Council_Mark_POS_RGB

6 September 2017

 

Dear Councillor,

In pursuance of the provisions of the Local Government Act, 1993 and the Regulations thereunder, notice is hereby given that a POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING of Penrith City Council is to be held in the Passadena Room, Civic Centre, 601 High Street, Penrith on Monday 11 September 2017 at 7:00PM.

Attention is directed to the statement accompanying this notice of the business proposed to be transacted at the meeting.

Yours faithfully

 

 

Alan Stoneham

General Manager

 

BUSINESS

 

1.           LEAVE OF ABSENCE

Leave of absence has been granted to:

Councillor Ben  Price - 5 September 2017 to 12 September 2017 inclusive.

Councillor Jim Aitken OAM - 28 August 2017 to 11 September 2017 inclusive.

Councillor John Thain - 4 September 2017 to 11 September 2017 inclusive.

2.           APOLOGIES

3.           CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES

Policy Review Committee Meeting - 14 August 2017.

4.           DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

Pecuniary Interest (The Act requires Councillors who declare a pecuniary interest in an item to leave the meeting during discussion of that item)

Non-Pecuniary Conflict of Interest – Significant and Less than Significant (The Code of Conduct requires Councillors who declare a significant non-pecuniary conflict of interest in an item to leave the meeting during discussion of that item)

5.           ADDRESSING THE MEETING

6.           MAYORAL MINUTES

7.           NOTICES OF MOTION TO RESCIND A RESOLUTION

8.           NOTICES OF MOTION

9.           DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

10.         REQUESTS FOR REPORTS AND MEMORANDUMS

11.         URGENT BUSINESS

12.         CONFIDENTIAL BUSINESS


POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING

 

Monday 11 September 2017

 

table of contents

 

 

 

 

 

 

meeting calendar

 

 

confirmation of minutes

 

 

DELIVERY program reports

 


Council_Mark_POS_RGB2017 MEETING CALENDAR

January 2017 - December 2017

(Adopted by Council - 28 November 2016 and Amended April 2017)

 

 

 

TIME

JAN

FEB

MAR

APRIL

MAY

JUNE

JULY

AUG

SEPT

OCT

NOV

DEC

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

 

Ordinary Council Meeting

7.30pm

 

6

 

 

1v

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

18

(7.00pm)

 

27@

27

10

22#

26*

24

28@

25^ü

23

27#+

 

Policy Review Committee

7.00pm

 

13

13

 

8

 

10

14

11

9

 

11

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

13

 

 

 v

Meeting at which the draft corporate planning documents (Delivery Program and Operational Plan) are endorsed for exhibition

 *

Meeting at which the draft corporate planning documents (Delivery Program and Operational Plan) are adopted

 #

Meetings at which the Operational Plan quarterly reviews (March and September) are presented

 @

Meetings at which the Delivery Program progress reports (including the Operational Plan quarterly reviews for December and June) are presented

 ^

Election of Mayor/Deputy Mayor

 ü

Meeting at which the 2016-2017 Annual Statements are presented

 

Meeting at which any comments on the 2016-2017 Annual Statements are presented

 +

Meeting at which the Annual Report is presented

-            Extraordinary Meetings are held as required.

-            Members of the public are invited to observe meetings of the Council (Ordinary and Policy Review Committee).

Should you wish to address Council, please contact Governance Coordinator, Adam Beggs.

 


UNCONFIRMED MINUTES

 OF THE POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING OF PENRITH CITY COUNCIL HELD IN THE PASSADENA ROOM, PENRITH

ON MONDAY 14 AUGUST 2017 AT 7:05PM

PRESENT

His Worship the Mayor, Councillor John Thain, and Councillors Jim Aitken OAM, Bernard Bratusa, Todd Carney, Kevin Crameri OAM, Greg Davies, Mark Davies, Aaron Duke, Ross Fowler OAM, Karen McKeown, Kath Presdee and Ben Price.

 

LEAVE OF ABSENCE

Leave of Absence was previously granted to Councillor Tricia Hitchen.

 

APOLOGIES

27  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Ross Fowler OAM seconded Councillor Jim Aitken OAM that apologies be received for Councillors Marcus Cornish and Joshua Hoole.

 

 CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES - Policy Review Committee Meeting - 10 July 2017

28  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Ross Fowler OAM seconded Councillor Jim Aitken OAM that the minutes of the Policy Review Committee Meeting of 10 July 2017 be confirmed.

 

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

 

There were no declarations of interest.

 

DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Outcome 4 - We have safe, vibrant places

 

3        Neighbourhood Renewal Program - North St Marys

Councillor Jim Aitken OAM left the meeting, the time being 7:21pm.

Councillor Jim Aitken OAM returned to the meeting, the time being 7:22pm.                             

29  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Ross Fowler OAM seconded Councillor Greg Davies

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Neighbourhood Renewal Program - North St Marys be received.

2.    Council endorse the continuation of activities in North St Marys as outlined in Attachment 1.

3.     Council endorse the work done by the Place Management team; Jeni Pollard, Heather Chaffey and Rubie Ireson.

 

 


 

Outcome 2 - We plan for our future growth

 

1        Hadley Park and Castlereagh Cemetery Heritage Listing Status                                

30  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Karen McKeown seconded Councillor Kath Presdee

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Hadley Park and Castlereagh Cemetery Heritage Listing Status be received.

