Council_Mark_POS_RGB

22 November 2017

 

Dear Councillor,

In pursuance of the provisions of the Local Government Act, 1993 and the Regulations thereunder, notice is hereby given that an ORDINARY MEETING of Penrith City Council is to be held in the Council Chambers, Civic Centre, 601 High Street, Penrith on Monday 27 November 2017 at 7:30PM.

Attention is directed to the statement accompanying this notice of the business proposed to be transacted at the meeting.

Yours faithfully

 

Alan Stoneham

General Manager

BUSINESS

 

1.           LEAVE OF ABSENCE

 

2.           APOLOGIES

 

3.           CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES

Ordinary Meeting - 23 October 2017.

 

4.           DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

Pecuniary Interest (The Act requires Councillors who declare a pecuniary interest in an item to leave the meeting during discussion of that item)

Non-Pecuniary Conflict of Interest – Significant and Less than Significant (The Code of Conduct requires Councillors who declare a significant non-pecuniary conflict of interest in an item to leave the meeting during discussion of that item)

 

5.           ADDRESSING COUNCIL

 

6.           MAYORAL MINUTES

 

7.           NOTICES OF MOTION TO RESCIND A RESOLUTION

 

8.           NOTICES OF MOTION AND QUESTIONS ON NOTICE

 

9.           ADOPTION OF REPORTS AND RECOMMENDATION OF COMMITTEES

Resilience Committee Meeting - 4 October 2017.

Access Committee Meeting - 11 October 2017.

Local Traffic Committee Meeting - 6 November 2017.

Policy Review Committee Meeting - 13 November 2017.

 

10.         DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

11.         REQUESTS FOR REPORTS AND MEMORANDUMS

12.         URGENT BUSINESS

13.         COMMITTEE OF THE WHOLE


ORDINARY MEETING

 

Monday 27 November 2017

 

table of contents

 

 

 

 

ADVANCE AUSTRALIA FAIR

 

 

STATEMENT OF RECOGNITION OF PENRITH CITY’S ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER CULTURAL HERITAGE

 

 

PRAYER

 

 

COUNCIL CHAMBER seating arrangements

 

 

meeting calendar

 

 

confirmation of minutes

 

 

PROCEDURE FOR ADDRESSING COUNCIL MEETING

 

 

MAYORAL MINUTES

 

 

report and recommendations of committees

 

 

DELIVERY program reports


 

 

ADVANCE AUSTRALIA FAIR

 

 

 

Australians all let us rejoice,

For we are young and free;

We’ve golden soil and wealth for toil;

Our home is girt by sea;

Our land abounds in nature’s gifts

Of beauty rich and rare;

In history’s page, let every stage

Advance Australia Fair.

 

In joyful strains then let us sing,

Advance Australia Fair.

 

Beneath our radiant Southern Cross

We’ll toil with hearts and hands;

To make this Commonwealth of ours

Renowned of all the lands;

For those who’ve come across the seas

We’ve boundless plains to share;

With courage let us all combine

To Advance Australia Fair.

 

In joyful strains then let us sing,

Advance Australia Fair.

 



Statement of Recognition of

Penrith City’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cultural Heritage

 

 

Council values the unique status of Aboriginal people as the original owners and custodians of lands and waters, including the land and waters of Penrith City.

 

Council values the unique status of Torres Strait Islander people as the original owners and custodians of the Torres Strait Islands and surrounding waters.

 

We work together for a united Australia and City that respects this land of ours, that values the diversity of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural heritage, and provides justice and equity for all.

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

PRAYER

 

 

 

“Sovereign God, tonight as we gather together as a Council we affirm that you are the giver and sustainer of life.  We come together as representatives of our community to make decisions that will benefit this city and the people within it. 

 

We come not in a spirit of competition, not as adversaries, but as colleagues.  Help us to treat each other with respect, with dignity, with interest and with honesty.  Help us not just to hear the words we say, but also to hear each others hearts.  We seek to be wise in all that we say and do.

 

As we meet, our concern is for this city.  Grant us wisdom, courage and strength.

 

Lord, help us.  We pray this in the name of Jesus Christ our Lord.  Amen.”

 

 

 

 

 


 

Council Chambers

Seating Arrangements


For members of the public addressing the meeting


 

 

 

Lectern


 

 

Executive Managers


 

 

 

Assistant General Manager Craig Butler


Executive Manager - Community Vicki O’Kelly

General Manager
Alan Stoneham

His Worship the Mayor Councillor John Thain



Governance Coordinator Adam Beggs






Minute Clerk

MediaClr Marcus Cornish

North Ward

 

Clr Bernard Bratusa

East Ward

 

 

Clr Tricia Hitchen

East Ward

 

 

Clr Joshua Hoole

South Ward

 

 

Clr Mark Davies

South Ward

 

 

Clr Jim Aitken OAM

Public GalleryNorth Ward

 

 

Clr Ross Fowler OAM

South Ward

 

 

Clr Kevin Crameri OAM

North Ward

Clr Karen McKeown

South Ward

 

Clr Aaron Duke

North Ward

 

Clr Todd Carney

East Ward

 

Clr Greg Davies

East Ward

 

Clr Ben Price

East Ward

 

Clr Kath Presdee

ManagersSouth Ward

 

 

Executive Managers


 


Oath of Office

 

I swear that I will undertake the duties of the office of Councillor in the best interests of the people of Penrith and the Penrith City Council and that I will faithfully and impartially carry out the functions, powers, authorities and discretions vested in me under the Local Government Act 1993 or any other Act to the best of my ability and judgment.

 

 

Affirmation of Office

 

I solemnly and sincerely declare and affirm that I will undertake the duties of the office of Councillor in the best interests of the people of Penrith and the Penrith City Council and that I will faithfully and impartially carry out the functions, powers, authorities and discretions vested in me under the Local Government Act 1993 or any other Act to the best of my ability and judgment.

 

 

Taken at the Ordinary Meeting of Council on 26 September 2016, Minute Number 272

 

 

Local Government Act 1993, Section 233A

 


Council_Mark_POS_RGB2017 MEETING CALENDAR

January 2017 - December 2017

(Adopted by Council - 28 November 2016 and Amended April 2017)

 

 

 

TIME

JAN

FEB

MAR

APRIL

MAY

JUNE

JULY

AUG

SEPT

OCT

NOV

DEC

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

 

Ordinary Council Meeting

7.30pm

 

6

 

 

1v

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

18

(7.00pm)

 

27@

27

10

22#

26*

24

28@

25^ü

23

27#+

 

Policy Review Committee

7.00pm

 

13

13

 

8

 

10

14

11

9

 

11

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

13

 

 

 v

Meeting at which the draft corporate planning documents (Delivery Program and Operational Plan) are endorsed for exhibition

 *

Meeting at which the draft corporate planning documents (Delivery Program and Operational Plan) are adopted

 #

Meetings at which the Operational Plan quarterly reviews (March and September) are presented

 @

Meetings at which the Delivery Program progress reports (including the Operational Plan quarterly reviews for December and June) are presented

 ^

Election of Mayor/Deputy Mayor

 ü

Meeting at which the 2016-2017 Annual Statements are presented

 

Meeting at which any comments on the 2016-2017 Annual Statements are presented

 +

Meeting at which the Annual Report is presented

-            Extraordinary Meetings are held as required.

-            Members of the public are invited to observe meetings of the Council (Ordinary and Policy Review Committee).

Should you wish to address Council, please contact Governance Coordinator, Adam Beggs.

 



UNCONFIRMED MINUTES

 OF THE ORDINARY MEETING OF PENRITH CITY COUNCIL HELD IN THE

COUNCIL CHAMBERS

ON MONDAY 23 OCTOBER 2017 AT 7:33PM

NATIONAL ANTHEM 

The meeting opened with the National Anthem.

STATEMENT OF RECOGNITION

His Worship the Mayor, Councillor John Thain read a statement of recognition of Penrith City’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cultural Heritage.

PRAYER

The Council Prayer was read by Rev Neil Checkley.

PRESENT

His Worship the Mayor, Councillor John Thain, Deputy Mayor, Councillor Tricia Hitchen, and Councillors Jim Aitken OAM, Bernard Bratusa, Todd Carney, Marcus Cornish, Kevin Crameri OAM, Greg Davies, Aaron Duke, Ross Fowler OAM, Karen McKeown, Kath Presdee and Ben Price.

 

LEAVE OF ABSENCE

Leave of Absence was previously requested by Councillor Joshua Hoole for the 23 October 2017 to 12 November 2017 inclusive.

 

262  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Tricia Hitchen seconded Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM that the leave of absence be granted to Councillor Joshua Hoole for the 23 October 2017 to 12 November 2017 inclusive.

 

APOLOGIES

263  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Tricia Hitchen seconded Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM that apologies be received for Councillor Mark Davies.

 

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES - Ordinary Meeting - 25 September 2017

264  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM seconded Councillor Todd Carney that the minutes of the Ordinary Meeting of 25 September 2017 be confirmed.

 

Councillor Greg Davies arrived at the meeting, the time being 7:38pm.

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

The Mayor, Councillor John Thain declared a Non-Pecuniary Conflict of Interest – Less than Significant in Notice of Motion 1 – Questions to Forum on Western Sydney Airport (FOWSA) as he is on the board of Forum of Western Sydney Airport (FOWSA).

 

 

 

 

 

Mayoral Minutes

 

1        Environmental Health Awards

Councillor Tricia Hitchen spoke in support of the Mayoral Minute.                                              

265  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor John Thain seconded Councillor Tricia  Hitchen that the Mayoral Minute on Environmental Health Awards be received.

 

Notices of Motion

 

1        Questions to Forum on Western Sydney Airport (FOWSA)

Councillor Todd Carney left the meeting, the time being 7:44pm.

Councillor Todd Carney returned to the meeting, the time being 7:45pm.                                  

266  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM seconded Councillor Marcus Cornish that a response to the following questions be requested from the Forum on Western Sydney Airport (FOWSA) and the Department of Infrastructure and Regional Development:

·         Have the flight paths applicable to the Bankstown, Camden, Richmond and Sydney KSA airports been taken into account? Is there an alternative to the flight paths that were in the EIS?

·         Why are they doing remediation works at Badgerys Creek site?

·         Why is an assessment of risks associated with bird and bat strikes not included in the EIS?

·         How will the colonies of bats within 8kms of the airport in the national parks and on private land be managed?

·         Will bats need to be culled and will FOWSA make this known, will they ensure that studies are done on the number of bats to be culled?

·         Did the EIS take into account migratory birds?

·         Will FOWSA do a long-term study addressing these issues of fauna?

·         When FOWSA approves the flight paths, will they provide insulation for homes under the flight paths at Penrith, St Marys, St Clair, Erskine Park, Twin Creeks and Blacktown? 

·         Will FOWSA fight for equal curfews as KSA Politicians around KSA say that the cap and curfew around KSA can't be changed as it would be unfair to residents within 20 km of the airport?

·         Will FOWSA provide a means for the community to ask questions of FOWSA?

·         We already have worse than average health statistics will FOWSA stipulate that extra health funding be provided?

·         When will job plans and studies be released?

·         There is still no corridors for rail freight rail and the M9. When can we expect to have this sorted out?

·         There is no corridor for a fuel pipeline to the airport or is it planned to always use trucks?

·         Will FOWSA do air quality studies now of the areas to be under of the flight paths to predict what it will be like if the future with the cars busses trucks to cater for the supposed millions of passengers?

 

 Reports of Committees

 

1        Report and Recommendations of the Penrith Community Safety Partnership Meeting held on 6 September 2017                                                                                 

267  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Karen McKeown seconded Councillor Aaron Duke that the recommendations contained in the Report and Recommendations of the Penrith Community Safety Partnership meeting held on 6 September, 2017 be adopted.

 

2        Report and Recommendations of the Local Traffic Committee Meeting held on 9 October 2017                                                                                                                      

268  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Karen McKeown seconded Councillor Marcus Cornish that the recommendations contained in the Report and Recommendations of the Local Traffic Committee meeting held on 9 October, 2017 be adopted.

 

3        Report and Recommendations of the Policy Review Committee Meeting held on 9 October 2017                                                                                                                      

269  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Ross Fowler OAM seconded Councillor Karen McKeown that the recommendations contained in the Report and Recommendations of the Policy Review Committee meeting held on 9 October, 2017 be adopted.

 

DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Outcome 1 - We can work close to home

 

1        North South Rail Advocacy Update                                                                                

270  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Todd Carney seconded Councillor Karen McKeown

          That:

1.    The information contained in the report on North South Rail Advocacy Update be received.

2.    The words ‘to be built prior to the Western Sydney Airport’ be inserted in the conclusion to the report to read:

                   Council will continue to advocate most strongly to the State and Federal                          Governments for North-South Rail, including the priority reservation of a corridor            to be built prior to the Western Sydney Airport. Council will continue its                          partnership with the other councils in the Western Sydney region to                                      promote North-South Rail as a transformative opportunity and a key element of                 the future City Deal. We will also continue to work with the WSRA to present                North-South Rail a driver of productivity, growth and amenity in the region.

