Council_Mark_POS_RGB

5 July 2017

 

Dear Councillor,

In pursuance of the provisions of the Local Government Act, 1993 and the Regulations thereunder, notice is hereby given that a POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING of Penrith City Council is to be held in the Passadena Room, Civic Centre, 601 High Street, Penrith on Monday 10 July 2017 at 7:00PM.

Attention is directed to the statement accompanying this notice of the business proposed to be transacted at the meeting.

Yours faithfully

 

 

Alan Stoneham

General Manager

 

BUSINESS

 

1.           LEAVE OF ABSENCE

 

2.           APOLOGIES

 

3.           CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES

Policy Review Committee Meeting - 8 May 2017.

 

4.           DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

Pecuniary Interest (The Act requires Councillors who declare a pecuniary interest in an item to leave the meeting during discussion of that item)

Non-Pecuniary Conflict of Interest – Significant and Less than Significant (The Code of Conduct requires Councillors who declare a significant non-pecuniary conflict of interest in an item to leave the meeting during discussion of that item)

 

5.           ADDRESSING THE MEETING

 

6.           MAYORAL MINUTES

 

7.           NOTICES OF MOTION TO RESCIND A RESOLUTION

 

8.           NOTICES OF MOTION

 

9.           DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

10.         REQUESTS FOR REPORTS AND MEMORANDUMS

 

11.         URGENT BUSINESS

 

12.         CONFIDENTIAL BUSINESS


POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING

 

Monday 10 July 2017

 

table of contents

 

 

 

 

 

 

meeting calendar

 

 

confirmation of minutes

 

 

DELIVERY program reports

 


Council_Mark_POS_RGB2017 MEETING CALENDAR

January 2017 - December 2017

(Adopted by Council - 28 November 2016 and Amended April 2017)

 

 

 

TIME

JAN

FEB

MAR

APRIL

MAY

JUNE

JULY

AUG

SEPT

OCT

NOV

DEC

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

 

Ordinary Council Meeting

7.30pm

 

6

 

 

1v

 

 

 

 

4

 

 

 

18

(7.00pm)

 

27@

27

10

22#

26*

24

28@

25^ü

(7.00pm)

23

27#+

 

Policy Review Committee

7.00pm

 

13

13

 

8

 

10

14

11

9

 

11

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

13

 

 

 v

Meeting at which the draft corporate planning documents (Delivery Program and Operational Plan) are endorsed for exhibition

 *

Meeting at which the draft corporate planning documents (Delivery Program and Operational Plan) are adopted

 #

Meetings at which the Operational Plan quarterly reviews (March and September) are presented

 @

Meetings at which the Delivery Program progress reports (including the Operational Plan quarterly reviews for December and June) are presented

 ^

Election of Mayor/Deputy Mayor

 ü

Meeting at which the 2016-2017 Annual Statements are presented

 

Meeting at which any comments on the 2016-2017 Annual Statements are presented

 +

Meeting at which the Annual Report is presented

-            Extraordinary Meetings are held as required.

-            Members of the public are invited to observe meetings of the Council (Ordinary and Policy Review Committee).

Should you wish to address Council, please contact Governance Coordinator, Adam Beggs.

 


UNCONFIRMED MINUTES

 OF THE POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING OF PENRITH CITY COUNCIL HELD IN THE PASSADENA ROOM, PENRITH

ON MONDAY 8 MAY 2017 AT 7:00PM

PRESENT

His Worship the Mayor, Councillor John Thain, Deputy Mayor, Councillor Tricia Hitchen, and Councillors Jim Aitken OAM, Bernard Bratusa, Todd Carney, Marcus Cornish, Kevin Crameri OAM, Greg Davies, Mark Davies, Aaron Duke, Ross Fowler OAM, Karen McKeown, Kath Presdee and Ben Price.

 

 

APOLOGIES

PRC18  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM seconded Councillor Marcus Cornish that an apology be accepted for Councillor Joshua Hoole.