2.    Council make a submission of support to the proposed State Heritage Listing of Hadley Park when it is placed on exhibition.

3.    Council write to the Minister for Heritage and the Member for Londonderry to request their support for the State Listing of Hadley Park.

4.    Council write to the Executive Director of the Office of Environment and Heritage requesting reactivation of the nomination for State Heritage Listing of Castlereagh General Cemetery.

5.     A copy of the report and letter to the Executive Director of the Office of Environment and Heritage be sent to the Honourable Stuart Ayres MP, Minister for Western Sydney and Ray Hadley.

 

2        Accelerated Housing Delivery Program for New Release Areas                                 

31  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Bernard Bratusa seconded Councillor Greg Davies

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Accelerated Housing Delivery Program for New Release Areas be received.

2.    Council commence the Accelerated Housing Delivery Program, as detailed in this report.

3.    A report be prepared for Council to present the findings of the assessment of the nominations of the Accelerated Housing Delivery Program.

 

Outcome 7 - We have confidence in our Council

 

4        Draft Policy - Interaction between Councillors and Staff                                             

32  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Jim Aitken OAM

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Draft Policy - Interaction between Councillors and Staff be received.

2.    Council adopt the Interaction between Councillors and Staff Policy as appended to the report.

 

 


 

URGENT REPORT

 

5        Information on Mandatory Introduction of Independent Hearing and Assessment Panels

Councillor Mark Davies left the meeting, the time being 7:38pm

Councillor Mark Davies returned to the meeting, the time being 7:39pm                                    

33  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Karen McKeown seconded Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM

That:

1.         The information contained in the report on Information on Mandatory Introduction of Independent Hearing and Assessment Panels be received.

2.         The Mayor facilitate a meeting of the eight Western Sydney City Deal Mayors (Penrith, Liverpool, Camden, Campbelltown, Fairfield, Wollondilly, the Blue Mountains and Hawkesbury) with the Minister for Planning to discuss the impact compulsory Independent and Assessment Panels will have on City Deals projects.

3.         Council seek the support of the eight Western Sydney City Deal Councils in writing an open letter to the Ministers for Planning and Local Government expressing opposition to the recent changes to the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act.

4.         Council request Local Government NSW to lobby the State Government to reconsider the recent changes to the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act introducing compulsory Independent Hearing and Assessment Panels for Sydney metropolitan councils.

 

 

There being no further business the Chairperson declared the meeting closed the time being 8:32pm.

    



DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

  

Outcome 4 - We have safe, vibrant places

 

1        The Penrith Mayoral Challenge - Review and Proposed Future Direction                       1

 

2        Oxley Park Place Plan                                                                                                       8

 

 

Outcome 5 - We care about our environment

 

3        Waste and Resource Recovery Strategy                                                                        18

 

 


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


 

 

Outcome 1 - We can work close to home

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


 

 

Outcome 2 - We plan for our future growth

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


 

 

Outcome 3 - We can get around the City

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


Outcome 4 - We have safe, vibrant places

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

1        The Penrith Mayoral Challenge - Review and Proposed Future Direction                       1

 

2        Oxley Park Place Plan                                                                                                       8

 

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                           11 September 2017

 

 

 

1

The Penrith Mayoral Challenge - Review and Proposed Future Direction   

 

Compiled by:               Heather Chaffey, Neighbourhood Renewal Coordinator

Rubie Ireson, Community Engagement Officer

Sophia Purtell, Community Projects Officer (Graduate)

Authorised by:            Jeni Pollard, Place Manager  

 

Outcome

We have safe, vibrant places

Strategy

Grow and revitalise our centres and neighbourhoods

Service Activity

Work with the community to deliver priority infrastructure and activation projects in identified established areas of the City

 

Presenters:                  Jeni Pollard and Heather Chaffey - Place Management - The Penrith Mayoral Challenge      

 

Executive Summary

This report provides Council with an update on the three-year pilot program the Penrith Mayoral Challenge. The program is an innovative co-design project that has grown from a meaningful question posed to students in Cranebrook and has gone on to involve communities, children and young people in the renewal of local playgrounds in older established neighbourhoods, building civic responsibility and understanding.  

 

This report will provide an overview of the Penrith Mayoral Challenge to date, including a summary of the placemaking workshops, community engagement process and program outcomes.


Overall, the Penrith Mayoral Challenge has proven to be highly successful and has delivered important infrastructure to priority neighbourhoods. The participatory approach to the design of new playgrounds has provided young people and communities with a sense of ownership and respect for their local green spaces. The program outcomes and significant community feedback from the project as outlined in this report, have demonstrated that the Penrith Mayoral Challenge has greatly enhanced positive neighbourhood narratives in priority areas and provides a legacy that younger residents ‘pay forward’ in their community.

 

A proposed two-year schedule of project sites is put forward for Council to consider and endorse. Managers have agreed on these sites with regards to available funds and resource priorities.

Background

The Penrith Mayoral Challenge evolved from the success of the Callisto Playground Renewal Project in Cranebrook. Responding to a challenging question in 2014 from the then Mayor, Clr Ross Fowler, students from Cranebrook High School brought forward a proposal for enhancements to the playground. This project as well as delivering a high-quality playground, produced a number of unexpected outcomes for participants who expressed increased understanding of local government, increased interest in civic participation and various related career aspirations.

