been awarded for nearly $5m of Streetscape Improvement works along the length of Queen St, St Marys.  The construction will be completed in the 2015-16 financial year.

·    The Emu Plains component of the Great River Walk shared path loop was completed. This popular recreational path has been heavily used since completion.

·    The Jamison Park All Age Health & Fitness Zone and three building upgrades for Netball and Soccer have been completed as part of the $1.8m overall program of upgrades and enhancement to this heavily utilised sporting precinct

 

10.     Planning, submissions and reports

Penrith Progression

The consultation and collaboration phase of the Penrith Progression continued from July to December 2014 with two major events bringing together participants representing investors, landowners, business groups, government agencies, not-for-profit / community sectors, creative and educational groups.  The Ideas and Opportunities Workshop was held on 8 August to explore the economic drivers, potential areas of competitive advantage and future investment in the City Centre. The workshop drew on the ideas gathered at the public forum held in May and focus group sessions held in June to shape potential projects and opportunities for renewal and revitalisation in the City Centre. Forty-eight participants took part in the Workshop. An on-line forum received 39 responses and over 500 views.

 

Alongside the engagement program, an economic analysis was undertaken by Jacobs Ltd and Arup which identified five key industry sectors with the capacity to stimulate future growth in Penrith City Centre which have been market-tested by Savills

 

Housing and Development

With the newly endorsed City-Wide LEP and Penrith’s new urban release areas, our City has been a hub of development activity; over the last 12 months 1,474 applications were determined with is an increase of 86 applications compared to 2013-14.

 

The Joint Regional Planning Panel approved four major proposals: the Western Sydney Community & Sports Centre, St Marys Rugby League Club, seniors living housing at Thornton, and affordable housing residential flat building at Phillip Street, St Marys.

 

DCP/LEP

Council also began consolidating Penrith’s various Development Control Plans (DCP) into one City-Wide DCP. Council resolved at the Policy Review Committee to publicly exhibit the City-Wide DCP on 8 September 2014. The City-Wide DCP was publicity exhibited from Monday 13 October 2014 to Friday 14 November 2014 where over 50 submissions were received. Council resolved to adopt the draft DCP at the Policy Review Committee on 9 March 2015. Penrith’s City-Wide DCP came into effect on 17 April 2015.

 

On 25 May 2015, Council confirmed a position on the proposed airport, resolving to accept the Federal Government’s decision to build an airport on the Government owned land at Badgerys Creek subject to the precondition that the Sydney Airport Curfew Act 1995 be amended to become the Sydney Airports Curfew Act and that it apply to both Sydney and the future Western Sydney Airports.

 

11.     Sporting, recreation and park facilities

Many parks, sporting and recreation facilities across the City have benefited from a range of improvements and upgrades. Over 50 capital works and asset renewal projects were implemented including outdoor health and fitness gyms, improvements to floodlighting, new playgrounds, upgraded sports fields, canteens and storage at various venues and facilities.

 

Enhancements to the playground on Callisto Road Cranebrook were completed and launched with a community celebration. The Mayor Cr Ross Fowler OAM and young people involved in the project spoke proudly of the achievement and the participatory process. This was an exceptional outcome to this project that has actively worked with the community of Cranebrook, through the Cranebrook High School.

 

The park enhancement on Tobruk and Warrego Reserve in North St Marys has had a significant impact on the amenity of the area. The feedback from residents is very positive regarding the changes and the park is being well used by local children.

 

·    St Clair Leisure Centre has increased its participation, attendance and income generation significantly across all programs and services, and will continue to build on this existing platform. A business case is being developed to continue to improve the services provided at St Clair Leisure Centre, by providing health and fitness gym facilities.

·    An online booking system has been installed at Emu Plains Tennis Courts, which allows users to book a court at any time or from anywhere.

·    The installation of the automated floodlight system has been completed across the City’s sportsgrounds.

·    A new awning has been constructed at Jamison Park Netball Pavilion, and a new concrete concourse has been installed at the facility.

·    A multi-use sports court has been installed at Sixth Road Reserve, Berkshire Park

·    Canteen upgrades have been completed at The Kingsway (Touch/Oztag Fields), Hunter Fields and Leonay Oval

·    The storage facility at Blue Hills Oval was completed.

·    New baseball batting cages have been installed at Monfarville Reserve, while Andrews Road and Samuel Marsden baseball facilities have benefited from new fencing, and seating

·    Additional cricket practice facilities have been constructed at Cook and Banks Reserve.

