Council_Mark_POS_RGB

4 November 2015

 

Dear Councillor,

In pursuance of the provisions of the Local Government Act, 1993 and the Regulations thereunder, notice is hereby given that a POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING of Penrith City Council is to be held in the Passadena Room, Civic Centre, 601 High Street, Penrith on Monday 9 November 2015 at 7:00PM.

Attention is directed to the statement accompanying this notice of the business proposed to be transacted at the meeting.

Yours faithfully

 

 

Alan Stoneham

General Manager

 

BUSINESS

 

1.           LEAVE OF ABSENCE

Leave of absence has been requested by:

Councillor Michelle Tormey - 30 October 2015 to 3 January 2016 inclusive.

 

2.           APOLOGIES

 

3.           CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES

Policy Review Committee Meeting - 19 October 2015.

 

4.           DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

Pecuniary Interest (The Act requires Councillors who declare a pecuniary interest in an item to leave the meeting during discussion of that item)

Non-Pecuniary Conflict of Interest – Significant and Less than Significant (The Code of Conduct requires Councillors who declare a significant non-pecuniary conflict of interest in an item to leave the meeting during discussion of that item)

 

5.           ADDRESSING THE MEETING

 

6.           MAYORAL MINUTES

 

7.           NOTICES OF MOTION TO RESCIND A RESOLUTION

 

8.           NOTICES OF MOTION

 

9.           DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

10.         REQUESTS FOR REPORTS AND MEMORANDUMS

 

11.         URGENT BUSINESS

 

12.         CONFIDENTIAL BUSINESS


POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING

 

Monday 9 November 2015

 

table of contents

 

 

 

 

 

 

meeting calendar

 

 

confirmation of minutes

 

 

DELIVERY program reports

 


Council_Mark_POS_RGB2015 MEETING CALENDAR

January 2015 - December 2015

 

 

 

TIME

JAN

FEB

MAR

APRIL

MAY

JUNE

JULY

AUG

SEPT

OCT

NOV

DEC

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

 

Ordinary Council Meeting

7.30pm

 

2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

21^ü

(7.00pm)

 

 

7

 

23@

23

27v

25#

29*

27

24@

28

26

23#+

14

(7.00pm)

Policy Review Committee

7.00pm

 

 

 

20

11

22

13

10

14

19

9

 

 

9

9

 

 

 

 

31

 

 

30

 

 

 v

Meeting at which the draft corporate planning documents (Delivery Program and Operational Plan) are endorsed for exhibition

 *

Meeting at which the draft corporate planning documents (Delivery Program and Operational Plan) are adopted

 #

Meetings at which the Operational Plan quarterly reviews (March and September) are presented

 @

Meetings at which the Delivery Program progress reports (including the Operational Plan quarterly reviews for December and June) are presented

 ^

Election of Mayor/Deputy Mayor

 ü

Meeting at which the 2013-2014 Annual Statements are presented

 

Meeting at which any comments on the 2013-2014 Annual Statements are presented

 +

Meeting at which the Annual Report is presented

-            Extraordinary Meetings are held as required.

-            Members of the public are invited to observe meetings of the Council (Ordinary and Policy Review Committee).

Should you wish to address Council, please contact the Senior Governance Officer, Glenn Schuil.

 


UNCONFIRMED MINUTES

 OF THE POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING OF PENRITH CITY COUNCIL HELD IN THE PASSADENA ROOM, PENRITH

ON MONDAY 19 OCTOBER 2015 AT 7:04PM

PRESENT

Her Worship the Mayor, Councillor Karen McKeown,  Deputy Mayor, Councillor Ross Fowler OAM, and Councillors Jim Aitken OAM, Bernard Bratusa, Prue Car MP, Kevin Crameri OAM, Marcus Cornish, Greg Davies (arrived 7:07pm), Mark Davies, Maurice Girotto, Ben Goldfinch, Jackie Greenow OAM, John Thain and Michelle Tormey.

 

LEAVE OF ABSENCE

Leave of Absence was previously requested by Councillor Tricia Hitchen for the period 15 October 2015 to 25 October 2015 inclusive.

PRC 78  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Ross Fowler OAM seconded Councillor Jackie Greenow OAM that the matter be brought forward and dealt with as a matter of urgency.

Her Worship the Mayor, Karen McKeown, ruled that the matter was urgent and should be dealt with at the meeting.

 

PRC 79  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Ross Fowler OAM seconded Councillor Jackie Greenow OAM that leave of absence be granted to Councillor Tricia Hitchen for the period 15 October 2015 to 25 October 2015 inclusive.

 

APOLOGIES

There were no apologies.

 

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES - Policy Review Committee Meeting - 14 September 2015

PRC 80  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Jackie Greenow OAM seconded Councillor Bernard Bratusa that the minutes of the Policy Review Committee Meeting of 14 September 2015 be confirmed.

 

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

 

There were no declarations of interest.

 

DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Outcome 7 - We have confidence in our Council

 

2        NBN Briefing

Executive Manager – Corporate, Vicki O’Kelly introduced the report and invited Michael Tyler from NBN Co to give a presentation.

Councillor Jim Aitken OAM left the meeting, the time being 7:06pm.
Councillor Greg Davies arrived at the meeting, the time being 7:07pm.
Councillor Jim Aitken OAM returned to the meeting, the time being 7:08pm.
Councillor Mark Davies left the meeting, the time being 7:34pm.
Councillor Mark Davies returned to the meeting, the time being 7:38pm.                                   

PRC 81  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Ben Goldfinch seconded Councillor Greg Davies that the information contained in the report on NBN Briefing be received.

 

Outcome 4 - We have safe, vibrant places

 

1        St Marys Town Centre Corporation Business Plan 2015-16

City Centres Coordinator, Terry Agar introduced the report and invited Alex Karavas – Chair of the St Marys Town Centre Corporation to give a presentation.                                                   

PRC 82  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Marcus Cornish seconded Councillor Prue Car

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on St Marys Town Centre Corporation Business Plan 2015-16 be received.

2.    Council endorse the Business Plan 2015-16 for the St Marys Town Centre Corporation.

 

3        Update on the Capacity Review

Executive Manager – Corporate, Vicki O’Kelly introduced the report.                                        

PRC 83  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Ross Fowler OAM seconded Councillor Marcus Cornish that the information contained in the report on Update on the Capacity Review be received.