 

From the success of this project Council endorsed the Penrith Mayoral Challenge pilot project to include 3 sites over three years.

 

In 2015 Council officers worked with students from Bennett Rd Public School and Colyton Trade High School to design enhancements to Barr and Bass Park, Colyton. The design for Barr and Bass featured a large flying fox, small climbing frame and a multi-play unit. The project also included garden beds, pathways and flowering trees, improving access and building on a resident desire for more ‘colour’ in the neighbourhood. This playground has proved popular with local families and neighbouring property owners have been very supportive.

 

In 2016 students from Kingswood Public School participated in co-designing improvements to Chapman Gardens, Kingswood. The Chapman Gardens design featured a unique climbing play unit, a multi-play unit, a coloured handball court and a range of other features. The launch event for this project was particularly successful as a sea of children and families from Kingswood Public School joined in the celebrations.

 

In 2017 Council officers facilitated the Mayoral Youth Challenge in Cambridge Park. Lincoln Park in Cambridge Park was the third site in the three-year pilot project and engaged students from Cambridge Park Public School in the co-design process. The Mayor of Penrith, Clr John Thain, challenged participants from Cambridge Park Public School to design a playground that accommodated the needs of the entire community. Construction of this playground will commence in the coming months but already, Council officers have been surprised and delighted at the numbers of children and families involved in the process.  Cambridge Park Public School have embraced the ‘Challenge’ and actively participated and supported Council.

 

The Parkitects project was another co-design process that this year was developed alongside the Penrith Mayoral Challenge after advocacy from the Deputy Mayor, Clr Tricia Hitchen. The need in Oxley Park is unique and has largely been driven in response to rapid development in the area, this will be discussed in another report to tonight’s meeting. Students from Oxley Park Public School designed the new playground located on the corner of Australia St and Brisbane St and have enthusiastically taken on the role of ‘Parkitects’.

 

Budget Information

 

This program is funded within existing resources from across Council. Small budgets are pooled for each project site to produce maximum value for the project.

 

Each Penrith Mayoral Challenge project began with a budget of $100,000. Funds were provided through the Playgrounds Asset Renewal Program (Asset), Local Open Space Section 94 Program (S94), Neighbourhood Renewal Program (NR) and Voted Works (VW).

 

The table below provides a breakdown of budget contributions for each of the Penrith Mayoral Challenge and associated projects during the pilot project. Councillors will observe that the available $100,000 per project has been exceeded at each site. Costs associated with accessibility and shade are generally the reason for additional expenses. Managers associated with the program will continue to work collaboratively to source additional funding for accessibility and shade as appropriate.

 

Parks

Year

Asset

S94

NR

VW

Total

Callisto Playground (Nereid Avenue Cranebrook)

 

14-15

 

$142,000

$10,000 (arts project)

 

$152,000

Barr and Bass (Colyton)

15-16

$60,500.00

 

$51,500.00

$10,000

$122,000

Chapman Gardens (Kingswood)

16-17

$75,000

 

$25,000

$17,000

$117,000

Lincoln Park (Cambridge Park)

17-18

$15,000

$88,500.00

$40,000 (including $10,000) arts project

 

$143,500

Brisbane Street (Oxley Park)

17-18

$100,000

 

$30,000

$3,000

$133,000

(cost of shade structure yet to be included)

 

An application for Community Builders Funding has been submitted to support the installation of a shade structure in Lincoln Park, Cambridge Park.

 

It is estimated an additional cost of $5,000 for workshop and event expenses have been paid for through the Neighbourhood Renewal Program for each of these projects.

 

The Challenge

 

Each of these projects included specific guidelines within which participants had to work to achieve their design. These included;

 

·    Designing a playground that was inclusive and accessible for the entire community. This required the participants to consider the needs of their community and added to costs relating to concrete works for accessibility and adapting certain playground elements to allow for disability access and a variety of ages

·    A process of community engagement that involved an afterschool BBQ and community surveys. Participants assisted the Neighbourhood Renewal Team in conducting surveys with locals to find out what improvements the community would like in their park. These results were taken into consideration in the design process

·    An allocated budget of $100,000, including a contingency of $20,000. Participants reflected on the frustration they experienced in working within the limitations of this budget while still being responsive to community needs and requests 

·    Engaging in leadership development exercises and actively participating in civic engagement throughout the co-design process

 

  

Oxley Park Public School students presenting          Cambridge Park Public School students                            
 the first draft of their design                                      assessing the old playground in Lincoln Park

Program outcomes

Developing a design for each site required Council officers to facilitate a series of workshops with participants and relevant Council staff such as the Landscape Architect.

 

Workshops were interactive and designed to produce both leadership and development outcomes for participants as well as an inclusive design for each site. Participants were also supported to learn more about government and particularly local government, civic participation and local democracy.

 

In addition, the Neighbourhood Renewal Program has hosted community engagement events at each renewal site. Engagement events provided an opportunity for program participants to survey community members about the diversity of park users and their needs.

 

Workshops were designed to develop a creative safe space for participants where ideas could be comfortably shared. Participants collaborated to design a new playground, developing decision-making and conflict resolution skills in the process. At the completion of the workshops participants visited Council chambers to present their designs to the Mayor and Deputy Mayor. This was a significant step in the process for participant learning.