 

 

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES - Policy Review Committee Meeting - 13 March 2017

PRC19  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Aaron Duke seconded Councillor Todd Carney that the minutes of the Policy Review Committee Meeting of 13 March 2017 be confirmed.

 

 

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

 

There were no declarations of interest.

 

 

DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Outcome 7 - We have confidence in our Council

 

1        Draft Policy on the Payment of Expenses and Provision of Facilities to Mayor, Deputy Mayor and Councillors                                                                                        

PRC20  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Marcus Cornish

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Draft Policy on the Payment of Expenses and Provision of Facilities to Mayor, Deputy Mayor and Councillors be received

2.    Council advertise for 28 days a public notice of its intention to adopt the amended Policy on the Payment of Expenses and Provision of Facilities to Mayor, Deputy Mayor and Councillors.

3.    A further report be presented to an ordinary meeting of Council at the conclusion of the exhibition period.

 


 

 

2        Draft Audit, Risk and Improvement Committee Charter                                               

PRC21  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Tricia  Hitchen seconded Councillor Kath Presdee

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Draft Audit, Risk and Improvement Committee Charter be received.

2.    The Audit Committee be renamed the Audit, Risk and Improvement Committee.

3.    The Draft Audit, Risk and Improvement Committee Charter be adopted.

 

 

REQUESTS FOR REPORTS AND MEMORANDUMS

 

RR 1           Fire Safety Levy         

Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM requested that the report to Council on the Fire Safety Levy include commentary on the impact of the fire safety levy on rural properties compared to residential properties.

 

RR 2           Jane Street Car Park 

Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM requested a memo reply to all Councillors outlining the closures to the Jane Street Carpark.

 

 

There being no further business the Chairperson declared the meeting closed the time being 7:13pm.

 

    


DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

  

Outcome 4 - We have safe, vibrant places

 

1        High St, Linear Plaza Concept Amendment                                                                      1

 

Outcome 6 - We're healthy and share strong community spirit

 

2        Mobile Local Food and Homelessness Support Services Policy                                      9

 

Outcome 7 - We have confidence in our Council

 

3        Redundant Policies                                                                                                          21

 

 


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


 

 

Outcome 1 - We can work close to home

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


 

 

Outcome 2 - We plan for our future growth

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


 

 

Outcome 3 - We can get around the City

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


Outcome 4 - We have safe, vibrant places

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

1        High St, Linear Plaza Concept Amendment                                                                      1

 

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                       10 July 2017

 

 

 

1

High St, Linear Plaza Concept Amendment   

 

Compiled by:               Jeni Pollard, Place Manager

Michael Jackson, City Assets Transition Manager

Authorised by:            Brian Steffen, Executive Manager - City Assets  

 

Outcome

We have safe, vibrant places

Strategy

Grow and revitalise our centres and neighbourhoods

Service Activity

Manage the development of master plans and designs for Council's assets and public domain

 

Previous Items:           2- High St, Linear Park concept amendment- Policy Review Committee- 08 Aug 2016 7:00PM    

 

Executive Summary

The purpose of this report is to adopt an amendment to the Linear Plaza design concept in the Penrith City Centre Public Domain Masterplan for the city centre, so as to prepare for its implementation as part of the upgrade works scheduled for construction commencement in early 2018.

Background

The Penrith City Centre Public Domain Masterplan, adopted by Council in 2013 was the result of an extensive consultation process and established planned public domain upgrade works for the city core.  One of the proposed upgrades was the construction of a Linear Plaza on the southern side of High Street, between the two pedestrian crossings.

 

The Public Domain Masterplan shows the Linear Plaza concept as an idealistic intervention contributing to the liveability of the city centre. It is a public space enhancement with an emphasis on outdoor dining opportunities, public seating and place making outcomes.

 

The concept involves an extension of the kerb and paving into the parking lane on the south side of the street, between the pedestrian crossings. The original endorsed proposal saw the transfer of ten (10) parking spaces to the public domain and community for dining, socialisation, placemaking and amenity.

 

Whilst supportive of the 2013 concept, the Penrith Valley Chamber of Commerce and the Penrith CBD Corporation subsequently raised concerns over the feasibility of tenancies in that location to be able to convert or upgrade to commercial kitchens and therefore bringing into question the potential increase of dining activity.