 

REQUESTS FOR REPORTS AND MEMORANDUMS

 

RR 1           Werrington House     

Councillor Jackie Greenow OAM requested that a letter be sent from the Mayor to the owners of Werrington House thanking them for the recently held open day.

 

URGENT BUSINESS

 

UB 1           Leave of Absence      

Councillor Greg Davies requested Leave of Absence for the period 22 October 2015 to 30 October 2015 inclusive.

PRC 84  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Jackie Greenow OAM seconded Councillor Ben Goldfinch that the matter be brought forward and dealt with as a matter of urgency.

 

Her Worship the Mayor, Karen McKeown, ruled that the matter was urgent and should be dealt with at the meeting.

 

PRC 85  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Jackie Greenow OAM seconded Councillor Ben Goldfinch that Leave of Absence be granted to Councillor Greg Davies for the period 22 October 2015 to 30 October 2015 inclusive.

 


 

 

 

UB 2           Leave of Absence      

Councillor Mark Davies requested Leave of Absence for 2 November 2015.

PRC 86  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Ross Fowler OAM that the matter be brought forward and dealt with as a matter of urgency.

 

Her Worship the Mayor, Karen McKeown, ruled that the matter was urgent and should be dealt with at the meeting.

 

PRC 87  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Ross Fowler OAM that Leave of Absence be granted to Councillor Mark Davies for 2 November 2015.

 

 

There being no further business the Chairperson declared the meeting closed the time being 8:36pm.

    



DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

 

Outcome 1 - We can work close to home

 

1        Penrith City Children's Services Cooperative Ltd                                                              1

 

Outcome 4 - We have safe, vibrant places

 

2        Regentville Hall - Change of Use                                                                                     13

 

Outcome 5 - We care about our environment

 

3        Multi-Unit Developments - Penrith Development Control Plan                                       21

 

Outcome 7 - We have confidence in our Council

 

4        Annual Report                                                                                                                   33

 

5        Penrith Whitewater Stadium - Annual Report and Board of Directors                            35

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


Outcome 1 - We can work close to home

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

1        Penrith City Children's Services Cooperative Ltd                                                              1

 

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                              9 November 2015

 

 

 

1

Penrith City Children's Services Cooperative Ltd   

 

Compiled by:               Jade Bradbury, Business Co-ordinator Children's Services

Marlene Cauchi, Management Accountant Children's Services

Authorised by:            Janet Keegan, Children’s Services Manager  

 

Outcome

We can work close to home

Strategy

Provide access to education and training to improve residents ability to take advantage of current and future employment opportunities

Service Activity

Deliver high quality children's services

 

Presenters:                  Max Friend - Chairman - Penrith City Children's Services Cooperative Ltd - Annual Report      

 

Executive Summary

This report provides information on the operations of the children’s services auspiced by Council and managed by the Penrith City Children’s Services Cooperative (PCCSC) for the period July 2014 to June 2015. The report includes information on the financial operations of the services managed by the Cooperative. The report recommends that the information be received and that Council underwrite the operations of the PCCSC Ltd until the presentation to Council of the Penrith City Children’s Services Cooperative Ltd Annual Report for

2015-2016.

Background

The PCCSC became effective from 1 January 2003 and was created to manage a number of children’s services on Council’s behalf including long day care, preschool, before and after school and vacation care. In 2008, the Board also took on the management of St Marys Occasional Children’s Centre following its co-location with St Marys Children’s Centre. The structure of the Cooperative is a Board of 11 Directors including parent representatives,  Councillors, a staff representative, community representatives and a representative of the General Manager. The Board meets on a bi-monthly basis and operates under Council delegation as a non-trading entity. The Board looks at broad policy matters, sets the direction for children’s services and makes major decisions about service provision. Parent Advisory Committees, elected annually at each site, provide valuable input into the operational aspects of individual services. 

 

On Council’s behalf, the Board manages 26 facilities encompassing 17 long day care, five preschools, nine before and after school care services, seven vacation care and one occasional care service. (The Board took over management of the Glenmore Park Child and Family Centre from July 2015.) Approximately 3,750 children aged 0-12 years attend the services annually with approximately 300 staff employed in centre-based service delivery including permanent, temporary and casual employees working in full-time and part-time capacities.

 

Children’s Services has a broad strategy in Council’s Delivery Program to deliver high quality children’s services. Linked to this strategy are the five major goals in the Board’s Strategic Plan – being a leader in quality, sound financial management, enabling a skilled workforce,  being known as a provider of high quality not-for-profit services and having decision making processes that are open and transparent. It is pleasing that a number of key primary actions within these goals have been implemented during the period of review. Following the previous year’s favourable operational financial outcome, this year Children’s Services has focussed on consolidating service delivery to the high levels expected by the community. In an effort to address some of the challenges faced during the year, the Board, along with the Children’s Services leadership and management team, have focussed attention on a variety of initiatives, a snapshot of which are highlighted in this report. The following comments provide information on some of the operational aspects of the children’s services managed by the Cooperative, as well as a summary of the financial reports for the period July 2014 to June 2015.

 

The Children’s Services Program 

The Children’s Services program is focused on delivering high quality children’s services that are affordable, accessible and viable. Affordability was particularly significant in the second half of the financial year when families were reporting loss of jobs, redundancies, reduced work hours and businesses going out of operation as major factors in their ability to afford childcare. Our experience is that children are often withdrawn from formal childcare when there is increased pressure on families’ disposable income and children are cared for by friends or family (especially grandparents) or children of school age go home alone. Where utilisation levels were lower than projected, rectification steps were taken at the services to ensure ongoing viability of impacted centres including some reduced staffing, cut backs in discretionary spending and a reduction in amounts being contributed to pooled funds.    

 

Annual Customer Survey

The children’s services annual customer satisfaction survey was undertaken in March 2015,  the results of which have been analysed. Parents were asked to identify their satisfaction and perception in a number of key areas including rating the quality and their confidence in the service. Parents were also invited to make suggestions for improvement. In summary, services were rated excellent to good with particular feedback made about the high quality of the centre staff. There are always opportunities to improve the way in which services are delivered and the Children’s Services Coordination Unit is working with centre staff to identify strategies to continue to support and develop them. It is pleasing that a number of strategies from the Children’s Services Workforce Workplan, developed after the Employee Opinion Survey, have been implemented. In addition, work has been progressed on ways to improve communication between parents, staff and children. Where issues were identified at particular sites through the customer survey, the matters have been addressed with services individually.