 


 

 

2        Opportunities for tertiary education in Penrith                                                             

271  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Aaron Duke seconded Councillor Kath Presdee

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Opportunities for tertiary education in Penrith be received.

2.    Penrith Council supports a University and TAFE in the Penrith CBD.

3.    Council write to the Federal Education Ministers and Federal Member advising of this.

4.    Council write to our sister cities as well as Universities Australia and TAFE advising them of this opportunity.

 

3        National Growth Areas Alliance Annual Congress                                                       

272  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Ross Fowler OAM

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on National Growth Areas Alliance Annual Congress be received.

2.    Council nominate The Mayor, Councillor John Thain and Councillors Greg Davies and Karen McKeown as its delegates to attend the NGAA’s Annual Congress, to be held in the City of Casey, from November 19-21 2017 and grant leave of absence as appropriate.

 

4        The UDIA National Congress 20-22 March 2018                                                            

273  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Ross Fowler OAM

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on The UDIA National Congress 20-22 March 2018 be received.

2.    Council nominate The Mayor, Councillor John Thain and Councillors Karen McKeown, Aaron Duke, Jim Aitken OAM, Greg Davies and Tricia Hitchen as its delegates to attend the Urban Development Institute of Australia National Congress 2018 to be held 20-22 March in Melbourne and grant leave of absence as appropriate.

 


 

Outcome 2 - We plan for our future growth

 

5        Nomination for Replacement Council Representation at the Sydney Western City Planning Panel                                                                                                                   

274  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Aaron Duke

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Nomination for Replacement Council Representation at the Sydney Western City Planning Panel be received.

2.    Council nominate Councillor Ross Fowler OAM and Karen McKeown (alternate) as representatives to the Sydney Western City Planning Panel.

3.     The Panel Secretariat of the Sydney Western City Planning Panel be advised of the outcome of the nominations.

4.    The General Manager retain granted delegation to reappoint a staff representative as previously resolved.

5.    Where further panel changes occur within the appointment period, this resolution can be relied upon for continued representation on that panel.

 

6        Proposed Letter of Offer to Enter into a Voluntary Planning Agreement for the Embellishment of Webb Street (Unformed Road)                                                         

275  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM seconded Councillor Greg Davies

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Proposed Letter of Offer to Enter into a Voluntary Planning Agreement for the Embellishment of Webb Street (Unformed Road) be received.

2.    That the letter of offer from Universal Property Group Pty Ltd dated 16 October 2017 be accepted in principle to enable preparation of a Voluntary Planning Agreement which is reflective of the terms of the offer.

3.    The draft Voluntary Planning Agreement be placed on public exhibition in accordance with the Environmental Planning and Assessment Regulations (2000).

4.    The outcome of the exhibition of the draft Voluntary Planning Agreement be reported to Council for consideration of endorsement and execution.

In accordance with Section 375A of the Local Government Act 1993, a DIVISION was then called with the following result:

For

Against

Councillor Kath Presdee

 

Councillor Bernard Bratusa

 

Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM

 

Councillor Karen McKeown

 

Councillor John Thain

 

Councillor Greg Davies

 

Councillor Ross Fowler OAM

 

Councillor Jim Aitken OAM

 

Councillor Tricia  Hitchen

 

Councillor Marcus Cornish

 

Councillor Aaron Duke

 

Councillor Todd Carney

 

Councillor Ben  Price

 

 

Outcome 3 - We can get around the City

 

7        Eighth Ave, Llandilo road condition                                                                               

276  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM seconded Councillor Marcus Cornish that the information contained in the report on Eighth Ave, Llandilo road condition be received.

 

 

Outcome 4 - We have safe, vibrant places

 

8        Tender Reference RFT17/18-03, Bank Stabilisation & Stormwater Treatment - River Road, Leonay                                                                                                                     

277  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor John Thain seconded Councillor Jim Aitken OAM

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Tender Reference RFT17/18-03, Bank Stabilisation & Stormwater Treatment - River Road, Leonay  be received.

2.    Civil Constructions Pty Ltd be awarded the contract subject to the execution of a formal agreement for Bank Stabilisation & Stormwater Treatment works, River Rd Leonay, for an amount of $370,473.00 excluding GST.

3.    The Common Seal of the Council of the City of Penrith be placed on all documentation if necessary.

 

9        CBD Drainage - Managing Remaining Works                                                                

278  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Jim Aitken OAM

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on CBD Drainage - Managing Remaining Works be received

2.    Council use the extenuating circumstances provisions in Section 55 (3)(i) of the Local Government Act 1993 on the basis that;

a.   Incomplete works on public roads, footpaths and on private land represent a safety risk to the community

b.   The works are only partially complete leaving potential to damage the works themselves, the roads, car parks and surrounding properties in the event of significant rainfall

c.   The safety, asset and property risks are such that a further delay for a tendering process will expose Council to unacceptable risk.

d.   The prices received by quotation have been demonstrated to be competitive by independent Quantity Surveyor assessment

3.    Cockerill Contracting Pty Ltd be awarded the Contract for the Construction of CBD Drainage Remaining Works, for an amount of $596,030.00 excluding GST.

 

11      Magnetic Places Grants Program 2017-18                                                                     

279  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Jim Aitken OAM

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Magnetic Places Grants Program 2017-18 be received

2.    The 5 projects listed in Table 1 are funded as part of the Magnetic Places Grants Program 2018.

 

10      Metropolitan Greenspace Program Grant Acceptance                                                 

280  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Ross Fowler OAM

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Metropolitan Greenspace Program Grant Acceptance be received

2.    Council accept the grant funds from the NSW Department of Planning’s Metropolitan Greenspace Program and send letters of thanks to the Hon. Anthony Roberts, MP, Minister for Planning and Minister for Housing, and the Local Member, the Hon Stuart Ayres MP.

3.    Council endorse placement of the Common Seal of the Council of the City of Penrith on the Funding Deeds.

 

Outcome 5 - We care about our environment

 

12      58th Annual Floodplain Management Australia Conference - Tuesday, 29 May to Friday, 01 June 2018                                                                                                         

281  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Ross Fowler OAM

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on 58th Annual Floodplain Management Australia Conference - Tuesday, 29 May to Friday, 01 June 2018 be received.

2.    Council nominate Councillors Jim Aitken OAM, Kevin Crameri OAM and Marcus Cornish as its delegates to the 2018 Floodplain Management Australia Conference and Workshops to be held on the Gold Coast, from Tuesday, 29 May to Friday, 01 June 2018 and grant of leave absence as appropriate.

 


 

 

13      Regional Illegal Dumping Squad (RID) – EPA Project Agreement                              

282  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Marcus Cornish seconded Councillor Tricia  Hitchen

 

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Regional Illegal Dumping Squad (RID) – EPA Project Agreement be received.

2.    Penrith City Council continues to manage the Squad on behalf of the member Councils.

3.    The General Manager be granted delegation to sign the EPA Project Agreement and Strategic Alliance Agreement for the Western Sydney Regional Illegal Dumping (RID) Squad for the period June 2017- July 2021.

 

 

14      Tender Reference 17/18-05, Supply and/or Distribution of Compostable Bags        

283  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Aaron Duke

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Tender Reference 17/18-05, Supply and/or Distribution of Compostable Bags be received.

2.    The tender submitted by Cardia Bioplastics Pty Ltd for the period October 2017 to June 2019 be accepted subject to the execution of a formal agreement for the Supply and Distribution of Compostable Bags.

3.    The Common Seal of the Council of the City of Penrith be placed on all documentation as necessary.

 

Outcome 7 - We have confidence in our Council

 

16      Pecuniary Interest Returns                                                                                              

284  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Todd Carney seconded Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM that the information contained in the report on Pecuniary Interest Returns be received.

 

17      Audit, Risk and Improvement Committee                                                                      

285  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Todd Carney seconded Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM that the information contained in the report on Audit, Risk and Improvement Committee be received.

 


 

 

19      Write off of unrecoverable Sundry Debtor accounts                                                    

286  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Todd Carney seconded Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM

That:

1.    The information in this report on Abandonment of Sundry Debts be received.

2.    The two sundry debts totalling $15,793 outlined above be written off as irrecoverable.

 

20      2016-17 Financial Statements                                                                                          

287  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Todd Carney seconded Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM that the information contained in the report on 2016-17 Financial Statements be received.

 

21      Summary of Investments & Banking for the period 1 September to 30 September 2017                                                                                                                                     

288  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Todd Carney seconded Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Summary of Investments & Banking for the period 1 September to 30 September 2017 be received

2.    The certificate of the Responsible Accounting Officer and Summaries of Investments and Performance for the period 1 September 2017 to 30 September 2017 be noted and accepted.

3.    The graphical investment analysis as at 30 September 2017 be noted.

 

15      Senior Staff Working Party                                                                                              

289  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Jim Aitken OAM

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Senior Staff Working Party be received.

2.    The Mayor undertake the General Manager’s current performance review in consultation with Councillors.

3.     The structure and form of any Senior Staff group be the subject of a future council report.

 

18      Local Government NSW Annual Conference 2017                                                       

290  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Ross Fowler OAM

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Local Government NSW Annual Conference 2017 be received.

2.    Council nominate The Mayor, Councillor John Thain and Councillors Aaron Duke, Greg Davies, Kath Presdee, Ben Price, Ross Fowler OAM, Tricia Hitchen, Jim Aitken OAM, Kevin Crameri OAM and Bernard Bratusa as its voting delegates to attend the 2017 LG NSW Conference to be held in Sydney from 4-6 December 2017.

3.    Council nominate Councillor Karen McKeown as its observer to attend the 2017 LGNSW Conference.

4.    Leave of absence be granted as appropriate for those councillors attending the conference.

5.    The Motions detailed in the report be submitted for inclusion in the 2017 Local Government NSW Annual Conference Business Paper.

 

 

REQUESTS FOR REPORTS AND MEMORANDUMS AND URGENT BUSINESS

 

UB 1           Leave of Absence      

Councillor Kath Presdee requested a Leave of Absence from 12 November 2017 to 19 November 2017 inclusive.

291 RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Todd Carney seconded Councillor Greg Davies that the matter be brought forward and dealt with as a matter of urgency.

His Worship the Mayor, Councillor John Thain, ruled that the matter was urgent and should be dealt with at the meeting.

292 RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Todd Carney seconded Greg Davies that Leave of Absence be granted to Councillor Kath Presdee from 12 November 2017 to 19 November 2017 inclusive.

 

UB 2           Guide Dogs Fundraiser      

Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM requested that an amount of $1,100 be split between the three wards for the hire costs of St Marys Memorial Hall for the fundraiser for the guide dogs to be held in July next year.

293 RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM seconded Councillor Marcus Cornish that the matter be brought forward and dealt with as a matter of urgency.

 

His Worship the Mayor, Councillor John Thain, ruled that the matter was urgent and should be dealt with at the meeting.

294 RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM seconded Councillor Marcus Cornish that an amount of $1,100 be split between the three wards for the hire costs of St Marys Memorial Hall for the fundraiser for the guide dogs to be held in July next year.

 

RR 1           Proposed Link Road - Christie St and Links Rd   

Councillor Ross Fowler OAM requested a detailed memo regarding the proposed Link Road between Christie St and Links Rd connecting the expansion of the Lend Lease development at ADI including when construction will start and finish and a timeline of works.

 

RR 2           Planning Proposal     

Councillor Ross Fowler OAM requested that Council write to the Director General of Department of Planning and Environment and Local Members Stuart Ayres MP and Tanya Davies MP regarding the Planning Proposal for a cemetery at Fernhill Estate.

 

RR 3           Road System in Orchard Hills    

Councillor Tricia Hitchen requested a memo with the outcome of the audit of the roadways and traffic movements conducted 6 months after the opening of the new M4 ramps. Councillor Hitchen further requested weekly patrols be done of the roads to fill in the pot holes.

 

RR 4           Greater Sydney Region Plan      

Councillor Tricia Hitchen requested to speak on the Greater Sydney Region Plan. Councillor Hitchen acknowledged that the document was announced on Sunday 21 October 2017 and congratulated council on their work that has been lobbied for in the past is now reflected within the document. Councillor Hitchen mentioned how well Council is working with the State Government and a great plan overall.

 

UB 3           Leave of Absence      

Councillor Todd Carney requested a Leave of Absence from 18 November 2017 to 26 November 2017 inclusive.

295 RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Ben Price seconded Councillor Greg Davies that the matter be brought forward and dealt with as a matter of urgency.

His Worship the Mayor, Councillor John Thain, ruled that the matter was urgent and should be dealt with at the meeting.