 

The Penrith Mayoral Challenge has generated very positive feedback from residents associated with the schools engaged in the challenge as well members of the wider community. The program provides a good example for the local community of Councils’ commitment to working in collaboration with residents, using funds judiciously to celebrate and build on the strengths of our neighbourhoods and produce a high quality outcome.

 

  


Oxley Park Public School students with                 Cambridge Park Public School students with
Deputy Mayor, Clr Tricia Hitchen                                 Penrith Mayor, Clr John Thain   

 

Developmental Outcomes

 

The workshop delivery was intentionally designed to foster leadership skills and develop participant’s capacity for civic engagement through team building and decision making exercises. Council staff, teachers and parents observed the following developmental outcomes and opportunities in participants:

 

·    Increased capacity for and knowledge about leadership

·    New knowledge about local government and civic engagement

·    Greater awareness of community and the needs of others

·    Development of interpersonal skills and decision making skills

·    Development of positive narratives about the local neighbourhood

·    Increase in self-confidence and willingness to contribute creative ideas

 

Feedback from program participants, teachers, parents and carers has been overwhelmingly positive. Participation in this program enhances understanding of government, democracy, project management and design. It increases children’s confidence and engagement in their education.

Quotes are included below.  

“Throughout the program, it was incredible to see the maturity and responsible decision making of the students develop. The students were highly engaged and thrived on the real-world connectedness of the activity, knowing the decisions they made were going to have a real-world result and a real park being constructed was very exciting.” - Teacher

“Witnessing the overwhelming community support and interest in the project at our Playground Community BBQ was incredible and it has showed us that we have a community ready to be engaged and involved if we create the right platform where they feel inspired to do so.” - Teacher

“Thanks so much to Penrith City Council for getting the kids involved in the new designs. My son has had so much fun, and his confidence as really increased working on this!” – Parent

“I learnt that when we design a park, we have to consider everyone” - Student

“Please tell the Mayor that we will always remember him” – Student

In addition to planned outcomes several unexpected outcomes have arisen from this program, including;

·    Participants initiated discussions about future career pathways, including local government and community sector work

·    Participants fostered strong connections with their peers that continued after the delivery of the program

·      Upon the completion of the workshops, Cambridge Park Public School implemented new participatory and co-design approaches to learning and development programs at the school after teachers noticed a definitive transformation in the participant’s interest towards learning

·      Marked increase in capacity for critical thinking in participants

 

 

Project participants with Penrith Mayor, Clr John Thain in the Council Chambers                             

 

 

Future opportunities

 

The Penrith Mayoral Challenge is delivered by a cross functional team of Council staff and supported by a number of managers. Sites selected for playground renewal during the pilot phase of the project, 2015-2018 were selected based on funds allocated through the playground renewal fund that is delivered by the City Presentation Department as well as resources and stakeholder relationships available through the Neighbourhood Renewal Program within the Place Management Department.

 

Councillors have also contributed to projects through Voted Works to a number of these projects.

 

The process of identifying sites which meet the needs of communities in older established areas and make efficient use of Council funds across various departments has worked well and this approach would continue to support the project should Councillors endorse a two-year continuation of the Penrith Mayoral Challenge.

 

Two sites have been identified as suitable sites for the project for the period of 2018-2020.

 

Proposed schedule of playground sites

 

Year

Site

Allocated budget City Presentation

Additional funds Neighbourhood Renewal

TOTAL

2018-19

Cook Park St Marys

$75,000

$35,000

$110,000

2019-20

Spence Park Penrith

$75,000

$35,000

$110,000

 

Funds will be sought to add value to the proposition for Brian King Reserve, Oxley Park in 2018 and 2019. This playground is a priority as the population of Oxley Park grows with an influx of medium density development. $37,500 is allocated for the renewal of the playground equipment in Brian King Park in 2022-2023.

 

Based on budgets for the Penrith Mayoral Challenge to date, an increase in funding will be necessary to provide a quality play and recreation space for the community of Oxley Park. Sources may include Community Builders funding through the NSW Department of Family and Community Services or Councils Property Reinvestment project.

 

Comment from City Presentation Manager

 

One of the successes of the Mayoral Playground Challenge has been the ability to link projects identified by the Neighbourhood Renewal team and projects identified in the Parks Asset Renewal Program to create enhanced play outcomes for the community. The Parks Asset Renewal Program is designed to ensure Council’s playground assets are contemporary and fit for purpose. Program priorities have been determined on the basis of asset condition and the level of facility utilisation. Approximately $300,000 is allocated annually to deliver this program. This amount has been regularly complemented by successful grant applications that have enabled the program to be accelerated.

 

The playgrounds proposed to form part of the of the Mayoral Playground Challenge over the next two years are currently listed for replacement in 2020-21 (Cook Parade) and 2022-23 (Spence Park) financial years. To enable these projects to be delivered in accordance with the proposed Mayoral Playground schedule, both Cook Parade and Spence Park need to be brought forward in the program. This will result in two projects being deferred by 12 months to accommodate these changes to the Parks Asset Renewal program.