 

Building and Playground Upgrades

Children’s Services continuously strives to maintain services as aesthetically pleasing and safe environments for children, families and staff. To this end a significant number of building and playground upgrades totalling $515,139 have been completed during the financial year being reported on, with funds from the Cooperative’s operations. The Board is making more provision than ever before for building and playground upgrades to meet the ongoing challenge of ageing buildings.

 

Enrolment of Children from an Aboriginal Background and Children with Disabilities

Of particular note during this reporting period is the increased enrolment of children from an Aboriginal background across Children’s Services with the support of significantly reduced preschool fees and the support of the SAACS (supporting Aboriginal access to children’s services) worker. The SAACS worker is the first point of contact for Aboriginal parents which is then followed up with assistance through the enrolment process and liaison with the family some weeks after enrolment. Children’s Services has undertaken an enormous body of work in the last financial year with centre based educators to build their capacity to include families from an Aboriginal background and be culturally reflective. 

 

Support to improve access for children with ongoing high support needs has been provided by the commonwealth funded Inclusion Support Subsidy (ISS). This program builds the capacity of services through the development of service support plans to include children with ongoing high support needs into mainstream services. ISS funding enables services to engage an additional staff member but there is a significant shortfall in the funding received and the cost of employing additional staff which needs to be met by services. It is this gap in funding that is provided by Council to the Cooperative’s operations. During the year the services managed by the Cooperative enrolled over 100 children with additional needs and disabilities.

 

Curriculum Implementation

It has been an extremely positive year for Children’s Services curriculum implementation with the rollout of the LDCPDP (Long Day Care Professional Development Program) federal funding ($609,357 to June 2017); the Children’s Services Curriculum Group took on an entirely new direction in 2015 as the funding has opened up a wide range of opportunities for professional learning targeting ‘building staff capacity in understanding and implementing the EYLF (Early Years Learning Framework) and the NQS (National Quality Standards)’. 

 

The Children’s Services leadership team relies on current research in the early childhood field to support the type of professional learning provided. It is well documented that ‘one off’ training sessions have little impact on changing or improving professional practice long term. In light of this, professional learning programs have been created that are embedded in professional development through ongoing training, mentoring, and critical reflection.


Over 55 professional learning sessions and forums have been attended by all educators across Children’s Services with more than 1,300 individual attendances over the year. Some inspiring professional speakers and specialists have been engaged in particular areas of expertise. This body of work will culminate in the children’s services curriculum showcase and symposium in November 2015 which will be open for children, families and other early childhood professionals in the region.

The Paint Penrith REaD (PPR) project, supported by Council and the Board, and led locally by Mission Australia, has substantially increased its profile during this reporting period. The focus of the project is on promoting the importance of reading to children from birth as research clearly shows this has positive literacy outcomes for later life. All of Council’s children’s centres and libraries again participated in National Simultaneous Storytime in May this year and Council’s centres are ‘thinking smarter’ about literacy initiatives at each site and branding activities under PPR. The Board has previously entered into an agreement with Mission Australia and United Way Australia for the rollout of the Imagination Library, a book delivery program, in North St Marys, a program expanding now into Colyton and well on its way to realising its goal of reaching 80% of children aged under five years in these areas, signed up and each receiving a book a month, posted to them at their home, until their fifth birthday. 

 

Funding for Special Projects

Federal funding to Children’s Services for the Child Care Links program, which commenced in 2008, and the Supplementary Recurrent Funding, ceased in June 2015. These have been replaced with funding under the Children and Parenting Support Service (CAPSS) ($215,347 over two years) and Indigenous Advancement Strategy (IAS) funding of $154,500 over 2.5 years.  The CAPSS funding will build on and continue the successful strategies under Child Care Links to support families living in vulnerable circumstances, particularly the family support service to Council’s centres. The IAS funding will build the capacity of Council’s children’s centres to enrol children from an Aboriginal background. To this end, Children’s Services has developed and rolled out professional learning to all educators in relation to cultural competence and trauma informed care. Community members and commercial childcare providers across the region have also attended the training.  

 

Children’s Services Business Approach

During the year, children’s services has strengthened its business model approach to the management of centres. The Business Coordinator dedicated to Children’s Services has further strengthened and streamlined business practices across all services. Productivity initiatives have included upgrades to the software for the management of children’s enrolments, attendance and family fees as well as efficiencies from centralised financial systems and global contracts for cleaning, consumables and garden maintenance. 

 

Financial Results

The services managed by the Cooperative reported a small operating surplus from ordinary activities of $25,000 for the 2014-15 year. This surplus was achieved from revenues of $18,734,000 with expenses for the same period being $17,683,000. This surplus result is after a contribution from Council of $165,000, transfers to a number of operational reserves of $1,126,000 for future projects (e.g. building and playground upgrades, bus replacement, centre equipment, marketing and promotions) and transfers from fundraising reserves of $65,000.  

 

Grant funding of $2,141,000 was provided by both the State and Federal Governments which is an increase of 5.6% compared to last year financial year.  Employee costs for 2014-15 were $15,889,000 which is an increase of 11%. Reflective of the industry within which the Cooperative’s services operate, employee costs account for the largest category of expenditure and comprise 84.2% of the total cost of the Cooperative’s operations.

 

In 2014-15 the Cooperative Services made provision for $176,000 towards funding Employee Leave Entitlements (ELE) for children’s services staff. This allowed the Cooperative to fully fund leave entitlements attributable largely to annual leave and long-service leave for its staff.  The total entitlements funded by the Children’s Services ELE reserve for the year ended 30 June 2015 was $78,000.

 

Expenditure on materials, contracts and other expenses were $1,794,000 which is a decrease of 3.2% on last year’s result. This was largely the result of reduced discretionary expenditure at a number of Children’s Centres.