296 RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Ben Price seconded Greg Davies that Leave of Absence be granted to Councillor Todd Carney from 18 November 2017 to 26 November 2017 inclusive.

 

RR 5           NBN Roll out in Penrith LGA      

Councillor Todd Carney requested that this matter be discussed at a Councillor Briefing to discuss how council can work with NBN to complete the NBN roll out in fibre-to-the-curb within the Penrith LGA similar to what was completed at Bellingen Shire Council.

 

RR 6           M9 Corridor Progress

Councillor Marcus Cornish requested a memo reply to all Councillors on the M9 Corridor progress including how many lanes and the inclusion of over passes.

 

UB 4           Code of Conduct       

Councillor Greg Davies requested that Council write to the Premier and Minister for Local Government regarding the new Council Code of Conduct introduced by the NSW State Government requesting that the same code of Conduct be applied to all State MP’s. If a decision is made that it not be applied to State MP’s the Premier advise Council why this decision was made.

297 RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM that the matter be brought forward and dealt with as a matter of urgency.

His Worship the Mayor, Councillor John Thain, ruled that the matter was urgent and should be dealt with at the meeting.

298 RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Kevin Crameri OAM that Council write to the Premier and Minister for Local Government regarding the new Council Code of Conduct introduced by the NSW State Government requesting that the same code of Conduct be applied to all State MP’s. If a decision is made that it not be applied to State MP’s the Premier advise Council why this decision was made.

 

RR 7           Penrith Council as a power supplier   

Councillor Marcus Cornish requested a memo reply to all Councillors on his previous request about Penrith City Council becoming a retail supplier of electricity at cost to the people of Penrith, the Western Suburbs and further afield.

 

Committee of the Whole

 

299 RESOLVED on the motion of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Jim Aitken OAM that the meeting adjourn to the Committee of the Whole to deal with the following matters, the time being 8:43pm.

 

1        Presence of the Public

 

CW1 RESOLVED on the motion of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Jim Aitken OAM that the press and public be excluded from Committee of the Whole to deal with the following matters:

 

 Outcome 1

 

2        Council Property - Lease Agreement - Suite 1, 54 Henry Street Penrith (former Council library)                                                                                                                  

 

This item has been referred to Committee of the Whole as the report refers to commercial information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed (i) prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied it; or (ii) confer a commercial advantage on a competitor of the Council; or (iii) reveal a trade secret and discussion of the matter in open meeting would be, on balance, contrary to the public interest.

 

3        Council Property - Lease Agreement - Part 32-52 Harris Street, North St Marys      

 

This item has been referred to Committee of the Whole as the report refers to commercial information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed (i) prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied it; or (ii) confer a commercial advantage on a competitor of the Council; or (iii) reveal a trade secret and discussion of the matter in open meeting would be, on balance, contrary to the public interest.

 

 

The meeting resumed at 8:46pm and the General Manager reported that the Committee of the Whole met at 8:43pm on 23 October 2017, the following being present

 

His Worship the Mayor, Councillor John Thain, Deputy Mayor, Councillor Tricia Hitchen, and Councillors Jim Aitken OAM, Bernard Bratusa, Todd Carney, Marcus Cornish, Kevin Crameri OAM, Greg Davies, Aaron Duke, Ross Fowler OAM, Karen McKeown, Kath Presdee and Ben Price.

 

and the Committee of the Whole excluded the press and public from the meeting for the reasons set out in CW1 and that the Committee of the Whole submitted the following recommendations to Council.

 

CONFIDENTIAL BUSINESS

 

2        Council Property - Lease Agreement - Suite 1, 54 Henry Street Penrith (former Council library)                                                                                                                  

RECOMMENDED on the MOTION of Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM seconded Councillor Marcus Cornish

CW2 That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Council Property - Lease Agreement - Suite 1, 54 Henry Street Penrith (former Council library) be received

2.    Council approve the proposed new lease agreement under the terms and conditions listed within the report.

3.    The Common Seal of the Council of the City of Penrith be placed on all necessary documentation.

 

3        Council Property - Lease Agreement - Part 32-52 Harris Street, North St Marys      

RECOMMENDED on the MOTION of Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM seconded Councillor Marcus Cornish

CW3 That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Council Property - Lease Agreement - Part 32-52 Harris Street, North St Marys be received

2.    Council approve the proposed new lease agreement under the terms and conditions listed within the report.

3.    The Common Seal of the Council of the City of Penrith be placed on all necessary documentation.

 

ADOPTION OF Committee of the Whole

 

300 RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Jim Aitken OAM seconded Councillor Ross Fowler OAM that the recommendation contained in the Committee of the Whole and shown as CW1, CW2 and CW3 be adopted.

 

 

There being no further business the Chairperson declared the meeting closed the time being 8:47pm.

 



PENRITH CITY COUNCIL

 

Procedure for Addressing Meetings

 

Anyone can request permission to address a meeting, providing that the number of speakers is limited to three in support of any proposal and three against.

 

Any request about an issue or matter on the Agenda for the meeting can be lodged with the General Manager or Public Officer up until 12 noon on the day of the meeting.

 

Prior to the meeting the person who has requested permission to address the meeting will need to provide the Public Officer with a written statement of the points to be covered during the address in sufficient detail so as to inform the Councillors of the substance of the address and a written copy of any questions to be asked of the Council in order that responses to those questions can be provided in due course.

 

In addition, prior to addressing the meeting a person addressing Council or Committee will be informed that they do not enjoy any privilege and that permission to speak may be withdrawn should they make inappropriate comments.

 

It should be noted that persons who wish to address the Council are addressing a formal part of the Council Meeting. All persons addressing the Meeting should give consideration to their dress attire. Smart casual is a minimum that is thought to be appropriate when addressing such a forum.

 

It should be noted that speakers at meetings of the Council or Committee do not have absolute privilege (parliamentary privilege).  A speaker who makes any potentially offensive or defamatory remarks about any other person may render themselves open to legal action.

 

Prior to addressing the meeting the person will be required to sign the following statement:

 

“I (name) understand that the meeting I intend to address on (date) is a public meeting.  I also understand that should I say or present any material that is inappropriate, I may be subject to legal action.  I also acknowledge that I have been informed to obtain my own legal advice about the appropriateness of the material that I intend to present at the above mentioned meeting”.

 

Should a person fail to sign the above statement then permission to address either the Council or Committee will not be granted.

 

The Public Officer or Minute Clerk will speak to those people who have requested permission to address the meeting, prior to the meeting at 7.15pm.

 

It is up to the Council or Committee to decide if the request to address the meeting will be granted.

 

Where permission is to be granted the Council or Committee, at the appropriate time, will suspend only so much of the Standing Orders to allow the address to occur.

 

The Chairperson will then call the person up to the lectern or speaking area.

 

The person addressing the meeting needs to clearly indicate:

 

·       Their name;

 

·       Organisation or group they are representing (if applicable);

 

·       Details of the issue to be addressed and the item number of the report in the Business Paper;

 

·       Whether they are opposing or supporting the issue or matter (if applicable) and the action they would like the meeting to take;

 

·         The interest of the speaker (e.g. affected person, neighbour, applicant,    applicants spokesperson, interested citizen etc).

 

Each person then has five minutes to make their address.  Those addressing Council will be required to speak to the written statement they have submitted.  Permission to address Council is not to be taken as an opportunity to refute or otherwise the points made by previous speakers on the same issue. 

 

The Council or Committee can extend this time if they consider if appropriate, however, everyone needs to work on the basis that the address will be for five minutes only.

 

Councillors may have questions about the address so people are asked to remain at the lectern or in the speaking area until the Chairperson has thanked them.

 

When this occurs, they should then return to their seat.

 

Glenn McCarthy

Public Officer

02 4732 7649                                               

   


Mayoral Minutes

 

Item                                                                                                                                                Page

 

1        Louise Petchell Memorial Award                                                                                        1

 

2        Launch of new brand and Action Plan for The Quarter                                                     2

 

3        Nepean Triathlon                                                                                                                4

 

4        Vince Graham, AM - appointment as Director on the Board of WSA Co Limited             5

 

 

 

 

 

 



Ordinary Meeting                                                                                         27 November 2017

 

Mayoral Minute

Louise Petchell Memorial Award

           

 

It’s my pleasure to commend Council’s Sustainability Coordinator Carmel Hamilton on receiving the Louise Petchell Memorial Award at the LGNSW Excellence in the Environment Awards in October. The award recognises one individual from the whole state for their leadership, innovative approaches, and challenges they have overcome regarding sustainability.

 

Carmel’s achievements at Council and as a leader in the sustainability sector reflect the very ideals and spirit of the Louise Petchell memorial award and the characteristics that Louise embodied with her work. Carmel continues the work of Council in Louise’s legacy. Since Louise’s passing, thanks to Carmel’s leadership Council has undertaken a number of key sustainability actions including:

 

·    Adopting the Sustainability Policy and Sustainability Strategy

·    Imbedding sustainability into our IPR documents including the City Strategy, Resource Strategy, Delivery Program and annual Operational Plans

·    Incorporating sustainability into end of year staff performance reviews

·    Establishment of the Louise Petchell Learning for Sustainability Scholarship

·    Ongoing delivery of the MyIdea program

·    The Cooling the City Strategy

·    The Sustainable Buildings, sustainable events, Community Gardens Policies

·    The Sustainability Revolving Fund

·    The establishment of the Resilience Committee

·    This is in addition to ongoing sustainability improvements such as building upgrades and solar installations.

 

Penrith Council is proud to boast a reputation as being one of the leaders in sustainability in the local government sector. This award is recognition of Carmel’s leadership role in achieving this, and for the regard that she is held in across the industry.

 

 

Councillor John Thain

Mayor

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the Mayoral Minute on Louise Petchell Memorial Award be received.

 

 

 


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                         27 November 2017

 

Mayoral Minute

Launch of new brand and Action Plan for The Quarter

           

 

In Penrith, improvements to healthcare have long been led by community, our institutions built on partnerships and advancements made through collaboration. Our City’s first dispensary was established by a committed group of locals in 1846 and similarly, in 1860 community leaders rallied to build our first Hospital.

 

Fast forward to today, and this spirit of collaboration is alive and well in Penrith where on 23 October 2017 I was honoured to welcome key stakeholders and potential investors to the launch of The Quarter – the reimagined Penrith Health and Education Precinct. The event incorporated the launch of an Action Plan to drive the Precinct’s success including one of the first actions, development of a new brand and identity for the Precinct to position it at a global level.

 

The Action Plan was developed in consultation with The Quarter partners, including representatives from:

 

·    Nepean Hospital / Nepean Blue Mountains Local Health District

·    Nepean Private Hospital

·    TAFE NSW

·    Western Sydney University

·    University of Sydney Medical School

·    Primary Health Network

·    Celestino (who are developing Sydney Science Park)

·    NSW Health Infrastructure, and

·    Penrith City Council

 

The Action Plan outlines the Quarter’s vision for 6000 additional jobs, attracting world class medical researchers, educators and innovators to the region. The Precinct spans 300 hectares between Penrith and St Marys. The realisation of the Action Plan will see tertiary institutions, research facilities and hospitals collaborating to accelerate the implementation of cutting edge technologies and medical advances in patient care and treatment in our local community.

 

The Quarter will consolidate and build on record levels of new infrastructure and investment to the region, leveraging off the international airport and major road upgrades, along with significant spending on major hospitals like Nepean.

 

I would like to thank and commend all who were involved in the launch of The Quarter and the significant work to develop the Action Plan and vision that will drive its success. In particular I acknowledge the Precinct Leadership Committee and all of the representatives of their respective organisations who give their time so generously and Chair Greg Allchin for his dedication over many years.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thank you also to TAFE NSW who hosted the launch at their impressive Health Services Building and provided their hospitality and catering students who were extremely professional.

 

 

Councillor John Thain

Mayor

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the Mayoral Minute on Launch of new brand and Action Plan for The Quarter be received.

 

 

 


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                         27 November 2017

 

Mayoral Minute

Nepean Triathlon

           

 

The 2017 Nepean Triathlon was held over the weekend of 28 and 29 October. Once again, this iconic Australian Triathlon that is synonymous with Penrith was a huge success, featuring just under 1,400 competitors, including a number of interstate and overseas competitors. This year marked the 36th year that the event has been held making it the longest running triathlon in Australia.

 

Penrith City Council has supported the Nepean Triathlon for many years from the time it was a fledgling event, and has watched it grow to become the most successful triathlon in the country. Since 2008, Council’s support has also included an annual financial contribution that has helped the event to survive and flourish to the level it is today where it is universally recognised as Australia’s premier triathlon.

 

Council is well aware of the vital role that events such as this play in our community. They not only give our people the opportunity to connect with our City and actively participate but also bring a vibrancy to our City.