 

Conclusion

 

The three year pilot of the Penrith Mayoral Challenge has generated significant outcomes for the communities and the young people that have participated. The innovative co-design project has seen young people collaborate with their community to design four new playground sites in older established neighbourhoods including;

·    2015, Barr and Bass Reserve, Colyton

·    2016, Kingswood Park, Kingswood

·    2017, Lincoln Park, Cambridge Park

·    2017, The park on the corner of Australia Street and Brisbane Street, Oxley Park (Parkitects)

 

This report has provided an overview of the Penrith Mayoral Challenge to date, including a summary of the placemaking workshops, community engagement process, program outcomes and a recommendation for the continuation of the Penrith Mayoral Challenge into the future. 


Overall, the Penrith Mayoral Challenge has proven to be highly successful and has delivered important infrastructure to priority neighbourhoods. The participatory approach to the design of new playgrounds has provided young people and communities with a sense of ownership and respect for their local green spaces. The notable program outcomes and significant community feedback from the project have demonstrated that the Penrith Mayoral Challenge has greatly enhanced positive neighbourhood narratives in priority areas.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on The Penrith Mayoral Challenge - Review and Proposed Future Direction be received.

2.    Council endorse the proposed schedule of playground sites for inclusion in the Penrith Mayoral Challenge for 2018-19 and 2019-20.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                           11 September 2017

 

 

 

2

Oxley Park Place Plan    

 

Compiled by:               Heather Chaffey, Neighbourhood Renewal Coordinator 

Authorised by:            Jeni Pollard, Place Manager  

 

Outcome

We have safe, vibrant places

Strategy

Grow and revitalise our centres and neighbourhoods

Service Activity

Engage the community in identified priority established areas of the City

 

Presenters:                  Jeni Pollard and Heather Chaffey - Penrith City Council - Oxley Park Place Presentation      

 

Executive Summary

This report informs Council about the outcomes of recent community engagement activities in Oxley Park and presents a draft Oxley Park Place Plan for Council’s consideration and endorsement.

 

The Oxley Park Place Plan 2017-2019 has been developed in response to issues raised by residents and in collaboration with a cross functional team of Council staff and relevant managers. The Place Management Department and City Planning Department have worked to co-facilitate several activities supporting the development of planning based responses to concerns raised by residents. A comment from the City Planning Manager is included in the report.

 

The report recommends that Council receive the information and endorse the attached Oxley Park Place Plan.

Background

In 1998, Council zoned Oxley Park as “2(c) Residential (Low-Medium Density)” under LEP 1998 (Urban Lands). This zone was applied in the context of the NSW State Government’s planned railway station for Oxley Park, which subsequently did not progress. This zone allowed villa style development / multi-unit housing with a single storey appearance.

 

In 2015, this zone was translated to R3 Medium Density zone (template zone) in Amendment 4 to Penrith LEP 2010. The R3 Medium Density zone permitted town houses in addition to the then permissible villa development.

 

Noticeable change did not occur in the suburb until around 2010 when development applications for multi-unit housing began to be received by Council due to an increase in demand in the market. In recent years, there has been a significant acceleration of development in Oxley Park, changing the streetscape from one of detached dwellings with front yards and back yards to many more villas and town houses with less room and a greater reliance on on-street parking. This change has caused significant concern for some residents who have seen and felt the impact.

 

Population change and growth also supports local businesses on Sydney Street and the local public school to thrive with increased patronage and student numbers.

 

 

 

It is estimated that of all developable land in Oxley Park;

 

·    approximately 40% has been developed

·    approximately 20% of properties have had development applications approved and are awaiting construction

·    the remaining 40% of developable land is available for future development

 

This report details residents’ concerns, documents community engagement efforts undertaken in 2017 and provides a draft Place Plan for Councils consideration.

 

Place Management and Community Engagement

A number of activities have taken place to engage with residents in Oxley Park in recent months. These include;

 

·    A letter delivered to all homes introducing the Place Management Department and inviting residents to contact an officer regarding any concerns,

·    Follow up contact by phone and email exchanges with approximately 10 residents that responded to the letter, some representing groups of neighbours who had come together to convey their concerns and aspirations for the neighbourhood,

·    Site meetings with residents and the cross-functional team of Council staff; including Rangers, Waste Education Officers, Road Safety Officer, Neighbourhood Renewal staff, representatives from City Planning and Development Services,

·    Parkitects - a project engaging children attending Oxley Park Public School in the design of a new playground,

·    Continued correspondence with residents,

·    Continued collaboration with appropriate managers to develop the Oxley Park Place Plan.

 

The table below provides a summary of residents’ concerns:

 

Issue

 

Waste Management

-     Illegal dumping associated with high turnover of rental properties

-     Difficulty for trucks to pick up waste

-     Inappropriate bin storage areas in some new developments

-     Residents have reported concern regarding the delivery of pamphlets and newspapers and the unsightly impact this has where there are many rental properties and these resources are not picked up

Parking and traffic congestion

-     Specific requests regarding Craig Avenue, Sydney Street and Adelaide Street surrounding Oxley Park Public School

-     Illegal parking on verge

-     Congestion on streets caused by on street parking

Bus shelters

-     Resident request Council install bus shelters in Oxley Park as many people use buses, particularly Brisbane Street

Footpaths

-     Residents request that Council install footpaths along bus routes, specifically Brisbane Street

-     Residents report that footpaths are not sufficiently repaired by developers

-     Residents requested maintenance to street trees which can impact on accessibility of footpaths