·    90 Sports Donation Travel Assistance grants have been allocated to sportspeople

·    A new licence agreement has been signed with Penrith Rugby Union Club for use of Andrews Road

·    Annual visitations  to sportsgrounds were approximately 2.5m

·    Over 650 facility and sportsground allocations were administered and approximately 350 events were facilitated  (including school and PSSA carnivals, regional, state and national, championships, as well as club & community events)

·    Planning for the development and allocation of sportsgrounds in new release areas including Jordan Springs and Mulgoa Rise has continued, and detailed design for new sportsgrounds at The Kingsway and an all weather athletics track at Blair Oval have been significantly progressed.

 

12.     Public domain amenity and safety

Cemeteries

·    Columbarium Ashes Wall for Emu Plains Cemetery has been approved and is in the final stages of construction. The new ashes walls will provide further interment options for the community.

Public Amenity

·    As part of Council’s Public Toilet Replacement Program, new Crime Prevention through Environmental Design (CPTED) public toilets have been installed at East Lane, St Marys and construction of new toilets at Victoria Park has recently commenced. A new toilet is also planned for Penrith General Cemetery.  

·    Launch of the Federal Government funded Western Sydney Councils 'Light Years Ahead' project occurred in Penrith in May.  Financially supported from Council's Sustainability Revolving Fund, this project coordinated by WSROC, allows for the changeover to energy-efficient fittings of 1,816 existing street lights across the city.  The changeover of all fittings is due to be completed by April 2016. The project will result in significant energy savings to Council as well as a significant reduction in greenhouse gas emissions.

 

Community Safety

·    Installation of 17 solar lights to illuminate a 550 metre section of footpath along the eastern end of Jamison Park, South Penrith. The lights will help to promote safe night time use for people using the park for leisure and exercise, as part of Council’s ‘Walk Wise’ Project.

 

13.     Transport and Infrastructure

Pathways

·    357 tonnes of waste was collected.

·    A total of 2.5km of pedestrian path and 3km of shared paths have been constructed by Council. This includes a shared path along the Great Western Highway, Emu Plains from River Road to Russell Street and along the Great Western Highway, St Marys from South Creek to Pages Road.  A further 22.2km of pedestrian paths and 8.1km of shared paths were constructed by developers.

·    Path paving upgrade works have been completed at Dukes Oval, Emu Plains, the forecourt along Union Lane, adjacent to Judges Place car park, Willow Road, North St Marys and at several schools including along Monfarville Street, St Marys, Forbes Street, Emu Plains and John Batman Ave, Werrington County.

·    A new shared path bridge has been constructed over South Creek on the south side of the Great Western Highway, St Marys

 

Roads and infrastructure

·    A total 100,000sqm of pavement rejuvenation was carried out in Glenmore Park.

·    Drainage improvement works have been undertaken in Hinxman Road, Castlereagh.

·    Water Street, Werrington has been sealed and drainage improvement works also undertaken.

·    A total of 14.6km of roadway and 10.1km of piped drainage, including 690 pits and 2 gross pollutant traps were dedicated to Council as part of the development of new release areas

·    Road reconstruction work has been undertaken on sections of Castle Road, Orchard Hills; St Thomas Road, Mulgoa; Russell Street Emu Plains; Dunheved Road, Werrington County and Swallow Drive, Erskine Park.

·    Road safety improvement works have been completed along Glossop Street, St Marys with intersection upgrades at Brisbane Street and Adelaide Street which were funded under the Federal Black Spot Program.

 

14.     Technology and Business Improvement

Workers compensation

As at the 30 June 2015 Council had lodged 46 claims for the 2014-15 financial year. This is the lowest number of claims for a number of years an of the 46 claims, 89.1% have resulted in employees returning to full pre-injury duties by 30 June 2015.

 

Fit for the Future

In November 2014 the Office of Local Government announced the ‘Fit for the Future’ program, which is their response to the issues raised through the work of the Independent Local Government Review Panel and the inquiry into the financial sustainability of local government undertaken by TCorp. Under Fit for the Future, councils must first assess whether they have appropriate scale and capacity to operate and, if so, report on 7 indicators which assess financial and asset management capabilities.  If it is determined that they do not have appropriate scale and capacity they must look at options to address this, primarily though merging with an adjoining council. 

 

The Independent Local Government Review Panel indicated in its final report that Penrith has appropriate scale and capacity and does not need to consider options to merge.  We prepared a submission on the 7 indicators which outlined those we currently meet, and what actions we will take to improve our performance for the ones we do not meet.  Our response to the indicators and the accompanying Improvement Plans was submitted to IPART (who are assessing applications on behalf of the Office of Local Government) on 27 June 2015.  IPARTs timeline requires they release their findings to the Minister for Local Government by 16 October 2015.  There is not a set date by which the findings will be released publicly. 