 

With world class venues such as the Sydney International Regatta Centre, access to public transport and the majestic Blue Mountains as our backdrop it is little wonder why Penrith has become a stand-out choice for major events. The annual Nepean Triathlon is one such event that helps to put Penrith on the map and showcase our City as a desirable tourism destination.

 

On behalf of the Council I would like to congratulate Nepean Triathlon organising committee for delivering such a wonderful event each year for our City. I wish you continued success into the future and look forward to continuing our long association with you.

 

 

Councillor John Thain

Mayor

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the Mayoral Minute on Nepean Triathlon be received.

 

 

 


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                         27 November 2017

 

Mayoral Minute

Vince Graham, AM - appointment as Director on the Board of WSA Co Limited

           

 

Mr Vince Graham, AM has been appointed as a Director on the Board of WSA Co Limited, the Government company building Western Sydney Airport.

 

Born and raised in Penrith, Vince brings a wealth of experience and expertise in the public sector to his role as Director of WSA Co Limited.

 

During his long and distinguished career in the NSW Public Service, Vince was Chief Operating Officer of the State Rail Authority, Managing Director of National Rail Corporation and Chief Executive of RailCorp. He first joined the public service in 1969 as a civil engineer for the NSW Railways and he retired in 2015.

 

Earlier this year, Vince was made a Member of the Order of Australia for almost half a century of service to public administration in New South Wales and he received the Alumni of the Year Award for Community Achievement from the University of Sydney in 2014.

 

There is no doubt that the Western Sydney Airport is a game changing development that represents an extraordinary opportunity to shape our region into a vibrant hub of economic activity.  It has the capacity to unlock Penrith’s exciting future and provide more local jobs, increased industry, investment and infrastructure that will open up our City to Australia and the world.

 

I congratulate Vince on behalf of our community who are closely watching the development of the Western Sydney Airport.

 

 

Councillor John Thain

Mayor

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the Mayoral Minute on Vince Graham, AM - appointment as Director on the Board of WSA Co Limited be received.

 

 

  


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


Reports of Committees

 

Item                                                                                                                                                Page

 

1        Report and Recommendations of the Resilience Committee Meeting held on 4 October 2017                                                                                                                                    1

 

2        Report and Recommendations of the Access Committee Meeting held on 11 October 2017                                                                                                                                             3

 

3        Report and Recommendations of the Local Traffic Committee Meeting held on 6 November 2017                                                                                                                                    6

 

4        Report and Recommendations of the Policy Review Committee Meeting held on 13 November 2017                                                                                                                15

 

 

 

 

 

 



Ordinary Meeting                                                                                         27 November 2017

 

REPORT AND RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE
 Resilience Committee MEETING

HELD ON 4 October, 2017

 

 

 

PRESENT

Councillors Karen McKeown and Kath Presdee, Associate Professor Bradley Forssman, Nevin Sweeney, Carina Fernandes, Michelle Tormey.

 

IN ATTENDANCE

Sandy Davies – Executive Manager People and Capability, Carmel Hamilton – Sustainability Coordinator, Andrew Hewson – Sustainability Education Officer, Aisha Poole – Resource Recovery Coordinator, John O’Callaghan – Director at JOC Consulting.

 

APOLOGIES

His Worship the Mayor, Councillor John Thain, Helen Ryan, Jeremy Spinak, Suzanne Dunford and Dr Teresa Swist.

 

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES - Resilience Committee Meeting - 5 July 2017

The minutes of the Resilience Committee Meeting of 5 July 2017 were confirmed.

 

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

 Nil

 

DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Outcome 5 - We care about our environment

 

1        Penrith Waste and Resource Recovery Strategy (2017-2026)

Aisha Poole presented the report, providing an overview of the recently adopted Waste and Resource Recovery Strategy.

 

The Strategy covers residential waste collection for the next 10 years and aims to achieve a higher level of resource recovery and landfill avoidance in line with state set targets, be more equitable in offering the same collections to more residents, and offering simpler choices in terms of collection options. The Strategy focuses on opportunities presented through innovation, new technologies and facilities, and community education to build upon Council’s leadership in waste management  into the future.

         

RECOMMENDED

That the information contained in the report on Penrith Waste and Resource Recovery Strategy (2017-2026) be received

 

2        Priority Setting Interviews - Preliminary Results

Carmel Hamilton presented on the outcomes of the individual interviews that had been undertaken with Committee members to identify committee members’ areas of interest and where they believe the Committee should be focusing. There was broad agreement from the respondents that there should be focus on greencover and improving social cohesion, as well as climate change adaptation, supporting urban food and healthy lifestyles.

Broadly 4 key focus areas were proposed for the Committee into the future: 

·    Key Council Policies & Projects

·    Awareness and Influence of Existing Work Programs

·    Committee Led Projects or Activities

·    Opportunities that Members Bring to the Group

A number of project ideas were suggested by Committee members. Facilitator John O’Callaghan then guided the group in a discussion about the findings of the research and discussing Committee members’ priorities and interests. The Committee then charted priority project ideas in terms of cost and effectiveness, and then project plans were drafted about how some of the projects could be delivered.

 

Broadly the two key themes to emerge were:

·    An interest that the committee provide advice and guidance in regards to focus areas 1 & 2 - Key Council Policies & Projects and Awareness and Influence of Existing Work Programs.

·    An interest that some committee members be actively involved in community level projects.

The results of this facilitated workshop will be reported back to the Committee prior to the next meeting.  

 

RECOMMENDED

That the information contained in the report on Priority Setting Interviews - Preliminary Results  be received.

 

GENERAL BUSINESS

GB 1           Sustainability Revolving Fund   

Michelle Tormey inquired about Council’s Sustainability Revolving Fund and Councillor McKeown requested that an update on Council’s Sustainability Revolving Fund be provided to Committee members when the minutes are sent out.

 

GB 2           REAL Festival 2017   

Councillor Kath Presdee informed the Committee of Council’s upcoming REAL Festival being held at Tench Reserve by the Nepean River on 4 -5 November 2017. REAL is an acronym for River, Arts, Environment, Lifestyle. There are a number of workshops and activities being held over the Festival that may be of interest to Committee members and flyers were made available. 

 

It may be appropriate for feedback on the activities and events on offer as part of the Festival to be coordinated and provided to Council for consideration in the planning of the 2018 event. Any feedback can be provided at the next Committee meeting in January 2018.

 

There being no further business the Chairperson declared the meeting closed the time being 8:05pm.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the recommendations contained in the Report and Recommendations of the Resilience Committee meeting held on 4 October, 2017 be adopted.

 

 


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                         27 November 2017

 

REPORT AND RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE
 Access Committee MEETING

HELD ON 11 October, 2017

 

 

 

PRESENT

Deputy Mayor, Councillor Tricia Hitchen (Chair), Anthony Mulholland, Allen Windley, Farah Madon, Carole Grayson, David Currie, Councillor Todd Carney (5.35pm).

 

IN ATTENDANCE

 

Hans Meijer – City Assets Manager, Jane Hetherington – Environmental Planner, Craig Squires – Acting Coordinator Certification and Fire Safety, Claire Galvin – Disability Inclusion Officer, Erich Weller – Community and Cultural Development Manager, Ari Fernando – Acting Design and Projects Manager (5.17pm).

 

APOLOGIES

Apologies were accepted from Graham Howe.

 

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES - Access Committee Meeting - 9 August 2017

The minutes of the Access Committee Meeting of 9 August 2017 were confirmed.

 

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

 

Nil.

 

DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Outcome 2 - We plan for our future growth

 

1        Development Applications Referred to the Access Committee                                  

DA17/0665     Six Storey Split Level Hospital Carpark, Rooftop Helipad and Related Stormwater Drainage, Servicing, Landscaping and Soil Remediation Works

Jane Hetherington spoke to the report regarding the proposal for a six-storey multilevel carpark on the hospital site, a rooftop helipad and related drainage, servicing and landscaping works.  Jane Hetherington described the site for the proposed development.

 

The proposed development is located within the north-western area of the Nepean District Hospital on the corner of Barber Avenue and Parker Street.

 

The proposed six level multi-deck carpark consists of 627 spaces, including the provision of six accessible spaces.

 

Ari Fernando arrived at the meeting at 5.17pm.

 

Two lifts are to be provided adjacent to the lobby on the upper deck and lower deck.  Stairs will be provided on every level.

 

There is a pedestrian overpass on the second level which connects the carpark to the adjoining hospital building. This gives direct access into the ICU building.

 

Jane Hetherington advised that the footpath from the lobby connects to the existing footpath and runs on the north of the site at a gradient of 1:20 gradient.  An access report had been requested and was provided today.

 

Issues discussed by the Committee included:

 

·    The width and angle of the stairs

·    The ratio of accessible parking as the Committee was concerned that there were not enough accessible spaces

·    The accessible parking spaces be as close to the lift as possible

·    The ceiling height of accessible parking spots

·    The type of ticketing system to be used in the carpark

·    Ticket machines should comply with 1428.2 regulation on heights

·    Signage directing people where to go

·    Possibility of doors in the lobby area being automatic

·    Drop off point at the hospital.

 

Councillor Todd Carney arrived at the meeting at 5.35pm.

 

RECOMMENDED

That:

 

1.       The information contained in the report on Development Applications Referred to the Access Committee be received.

 

2.       Council speak to the architects regarding consideration of additional accessible parking spaces for the development.

 

Jane Hetherington left the meeting at 5.36pm.

 

Outcome 3 - We can get around the City

 

2        High Street Penrith's Footpaths Upgrade - Communications Strategy                      

 

Ari Fernando spoke to the report regarding the communications strategy to be used during the lead up and construction of the upgrade to footpaths in High Street, Penrith.

 

The current upgrade is between Triangle Park, Riley Street, and Memory Park, Woodriff Street and from Triangle Park to Henry Street.

 

Upgrade will be made to two pedestrian crossings between Riley and Woodriff Streets and two traffic islands will be extended. An accessible parking spot will be provided on the street.

 

A major drainage upgrade will occur in Triangle Park with some drainage extending to Station Street.

 

The communication strategy has involved input from all internal groups, face to face engagement with shop tenants, information being provided on Council’s website and Facebook, as well as a fortnightly newsletter and notices.

 

Discussion by the Committee included the following issues:

 

·    Concern regarding the slope on the eastern side footpath on Riley Street from Triangle Park

·    Query regarding moving the button at the traffic lights

·    The danger of crossing near the corner of Triangle Park

·    The gradient to the Commonwealth Bank

·    No warning indicators or tactile warning indicators to let people know that there is a road there

·    The carpark underneath the buildings and two driveways.

 

Ari Fernando advised that the works will commence in February/March next year and be completed before Christmas 2018.

 

RECOMMENDED

That the information contained in the report on High Street Penrith's Footpaths Upgrade - Communications Strategy be received.

 

GENERAL BUSINESS

 

GB 1           Nepean Jobs for All Project        

Claire Galvin advised that the first breakfast for the Nepean Jobs for All project was held on 10 October in Penrith.  Forty people attended the breakfast with three businesses advising they will have employment vacancies in the next few months.  The vacancies are to be filled by local people.

 

GB 2           Bus Stop near Hospital      

Anthony Mulholland advised that he had received a number of complaints from people about the bus stop near the hospital construction site.  Due to parking in the bus zone the bus cannot stop and the people miss their ride.  He suggested that there are not adequate parking spaces and another pedestrian crossing could be needed.  Another suggestion was to move the bus stop from the island to further down the road to make it easier for people to cross.

 

Erich Weller advised that this issue would be referred to the Local Traffic Committee.

 

GB 3           TGSIs       

Farah Madon referred to the issue of TGSIs and that they should be compliant with Australian standards.

 

Ari Fernando advised that at every location where there is a crossing there should be a consistent approach with the installation of TGSIs.

 

There being no further business the Chairperson declared the meeting closed the time being 6.57pm.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the recommendations contained in the Report and Recommendations of the Access Committee meeting held on 11 October, 2017 be adopted.

 

 

 


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                         27 November 2017

 

REPORT AND RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE
 Local Traffic Committee MEETING

HELD ON 6 November, 2017

 

 

 

PRESENT

Deputy Mayor, Councillor Tricia Hitchen (Representative for the Member for Penrith), Councillor Karen McKeown (Council Representative), Wayne Mitchell (Chair) – Executive Manager Environment and City Development, Laura Van Putten – Roads and Maritime Services, Matthew Shirvington – Penrith Police LAC.

 

IN ATTENDANCE

Steve Grady – Busways, Nick Veljanovski – Transit Systems NSW, Paul Bottomley - Comfort Delgro Cabcharge NSW (Blue Mountains Transit), Adam Wilkinson – Engineering Services Manager, David Drozd – Traffic Engineering Coordinator, Graham Green – Senior Traffic Engineer, Daniel Davidson – Senior Traffic Engineer, Ruth Byrnes – Senior Traffic Officer, Kexin Ran – Development Engineer, Noel Fuller – Ranger and Animal Services Coordinator, Bernie Meier – Signs and Linemarking Officer.