 

Council’s commitment to directly supporting the initiatives undertaken by the Cooperative is reflected by the subsidy provided to the Cooperative’s operations. This subsidy provides essential funding for inclusion support. Historically Council has also provided a subsidy to the operations of St Marys Occasional Care which the Board has agreed to underwrite going forward. The financial outcome for the services managed by the Cooperative for the financial year 2014-15 is considered a good result and is testament to the strong financial management of the Cooperative’s services. For the children’s services managed by the Cooperative, the maintenance of utilisation levels is critical to their financial viability and the external grant funding received is of high importance to be able to sustain service delivery at current high levels.

 

Conclusion

The establishment of the Penrith City Children’s Services Cooperative in 2003, has proved to be an effective management model for the children’s services sponsored by Council. The favourable outcome for the 2014-15 financial year is an excellent achievement given the current financial environment, and provides some necessary equity to better position the services for the coming years. The Board of Directors is well aware of the complexities of the operation of children’s services and the challenges that this brings and maintaining a balance between services that are viable, accessible and affordable is high on the Board’s agenda. Sustaining the quality of service provision for which Council’s services are known is a key driver.

 

The Penrith City Children’s Services Cooperative is strongly committed to the provision of quality not-for-profit services for children. Affordability continues to be the driving factor for utilisation levels across all service types and balancing this with viability is a key priority.  Lobbying and advocacy continue in an attempt to ensure that issues related to children’s services, and particularly issues related to the not-for-profit sector, are raised and have a high profile. Continued compliance with the National Law and Regulations is testament to the skill, motivation and dedication of the children’s services staff and the support provided by the Children’s Services Internal Coordination Unit.

 

The Board is under no illusion that the year ahead will hold many challenges in its quest to ensure the children’s services remain viable within a climate of increased competition, legislation and regulation requirements and the challenge to maintain a skilled workforce. Some of the known challenges for children’s services for the year ahead include possible changes to the National Quality Framework and to external funding, implementation of the federal ‘jobs for families’ package in 2017, maintaining ageing assets, sustaining utilisation and marketing and promotions. The Board will need to keep abreast of emerging issues so that sound change management practices are adopted and the high quality of service provision is sustained. 

 

During the financial year 2014-2015, there were no significant changes in the state of affairs of the Cooperative. The Annual General Meeting of the Cooperative was held in October 2015.  The Council’s representatives on the Board are Councillors Michelle Tormey and Ross Fowler OAM. The General Manager’s representative and Company Secretary is Executive Manager – Corporate, Vicki O’Kelly.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Penrith City Children's Services Cooperative Ltd be received.

2.    Council agree to underwrite the operation of Penrith City Children’s Services Cooperative Ltd until the presentation to Council of the Penrith City Children’s Services Cooperative Ltd Annual Report for 2015-16.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.  


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


 

 

Outcome 2 - We plan for our future growth

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

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Outcome 3 - We can get around the City

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

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Outcome 4 - We have safe, vibrant places

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

2        Regentville Hall - Change of Use                                                                                     13

 

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                              9 November 2015

 

 

 

2

Regentville Hall - Change of Use   

 

Compiled by:               Stephanie Gray, Neighbourhood Facilities Development Officer

Authorised by:            Yvonne Perkins, Public Domain Amenity and Safety Manager  

 

Outcome

We have safe, vibrant places

Strategy

Grow and revitalise our centres and neighbourhoods

Service Activity

Manage neighbourhood facilities  using adopted management practice

      

 

Executive Summary

Council has received separate proposals for additional space at Regentville Hall from Nepean Food Service Inc - Meals on Wheels (NFS) and NSW Rural Fire Service (RFS).

NFS has been operating from the small hall within Regentville Hall (under licence agreement) since 1999.  They also use the large hall one day a week to run social support programs.  They have requested permission for full use of the large hall to better accommodate the current and future needs of the service. 

 

The Cumberland Zone Control Centre (RFS) is located adjacent to Regentville Hall.  They occasionally run training programs from the large hall and are seeking to establish a permanent training facility in the large hall for RFS and other emergency service agencies.  The large Hall will also be used for emergency situations if required. Nepean Food Services will continue to operate from the small hall under this proposal. 

 

Council Officers have now met with representatives of both organisations to further discuss their proposals and negotiate a shared arrangement that is suitable to both organisations.   This report recommends that Council enter into separate agreements for the use of Regentville Hall with both organisations to clarify roles and responsibilities to ensure the best outcome for the City of Penrith.

 

Background

 

On 20 April 2015 Councillors were informed by Memorandum that Council had received a proposal from Nepean Food Services Inc. - Meals on Wheels (NFS) and a separate proposal from NSW Rural Fire Service (RFS) requesting additional space at Regentville Hall.

Council Officers advised that they would review both submissions, investigate funding challenges and make recommendations for Council’s consideration regarding the shared use of the Hall.  

 

Regentville Hall (16 - 18 Jeanette St Regentville) is located in the Emergency Services precinct comprised of Cumberland Zone Fire Control Centre, Regentville Fire and Rescue Station, Regentville RFS Station and the Helicopter landing area and is identified in both the Penrith Disaster Plan and the Penrith Flood Plan as a staging facility in times of emergency.

The facility has two separate meeting areas. The large hall has a capacity of 120 people and is used mainly for private weekend functions and on weekday evenings for small business activities such as square dancing and personal training. It is used occasionally by RFS as a training room. 

 

The small hall was converted into office space and is currently occupied by Nepean Food Services for their Meals on Wheels operations.  Nepean Food Services also uses the large hall one day a week to run social support activities.

The S355 Management Committee that manages Regentville Hall has been advised in writing of both submissions.

 

Submission by Nepean Food Services

 

NFS have used Regentville Hall (small hall) as office and freezer space since 1999 and currently pay a Licence Fee of $10,048 p.a. They have 11 paid staff and approximately 85 volunteers. They also have a 5 year Licence Agreement with Council that is scheduled for renewal in June 2018. 

 

NFS run the following programs:

·    an extensive ‘meals on wheels’ service providing over 52,000 meals for over 500 residents in Penrith, Warragamba and Silverdale,

·    two community meal programs offering a day out and social support for the isolated and elderly,

·    Let’s Dine Out program enabling disadvantaged residents and seniors an opportunity to dine out locally at reduced rates; and

·    The provision of bulk meals to Homecare, Anglicare and the Uniting Church. 