 

Taking this into consideration, an amendment was proposed that focused the curb extensions around the existing pedestrian crossings, extending them to suit the nature of the surrounding tenancies. Whilst this solution resulted in a return of some car parking, one of the property owners was concerned that the shift from the original proposal would result in the loss of placemaking outcomes for the city centre.  Council took these concerns on board and asked for further discussions to take place with the business and property owners.

 

Further engagement with the Penrith Valley Chamber of Commerce and the Penrith CBD Corporation and the concerned High Street property owner has occurred over a number of occasions and a peer review of the proposed changes has resulted in general concurrence and support for three sites reimagined as permanent kerb extensions. There was also support for place making at the location where The Broadwalk Arcade meets High St footpath, which can include seating not licenced for outdoor dining, and public art.

Concept

The proposal is for permanent kerb and granite paving extensions in three locations abutting the pedestrian crossing extensions to produce two generous zones for community use.  It is proposed that up to eight (8) existing car spaces be utilised for these kerb extensions, two (2) fewer than were previously proposed.

 

Through the use of permanent materials, it is considered the look and feel of the spaces will be more in keeping with the other footpath upgrade works in the street including granite paving, tree planting, timber seats, garden bed hedges, special lighting and public art. This design solution will also be more efficient in terms of maintenance resourcing.

 

Cafes and food tenancies have been consulted about the provision of dedicated outdoor dining licence spaces beyond the footpath and they are supportive of the proposal. By moving all dining furniture into the kerb extensions, there will be a return to a continuous shoreline along shopfronts, clear of obstructions for the vision impaired.

 

In keeping with the shelters provided for outdoor dining in Triangle Park, it is proposed to continue the same look and feel of that shelter through the kerb extensions in High Street, thus linking the two spaces through these key urban elements. Council will provide the shelters for tenancies with outdoor dining licences.

 

This report seeks endorsement for the above design principles and in particular the amended layout of the kerb extensions.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on High St, Linear Plaza Concept Amendment be received.

2.    The amended layout of curb extensions be adopted as the new format of the Linear Plaza, to progress to detailed design and implementation.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

Linear Plaza Concept Amendment

1 Page

Appendix

  


Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             10 July 2017

Appendix 1 - Linear Plaza Concept Amendment

 

PDF Creator


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


 

 

Outcome 5 - We care about our environment

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


Outcome 6 - We're healthy and share strong community spirit

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

2        Mobile Local Food and Homelessness Support Services Policy                                      9

 

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                       10 July 2017

 

 

 

2

Mobile Local Food and Homelessness Support Services Policy   

 

Compiled by:               Vesna Kapetanovic, Community Projects Officer 

Authorised by:            Erich Weller, Community and Cultural Development Manager  

 

Outcome

We are healthy and share strong community spirit

Strategy

Provide opportunities for our community to be healthy and active

Service Activity

Resource and implement social programs that contribute to community wellbeing

      

 

Executive Summary

There are a number of volunteer services providing basic support services such as free food, clothing and information and referral to people who are homeless and/or disadvantaged across the City. Some of these services are based in a building that is the main service delivery point.  Others operate as mobile services.  Council recognises that these organisations provide a valuable service to the community and in some instances Council provides public space for these organisations to utilise for service delivery. This policy applies to mobile services that operate on Council land, including carparks.

This report proposes a policy to support organisations that provide mobile free food, meals and other support services in a public place in line with an integrated service delivery approach that encourages collaborative and safe service delivery.  The policy also covers the management of issues around amenity and relationships with the broader community including surrounding businesses.

 

It is likely that over time an increasing number of these types of homelessness mobile support services will request to operate in the public domain in the City.  In the City of Sydney where the number of homeless people is much higher than in Penrith the number of mobile voluntary services increased from nine in 2007 to over 30 in 2013.

 

The report recommends that the information contained in the report on Mobile Local Food and Homelessness Support Services Policy be received and that Council endorse the Mobile Local Food and Homelessness Support Services Policy as attached to this report.