 

LEAVE OF ABSENCE

Leave of Absence was previously granted to Councillor Joshua Hoole for the period 23 October 2017 to 12 November 2017 inclusive.

APOLOGIES

Councillor Marcus Cornish, Stephen Page – St Marys Police LAC, David Lance – Roads and Maritime Services, Catherine Waerner – Road Safety Officer, Kevin King – Trainee Engineer, Caitlin Bailey – Trainee Engineer.

 

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES - Local Traffic Committee Meeting - 9 October 2017

Laura Van Putten of Roads and Maritime Services (RMS) made reference to Item 8 on “Kurrajong and Maple Roads, and Plasser Crescent, North St Marys – Endorsement of Design Plans” previously raised at 9 October 2017 LTC meeting. Laura Van Putten advised that RMS does not support the splitter islands at the proposed roundabout with a width of less than 2 metres (in line with the RMS Technical Direction for a pedestrian refuge).

David Drozd – Traffic Engineering Coordinator advised that Council will amend the Design Plan to reflect a 2 metre width gap in the splitter islands and once finalised, will forward the updated Design Plan to RMS.

The minutes of the Local Traffic Committee Meeting of 9 October 2017 were confirmed.

 

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

Councillor Karen McKeown declared an interest in Item 3 “Hosking Street, Cranebrook – Change of Part-time Children’s Crossing into Full-time Pedestrian Crossing” and informed the Committee that she works at Cranebrook Neighbourhood Centre, located adjacent to Cranebrook Village Shopping Centre on Hosking Street, Cranebrook.

 


 

DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Outcome 3 - We can get around the City

 

 

1        Radar Speed Management Trailer - July to September 2017 Locations                    

Deputy Mayor, Councillor Tricia Hitchen (Representative for the Member for Penrith), made reference to Item 7 “Radar Speed Message Trailer – April to June 2017 Locations” previously raised at 9 October 2017 LTC meeting where she requested a copy of the speeds relating to the locations the radar speed message trailer were assigned to in the Oxley Park area. She advised that she has not yet received the speeds.

David Drozd – Traffic Engineering Coordinator advised that Council has received additional information for the Oxley Park area and once the information has been collated, it will be forwarded on via memorandum to Deputy Mayor, Councillor Tricia Hitchen, as Recommended at last month’s LTC meeting.

RECOMMENDED

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Radar Speed Management Trailer - July to September 2017 Locations be received.

2.     The July to September 2017 locations be noted.

 

2        John Tipping Grove, Penrith - Proposed 'No Parking' Signage                                  

RECOMMENDED

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on John Tipping Grove, Penrith - Proposed 'No Parking' Signage be received.

2.     A ‘No Parking’ zone be installed in the cul-de-sac of John Tipping Grove north of Union Lane, Penrith, as shown in Appendices 1 and 2.

3.     Council’s Rangers Department, the operator of the car sales yard and the property owner be informed.

 

3        Hosking Street, Cranebrook - Change of Part-time Children's Crossing into Full-time Pedestrian Crossing                                                                                                 

Councillor Karen McKeown declared an interest in this item and informed the Committee that she works at Cranebrook Neighbourhood Centre located adjacent to Cranebrook Village Shopping Centre on Hosking Street, Cranebrook.

Laura Van Putten of RMS requested a copy of the recorded pedestrian number warrants to change the part-time children’s crossing into a full-time pedestrian crossing. She advised that a risk analysis/ assessment will need to be undertaken by RMS for this location to support the change from a children’s crossing to a pedestrian crossing.

Matthew Shirvington of Penrith Police LAC highlighted the safety importance of a pedestrian crossing at this location and requested the proposed pedestrian crossing occur as soon as possible and for the matter not to be delayed. 

Councillor Karen McKeown highlighted the need for a pedestrian crossing at this location due to large numbers of pedestrians, particularly children who use the crossing between 7:00am – 7:30am. 

RECOMMENDED

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Hosking Street, Cranebrook - Change of Part-time Children's Crossing into Full-time Pedestrian Crossing be received.

2.     The existing footcrossing on Hosking Street, Cranebrook, be changed into a Full-time Marked Footcrossing, as shown in Appendix 1, subject to a Risk Assessment being undertaken and submitted to RMS for endorsement.

3.     A street lighting assessment be conducted in accordance with Council’s Public Domain Lighting Policy to ensure compliance with the relevant lighting category.

4.     Cranebrook High School be advised of Council’s decision.

 

4        High Street, Penrith – Proposed 1 Hour Parking (1P) Zone Restrictions                   

Laura Van Putten of RMS advised that the proposed changes from unrestricted parking to 1 Hour Parking (1P) zone restrictions is within a 1km radius of Penrith Railway Station. As such, this matter is required to be sent to Roads and Maritime Services to review and refer to Transport for NSW (TfNSW) for endorsement.

RECOMMENDED

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on High Street, Penrith – Proposed 1 Hour Parking (1P) Zone Restrictions be received.

2.     Consultation be undertaken with adjoining business and Roads and Maritime Services (RMS) for the proposed parking changes along High Street to the east of Evan Street intersection, Penrith regarding the parking changes from unrestricted parking spaces to a 1 Hour Parking (1P) Zone as shown in attachment 2.

3.     Subject to no substantial objections being received, 23 metres of 1 Hour Parking (1P) Zone be installed on the southern side of High Street, Penrith as shown in attachment 2.

4.     Council’s Ranger Services and the resident that raised the matter be advised of Council’s resolution.

 

5        Central Park Drive, Claremont Meadows - Proposed 'Bus Stop'                                 

RECOMMENDED

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Central Park Drive, Claremont Meadows - Proposed 'Bus Stop'  be received.

2.     The ‘Bus Stop’ be installed by Busways at 11m east of Silverwater Way as shown in Appendix 1.

3.     Busways be informed of the outcome.

4.     The resident who raised the matter be informed of the outcome.

 

 

6        Talara Avenue and Coco Drive, Glenmore Park - Proposed 'No Stopping' Restrictions                                                                                                                        

RECOMMENDED

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Talara Avenue and Coco Drive, Glenmore Park - Proposed 'No Stopping' Restrictions be received.

2.     ‘No Stopping’ restrictions be provided for the length of 10m on all approaches to the intersection of Talara Avenue and Coco Drive, Glenmore Park as shown in Appendix 1.

3.     The resident who reported the matter, Caroline Chisholm College and the residents adjacent to the proposed ‘No Stopping’ restrictions be advised of Council’s resolution.

 

7        Rodley Avenue, Penrith - Proposed Parking Restrictions                                           

Laura Van Putten of RMS advised that the proposed change from unrestricted parking to ‘No Parking - Waste Collection and Removalist Vehicles Excepted’ restrictions is within a 1km radius of Penrith Railway Station. As such, this matter is required to be sent to Roads and Maritime Services to review and refer to Transport for NSW (TfNSW) for endorsement.

RECOMMENDED

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Rodley Avenue, Penrith - Proposed Parking Restrictions be received.

2.     Consultation be undertaken with Roads and Maritime Services (RMS) for the proposed, “No Parking – Waste Collection and Removalist Vehicles Excepted” signage as shown in Appendix 1.

3.     Subject to no substantial objections being received, “No Parking – Waste Collection and Removalist Vehicles Excepted” signage be installed on Rodley Avenue as shown in Appendix 1.

3.     Affected residents, Council’s Waste Services and Ranger Services be advised of Council’s decision.

 

8        High Street and Riley Street, Penrith - Footpath Widening, Pedestrian Crossing Adjustments and Marked Parking Spaces                                                                     

Deputy Mayor, Councillor Tricia Hitchen (Representative for the Member for Penrith),  advised the Committee about concerns regarding the lack of undercover accessible parking spaces being available close to the shops and businesses on High Street, Penrith. Deputy Mayor, Councillor Tricia Hitchen stated that she was aware that there are limited opportunities for accessible parking spaces to be provided on-street due to safety requirements and, as such, requested that investigations be conducted into providing additional undercover accessible parking spaces in the Judges Place Car Park.

Laura Van Putten of RMS advised the Committee about additional signage required on High Street and Riley Street, Penrith that is not reflected in Design Plans. The additional signage required includes an additional ‘Motor Cycles Only’ parking restriction sign to close the restricted motor cycle parking zone on Riley Street as shown on Design Plan No. 0215 0738 01 WD 610 and the addition of a ½ Hour restricted parking sign to close the ½ Hour restricted parking zone on High Street, Penrith as shown on Design Plan Design Plan No. 0215 0738 01 WD 612.

Graham Green – Senior Traffic Engineer advised that the Design Plans will be reviewed and amended accordingly to reflect the additional signage.

Laura Van Putten of RMS advised the Committee that the Traffic Control Signal plans (TCS) for the proposed upgrade works on High Street and Riley Street, Penrith would need to be reviewed and approved by Roads and Maritime Services as part of a separate approval process.

RECOMMENDED

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on High Street and Riley Street, Penrith - Footpath Widening, Pedestrian Crossing Adjustments and Marked Parking Spaces be received.

2.     The proposed footpath widening, pedestrian crossing adjustments and marked parking spaces in High Street and Riley Street, Penrith as shown on Design Plans No. 0215 0738 01 WD 610 to 0215 0738 01 WD 616 Revision C dated 24 October 2017 and shown in Appendices 1-7 be approved, subject to additional signage requested by RMS.

3.     Council’s Traffic Engineers investigate Judges Place Carpark, off Woodriff Street, Penrith and review options for providing additional undercover accessible parking spaces and a report be brought back to a future Local Traffic Committee meeting. 

4.     The Traffic Control Signal plans (TCS) for the proposed upgrade works on High Street and Riley Street, Penrith be sent to Roads and Maritime Services as part of a separate approval process.

 

 

9        Somerset Street, Kingswood - Proposed "No Stopping" at Doctor Surgery Driveway                                                                                                                             

It was highlighted that Appendix 1 for this matter shows proposed pavement hatched linemarking at the driveway to Shakeshaft Rooms Doctor Surgery. It was clarified that hatched linemarking would not be provided at this location and that Appendix 1 will be amended to reflect this.

RECOMMENDED

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Somerset Street, Kingswood - Proposed "No Stopping" at Doctor Surgery Driveway be received.

2.     The “No Stopping” zone signage on Somerset Street, Kingswood at the driveway to Shakeshaft Rooms Doctor Surgery as shown on amended Appendix 1 be approved.

3.     The practice manager of Shakeshaft Rooms Doctor Surgery be advised.

 

10      Bennett Road, St Clair - Proposed Increase to 'No Stopping' Zone                            

RECOMMENDED

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Bennett Road, St Clair - Proposed Increase to 'No Stopping' Zone be received.

2.     Consultation be undertaken with adjoining property owners.

3.     Subject to no substantial objections being received, the existing ‘No Stopping’ area be extended to cover the frontage of property number 7 and adjoining property driveways fronting property number 9 Bennett Road, St Clair as per appendix 1.

4.     The resident who raised the matter be advised of Council’s resolution.

 

11      Dorset Street, Cambridge Park - Proposed 'No Stopping' Signage at Intersection  

RECOMMENDED

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Dorset Street, Cambridge Park - Proposed 'No Stopping' Signage at Intersection be received.

2.     The affected residents be notified regarding Council’s intention to install ‘No Stopping’ signage as shown in Appendix 1.

3.     Following notification, ‘No Stopping’ restrictions be installed at the intersection of Dorset Street and Newport Street, Cambridge Park, as shown in Appendix 1.

4.     The resident who contacted Council be advised of Council’s decision.

 

 

GENERAL BUSINESS

 

GB 1           Jamison Park, South Penrith - Endorsement of Design Plan for     Additional Parking     

Ruth Byrnes – Senior Traffic Officer presented a detailed Design Plan No. 110464, dated 25 October 2017 for the construction of proposed netball court and car park works at Jamison Park, South Penrith. 

The purpose of this report is to seek endorsement of a design plan for the provision of, in part, additional car parking in Jamison Park, South Penrith.  The report recommends that the design plan be endorsed.

Current Situation

As part of the Community Development Grants (CDG) Program, Council has received funding for the provision of new netball courts, lighting and car parking at the Jamison Park, South Penrith.  A condition of that grant was the provision of additional parking.  The design plan is for the three netball courts, as well as “car park 1” (south) providing 27 spaces, and “car park 2” (north) providing 37 spaces, including two accessible spaces, totalling 64 parking spaces. 

It is recommended that the design plan, where it relates to car parking, be endorsed for construction.  The works are expected to be completed by 31 January 2018.