 

NFS services have expanded to the point where they require additional office space, freezer room space and meeting space for their expanding social programs.  Community meal programs are currently offered fortnightly at Londonderry Hall and weekly in the large hall at Regentville Hall.

 

In February 2015 NFS submitted a written proposal to Council requesting full use of the large hall in order to extend their operation, grow their service and meet the future needs of the community. In particular NFS indicated that they aim to increase meal provision and social support activities to participants of the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS). The NDIS scheme was rolled out in the Nepean Hawkesbury area for under 18’s in July 2015. It is anticipated that older participants will be eligible to access the scheme in July 2016. Nepean Food Services are currently working towards becoming a provider under the new scheme.

 

Since receiving the submission from NFS, Council has assisted the organisation with the cost of installing a temporary freezer container to the east of the Hall.  This project was a trial project to ascertain whether external freezer storage would work from an operational perspective.  The project has been deemed highly successful.

 

In addition, in August 2015 Council assisted NFS with a grant application under the NSW Community Building Partnership Grant program to fund the cost of building a permanent free standing freezer room to the east of Regentville Hall. The total estimated cost is $90k and should the grant be successful the NSW government, Nepean Food Service and Penrith Council will contribute financially to this project. The outcome of the assessment process will be announced in January 2016. If successful, the two freezers currently located inside the small hall would be relocated to the new freezer room so that additional internal office space could be provided for Nepean Food Service’s growing staff and volunteer workforce.

 

Submission by NSW Rural Fire Service

 

Regentville Hall is located adjacent to the Cumberland Zone Fire Control Centre (FCC), Regentville Fire and Rescue Station and the Regentville RFS Station. This precinct is the subject of the Rural Fire District Service Agreement Cumberland Zone which outlines the terms and conditions of emergency service provision between Blacktown City Council, Fairfield City Council, Penrith City Council and the NSW Rural Fire Service.

In February 2015 RFS submitted a formal proposal requesting full use of the large hall on a permanent basis to cater for increased training demand.  Training is considered one of the highest priorities for emergency services. The RFS in particular have over 900 volunteer fire fighters in the Zone and operate a training calendar that consists of most weekends and weeknights. Establishing Regentville Hall as a training centre would alleviate pressure on the Fire Control Centre training rooms.

 

RFS also wish to offer centralised training space for the following agencies:

·    NSW Police

·    Roads and Maritime NSW

·    Fire Rescue NSW

·    NSW State Emergency Services

·    Ambulance NSW

·    Workcover NSW

 

RFS have indicated that they will refurbish the large hall area into a permanent training room with an operable wall installed to enable the room to be divided into two spaces when required.  The RFS will also upgrade the security system and link data and phone services from FCC to the hall.  They have secured a total of $350,000 to carry out this work.  They also propose to upgrade the parking area to the hall should funds or sponsorship become available.

 

This proposal is considered as an opportunity for the Cumberland Zone FCC to become a centralised training operation centre and improved emergency management for Penrith and surrounding districts for all types of emergency.

 

Existing User Groups

 

Regentville Hall is currently available for hire by the community however it is not heavily utilised.

 

Existing user groups include:

·    Blue Mountains Christadelphians – Sunday church services (weekly - 3 hrs)

·    Panther Squares (dancing classes) - Wednesday evenings (weekly - 2 hrs)

·    Personal Training - Monday and Wednesday evenings (weekly - 1 hr per session)

 

These activities are available for anyone to attend and are not exclusive to the Regentville community.

 

Alternative neighbourhood facilities are available for these user groups at the same time and on the same day that the groups would use Regentville Hall.  All groups have been relocated to other facilities in the past for shorts periods of time when Regentville Hall was used for emergency purposes. 

 

Nepean Food Services also use the large hall once a week for social support programs and community meals programs.   RFS have agreed, as part of negotiations that NFS can continue to use the large hall one day a week.

 

Residents seeking to hire the hall for a private weekend function would be directed to Council’s Neighbourhood Facilities Service where assistance would be provided to find an alternative venue at one of Council’s other 38 neighbourhood facilities.    

 


 

Management Committee

 

The Regentville Hall Management Committee is made up of volunteers from the Regentville Rural Fire Service and one local resident. The Committee has struggled to make a quorum despite direct support from Council’s Neighbourhood Facilities Development Officer and have not met regularly for some time. Given their onsite presence in the small hall Nepean Food Services has provided support to the Management Committee by taking bookings, showing people through the hall and meeting with contractors.

 

Review of Submissions

 

Council Officers have met separately with representatives of both Nepean Food Services and the NSW Rural Fire Service (Cumberland Control Centre) to further explore their submissions.  After initial discussion it was evident that both groups could successfully co-locate at Regentville Hall.  Council’s Legal Officer has advised that separate occupation agreements would be required between Council and the NSW Rural Fire Service and Council and Nepean Food Services to formalise shared use of the facility.  These agreements would ensure tenure for both organisations.  This arrangement would be subject to any declared state of emergency that required the Hall to be resumed as an emergency staging facility.

 

The benefits to Council include Penrith being home to a state of the art emergency service training facility with significantly improved incident control capability, while also ensuring that Nepean Food Services is able to continue providing essential community services to the frail and isolated Penrith residents now and into the future.

 

Funding Challenges

 

Nepean Food Services hope to obtain a grant from the NSW Community Building Partnership program to install a large freezer room to east of hall.  They will continue to use the recently installed freezer container if this grant is not successful however early feedback from the funding body has been positive. 

 

Conclusion

 

Council has received separate submissions from Nepean Food Services Inc. (Meals on Wheels) and NSW Rural Fire Service requesting additional space at Regentville Hall to extend their services.  Council officers have had discussions with both organisations and believe that the two can successfully co-locate in the one facility.

 

Council will continue to own Regentville Hall and will offer alternative space to Regular Hirers at the earliest opportunity to relocate groups for the 2016 calendar year.

 

Council will continue to support the installation of a permanent external freezer room to the east of the building should funding become available, and will also actively pursue opportunities for grant funding to extend the hall to accommodate the growing needs of Nepean Food Services Inc.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Regentville Hall - Change of Use be received.