Recreation space

-     With a growing population residents have requested improved play and recreation spaces to support local families

Privacy

-     Some residents report concern over privacy where living next to new townhouse developments, some overlooking backyards

Overgrown properties

-     Residents report developer owned properties are frequently overgrown and full of rubbish or unused building materials

General disappointment with Council

-     Some residents report feeling unheard and undervalued as they have actively opposed development

-     Sense of dissatisfaction with Council response to waste and parking complaints

-     Some residents reported feeling frustrated that Council officers had not stayed in touch with them sufficiently during this engagement process

 

Community engagement activity and regular communication with all residents will continue during the timeframe of the proposed Oxley Park Place Plan (Appendix 1). Considered and consistent communication will be an important focus of this work, aiming to improve resident knowledge of and take up of existing Council services.

 

It should be noted that most residents who contacted Council are those who reside in standalone single dwelling homes and have lived locally for long periods of time. Only two residents who live in new medium density housing contacted Council.

 

As a result, an action is included in the Oxley Park Place Plan to develop and implement specific strategies for engaging this newer community in coming years in order to establish their needs and aspirations for enhancing the liveability of Oxley Park as suburb with increased population growth.

 

Action to date

A cross functional team of Council staff was formed in January 2017 to work through resident feedback, act on requests which could be actioned quickly and develop a Place Plan which would include those actions which will take some time to implement.

 

Council’s Traffic Engineers have assessed parking congestion and pedestrian safety around Oxley Park Public School and a report was taken to the Local Traffic Committee 5 June 2017 about this site. The Road Safety Officer continues to work with the school to promote appropriate parent driver behaviour.

 

Council recently conducted an audit of all bus stops and shelters across the city, including Oxley Park, and discussions have commenced across various departments to seek funding to provide some bus shelters in Oxley Park over the next two years.

 

The cross-functional team has worked with senior council officers to investigate opportunities for changes to the Development Control Plan for Oxley Park and has discussed opportunities for raising funds to provide improvements to footpaths and playgrounds locally.

 

Deputy Mayor Clr Hitchen recently called for a report on changes to the Development Control Plan and this work is underway.  Council officers have met several times to work through what amendments need to be made to the controls. A report recommending changes to development controls in Oxley Park will be prepared for Councils consideration in early 2018 at which time a public exhibition of the draft document will also take place. Pending the result of these processes it is hoped amended development controls would be before Council for endorsement by end June 2018.   

Council’s Waste Services team changed development controls regarding waste management some time ago and these standards are now in place. Those developments which were built prior to that change are being assessed individually by Council officers who are working with property owners to retrofit each property. This is a lengthy process and the waste department are committed to achieving the best possible result on each site.

 

Designs for enhancements to Oxley Park shops have been accepted as part of the Neighbourhood Renewal Programs Local Charm project and works will be undertaken to improve the public domain in this shopping strip early in the new year.

 

Children from Oxley Park Public School have now submitted their designs for the construction of a new playground as part of the Parkitects project. The playground will be built and launched by Christmas, weather permitting.

 

Oxley Park Place Plan - Key Priorities

In considering resident feedback about key issues, a Place Plan for Oxley Park has been developed to include short term (June 2018) and longer term (June 2020) actions. Key priorities include;

 

·         Developing a Communications Strategy to promote Council services and actions,

·         Managing waste and illegal dumping,

·         Pathways, pedestrian safety, bus shelters and parking,

·         Residents have requested Council plan for recreational space for the increasing population density in the neighbourhood,

·         Enhancements to the local shopping strip,

·         Community leadership development.

 

The Oxley Park Place Plan is attached to this report (Appendix 1).

 

It should be noted that the actions included within the Oxley Park Place Plan will not stop development and therefore will not appease all residents. However, Council officers have worked together to find best possible strategies to alleviating some of the residents’ concerns. 

 

Issues such as illegal dumping are experienced across the city and are not isolated to Oxley Park. Individuals must be encouraged to responsibly remove their unwanted household items when they move. Development will continue in Oxley Park and will bring with it some of the benefits for the local community such as more viable small local business and a strong school aged population and therefore increased funding to local schools.

 

This is not to say that population growth and change has easy and the results have obviously been distressing for some residents, the communications strategy is an important action for Council in conveying the services available to residents as they experience these changes locally.

 

Finally, the Oxley Park Place Plan 2017-2020 is designed to respond directly to the key priorities identified by residents. It is a tangible and achievable strategy, with a three-year timeframe, for responding to local issues within existing resources. The plan incorporates the coordination of existing services to maximise impact in Oxley Park as well as strategic activities such as undertaking a walkability study and seeking funding for an additional recreation space in the neighbourhood. These strategic actions will support future funding submissions and the growing population of Oxley Park.

City Planning Manager’s Comments

The Oxley Park Place Plan includes an interim measure to change the Development Control Plan for Oxley Park only. This interim amendment would include;

 

-     Increasing requirements for frontage to encourage consolidation of lots

-     Review stacked parking controls

 

It should be noted that the amended development controls would not come into effect until exhibited and endorsed which is expected by mid 2018. However due to a backlog of approved developments residents may not see any significant change in the type of development for 3 to 4 years.

 

Council will also review the options for relationships between parking provision and densities to achieve appropriate outcomes for medium density development.