 

Council started an organisation wide Capacity Review in September 2014, which includes a review of all our services, a review of our assets and a review of our long term financial strategies. This work provided an important basis for our Fit for the Future submission, with many of the actions arising from the Capacity Review included in the Improvement Plan. 

 

Information, Communication and Technology

·    New technology in the areas of 3d modelling and Web Map Services are being adopted and developed.

·    Council has signed an agreement with Telstra to participate in their WiFi Nation project. This will provide limited free WiFi from selected Telstra WiFi points around the city.

·    Launched the new Corporate Website in February 2015

·    The iWork@Penrith Smart Hub launched in February 2015, supported by grants from Penrith City Council with the NSW Government

Access to information

Council welcomed its upgraded website in February that now meets the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0 (Level AA), providing broader access to Council information.

 

15.     Training and support

Council’s trainee program continued with the appointment of 60 trainees in a variety of Council services including Child Care, Business Administration, Information Technology, Horticulture and Civil Construction. In addition we have 14 Professional Specialist trainees for trainees studying a tertiary qualification in Civil Engineering, Environmental Health, Legal & Governance, Building Surveying, Planning and Library Services. Council facilitated approximately 128 work experience programs for students in secondary and tertiary education and hosted 2 business services students through Nova Employment.

 

Conclusion

We continue to deliver quality services with the aim to meet the needs of our community while ensuring we deliver value for their rates dollar and strive to make Penrith a better place to live and do business.

 

The past 12 months has seen not only a substantial increase in development activity with the newly endorsed City-wide LEP and Penrith’s new urban release areas; but a strong focus on planning for the future. Council’s new Advocacy Program, ‘Building a better future’, that was launched in January has already ensured the State Government’s commitment to support and provide funding for 9 projects that will support our growing infrastructure. Our organisation-wide capacity review is progressing well and identifying future opportunities for improving efficiencies across Council.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the information contained in the report on 2014-15 Year in Review be received.

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                           14 September 2015

 

 

 

5

Draft Policy on the Payment of Expenses and Provision of Facilities to Mayor, Deputy Mayor and Councillors   

 

Compiled by:               Adam Beggs, Governance Officer

Authorised by:            Glenn Schuil, Senior Governance Officer  

 

Outcome

We have confidence in our Council

Strategy

Demonstrate transparency and ethical behaviour

Service Activity

Ensure that the organisation promotes ethical behaviour, risk management, transparent decision making and meets contemporary governance standards

      

 

Executive Summary

Section 252 of the Local Government Act 1993 (the Act) requires Council to adopt a Policy on the payment of expenses and provision of facilities to the Mayor, Deputy Mayor and Councillors (252 Policy), within 5 months of the end of each financial year.  Section 253 of the Act requires that the Council must give at least 28 days’ public notice of its intention to adopt or amend the policy, unless it is of the opinion that the proposed amendment (s) are not substantial.  However, Council must comply with these provisions of the Act each year, even if it proposes to adopt a Policy that is the same as its existing Policy, or if the proposed amendments are not substantial.

 

Council reviews the Policy based on guidelines and circulars issued by the Office of Local Government (OLG) and other areas that officers deem appropriate. The report details the proposed changes that have been made to the Policy since last year. The review of the Policy this year includes a proposal for an additional clause pertaining to legal expenses for the Mayor of the day, in addition to a number of minor changes to the Policy which relate to the updating of figures, costs and refinement of text.

 

This report recommends that Council’s current Policy be amended to ensure that it continues to remain  consistent with the Guidelines issued by the OLG, and that the amended Policy is advertised for 28 days in accordance with the Act notifying the public of the Council’s intention to adopt the amended Policy.

 

Council officers will review the draft Policy again after the notification period has concluded, and submit any feedback or substantial changes which may occur back to a Council meeting in November before submitting the policy with the OLG by the due date.

Current Situation

Council is required to adopt its Policy on the Payment of Expenses and Provision of Facilities to Mayor, Deputy Mayor and Councillors by 30 November 2015.

 

The Act provides that the Chief Executive of the OLG may issue Guidelines in relation to the review and adoption of Council’s Section 252 Policy. Council has previously received advice from the OLG that Council’s current policy is a good policy which is consistent with the legislation and Guidelines.