Background

Homelessness is a complex social issue that can be understood and defined in various ways.  The widely accepted cultural definition of homelessness includes people who do not have access to stable and conventional accommodation. People moving between temporary forms of shelter or refuges and people living in minimum standard accommodation without security of tenure are also considered within this understanding of homelessness.

Homelessness is caused by a range of circumstances that have a devastating social and economic impact on individuals, families and communities. Homelessness often isolates people from the family and friends that could ordinarily provide support. People who are homeless are often excluded from the social, recreational, cultural and economic life of our communities and often have limited access to the mainstream support services they require.

 

Council has been proactive in responding to the challenge of addressing local homelessness and together with a range of other services is involved in a number of strategies to provide support to people who are homeless. In 2011 Council endorsed the Protocol for Service Delivery to People Experiencing Homelessness to ensure that Council officers are supported in responding to and working with homeless people through an agreed process for customer service.  Training on the Homelessness Protocol has been provided for a range of Council services including Library Services, Public Domain, Customer Services, and Rangers to ensure that Council officers are able to implement the policy. The Protocol Policy covers a range of issues that Council officers may encounter such as when belongings of a homeless person are found in a local park when work is taking place or when homeless people use Council facilities such as the Library to take shelter and get relief from harsh weather conditions.

 

Council also facilitated a successful Homelessness Summit in September 2014 that was action oriented in its approach to identifying issues regarding homelessness and has developed collaborative solutions to these challenges through an endorsed action plan that is currently being implemented. Council endorsed the Penrith Homelessness Summit Action Plan at the Ordinary Meeting on 24 November 2014.

The homelessness service system is comprised of diverse organisations, both funded and voluntary, that meet a wide range of needs through different models of service delivery that can be accessed in various settings. Council is committed to encouraging collaboration between services to assist the development of a well-connected and robust service system that has capacity to address the complex issues people who are homeless may experience.

Volunteer services undertake an important role in providing ongoing and flexible support to homeless people. These services include the provision of hot and/or portable meals, food hampers, clothing and information and referral. Local free meal and support services are often the first point of engagement for people requiring assistance and these services can facilitate effective referral pathways to a range of accommodation, health and other support services that people may require.

A number of the mobile food and related support services operating in the City also participate in the Penrith Homelessness Interagency which meets quarterly and provides opportunities for collaboration, coordination and joint initiatives. The Penrith Homelessness Interagency is convened by Council and is implemented as part of the Penrith Homelessness Summit Action Plan.

 

Council has also coordinated a number of Homelessness Hubs which has provided a one stop shop for a range of services to connect with homeless people or people at risk of homelessness and identify accommodation solutions or other needed support services.

 

Council officers believe the homelessness service sector has been very proactive in increasing awareness with our residents and the business community of the challenges in ending homelessness in our City through a range of press releases and stories of compassion.  This is evidenced by the significant business support provided to a number of these voluntary services.  The Wentworth Community Housing’s Heading Home – Ending Homelessness Here has also generated significant community support.

Mobile Free Meal and Support Services for Homeless People

There are four mobile services operating across Penrith that are managed by volunteer groups or associations that provide regular hot and/or portable meals, food hampers, clothing and information and referral. These services operate within the broader homeless service system, alongside government funded Specialist Homelessness Services (SHS) and other mainstream services and have an important role in providing outreach support to homeless people.

It is important to acknowledge that mobile free meal and support services complement the government funded service sector as they are not bound by government funding contracts, are often able to respond to community issues in more flexible ways, and in some cases these services are available after business hours and on weekends. Furthermore, these services also provide marginalised and vulnerable people with regular social contact and companionship in addition to providing daily sustenance.

There are several free mobile meal services based within Penrith City Centre locations such as Judges Carpark which accommodates the Christ Mission Possible (CMP) breakfast service 3 x mornings per week, the One Voice mobile shower service 2 x mornings per week and 1 x evening per week and Mama Lana’s Community Foundation evening meal service 6 x nights per week. Paying it Forward Homelessness Services also provide free meals and basic support each Sunday evening in Jamison Park. There are also free mobile meal services operating in Kingswood and other Penrith City locations that occur semi-regularly either once a week or twice per month.