 

Conclusion

This report has detailed resident concern regarding rapid development of medium density housing in the suburb of Oxley Park and the impact. Development has positive impacts such as contributing to the viability of local shops and schools and can have negative effects on the liveability of a neighbourhood.  Many of these issues are unavoidable consequences of urban change and Councils role along with the review of development controls will be to communicate carefully and consistently with residents who reside in a range of housing types.

 

A cross-functional team have developed strategies to respond to resident requests and to tackle some of the more difficult challenges such as driver behaviour, design and development and illegal dumping of waste.

 

A report recommending changes to development controls in Oxley Park will be prepared for Councils consideration in early 2018 at which time a public exhibition of the draft document will also take place. Pending the result of these processes it is hoped amended development controls would be before Council for endorsement by end June 2018.   

 

The Oxley Park Place Plan (Appendix 1) details these strategies and provides direction to Council’s work in the neighbourhood over a three-year period, including work undertaken to date.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Oxley Park Place Plan be received.

2.    Council endorse the Oxley Park Place Plan 2017 – 2020.

3.    The Place Management Department continue to liaise with residents and support the implementation of the Oxley Park Place Plan. 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

Oxley Park Place Plan 2017-2020

3 Pages

Appendix

  


Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         11 September 2017

Appendix 1 - Oxley Park Place Plan 2017-2020

 

oxley park place plan 2017-2020

Vision statements

Short term actions (2017 – June 18)

Long term actions (July 2018- June 2020)

Our neighbourhood is clean and tidy

Council will coordinate a publicised blitz on illegal dumping

February 2017 – complete

Waste Rangers will give special focus to Oxley Park over the Spring and Summer months September 2017 – March 2018

Council will conduct an education and enforcement project regarding kerb-side clean ups in October-November 2017 and March-April 2018

Council will actively promote our waste, public domain, graffiti hotline, and ranger programs as part of an active communications strategy

Council will actively build relationships with local realtors to promote our waste management services for rental tenants and new home owners

We can get around easily and safely

Council has investigated a number of treatments suitable for the control of traffic surrounding Oxley Park Public School

Council has utilised Variable Message Signs displaying a ‘slow down’ message on several streets in June 2017. This strategy will be implemented on Sydney Street close to the public school in September 2017

Councils Local Traffic Committee has received a report regarding line marking on Adelaide Street surrounding Oxley Park Public School (complete)

The Local Traffic Committee has received a report on signage and line marking on Craig Avenue, Oxley Park (complete)

Council will coordinate a publicised blitz on illegal parking February 2017 (complete) and November 2017

The Road Safety Officer will continue to work with Oxley Park Public School to promote consideration of neighbours and pedestrian safety

Council has conducted an audit of all bus routes and shelters across the City, including Oxley Park

Subject to further consultation with residents on Adelaide Street, between Sydney and Perth Streets, Council will install appropriate line markings and signage to aid parking in front of the public school.

Council will engage a consultant to conduct a walkability study of Oxley Park, identifying footpath maintenance issues and opportunities for formalising recreational walking

Council will seek funding to construct a formal shared walking/bike path throughout Oxley Park


Council will fund and deliver maintenance work identified through the walkability study

Council will seek funding to provide suitable bus shelters at identified high priority stops noting the particular request from residents on Brisbane Street

As requested by local residents, Council will install line marking and signage in Craig Avenue to improve road safety conditions

Council will consult with the local residents regarding speed reduction devices in Adelaide Street

Council will consult with local business owners and residents in relation  to parking and bus stops at the Sydney Street shops

Our children have great places to play and make lasting memories

Council will construct a playground on the corner of Brisbane and Australia Streets in 2017 which has been co-designed by local children through Parkitects

Council will seek funding to construct the playground and passive recreation space in Brian King Park on Braddon Street

Our local shops reflect the pride we have in our neighbourhood

Council has consulted the community and businesses operators at the Sydney Street shops to inform the development of plans to improve the Council owned outside the shops. This project is known as Local Charm

Local Charm Sydney Street will commence in early 2018 and enhancements will be complete by end June 2018

We know how to advocate for what we need

Council will develop a communications strategy for Oxley Park with particular focus on promoting waste services and educating residents on Council services available to them

 

Council will develop service information cards to be distributed to all homes on one occasion in 2018 and one occasion in 2019

Council will develop a project seeking to engage specifically with resident who reside in newly developed medium density housing in order to map their needs

Council will deliver Community Leadership Training in Oxley Park in 2018

Our Council is planning for our future

Council will prepare an amendment to the Development Control Plan (Oxley Park) and take this to Council for endorsement by June 2018. Amendments will include wider frontages required which will encourage consolidation of lots for development and limit stacked parking.

Council is reviewing residential development within the Local Housing Strategy and will update development controls for multi-unit (townhouse) development within Council’s Development Control Plan (city wide) in order to enable more satisfactory development outcomes long term

Council will continue to work with property owners to retrofit previously approved designs to accommodate kerbside waste pick up services

 

 


Outcome 5 - We care about our environment

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

3        Waste and Resource Recovery Strategy                                                                         18

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                           11 September 2017

 

 

 

3

Waste and Resource Recovery Strategy   

 

Compiled by:               Tracy Chalk, Waste and Community Protection Manager

Authorised by:            Wayne Mitchell, Executive Manager - Environment & City Development  

 

Outcome

We care for our environment

Strategy

Support our communities to live more sustainably and use resources wisely

Service Activity

Manage resource recovery and waste collection services

      

 

Executive Summary

The renewed Penrith Waste and Resource Recovery Strategy (2017-2026) is the final product of lengthy review and assessment of Council’s current operational practices, strategic influences, government legislation and state of the waste industry.