 

2.    Council enter into an agreement with the NSW Rural Fire Service to accommodate their request for change of use and planned refurbishments of Regentville Hall as outlined in the RFS proposal. (This agreement will be pursuant to any Agreement that exists between Penrith City Council and Nepean Food Services).

3.    Council enter into a new Occupation Agreement with Nepean Food Services for use of the existing office space for as long as required and use of the hall once a week for the delivery of social services.

4.    The S355 Committee that currently manages the Regentville Hall be dissolved and officially acknowledged for their contribution and service to the community through the management of Regentville Hall.

 

5.    A further report be presented to Council detailing the terms of the occupational agreements established with Nepean Food Service and NSW Rural Fire Service.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.  


 

 

 

 

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Outcome 5 - We care about our environment

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

3        Multi-Unit Developments - Penrith Development Control Plan                                       21

 

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                              9 November 2015

 

 

 

3

Multi-Unit Developments - Penrith Development Control Plan   

 

Compiled by:               Joshua Romeo, Waste Education Officer

Authorised by:            Tracy Chalk, Waste and Community Protection Manager  

 

Outcome

We care for our environment

Strategy

Support our communities to live more sustainably and use resources wisely

Service Activity

Manage resource recovery and waste collection services

 

Presenters:                  Milan Marecic - Square Link Pty Ltd - Multi Unit Developments - Penrith Development Control Plan      

 

Executive Summary

The planned and predicted growth of our City combined with the current rate of development is an impetus for further consideration to be given to waste planning for Penrith. The Development Control Plan (DCP) review process is an opportunity to provide controls, which are well considered, relevant and more sustainable. Minor amendments with regard for waste planning are outlined in this report to ensure that the DCP remains relevant and supports Council’s Community Strategic Plan and other relevant policy directions.

 

Waste management problems usually arise whenever there is change to population. Often considered to be local, the scope and magnitude of such issues increase as population density and standards of living rise.

 

The management of waste that will be generated by significant development precincts needs to be recognised as an essential consideration in the assessment process. Too often the management of waste from new developments is given little consideration when the critical initial planning and design decisions are made. This leads to not only delays in the development assessment process but broader problems that over time add to the cost of waste and resource recovery management services for Council. These costs are then ultimately borne by residents and businesses.

 

Waste management can no longer be considered in isolation. Environmental, technological and financial factors all have influence on waste management practices and the community amenity.

 

The issue of waste planning has also been identified across the Western Sydney region and members of the Western Sydney Regional Waste Group through WSROC are looking to provide consistency of approach to waste issues in medium and high density development across the region.  Council Officers have worked with expert consultant Milan Marecic to review the Penrith DCP and ensure consistency with other Western Sydney councils.

 

This report recommends changes to the Penrith Development Control Plan 2014, specifically Section C5: Waste Management. The amendments will not only assist Council in maintaining its commitment to sustainable development but also ensure Council is able to manage waste responsibly and effectively.

Waste Management Controls

Waste Management Controls assist Council in ensuring that waste minimisation and management is planned and undertaken for new developments during the demolition, construction and operational stages.

 

The demolition and construction stages of development are managed well within Penrith City Council and controls still are relevant. However, current policies and Waste Management Controls do not adequately address waste management issues for operational stages of development, specifically for medium and high density developments.

 

Council waste contracts provide for the collection of waste for periods often exceeding 10 years. Residential and commercial buildings need to be capable of access for service by waste contract vehicles whether council or private. Whilst diversity of fleet is available, waste removal and larger vehicle access require due consideration so that costs may be anticipated and responsibly costed.

 

Waste Management Controls within the Penrith Development Control Plan 2014 form fundamental tools and mechanisms for waste collection in medium to high density developments. This enables both environmental protection and public health whilst integrating efficiently and effectively with Council’s waste collection service.

 

Council currently requires all development applications to address the Waste Management Controls outlined in the Penrith Development Control Plan 2014. Given the current controls do not adequately identify and outline Council’s current requirements, specifically for medium and high-density developments, unnecessary delays are occurring during the development assessment process through requests for information and design amendments.

 

Identification of Council’s requirements for the operational specifications for waste collection in both medium and high density developments will assist Council’s work with relevant stakeholders. The collaboration will ensure new developments have waste systems that prioritise the protection of public health and the environment whilst able to integrate to Council’s waste collection fleet.

 

To effectively communicate Council’s waste collection requirements and ensure the design of new residential developments are considered in preliminary stages, minor amendments to the Waste Management Controls are required.

 

Consideration early in the design stage will ensure:

 

·    Waste storage facilities are appropriate for the development and take into consideration their needs and predicted waste generation;

·    Waste storage facilities incorporate adequate recycling facilities;

·    Waste storage and collection facilities are designed to minimise nuisance and protect amenity; and

·    New developments are integrated with Council’s waste collection service, which allows sufficient space for a waste collection vehicle to service the waste bins and safely manoeuvre on-site.

 

Amendments to the Controls

 

New developments need to implement waste management systems, which are integrated with Council’s standard waste collection service and also promote environmental protection and public health.

 

The proposed amendments seek to amend Section C5: Waste Management through broadening the objectives relating to waste management and introduce a number of new controls for medium and high-density developments (see Appendix 1).

 

The objectives and additional controls seek to ensure new developments are designed in an ecological sustainable manner and protect both the environment and public health. The proposed amendment achieves the above through introducing new controls which:

 

·    Ensure new developments incorporate suitable provisions for the storage and servicing of solid waste, which is both appropriate and adequate to the type and volume generated;

·    Ensure new developments are able to store waste that does not result in adverse impacts including the creation of nuisances for the occupants of the development or adjoining properties; and

·    Ensure new developments can be serviced in a manner to minimise risk and can be safely collected without disrupting traffic.

 

The proposed amendments will:

 

·    Clearly outline the requirements for waste management for the operational stage of the development; and

·    Detail the specific development application requirements to assist in streamlining the assessment process.

 

New Waste Objectives

 

Council Officers are regularly providing comment and conditions consistent across medium and high density developments on issues such as storage and collection infrastructure, vehicle access and turning requirements, bin storage areas, chute systems, bin provision per floor/storey, off-street bulky waste storage, collection rooms, internal pavement construction, washing and drainage requirements, and bin presentation plans.  However, such comments are often not viewed favourably as they are post design, prescriptive and costings have been completed resulting in poor or little compliance.