 

The Guidelines and the advice previously received from the OLG have again been examined to ensure Council’s policy remains contemporary and consistent with the OLG recommendations.  A draft Policy that has considered the Guidelines and the OLG advice can be found in Attachment 1 to tonight’s business paper.  The provisions of Council’s existing 252 Policy have remained largely consistent with the Guidelines. The majority of the proposed changes relate to minor wording refinement and the updating of figures. The figures and cost limits in the report relate to the current Consumer Price Index (CPI). When the September 2015 CPI figures are available these figures will be incorporated into the Policy. It is expected in most cases the figures will only be required to be amended by a small percentage. After the notification period the policy will be reported back an Ordinary meeting of Council.

 

The majority of changes to the Policy relate to updating of figures, costs and refinement of text. The only other change that has been proposed for incorporation into the policy pertains to legal expenses for the Mayor.

 

It is acknowledged there are circumstances where the Mayor of the day, by virtue of their position may require independent legal advice for matters directly associated with the Office of the Mayor. As such it would be appropriate to amend one of the existing clauses with the policy as follows: (deleted words struck out and additional words italicised)

 

9.2.8 Legal Expenses and Obligations

 

Legal assistance will not be provided in respect of legal proceedings initiated by the Mayor, Deputy Mayor and / or Councillors in any circumstances except where the Mayor of the day requires independent legal advice (but not to initiate legal proceedings) having regard to the Office of Mayor up to an annual amount of $10,000. In these circumstances the Mayor should advise the General Manager in writing outlining the reasons for requiring the independent legal advice, where possible prior to the expense being incurred.

 

Next Steps

Should Council resolve to adopt the Draft Policy it will be placed on public exhibition for 28 days. At the conclusion of this exhibition period, any submission received will be examined and a report will be submitted to the Council’s Ordinary Meeting in either October or November.

 

Conclusion

The Council’s 252 Policy must be reviewed within 5 months of the end of each financial year. Given that Council must give at least 28 days’ public notice of its intention to adopt or amend its Policy, it is considered prudent that Council approves the draft Policy, and then a 28-day public exhibition period will commence.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Draft Policy on the Payment of Expenses and Provision of Facilities to Mayor, Deputy Mayor and Councillors be received

2.    Council advertise for 28 days a public notice of its intention to adopt the amended Policy on the Payment of Expenses and Provision of Facilities to Mayor, Deputy Mayor and Councillors.

3.    A further report be presented to Council at the conclusion of the exhibition period.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.  

Draft Policy on the Payment of Expenses and Provision of Facilities for Exhbition

22 Pages

Attachments Included

   


 

ATTACHMENTS  

 

 

Date of Meeting:     Monday 14 September 2015

Report Title:            Rezoning Application (RZ15/0001) - 88-89 Nepean Gorge Drive, Mulgoa (Owner) Angas Securities Limited (as Mortgagee in Possession)

Attachments:           Site Location

                                Indicative Layout

                                Proposed Biobank Site

                                Draft Planning Proposal



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                         14 September 2015

Attachment 1 - Site Location

 

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Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                         14 September 2015

Attachment 2 - Indicative Layout

 

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Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                         14 September 2015

Attachment 3 - Proposed Biobank Site

 

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Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                         14 September 2015

Attachment 4 - Draft Planning Proposal

 

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ATTACHMENTS  

 

 

Date of Meeting:     Monday 14 September 2015

Report Title:            City-wide Advocacy Program

Attachments:           Advocacy Project Status and community information sheets



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                         14 September 2015

Attachment 1 - Advocacy Project Status and community information sheets

 

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ATTACHMENTS  

 

 

Date of Meeting:     Monday 14 September 2015

Report Title:            Penrith CBD Corporation Business Plan 2015-16

Attachments:           Annual Operations Report 2014-2015 penrith CBD Corporation

                                Penrith CBD Corporation Ltd Financial Report 30 June 2015

                                Penrith CBD Corporation Triennial Business Plan Year 3 2014-16



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                         14 September 2015

Attachment 1 - Annual Operations Report 2014-2015 penrith CBD Corporation

 

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Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                         14 September 2015

Attachment 2 - Penrith CBD Corporation Ltd Financial Report 30 June 2015

 

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Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                         14 September 2015

Attachment 3 - Penrith CBD Corporation Triennial Business Plan Year 3 2014-16

 

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ATTACHMENTS  

 

 

Date of Meeting:     Monday 14 September 2015

Report Title:            Draft Policy on the Payment of Expenses and Provision of Facilities to Mayor, Deputy Mayor and Councillors

Attachments:           Draft Policy on the Payment of Expenses and Provision of Facilities for Exhbition



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                         14 September 2015

Attachment 1 - Draft Policy on the Payment of Expenses and Provision of Facilities for Exhbition

 

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