 

Laura Van Putten of RMS advised the Committee that RMS will support Design Plan No. 110464, dated 25 October 2017 for construction, subject to all dimensions complying with the Australian Standards.

 

RECOMMENDED

          That:

1.    The information contained in the report on GB1. Jamison Park, Penrith – endorsement of Design Plan for Additional Parking be received. 

2.    The design plan prepared by J Wyndham Prince, numbered 110464, 25 October 2017, relating to additional car parking, be endorsed for construction, subject to all dimensions complying with the Australian Standards. 

3.    Council’s Acting Major Projects and Design Manager be advised of Council’s resolution. 

 

GB 2           Evan Street and Henry Street, Penrith - Right Turn Movements at Intersection                  

Deputy Mayor, Councillor Tricia Hitchen expressed concerns about north bound vehicle movements when turning right from Evan Street into Henry Street, Penrith. Deputy Mayor, Councillor Tricia Hitchen advised that traffic tends to queue and bank up along Evan Street due to phasing of the traffic signals.

David Drozd – Traffic Engineering Coordinator advised that Council will write to RMS and request a review of the traffic signal phasing at this subject intersection, to ensure it is working at optimum levels and further request a review of north bound lane allocations.

RECOMMENDED

          That:

1.   Council write to the Roads and Maritime Services (RMS) and request a review of the traffic signals phasing at the intersection of Evan Street and Henry Street, Penrith to ensure it is working at optimum levels and further request a review of north bound lane allocations.

 

2.   Deputy Mayor, Councillor Tricia Hitchen be advised of the outcome.

 

GB 3           Tench Avenue, Jamisontown - Bus Operations at the REAL Festival    

Steve Grady of Busways advised that bus operations during the ‘REAL Festival’ event held over the weekend from Friday 3 November to Sunday 5 November 2017 at Tench Reserve and Tench Avenue, Jamisontown went well. However, Steve Grady advised that on the Friday, there was an issue with traffic controllers letting buses travel southbound on Tench Avenue. Steve Grady requested that Council brief the traffic controllers in the future about bus movements on Tench Avenue, Jamisontown prior to the next REAL Festival held next year.

RECOMMENDED

          That:

1.   The Committee note the information.

 

2.   Council’s Events Team be notified of this information.

 


 

GB 4           Jane Street, Penrith - Opening of New Bus Interchange at Penrith                    Railway Station on 17 November 2017

Steve Grady of Busways advised the Committee that the new Bus Interchange at Penrith Railway Station on Jane Street, Penrith will be opening on 17 November 2017. Steve Grady advised that up until the 5 December 2017, buses will continue to use the temporary bus access off Belmore Street due to additional works occurring.

RECOMMENDED

          That the Committee note the information.

 

GB 5           The Northern Road and Frogmore Road, Orchard Hills - Removal          of Bus Stop and Pedestrian Facilities    

Steve Grady of Busways advised the Committee about the removal of the Bus Stop on The Northern Road, Orchard Hills at its intersection with Frogmore Road as part of The Northern Road Upgrade and that traffic signals have been provided at this intersection.

Adam Wilkinson – Engineering Services Manager advised that although there are no pedestrian facilities at this location on the Northern Road, there will be future pedestrian phasing available at the traffic signals for them to cross. Adam Wilkinson – Engineering Services Manager advised Steve Grady that (prior to the removal of the bus stop) confirmation should be sought from Lendlease who are coordinating construction works as part of The Northern Road Upgrade for RMS, with regard to pedestrian phasing at this location.

RECOMMENDED

          That the Committee note the information.

 

GB 6           Queen Street, St Marys - Reinstatement of Bus Stops 

Steve Grady of Busways advised the Committee that all Bus Stops in Queen Street, St Marys have been reinstated and are back in use.

RECOMMENDED

          That the Committee note the information.

 

GB 7           Riley Street and Jane Street, Penrith - Traffic Signals and Bus      Operations                  

Paul Bottomley of Comfort Delgro Cabcharge NSW (Blue Mountains Transit) and Nick Veljanovski of Transit Systems NSW enquired about information relating to the phasing of the traffic signals at the intersection of Riley Street and Jane Street, Penrith as part of the Penrith Railway Station Upgrade. Mr Paul Bottomley expressed concerns about traffic trying to get into Riley Street and in considering this, CDC NSW may need to amend their bus service timetables.

RECOMMENDED

          That Council’s Traffic Officers write to RMS requesting that information regarding the phasing of the traffic lights at the intersection of Riley Street and Jane Street, Penrith be forwarded to Comfort Delgro Cabcharge (Blue Mountains Transit), Busways and Transit Systems NSW. 

 


 

 

GB 8           Riley Street, Penrith - Christmas Twilight Tree Lighting Event      

Paul Bottomley of Comfort Delgro Cabcharge NSW (Blue Mountains Transit) and Nick Veljanovski of Transit Systems NSW enquired about the date of the ‘Christmas Twilight Tree Lighting’ event and the associated road closures occurring as well as the upgrade of Riley Street, Penrith. Paul Bottomley advised that in considering the associated road closures and upgrade of Riley Street, bus service routes may need to be re-routed and appropriate changes be made to bus timetables.

Ruth Byrnes – Senior Traffic Officer advised that the Christmas Tree event will occur on Friday, 17 November 2017. Ruth Byrnes also advised that as part of the conditions of approval for this event, the event applicant is required to discuss with all bus companies about all the associated road closures occurring as part of this event.

RECOMMENDED

          That Council’s Senior Traffic Officer contact the event applicant and advise them that as part of the conditions for approval for the ‘Christmas Twilight Tree Lighting’ event occurring on 17 November 2017, they and/or Westfield are to contact all the relevant bus companies and advise them of information about the event and the associated road closures that will be occurring.

 

 

There being no further business the Chairperson declared the meeting closed the time being 10:15am.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the recommendations contained in the Report and Recommendations of the Local Traffic Committee meeting held on 6 November, 2017 be adopted.

 

 

 


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                         27 November 2017

 

REPORT AND RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE
 Policy Review Committee MEETING

HELD ON 13 November, 2017

 

 

 

PRESENT

His Worship the Mayor, Councillor John Thain, Deputy Mayor, Councillor Tricia Hitchen, and Councillors Jim Aitken OAM, Bernard Bratusa, Todd Carney, Marcus Cornish, Greg Davies, Mark Davies, Aaron Duke, Ross Fowler OAM, Joshua Hoole, Karen McKeown and Ben Price.

LEAVE OF ABSENCE

Leave of Absence was previously granted to Councillor Kath Presdee for the period 12 November 2017 to 19 November 2017 inclusive.

 

APOLOGIES

Apologies were received for Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM.

 

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES - Policy Review Committee Meeting - 9 October 2017

The minutes of the Policy Review Committee Meeting of 9 October 2017 were confirmed.

 

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

 
Councillor Tricia Hitchen declared a Non-Pecuniary Conflict of Interest – Less than Significant in Item 3 – St Marys Town Centre Triennial Business Plan 2016-2019 and Operational Plan 2017-2018 as she is on the board of St Marys Town Centre Corporation.

 

DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Outcome 4 - We have safe, vibrant places

 

3        St Marys Town Centre Triennial Business Plan 2016-2019 and Operational Plan 2017-2018

Councillor Jim Aitken OAM left the meeting, the time being 7:44pm.

Councillor Jim Aitken OAM returned to the meeting, the time being 7:45pm.                             

RECOMMENDED

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on St Marys Town Centre Triennial Business Plan 2016-19 and Operational Plan 2017-18 be received.

2.    Council receive information on the Annual Report and Audited Financial Statement 2016-17 of the St Marys Town Centre Corporation.

3.    Council endorse the St Marys Town Centre Corporation’s Triennial Business Plan 2016-19 and Annual Operational Plan 2017-18.

4.     The utilisation of the excess funds of the organisation be subject of a future council report.

 

Outcome 7 - We have confidence in our Council

 

4        Penrith Performing and Visual Arts Ltd - Annual Report                                             

RECOMMENDED

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Penrith Performing and Visual Arts Ltd – Annual Report be received.

2.    Council agree to underwrite the operations of the Penrith Performing and Visual Arts Ltd until the presentation of the 2018/19 Annual Report.

3.     Council consider reviewing its annual operating subsidy for the Penrith Performing and Visual Arts Ltd from 2018/19 at the upcoming strategic planning workshop.

 

 

Outcome 2 - We plan for our future growth

 

1        Penrith Panthers Planning Proposal and DCP Amendment

Councillor Marcus Cornish left the meeting, the time being 8:37pm.

Councillor Marcus Cornish returned to the meeting, the time being 8:39pm.                             

RECOMMENDED

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Penrith Panthers Planning Proposal and DCP Amendment be received.

2.    Council endorses the Planning Proposal presented in this report which has been provided to Councillors under separate cover and tabled tonight.

3.    Council prepares and executes an amendment to the Road Works Planning Agreement based on the principles presented in this report.

4.    The General Manager be granted delegation to update and finalise the Planning Proposal prior to Council’s submission of the Planning Proposal to the Department of Planning and Environment for making of the amendment to the Penrith Local Environmental Plan 2010.

5.    The Planning Proposal referred to in 4 above be forwarded to the Department of Planning and Environment after an amendment to the Road Works Planning Agreement has been executed with a request that the amendment to the Penrith Local Environmental Plan 2010 be made.

6.    Council adopt the amendment to the Penrith Development Control Plan 2014 presented in this report so that it takes effect on the publication of the amendment to the Penrith Local Environmental Plan 2010.

7.    The General Manager be delegated authority to make any necessary changes required to the amendment to the Penrith Development Control Plan 2014 referred to in 6 above, particularly as a result of Road Works Planning Agreement negotiations and any other changes identified in consideration of transport and traffic matters before the Planning Proposal is submitted to the Department of Planning and Environment.

 

8.    Council note that a peer review of the Planning Proposal and Process is not necessary as Council is no longer an owner of land subject to the Planning Proposal.

In accordance with Section 375A of the Local Government Act 1993, a DIVISION was then called with the following result:

For

Against

Councillor John Thain

 

Councillor Bernard Bratusa

 

Councillor Karen McKeown

 

Councillor Greg Davies

 

Councillor Mark Davies

 

Councillor Ross Fowler OAM

 

Councillor Jim Aitken OAM

 

Councillor Tricia Hitchen

 

Councillor Marcus Cornish

 

Councillor Joshua Hoole

 

Councillor Aaron Duke

 

Councillor Todd Carney

 

Councillor Ben Price

 

 

2        Housekeeping Amendment to the Penrith Local Environmental Plan 2010              

RECOMMENDED

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Housekeeping Amendment to the Penrith Local Environmental Plan 2010 be received.

2.    Council endorse the Planning Proposal provided at Attachment 1 to this report.

3.    The General Manager be granted delegation to update and finalise the Planning Proposal prior to Council's submission of the Planning Proposal to the Minister for Planning, which will include the preparation of proposed amended LEP 2010 map tiles, proposed amendments to the LEP 2010 written instrument and supporting information.

4.    Council officers forward the Planning Proposal to the Minister for Planning with a request to issue a Gateway Determination.

5.    Council publicly exhibits the Planning Proposal for a period to be specified in the Gateway Determination, in accordance with the community consultation requirements.

6.    A further report be presented to Council following the Public Exhibition.

In accordance with Section 375A of the Local Government Act 1993, a DIVISION was then called with the following result:

For

Against

Councillor John Thain

 

Councillor Bernard Bratusa

 

Councillor Karen McKeown

 

Councillor Greg Davies

 

Councillor Mark Davies

 

Councillor Ross Fowler OAM

 

Councillor Jim Aitken OAM

 

Councillor Tricia Hitchen

 

Councillor Marcus Cornish

 

Councillor Joshua Hoole

 

Councillor Aaron Duke

 

Councillor Todd Carney

 

Councillor Ben Price

 

 

 

There being no further business the Chairperson declared the meeting closed the time being 8:43pm.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the recommendations contained in the Report and Recommendations of the Policy Review Committee meeting held on 13 November, 2017 be adopted.