The Penrith Community Kitchen operates in the Penrith PCYC facility on Station Street and is open for lunch five days per week. As this service operates in the PCYC facility, this policy does not apply to this service.

Council recognises the contribution provided by volunteer services in addressing homelessness and social disadvantage across Penrith and consequently makes available public space such as Judges Carpark which are necessary for a range of free meal and support services to operate in.  Alongside the provision of space, Council officers also provide support to these services with information and assistance to strengthen service capacity and maximise the opportunities for homeless people to access pathways out of homelessness.  Council also provides additional cleaning services in Judges Carpark to minimise the impact of the service delivery in that location.

 

Current context

The availability of free meal services across a regular and frequent time schedule is a relatively new occurrence for Penrith. The emergence of several local services over the recent past has ensured that homeless and/or disadvantaged people are able to readily access meals in addition to obtaining fresh food for their own preparation of meals if appropriate.

Council requests that organisations utilising Council public space (including carparks) for their service complete a hold harmless agreement prior to commencing operation in these spaces. This process is important for Council as it provides an outline of the type of service delivered, service frequency and operating hours and location. The Hold Harmless agreement stipulates that all groups submit a certificate of currency for public liability insurance to Council and are aware of basic procedures for emergencies.

Some of these groups are comparatively new to the service system and have required additional support regarding information and referral processes for clients experiencing complex issues. A specialised training package on the service system has been developed and delivered by Council officers to these organisations and their volunteers to outline the current service system and optimise effective referral processes. It is important to note the unique role free meal and support services can take on as the first point of contact for people who are homeless or at risk of homelessness and that effective referral may lead to pathways that enable people to exit homelessness and find accommodation. 

The majority of these services operate within the Penrith City Centre thus creating a concentration of services operating within a relatively small geographic space. This is not unusual and occurs in other Local Government Areas such as City of Sydney and City of Parramatta. There is also a potential for duplication of services being delivered at the same time in Council owned space in Penrith and surrounding areas.  Conversely, areas such as St Marys Town Centre and surrounds remain under serviced with very few street based food and basic support programs being provided in this area.

It has also been observed that on occasion people accessing the free meal services do not always exit the service space after the service concludes. This presents a challenging issue as homeless people do not have accommodation or other support networks that that they can rely on which can cause some tension with community and businesses also utilising this space for other purposes such as car parking.

Recent visits by Council officers to these services indicate that there are up to 30 - 40 individuals using these free meal services on each occasion of service in the Judges Carpark.  Both males and females attend, as well as people of different ages.  Council officers have not observed any children attending these services. It is estimated that approximately 10% of the people that use these services regularly are homeless.  The other attendees may be at risk of homelessness or are disadvantaged residents experiencing significant challenges in meeting the costs of daily living including food.

Council officers are regularly contacted by community members including local businesses regarding situations of homelessness and they are informed of Council’s role in working with services to identify suitable accommodation options. In line with Council’s Protocol for Service Delivery to Homeless People, the response of Council officers has been to coordinate outreach service (delivered by NSW Government funded homelessness specialist services) to spaces where homeless people are staying to resolve their homelessness. The NSW Police operate within a similar protocol where homeless people unless causing harm to themselves or others are left without interference in public space. The most sustainable response to homelessness is for people to find safe and long term accommodation.  Council rangers also have no power to move homeless people from public space.  Where there is a risk to public safety from the belongings of a homeless person, a Council ranger can move these to a safe location leaving a note informing the person where the belongings can be collected.

There have been a number of examples over the past few years where Council officers have worked with local NSW Government funded Specialist Homelessness Services (Wentworth Community Housing, Platform Youth Accommodation Services, Mission Australia Family Accommodation Service and WestConnect Domestic Violence Services) to identify and provide suitable accommodation for homeless people temporarily staying in public spaces such as Council and Transport NSW carparks, parks as well as privately owned spaces. This specialised response does require dedicated staff resources to coordinate an outreach response to homeless people and on several occasions an interagency response has been implemented to resolve challenging cases.