 

The purpose of the Strategy is to set strategic objectives for Council managed waste streams and fulfil regulatory requirements.

 

The Waste and Resource Recovery Strategy builds upon Penrith’s recognised leadership in domestic waste practice with broader application into all Council managed waste streams. 

The Strategy focuses on opportunities presented through innovation, new technologies facilities, and community education to maintain and build upon Penrith’s leadership in waste management practice.

 

The Strategy will set the direction for the next decade and inform the specifications for future waste tenders including domestic and Council managed waste services.

Background

Penrith City Council’s Domestic Waste Strategy (DWS) was adopted by Council in November 2005. It has been the foundation and guide for addressing waste management and resource recovery within and across Council. The Strategy is reviewed every five years, and has been reviewed and updated in line with the Western Sydney Regional Waste Avoidance and Resource Recovery Strategy (2014-2017) and the current State Government Waste and Resource Recovery Strategy.

 

This is the second review of the original Strategy, the first taking place in 2010-11.

 

The five key objectives remain in the renewed Waste and Resource Recovery Strategy:

 

1.   Convenience

2.   Recovery Targets

3.   Risk Exposure

4.   Competition

5.   Health & Safety

 

The Waste and Resource Recovery Strategy (2017-2026) is now a broader document and incorporates the opportunity to better manage all waste streams under Council control.

 


 

Discussion

 

Modern waste management is a dynamic state looking to suit community growth and consumption patterns. To ensure best practice methods can be considered the Strategy provides data on waste streams, regional facilities and outlines future directions that Council may consider when preparing contract specifications for the market.

 

The layout of the Waste and Resource Recovery Strategy is in accordance with the NSW EPA template and guidelines for preparing a waste strategy.  This provides additional support to any applications for grants under the EPA funding programs.

 

Under the Strategy, Council pioneered the introduction of the current three bin service, with a bin for Food Organics and Garden Organics (FOGO), a bin for recyclables and a residual waste bin. This service now achieves in excess of 65% diversion of waste from landfill.

 

The Waste and Resource Recovery Strategy identifies further opportunities for increasing resource recovery and landfill diversion through organics collection services and proposes aligning all other waste streams managed by Council to the aims and objectives. Whist this anticipates improved environmental outcomes, it is also a positive demonstration to the community of further sustainable practice.

 

As the Waste and Resource Recovery Strategy influences waste services offered by Council, community consultation was an essential component of the review. A community consultation survey sought resident satisfaction with the current service - 70% of respondents were satisfied with the existing waste services. Of respondents that were satisfied, 89% noted that the service meets their needs.

 

Consultation demonstrated that the community continues to support Council’s aims and direction commending practices of:

 

·     User pays services for households with varied needs and reflecting the true cost of waste disposal/resource recovery for both bins and bulky waste

·     Additional services at Christmas time and access to a community drop-off service

·     Provision of compostable bags

·     Options for increased capacity for recycling and responsible disposal of problem wastes

 

The majority of community members identified protecting the environment as their waste management priority - this was strongest for younger residents aged 18-35.  Convenience was the next most important factor followed by safe and healthy waste management and reducing costs. The Strategy supports this priority.

 

The review has considered a number of issues:

 

·    Timeframe - it is proposed as a ten-year period from 2017 to 2026, subject to a five year review

·    Consistency with Penrith’s Community Strategic Plan (CSP) and City Strategy

·    Alignment with the objectives and targets of the NSW Waste & Resource Recovery Strategy

·    Consistency with the Western Sydney Regional Waste & Resource Recovery Strategy

·    The Regional Strategic Alliance-Waste Management Group

·    Waste Less Recycle More grant funding opportunities

·    Delivery of a safe, cost effective, innovative and accessible waste management service for Penrith residents and contractors

·    Industry technologies and innovation opportunities

·    Continued improvement in waste minimisation and diversion

·    Diversion towards the new EPA target of 70%

 

Conclusion

 

This renewed Waste and Resource Recovery Strategy focuses on opportunities presented through innovation, new technologies and facilities, and community education to maintain and build upon Penrith’s leadership in waste management practice.

 

The Strategy will set the direction for the next decade and inform the specifications for future waste tenders including domestic and Council managed waste services.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on the Waste and Resource Recovery Strategy (2017-2026) be received.

2.    Council endorse the Penrith Waste and Resource Recovery Strategy (2017-2026).

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

Draft Waste and Resource Recovery Strategy

17 Pages

Attachments Included

   


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


 

 

Outcome 6 - We're healthy and share strong community spirit

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


 

 

Outcome 7 - We have confidence in our Council

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled



 

ATTACHMENTS  

 

 

Date of Meeting:     Monday 11 September 2017

Report Title:            Waste and Resource Recovery Strategy

Attachments:           Draft Waste and Resource Recovery Strategy



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                         11 September 2017

Attachment 1 - Draft Waste and Resource Recovery Strategy

 

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