 

 

  


DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Item                                                                                                                                                Page

 

 

Outcome 1 - We can work close to home

 

1        Naming of Western Sydney Airport                                                                                   1

 

 

Outcome 2 - We plan for our future growth

 

2        Penrith Accelerated Housing Delivery Program                                                                5

 

3        Submission on draft Greater Sydney Region Plan and draft Western City District Plan 12

 

4        Lot Consolidation and Subdivision into 57 x Torrens Title Residential Lots and Associated Road Construction, Drainage and Landscaping Works Lot 1001 DP 1131997 (No.27) Kent Road and Lot 14 DP 27107 (No. 326-330) Caddens Road, Claremont Meadows Applicant: Universal Property Group;  Owner: ~Upg 33 Pty Ltd

Procedural note: Section 375A of the Local Government Act 1993 requires that a division be called in relation to this matter.                                                                18

 

5        Caddens Voluntary Planning Agreement at the Corner of O'Connell Street and O'Connell Lane Applicant: LegPro;  Owner: ~LegPro

Procedural note: Section 375A of the Local Government Act 1993 requires that a division be called in relation to this matter.                                                                25

 

 

Outcome 3 - We can get around the City

 

6        The NSW Future Transport Strategy 2056                                                                      31

 

 

Outcome 4 - We have safe, vibrant places

 

7        Dedication of Council Land for Road Widening Purposes - Erskine Park Road Upgrade                                                                                                                                              43

 

8        Grant application: CreateNSW funding for Arts Cart mobile project                               47

 

9        Establishment of Additional Alcohol Free Zone on Henry Street, Penrith                      49

 

10      Jordan Springs Community Hub - Licence Agreement for U3A Nepean Blue Mountains Incorporated                                                                                                                     51

 

11      Tender Reference RFT17/18-06 - CRM based Field Services Management Solution   57

 

12      Vegetation Management to reduce fire risk                                                                     69

 

13      Management of 'Stand-Alone' Trees                                                                                71

 

 

Outcome 6 - We are healthy and share strong community spirit

 

14      The Hat Project - Aboriginal Community, Culture and Creativity - Grant Application     81

 

 

Outcome 7 - We have confidence in our Council

 

15      Proposed Council Meeting Calendar for 2018                                                                 87

 

16      2016-17 Penrith City Council Annual Report                                                                   91

 

17      Organisational Performance Report and Financial Review - September 2017              93

 

18      Tender Reference RFT17/18-04 - Information Management System                             99

 

19      Development and Project Management Services, Expression of Interest Reference 16/17-01                                                                                                                                    104

 

20      Appointment of Audit, Risk & Improvement Committee Members                                116

 

21      Summary of Investments & Banking for the period 1 October to 31 October 2017      120

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Outcome 1 - We can work close to home

 

Item                                                                                                                                                Page

 

1        Naming of Western Sydney Airport                                                                                   1

 

 

 



Ordinary Meeting                                                                                         27 November 2017

 

 

 

1

Naming of Western Sydney Airport   

 

Compiled by:               Rachel Pagitz, Advocacy and Government Relations Officer

Authorised by:            Kate Speare, Economic Initiatives Manager  

 

Outcome

We can work close to home

Strategy

Attract investment to grow the economy and increase the range of businesses operating in the region

Service Activity

Actively promote and market the New West

 

Previous Items:           Naming of Western Sydney Airport after Aviator William (Billy) Hart - Ordinary Meeting - 27 Feb 2017    

 

Executive Summary

A report was considered by Council at its meeting on 27 February 2017 in relation to the proposed naming of the new Western Sydney international airport after a request from Cr Fowler OAM into the naming of the airport after aviator William (Billy) Ewart Hart. Billy Hart was an early Australian aviator with a close connection to the Penrith area, after making the first successful cross country flight from Penrith and was the first Australian to qualify for an aviation license issued by the Aerial League of Australia on 5 December 1911.

 

The matter was deferred at the meeting to allow further investigation into other names such as “Badgerys”.  The purpose of this report is to provide additional information as requested.

 

In 2014, the Federal Government confirmed Badgerys Creek as the site for a new international airport to service Sydney’s growing aviation needs. The new airport is expected to start operations in the mid 2020’s.

 

The Federal Government advises a large number of names for the future airport have been suggested but that no official name has been allocated and no decision has been made about a process to identify a name. Suggestions have included: William (Billy) Ewart Hart, Lawrence Hargrave, Nancy “Bird” Walton, James Badgery and Andrew Delfosse Badgery.

Comments from Penrith Library Research Services Team

In 1810 Governor Lachlan Macquarie granted James Badgery 640 acres between South Creek on the east and the “western arm of South Creek” (later known as Badgery’s Creek) which divided it from John Blaxland’s farm, Luddenham.

 

The road to the south of the grant went by various names; Mulgoa Road, Orphan School Road and eventually after 1952, Elizabeth Drive. Elizabeth Drive has become the southern boundary of the Penrith City Council local government area and is the northern boundary of the new airport site. The future airport site is not on the original Badgery land grant but the locality was named for the creek running through it.

 

The property remained in the Badgery family until February 1854 when it was sold to James Boyd McKaughan, who sold it in 1894 to Henry Stivens. In 1919 the Stivens family relinquished the land for soldier settlements.

 

Andrew Delfosse Badgery (Junior) who was known as an aviator is a direct descendant of James and Elizabeth Badgery, with James being his great grandfather. Andrew Delfosse Badgery was born in 1888.

 

Andrew left Australia in 1913 and travelled to England where he became a certified pilot of the Royal Aero Club of Great Britain. Whilst in England he learnt to fly a Caudron and decided he would be able to build one himself.

 

In February 1914 Andrew returned to Australia, bringing with him all the parts needed to build his own Caudron. The Scrutineer & Berrima District Press of 22 July 1914, reported that Andrew had built his plane at Sutton Forrest and had already made a number of successful flights.

 

Suggestions that Badgery’s pioneering aviation activities were based in the vicinity of the proposed airport site cannot be substantiated, and are unlikely, as the family had relinquished their properties in Badgerys Creek by 1892 and were living on their land holdings in Sutton Forest, Braidwood and surrounding districts.

 

Conclusion

 

When referring to the future airport, the Federal Government commonly uses the term Western Sydney Airport and signage at the site designates it as the “Western Sydney Airport Site”. The Government’s dedicated website for the airport project is westernsydneyairport.gov.au.

 

The Government advises it is committed to getting the Western Sydney Airport right, and appreciates that there has been a great deal of interest in naming the Western Sydney Airport from across Sydney and indeed, the whole country.

 

A large number of names for the future airport have been suggested but no official name has been allocated. Suggestions have included: William Ewart (Billy) Hart, Lawrence Hargrave, Nancy “Bird” Walton and James Badgery. 

 

Few Australian airports feature names beyond their geographic location, for example Brisbane, Melbourne (Tullamarine), Perth and Canberra Airports are named for the cities they service. Sydney’s airport (Mascot) is colloquially referred to as Kingsford Smith or Mascot Airport, although the official designation is Sydney Airport.

 

A Federal Government spokesperson said at this stage of the project, no decision has yet been made about a process for naming the airport.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the information contained in the report on Naming of Western Sydney Airport be received.

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.  


Outcome 2 - We plan for our future growth

 

Item                                                                                                                                                Page

 

2        Penrith Accelerated Housing Delivery Program                                                                5

 

3        Submission on draft Greater Sydney Region Plan and draft Western City District Plan 12

 

4        Lot Consolidation and Subdivision into 57 x Torrens Title Residential Lots and Associated Road Construction, Drainage and Landscaping Works Lot 1001 DP 1131997 (No.27) Kent Road and Lot 14 DP 27107 (No. 326-330) Caddens Road, Claremont Meadows Applicant: Universal Property Group;  Owner: ~Upg 33 Pty Ltd

Procedural note: Section 375A of the Local Government Act 1993 requires that a division be called in relation to this matter.                                                                18

 

5        Caddens Voluntary Planning Agreement at the Corner of O'Connell Street and O'Connell Lane Applicant: LegPro;  Owner: ~LegPro

Procedural note: Section 375A of the Local Government Act 1993 requires that a division be called in relation to this matter.                                                                25

 

 

 

 

 

 



Ordinary Meeting                                                                                         27 November 2017

 

 

 

2

Penrith Accelerated Housing Delivery Program   

 

Compiled by:               Natalie Stanowski, Principal Planner

Authorised by:            Natasha Baker, City Planning Manager  

 

Outcome

We plan for our future growth

Strategy

Facilitate development that encourages a range of housing types

Service Activity

Plan for and facilitate delivery of release areas and urban renewal in the City

      

 

Executive Summary

In order to maintain housing delivery in the short term, Council commenced an Accelerated Housing Delivery Program (AHDP) to identify land suitable for new release housing delivery over the next 5 years. The AHDP has assisted in setting the strategic direction for the location, type and delivery of new release housing with Penrith LGA. It has also provided important information to be considered in the Penrith Local Housing Strategy.

 

As a result of the evaluation of the 11 submissions that were received, two (2) sites are recommended to be pursued as accelerated housing delivery sites. These sites have demonstrated consistency with the assessment criteria, as they provide logical extensions to Penrith’s urban areas that are supported by Centres, can be serviced and provide infrastructure to support housing and will not compromise future game changing infrastructure projects.

 

The AHDP is not itself a rezoning process and any sites recommended for short term housing delivery will require proponents to submit a planning proposal, which Council will consider through the normal statutory processes.

Background

The population of the Penrith Local Government Area (LGA) continues to grow. The remaining capacity of Penrith’s existing new release areas is less than 4,500 dwellings. This capacity is anticipated to only satisfy demand for the next 3 – 4 years.

 

In order to facilitate sufficient housing supply in a timely fashion, Council resolved at its Policy Review Committee meeting of 14 August 2017 to commence an innovative Accelerated Housing Delivery Program, calling for landowner nominations for sites suitable to provide short term housing supply. The aim of the Program is to ensure that a housing delivery pipeline is maintained and to assist in informing the medium to long term component of Council’s Local Housing Strategy.

 

Councils previous experience with planning new release areas has revealed that the length of time to plan and deliver a release area can take up to five years. To ensure the continuous and timely supply of new release area housing in the Penrith LGA, it is therefore considered critical that the identification and commencement of planning a new release area is undertaken.

 

Region and District Plans

 

Both the Draft Greater Sydney Region Plan and the Draft Western City District Plan provide a framework for the future growth and city building for our region. The Greater Sydney Commission (GSC) have indicated a priority for delivering a diversity of housing that is close to employment with accessible infrastructure.

 

A key action from both draft plans is for Councils to prepare a Local Housing Strategy (“the Strategy”). The Strategy will address the delivery of both five and ten year housing targets and how Penrith LGA will contribute to the 20 year housing target for the Western City District.

 

Council has been set a five year dwelling target of 6,600 and will work with the GSC through the Local Housing Strategy to set a ten and 20 year housing targets. To ensure delivery of our housing targets, planning must commence now, to ensure Council is able to provide conditions that support the timely supply of housing.

 

Local Housing Strategy- Housing Demand Forecasting

 

Work to date on Council’s Local Housing Strategy has highlighted the impact of delays to the release of planned housing at Penrith Lakes (4,900 dwellings). The growth in housing demand within Council’s existing new release areas is such that it is now necessary to accelerate the planning of areas to supply housing (over 3,000 dwellings over the next 3-5 years) ahead of the finalisation of the Strategy.

 

Recent work undertaken by SGS Economics and Planning for the Strategy has forecast approximately half of all additional housing in Penrith over the next 20 years is to be provided in greenfield locations. It is anticipated that the Strategy will identify potential future release area housing locations based on these demand forecasts that are consistent with regional and district plans.

 

Game changers and new housing alignment

 

Over the past 18 months a number of game changing development catalysts, that have the ability to transform infrastructure and provide opportunities for increased economic growth for our region, have been announced by State and Federal Governments for delivery and/or investigation. These include:

·    Western Sydney Airport,

·    widening of the Northern Road and Mulgoa Road,

·    the Outer Sydney Orbital and M12,

·    the North-South Rail Link, and

·    Western Sydney City Deal.

 

It is expected that these projects will be catalysts for identifying appropriately located housing in the future and will form the basis for medium to long term planning decisions.

The Program

 

The AHDP was established to identify suitable sites that have the ability to deliver release area housing in the next 3-5 years, through an open and transparent submission process.

 

Notification and submission process

 

The AHDP was open to landowners with land approximately 100 hectares in size (or more), capable of producing 1,000+ lots, and with access to immediate infrastructure, to make a submission.

 

The AHDP did not apply to:

·    Existing urban areas

·    Non-urban housing proposals or

·    Proposals which are mainly for employment, retail or other non-residential uses.

 

The AHDP was advertised in the Western Weekender. Letters were sent to previous submitters to the Draft West District Plan, parties that had made previous enquiries in respect to new release housing development and other relevant stakeholders.

 

Detailed information was provided on Council’s website regarding the Program, submission requirements and the assessment criteria.

 

Probity Plan and Evaluation Process

 

The framework for how the AHDP was conducted was established by a Probity and Evaluation Plan (“The Plan”). The Plan outlines principles, processes and roles and responsibilities required to mitigate and manage probity risks associated with the project. The plan was created as the AHDP is a non-statutory process, unlike the planning proposal process, which is governed by the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act, 1979. The plan therefore only relates to the AHDP process and evaluation.

 

The successful proponent/s will be required to go through the normal planning proposal process, including the assessment of the merits of the proposal, community engagement and associated Council and Department of Planning & Environment (DPE) approvals. The proponent will also be responsible for the preparation and lodgement of the planning proposal, including their own land use and planning investigations and supporting studies in order to enable the lodgement of a planning proposal.