Council is a key partner to the Wentworth Community Housing ‘Heading Home’ Campaign and Mayor John Thain and Councillor Karen McKeown are ambassadors for this multi-faceted campaign that is increasing community understanding of homelessness and working with a range of stakeholders to increase accommodation options for people who are homeless. Council coordinated the Penrith Headquarters for the Registry Week Vulnerability Index survey that took place with homeless people across the Nepean region in November 2016. It is positive to note that 15 (7 adult individuals, 4 families and 4 young people) of the people surveyed have been housed since the campaign launched in August 2016.

 

It is likely there will be an increase in cases of homelessness as Penrith City and the City Centre in particular continue to develop and the population grows. A major challenge is the lack of affordable housing options for homeless people or people at risk of homelessness. A structured framework for integrated service delivery will contribute to enhanced service delivery and effective referral processes to support people who are homeless achieve change in their life circumstances including maintaining suitable accommodation.

Proposed policy

It is timely that a structured policy be developed in supporting organisations that provide free food, meals and other support services to homeless people in public places.

The framework for the proposed policy is structured upon compulsory requirements and discretionary elements as outlined below

It is proposed that an integrated service delivery approach be continued and emphasised to further encourage collaborative and safe service delivery in addition to managing issues around amenity and relationships with the local community.

Integrated service delivery refers to a number of service agencies working together to collaborate and coordinate their support, services and interventions to clients. The focus is generally on clients, or client target groups, who have complex needs that require services from a number of agencies. Some efforts may be one-off, but more typically, there will be a system developed such as an interagency that enables agencies to connect, communicate and possibly streamline processes, to provide ongoing coordination.

 

This approach will continue to strengthen the current linkages between funded and voluntary organisations, enhance the service system and enable individual services to more effectively assist clients to exit homelessness.

 

An anticipated outcome of this proposed policy is also to encourage organisations to participate in service planning for the whole of the Penrith LGA where services and resources are distributed more broadly rather than concentrated in a fairly small area. This may involve services adjusting and changing their service location at certain times and/or reducing their current schedule.

 

Compulsory requirements

Services are required to submit the following documentation to secure approval to operate in Council owned public space including Council carparks:

 

·    Hold Harmless Agreement which includes service delivery information such as location, frequency of service delivery, organisational contact details and what the service delivery entails alongside a copy of the organisational Certificate of Currency for public liability insurance. The Hold Harmless Agreement will also outline food safety principles and practices and relevant resources will be made available to the mobile services. 

·    A brief outline developed in collaboration with Council detailing how services will manage litter and excess food wastage which will assist in managing a range of public health and community concerns. This will reduce the negative effects of litter in public space.

 

·    Risk management plans that include defined organisational policies and procedures to meet the varied issues that can arise through outreach service delivery in a public space.  This would include policies and procedures for volunteers in how to respond to emergencies and working with people with complex needs.

 

 

 

Discretionary elements

Council officers will encourage free meal and support services to submit the following information that demonstrates their commitment to work within this policy to strengthen both their organisational capacity and service delivery to people who are homeless.

 

·    Mobile free meal and support services will be asked to indicate their willingness to participate in training coordinated and/or delivered by Council to ensure their volunteers feel competent in responding to a range of issues that can present in service delivery.  This would include improving referral processes and managing difficult behaviours. Council can assist these organisations with the provision of training and is able to work with them to develop and deliver appropriate training packages suitable for the specific organisation.

 

·    Organisations also need to consider the impact of their service delivery on the business sector and there will be opportunity for them to outline how they will minimise any impact from anti-social behaviour on community and businesses as part of their regular procedures.

 

·    Organisations operating a mobile service in a Council owned space will be requested to indicate their willingness to deliver their service as part of an integrated service delivery approach to strengthen both their organisational capacity and service delivery to people who are homeless. 