 

The new objectives proposed for inclusion into the Penrith Development Control Plan 2014 have been provided below:

 

1.   To ensure new developments are designed to maximise resource recovery through measures and features that promote waste avoidance, source separation and recycling.

2.   To ensure new developments incorporate waste storage and waste collection areas that are accessible, safe and convenient for both occupants and service providers.

3.   To promote measures which ensure all waste streams are stored and handled appropriately to minimise adverse environmental, health and amenity impacts. To minimise risk to health and safety for all associated with waste collection and handling.

4.   To reduce illegal dumping through providing well designed and appropriate bulky waste storage areas within the development.

5.   To ensure new developments can be serviced efficiently and effectively by Council’s standard waste service.

 


 

Community Consultation

 

Community consultation will be carried out as a part of the Public Exhibition of Penrith Development Control Plan 2014 in accordance with the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979.The proposed amendments will not affect existing residents, but will assist in ensuring future developments provide appropriate waste management practices to protect local amenity.

 

Council Officers are currently communicating with relevant development industry stakeholders through a number of mechanisms. Council will continue to maintain a high level of communication with relevant industry groups.

 

Conclusion

 

Waste Management Controls assist Council in ensuring that waste minimisation and management is planned and undertaken for new developments during the demolition, construction and operational stages.

 

The management of waste that will be generated by significant development precincts should be recognised as an essential consideration in the assessment process. Too often the management of waste from new developments is given little consideration when the critical initial planning and design decisions are made. This leads to not only delays in the development assessment process but broader problems that over time add to the cost of waste and recovery management services for Council and negatively affect community amenity.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Multi-Unit Developments - Penrith Development Control Plan be received.

2.    Penrith Development Control Plan 2014 be amended in accordance with the changes described in this report and detailed in Appendix 1.

3.    Draft Penrith Development Control Plan 2014 be publicly exhibited, in accordance with the relevant provisions of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act, 1979 and associated Regulations.

4.    The General Manager be delegated authority to make any necessary minor changes to the Development Control Plan 2014 in accordance with Council’s adopted policy position regarding this matter before Public Exhibition.

5.    A further report be presented to Council following the Public Exhibition.

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.  

Amendment to the current Penrith Development Control Plan 2014

4 Pages

Appendix

  


Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                            9 November 2015

Appendix 1 - Amendment to the current Penrith Development Control Plan 2014

 

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Outcome 6 - We're healthy and share strong community spirit

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


Outcome 7 - We have confidence in our Council

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

4        Annual Report                                                                                                                   33

 

5        Penrith Whitewater Stadium - Annual Report and Board of Directors                            35

 

 

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                              9 November 2015

 

 

 

4

Annual Report   

 

Compiled by:               Fiona Plesman, Organisational Performance & Development Manager

Authorised by:            Vicki O’Kelly, Executive Manager - Corporate  

 

Outcome

We have confidence in our Council

Strategy

Provide opportunities for our community to participate in making decisions about the City's future

Service Activity

Manage Council's corporate planning and engagement program

      

 

Executive Summary

Under the Local Government Act (1993) Council must produce an Annual Report each year and submit it to the Office of Local Government by 30th November. The report must focus on  performance in implementing the adopted Delivery Program and Operational Plan, but also include a range of other information as specified in the Local Government Act and Regulations, as well as other legislation.

 

Content for the Annual Report has been drawn from the Delivery Program Progress Reports, and supplemented with additional information sought from management and staff in order to meet our legislative reporting requirements.

 

The 2014-2015 draft Annual Report is attached for Council’s consideration.

The 2014-2015 Annual Report

2015 marks the 200 years since the first Government building opened in Penrith. In this our bicentenary year the Annual Report includes a number of historical images alongside recent photographs to show how much the City has grown and changed.  All of the historical images were sourced from the Penrith in Pictures collection held by the Penrith Library, which includes more than 30,000 photographs capturing the local area from the mid-19th Century.

 

The Annual Report focuses on what we have achieved in implementing our Delivery Program and Operational Plan from July 2014 to June 2015 and includes highlights, challenges, information about the Penrith local government area and information on a number of other statutory matters including the full Financial Statements for the reporting period.

 

The format and content of the Annual Report has been built on feedback from the Australasian Reporting Awards (ARA) and internal stakeholders.

 

This year’s Annual Report aims to be a comprehensive and visual representation of Council’s activities, services and achievements.

 

Conclusion

 

The Annual Report is an opportunity to share with the community the things we have achieved, the challenges we have faced and how we have operated as an organisation.  The Annual Report is made available via our website and a short two page document will be provided as a summary of the key highlights and messages from the Annual Report.  The summary document will be made available via websites, libraries, community centres and child care centres.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the information contained in the report on Annual Report be received.

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.  

Draft Annual Report 2014-15

160 Pages

Attachments Included

  


Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                              9 November 2015

 

 

 

5

Penrith Whitewater Stadium - Annual Report and Board of Directors   

 

Compiled by:               Adam Beggs, Governance Officer

Authorised by:            Glenn Schuil, Senior Governance Officer  

 

Outcome

We have confidence in our Council

Strategy

Demonstrate transparency and ethical behaviour

Service Activity

Ensure that the organisation promotes ethical behaviour, risk management, transparent decision making and meets contemporary governance standards

      

 

Executive Summary

Each year, following the Annual General Meeting of the Company, a report is presented to the Council on the year’s activities of the Penrith Whitewater Stadium (PWS), including the financial performance.

 

The reports from both the Chairman and the Stadium Manager highlight the major activities of the Stadium over the last year. The venue has continued throughout the year to attract professional athletes, sporting championships and casual users, the participation rates in each activity are detailed in the report.

Annual Report

The Seventeenth Annual General Meeting of the Company was held on 17 September 2015 for the period ended 30 June 2015.

 

The Chairman of the Board and Stadium Manager will be in attendance tonight to make a short presentation which will focus on:

 

·    The Past year – highlights, financial position and issues arising; and

·    The Year ahead.

 

Following are their reports that have been extracted from the Annual Report of Penrith Whitewater Stadium Limited (PWS).

 

Chairman’s Report

 

It gives me much pleasure to present the Chairman’s Report to the Seventeenth Annual General Meeting of Penrith Whitewater Stadium Limited.