 

Consultation on the Policy

 

Council has consulted with the mobile free meal and support services operating in Penrith in the development of this policy. Some of the areas of focus in the policy have been identified and raised by these services who also recognise the value of a strengthened service system that can better assist people to exit homelessness.  Council officers are of the view that the existing mobile services would with minor improvements meet the objectives of the policy.

 

Discussion has also taken place with the Penrith City Centre Corporation who were able to provide advice from the perspective of local businesses that operate in adjacent space to the free meal and support services in Judges Carpark.

 

Council officers have also consulted with the City of Sydney Homelessness Unit who provided information and advice on the development of their Mobile Free Food Services Policy and accompanying Accord.

 

Implementation

 

Council’s Community and Cultural Development Service would lead and coordinate the implementation of the proposed policy as part of its broader engagement with the homelessness service system.  The involvement of other Council departments is however critical to success and Community Safety, Public Domain and Amenity, City Works, the Rangers, Place Management and Environmental Health have all contributed to aspects of the policy.

 

The implementation of this policy will require increased liaison between Council and the free mobile food and related support services to enable effective implementation of the policy.  

 

The Penrith Homelessness Interagency will continue to provide an effective forum for services to develop partnerships and identify opportunities to work collaboratively with a range of services. A wide range of organisations attend the interagency and there are structured opportunities for networking and sharing information on current issues, changes to policies and programs, professional development and systemic advocacy.

 

Additional in-kind resourcing will be provided by Council’s Community and Cultural Development service to manage the policy. This includes identifying and facilitating linkages to funded organisations that have the capacity to attend mobile free meal services and support homeless people, developing and delivering specialised training and monitor the success of the policy with various stakeholders across the community.

 

Evaluation

It is intended that the policy be evaluated after the first 12 months of implementation to assess the effectiveness of the policy and the impact and outcomes the policy has contributed to in the homelessness service sector.

 

The evaluation process will be undertaken with the mobile free food and related support services in addition to key Council service areas to inform any areas of the policy that require refinement to the currently outlined compulsory and discretionary elements.

 

Summary

 

Council is committed to preventing homelessness in the community and has developed an enhanced policy that strengthens the capacity of volunteer organisations to provide outreach mobile services to people who are homeless and/or disadvantaged to create improved access to pathways out of homelessness.

This policy maintains a balanced perspective on the use of public space and addresses a number of challenges raised by stakeholders. This includes the concerns of general community members and local businesses.

 

The policy is comprised of compulsory and discretionary elements that encourage integrated service delivery and strengthen the organisational capacity of mobile free meal support services to meet the various challenges that arise in service delivery.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.      The information contained in the report on Mobile Local Food and Homelessness Support Services Policy be received.

2.      Council endorse the Mobile Local Food and Homelessness Support Services Policy as attached to this report.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

Mobile Local Food and Homelessness Support Services Policy

3 Pages

Appendix

  


Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                                    10 July 2017

Appendix 1 - Mobile Local Food and Homelessness Support Services Policy

 

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Outcome 7 - We have confidence in our Council

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

3        Redundant Policies                                                                                                          21

 

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                       10 July 2017

 

 

 

3

Redundant Policies    

 

Compiled by:               Madison Foster, Administration Officer 

Authorised by:            Adam Beggs, Governance Coordinator  

 

Outcome

We have confidence in our Council

Strategy

Demonstrate transparency and ethical behaviour

Service Activity

Ensure that the organisation promotes ethical behaviour, risk management, transparent decision making and meets contemporary governance standards

      

 

Executive Summary

This report seeks the approval from the Policy Review Committee to remove the below policies that are no longer relevant to the functions of Council from Council’s current policy register. The policies are attached to this report for information.

Background

The main purpose of a policy is to establish broad directions to guide an organisation’s decisions and activities. It establishes a framework to deal with the matter being addressed and encourages consistency in Council’s decisions and activities. Generally, policies are approved by the Council by way of report or in some occasions by the General Manager.

 

Over time policies become outdated and irrelevant to the functions of council. This then requires the Council to endorse outdated policies to be made redundant and be removed from Council’s current policy register.

 

Current Situation

The following policies have been identified by the relevant managers as no longer being required and are recommended for removal from the Council’s policy register.