Patronage for whitewater rafting and canoeing based activities remains healthy,  despite the overall poor economic conditions. Revenue for the year was $1,341,783 which is 18% less than $1,629,377 for 2014. The financial outcome for the year ended 30 June 2015 resulted in a loss before depreciation, amortisation and interest of $67,460, an decrease of 150% when compared to the surplus achieved in 2014 of $133,806.  During the year some $34,135 was spent on capital improvements. 

 

The Stadium continues to contribute to the overall Penrith economy and to the advancement of the sport of canoe slalom both locally and internationally. It is pleasing to note the continuing national and international success of paddlers based in Penrith, particularly Jessica Fox.

 

Penrith Whitewater Stadium continues to generate a great deal of publicity both nationally and internationally, adding to its reputation as one of the world’s premier sporting facilities. Again the venue has successfully hosted both international and local competitions and has continued to attract a significant number of athletes who see the Stadium as their preferred off-season training venue.

 

I would like to take this opportunity to thank Venue Manager, Jack Hodge and his management team (Simonetta, Jeff, and Vicki) for leading the organization throughout the year.  Penrith Whitewater staff continues to show great dedication and commitment to the business. The underlying enthusiasm and commitment of staff is fundamental to the venue’s continuing success.

 

I would also like to thank my fellow directors for their continuing commitment and input to the operations of Penrith Whitewater Stadium.  This year sees the reappointment of Helen Brownlee, Andrew Pearce, Councillor Jim Aitken OAM and Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM.

 

Finally, I would like to take the opportunity to congratulate the members of the Australian Canoe Slalom Team and coaches on their results throughout the year.

 

Stadium Manager’s Report

 

Overall participation in the activities offered by PWS decreased in 2014-15.  Rafting decreased by 11%. Canoe/Kayak decreased by 58% due to the number of large competitions last year, particularly the Junior and U23 Canoe Slalom World Championships.  Swiftwater Rescue courses increased by 5%.

 

Whitewater rafting remains the most popular activity and the highest revenue earner for PWS.  Rafting participation decreased from 11,192 to 9,914.  Total revenue for rafting decreased by 14% from $925,340 to $794,176.

 

Total PWS income decreased by 6% from $1,629,377 in 2013-14 to $1,339,199 in 2014-15.  Total expenses decreased by 8% from $1,625,260 to $1,531,682 resulting in a decrease in operating profit from $4,118 to -$192,483.  Net loss increased from -$44,691 to -$229,736, as a direct result of decreased revenue, this was mitigated by decreased expenses in the year. 

 

PWS maintained its strong support for the sport of canoeing throughout the year.  The venue hosted the Australian Open and NSW Slalom Championships.  PWS facilitated over 370 hours of slalom training and competitions for Australian and International paddlers.  This included 169 hours for the Australian team as part of the Canoe Slalom National Centre of Excellence (NCE) Agreement between PWS, the Australian Institute of Sport (AIS), the New South Wales Institute of Sport (NSWIS) and Australian Canoeing.  The value of PWS’s contribution to the agreement was approximately $78,000.

 

PWS continued its support of various charitable and community organisations.  This included hosting the annual Rotary Club Duck race and the donation of 356 gift certificates to the value of $33,464.

 

Thanks to all PWS staff for their assistance during the year.  Thanks also to the PWS Board of Directors for their ongoing dedication and support. The successful operation of PWS relies upon the support of the general public and a network of companies and organisations.  PWS would like to thank the general public, suppliers, venue stakeholders and neighbouring organisations for their support and looks forward to working together more closely in the future to maximise the ongoing success of PWS and Penrith Lakes.

 

Board of Directors

 

The Constitution of the Company provides, in part, that:

 

1.   To provide continuity the members of the Board shall resign on a rotating basis. At the First Annual General Meeting, three (3) Directors (including one (1) Councillor) shall resign. At the Second Annual General Meeting, three (3) members shall resign (including one (1) Councillor). Thereafter, the members of the Board, except the Council Officer, shall resign after they have served on the Board for three (3) years after appointment or re-appointment to the Board.        

2.   All retiring Directors shall be eligible for re-appointment.

 

Council should note that the positions of Chairman, Deputy Chairman and Company Secretary were declared vacant. Elections were held for the vacant positions at the seventeenth Annual General Meeting.

 

Councillor Ross Fowler OAM was re-appointed to the position of Chairman, Helen Brownlee OAM was re-appointed to the position of Deputy Chair and the Council’s Executive Manager City Assets, Mr David Burns was re-appointed to be the Council’s General Manager’s representative and Company Secretary on the Board.

 

It was resolved that Penrith City Council be requested to endorse the reappointment of Councillor Ross Fowler OAM, Patrick Sheehy AM and Councillor Marcus Cornish as continuing Directors of Penrith Whitewater Stadium Ltd.

 

Business Support Accountant

 

Penrith Whitewater Stadium Limited reported a net deficit for the 2014-15 financial year of $229,735. This resulted in an increased loss of $185,044 from their 2013-14 deficit of $44,691, or 414.05%. No direct subsidy was provided by Council to the Company.

 

Income in 2014-15 decreased by $288,136 from 2013-14, a decrease of 17.66%. Expenditure in 2014-15 decreased by $104,092 from 2013-14, a decrease of 6.19%.  The main expenditure lines affected were, advertising with an increase of $134,014 [165.36%], electricity with a decrease of $157,428 [39.87%], and insurance with a decrease of $51,794 [49.62%].

 

The overall increase net deficit for the financial year was due to a decrease in income ($288,136).  This was mitigated by a decrease in expenditure ($104,092).

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Penrith Whitewater Stadium - Annual Report and Board of Directors be received.

2.    Council agree to underwrite the operation of the Penrith Whitewater Stadium Limited until the presentation to Council of the Penrith Whitewater Stadium Limited Annual Report for 2015-16.

3.    Council note and support the appointment and re-appointment of the persons named in the report to the Board of Directors of Penrith Whitewater Stadium Ltd. 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.  


 

ATTACHMENTS  

 

 

Date of Meeting:     Monday 9 November 2015

Report Title:            Annual Report

Attachments:           Draft Annual Report 2014-15



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                            9 November 2015

Attachment 1 - Draft Annual Report 2014-15

 

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