Children’s Services

 

CS001 Provision of Child Care Centres

This policy was adopted in 1983 and is now redundant as it refers to the establishment of a child care centre within the Penrith Industrial Area which is no longer relevant.

CS002 Child Care Services

This policy was adopted in 1987 and outlined Council’s approach to the provision of facilities for child care services. The policy references Section 94 funds for the construction of child care services which no longer applies.
 

CS003 Child care Centres in Residential Areas

This policy was adopted in 1982 and provides appropriate guidelines relating to the provision of child care centres in residential areas. This policy is no longer relevant due to changes in legislation and implementation of the Children (Education and Care Services National Law Application) Act 2010 and the Education and Care Services National Regulations.

 



CS004 Registration of Child Care Centre Names

This policy was adopted in 1988 and refers to the registration of child care centre names for Council’s child care centres. Legislation in relation to this has changed and the policy is redundant. 

CS005 Funding of Before and After School Care Services

This policy was adopted in 1989 and outlined Council’s approach to the provision of newly funded community based before and after school care services.  The policy statement was that Council would provide an equipment grant for before and after school care programs that opened within the LGA with recurrent operational funding from other levels of government. The funding model for the provision of before and after school care programs has changed over time and this policy is no longer relevant.

 

Development Services

 

DS01 Erskine Park Quarry – Putrescible Waste

In July 1989 Council adopted a policy on ‘Erskine Park Quarry – Putrescible Waste.’ The purpose of the policy was to provide a statement of Council’s position that the concept of putrescible waste disposal at the Erskine Park Quarry be totally rejected. The responsible Department for the policy is Development Services.

 

The Erskine Park Quarry is no longer used for waste disposal and has been remediated. A current proposal for a Waste Transfer Station as a State Significant Development is currently before the Planning and Assessment Commission for determination.

 

Whilst this application involves putrescible waste, it does not involve disposal. This policy is therefore redundant and unnecessary and can be repealed.

 

Conclusion

The attached policies from Children Services and Development Services departments are recommended to the Policy Review Committee to be made redundant and removed from Council’s Policy Register.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Redundant Policies be received.

2.    The Children’s Services policies; CS001 Provision of Child Care Centres, CS002 Child Care Services, CS003 Child care Centres in Residential Areas, CS004 Registration of Child Care Centre Names and CS005 Funding of Before and After School Care Services be removed from Council’s current policy register.

3.    The Development Services policy, DS 001 Erskine Park Quarry - Putrescible Waste be removed from Council’s current policy register.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

CS 001 Provision of Child Care Centre

2 Pages

Attachments Included

2.

CS 002 Child Care Services

2 Pages

Attachments Included

3.

CS 003 Child Care Centres

3 Pages

Attachments Included

4.

CS 004 Child Care Services - Registration of Business Name

1 Page

Attachments Included

5.

CS 005 Before & After School Care Equipment Grants

1 Page

Attachments Included

6.

DS 001 Erskine Park Quarry - Putrescible Waste

1 Page

Attachments Included

   



 

ATTACHMENTS  

 

 

Date of Meeting:     Monday 10 July 2017

Report Title:            Redundant Policies

Attachments:           CS 001 Provision of Child Care Centre

                                CS 002 Child Care Services

                                CS 003 Child Care Centres

                                CS 004 Child Care Services - Registration of Business Name

                                CS 005 Before & After School Care Equipment Grants

                                DS 001 Erskine Park Quarry - Putrescible Waste



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                                    10 July 2017

Attachment 1 - CS 001 Provision of Child Care Centre

 

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Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                                    10 July 2017

Attachment 2 - CS 002 Child Care Services

 

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Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                                    10 July 2017

Attachment 3 - CS 003 Child Care Centres

 

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Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                                    10 July 2017

Attachment 4 - CS 004 Child Care Services - Registration of Business Name

 

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Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                                    10 July 2017

Attachment 5 - CS 005 Before & After School Care Equipment Grants

 

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Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                                    10 July 2017

Attachment 6 - DS 001 Erskine Park Quarry - Putrescible Waste

 

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