 

The evaluation of submissions under the AHDP occurred through the following steps:

 

1.   Initial review of submissions by City Planning Team,

2.   Evaluation of submissions by City Planning Team, with assistance from relevant technical officers,

3.   Assessment by AHDP Assessment Group (comprising Executive Manager - City Economy and Planning, Executive Manager - Environment and City Development, Engineering Services Manager, City Planning Manager, Development Services Manager),

4.   Comments sought from Department of Planning & Environment (DPE) and Greater Sydney Commission (GSC) and Sydney Water,

5.   Briefing of Council’s Property Development Advisory Panel (PDAP),

6.   Peer Review conducted on the AHDP Assessment Group evaluation, by independent consultant.

 

Submission & Assessment Criteria

 

Submission requirements and assessment criteria were prepared for the program (refer to Attachment 1). Submissions were required to provide documents to meet the submission requirements and to demonstrate achievement of the assessment criteria. The submission requirements were created in order to determine:

 

·    The ability for the size and scope of the land to deliver efficient and cost effective housing and infrastructure in a short timeframe.

·    The impact of land ownership and fragmentation on the deliverability of land.

·    The physical, strategic and market suitability of housing development on the land.

·    Consideration of housing diversity, strategic merit and land capability.

·    The ability to service land and provide infrastructure essential to the delivery of housing in a short timeframe at no cost to Government.

 

Table 1 (Attachment 2) lists the qualities that were considered necessary in order to be highly suitable for short term urban housing.

 

The Submissions

Eleven (11) submissions across Penrith LGA were received for the AHDP. These sites are identified in Table 2 (Attachment 2) and the attached map (Attachment 3).

Assessment Results

A full review of each submission was undertaken against the assessment criteria at two stages in the evaluation process. A summary of the assessment of each submission, including a score out of 100, is provided in Attachment 4. As a result of the evaluation, the submissions were placed into one of three categories: suitable for short term development, medium term development potential and long term or unsuitable development sites. 

 

1.   Suitable for Short term Development

 

Two sites met all criteria objectives and are recommended as suitable for short term housing. These are:

·    Site 4 – Glenmore Park Extension, and

·    Site 2 – Legacy (Orchard Hills North)

 

The submissions established their ability to be physically and strategically fit, have access to immediate servicing and demonstrated a proven ability to deliver housing quickly. Details of these sites can be found in Table 3 (Attachment 5).

 

Both sites offer logical extensions to existing urban areas, without compromising existing agricultural or future employment and transport corridors. The sites are in sequence with regional and district growth planning outcomes and offer the ability to define Penrith’s urban edges.

 

It is noted that Site 2 would impact Councils long standing policy of providing a rural entrance into Penrith along The Northern Road. Further investigation of the impact of the Site 2 proposal, in conjunction with the widening of The Northern Road and Western Sydney Airport, on this policy would be undertaken as part of a future planning proposal.

 

2.   Medium term development

 

A number of sites demonstrated that they are generally physically and strategically fit for urban development, however, the submissions were unable to demonstrate immediate access to infrastructure and/or further clarification of the location of future employment and transport corridors is required.

 

Sites identified as having potential for medium term development are:

Site 6 – Atilol Holdings (Orchard Hills South)

Site 7 – Celestino (Sydney Science Park)

Site 8 – Capitol Hill (Mt Vernon)

Sites 1 & 3 – The Northern Road

 

Details of these sites can be found in Table 4 (Attachment 5).

 

These sites will be further investigated as part of Council’s Local Housing Strategy for opportunities for medium term housing.

 

It is noted that Sites 1& 3 would impact Councils long standing policy of providing a rural entrance into Penrith along The Northern Road. As indicated above, further investigation of the impact of this proposal in conjunction with the widening of The Northern Road and Western Sydney Airport, on this policy will be undertaken.

 

3.   Long term or unsuitable sites

 

Sites that could not demonstrate any of the three criteria were placed in this category. A number of sites were subject to physical constraints that would appear to make urban housing unsuitable and some sites did not address or satisfy regional and district planning.

 

These sites are:

Site 5 – Luddenham Landowners

Site 9/9A – Bakers Lane (Kemps Creek)

Site 10 – Whitegate Road (Londonderry)

Site 11 – Agnes Banks

 

Details of these sites can be found in Table 5 (Attachment 5).

 

The sites did not demonstrate access to immediate infrastructure and would generally represent out of sequence development.

 

Peer review

 

As required under the Probity and Evaluation Plan, an independent peer review of Council’s assessment of the submissions was undertaken by planning consultants Ryan Planning. The consultants brief was to:

·    Review council’s assessment of submissions,

·    Provide advice on the reasonableness and soundness of Council’s recommendations and,

·    Provide advice on whether the conclusions and decisions reached by Council are consistent with the objectives of the assessment criteria.

 

The peer review concluded that:

 

·    “Council’s merit and quantitative based assessment of the submissions was undertaken in a comprehensive and consistent manner,

·    Council has consistently applied and ranked the various criteria across all sites and,

·    Council’s assessment and recommendation that Sites 2 and 4 proceed to the next stage of investigation under the AHDP is endorsed”

 

A copy of the final peer review is in Attachment 6.

 

Next Steps – Planning proposals and Council’s Local Housing Strategy

 

Where it is recommended to support accelerating the planning and delivery of sites for urban housing, Council’s City Planning Team will work closely with proponents and government agencies to enable planning processes for these sites to be prioritised and occur quickly and efficiently.

 

Proponents will be responsible for preparing and lodging planning proposals for consideration, under the usual statutory processes. It is anticipated that planning proposals will be lodged between in December 2017 and February 2018 and reported to Council within the first half of 2018.

 

Council has briefed both DPE and GSC on the program and its intend outcomes. The DPE has informed Council of the formation of a fast track zoning team within its Housing Delivery Unit, whose responsibility will be coordinating and delivering planning outcomes that result in the creation of additional housing supply. The team will assist Council in processing proposals efficiently and liaising with government agencies.

 

Those sites identified as medium term sites will be included in Council’s Local Housing Strategy for further investigation. Landowners will have a further opportunity to be engaged in this process. Some sites identified as long term may not be suitable at all for urban housing, however some may become suitable over time. These will be considered as required in Council’s Strategy.

 

Conclusion

 

The objective of the AHDP was to accelerate the identification of land and planning processes associated with new release housing development. The program was developed in order to maintain a continuous pipeline of new release housing, consistent with regional and district planning and Councils work to date on the Local Housing Strategy.

 

Eleven (11) submissions were received for the program and these were evaluated following the Probity and Evaluation Plan. As a result, Site 2 and Site 4 have been recommended as suitable for short term housing delivery. Sites 1 & 3, 6, 7, 8 are recommended for consideration under the Local Housing Strategy. Where sites become suitable for long term housing, these can be identified in a future review of the Local Housing Strategy.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Penrith Accelerated Housing Delivery Program be received.

2.    Council support Sites 2 and 4 as accelerated housing sites and that discussions commence with proponents in order to proceed with statutory planning processes.

3.    Council continue to investigate future housing on Sites 1 & 3, 6, 7, & 8 through the Local Housing Strategy or other available mechanisms and monitors the suitable of long term sites for future housing.

4.    The proponent of each submission made to the AHDP be advised of Council’s resolution.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

AHDP submission requirements and assessment criteria

2 Pages

Attachments Included

2.

Table 1 - Assessment critieria and qualitieis suitable for short term housing development and Table 2 - AHDP submission details

2 Pages

Attachments Included

3.

Map of land subject to submissions for the AHDP

1 Page

Attachments Included

4.

Summary evaluation of submissions

11 Pages

Attachments Included

5.

Table 3 - Sites suitable for short term urban housing , Table 4 - Sites for future investigation in Local Housing Strategy and Table 5 - Long term or unsuitable sites for urban housing

2 Pages

Attachments Included

6.

Peer Review of AHDP

17 Pages

Attachments Included

  


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                         27 November 2017

 

 

 

3

Submission on draft Greater Sydney Region Plan and draft Western City District Plan   

 

Compiled by:               Nicole Dukinfield, Senior Planner

Authorised by:            Natasha Baker, City Planning Manager  

 

Outcome

We plan for our future growth

Strategy

Ensure services, facilities and infrastructure meet the changing needs of our community

Service Activity

Seek to influence planning legislation and related government policies to ensure the best outcomes for our community

      

 

Executive Summary

The Greater Sydney Commission (GSC) has released several plans for public consultation that outlines their vision for Greater Sydney to 2056. The draft Region Plan A Metropolis of three cities, sets the overarching vision for Greater Sydney. The draft District Plans provide the link between the Region Plan and Council’s local plans and strategies. Council now forms part of the Western City District and the draft Western City District Plan is the relevant district-level strategy. Both plans are on exhibition until 15 December 2017.

 

These plans have been reviewed and submissions will be made on the draft Region Plan and draft Western City District Plan. It is recommended that Council largely support the vision and focus on Western Sydney, and emphasise the importance of delivering infrastructure to support growth, including North-South rail links, to ensure the plans’ success. The submission will also acknowledge the GSC for recognising the three cities framework and the concept of a 30 minute city for Greater Sydney, and reinforce a desire for Council to have a meaningful role in implementation and delivery of the plans.

 

Following Council’s endorsement of the key elements of Council’s submission, a submission will be prepared elaborating on these key elements and submitted to the GSC by 15 December 2017. Council will continue to be updated on the finalisation and implementation of the plans throughout 2018 and as required.

Background

In November 2016, the GSC released six draft District Plans for public consultation. Council was identified as part of the West District, along with Blue Mountains and Hawkesbury Councils. The purpose of the District Plan is to provide a link between the Region Plan, and Council’s local plans and strategies.

 

At the same time, the GSC exhibited an amendment to the existing Region Plan, titled Towards our Greater Sydney 2056 which introduced the long-term vision for Sydney to become a city of three cities – the Eastern City, the Central City, and the Western City. The draft District Plans aimed to implement this vision by providing more detailed actions and planning priorities to deliver the objectives within Towards our Greater Sydney 2056.

 

Council provided a submission on the draft West District Plan that was underpinned by the following six principles:

·    New and diverse jobs

·    Transformative infrastructure that addresses Penrith’s needs now and into the future including critical North-South connections

·    A range of housing options that are innovative and sustainable

·    Supporting greater Penrith as the centre of the North-South and East-West economic corridor

·    Create the Western City that boosts the Western City economy

·    Balance Penrith’s growth whilst protecting and enhancing our natural environment

 

In October 2017, the GSC released the draft Greater Sydney Region Plan and revised District Plans for public exhibition. The public exhibition period is open until 15 December 2017.

 

Draft Greater Sydney Region Plan

 

The draft Greater Sydney Region Plan titled Our Greater Sydney 2056 - A metropolis of three cities outlines the overarching vision for Greater Sydney. It builds on the vision for a city of three cities by reinforcing the roles and opportunities for each city. The draft Region Plan has been prepared concurrently with Transport for NSW’s Future Transport 2056 Strategy, integrating land use and transport planning for the first time and also identifies the major transport initiatives that will determine the future land use planning and growth outcomes. Further information regarding Council’s submission on the Future Transport 2056 Strategy and associated plans will also be presented at this Ordinary Meeting.

 

Council’s submission on the draft Region Plan will be underpinned by a response to the key themes presented. These key themes and the proposed response is outlined below.

 

Metropolis of three cities

 

The draft Region Plan reinforces the vision for Greater Sydney of a metropolis of three cities –  the Eastern Harbour City, the Central River City and the Western Parkland City. This is a result of Council’s advocacy for greater opportunities and investment within Western Sydney.

 

Response:

·    Thank and congratulate the GSC for their vision and the opportunities for Penrith and Western Sydney as presented by the draft Region Plan.

 

Alignment of growth with infrastructure

 

The draft Region Plan has been prepared by the GSC concurrently with Transport for NSW’s Future Transport 2056 Strategy and associated plans to align land use, transport and infrastructure outcomes for Greater Sydney. A key element for future development opportunities within the Western City is new North-South connections including passenger rail.

 

Growth Infrastructure Compacts are described in the draft Region Plan as being a tool to determine the most effective and appropriate locations for growth and infrastructure investment. The Growth Infrastructure Compact will assess the nature, level and timing of the infrastructure investment required for an area, aligning with the projected growth scenario. The Greater Parramatta and Olympic Park precinct will be the first pilot for the tool.

 

Response:

·    Acknowledge the ‘line on the page’ for North-South rail and seek further clarification and information on timeframes for the identification of the corridor and delivery

·    Recommend Collaboration Areas and Priority Growth Areas be prioritised for Growth Infrastructure Compact assessment to ensure infrastructure is delivered alongside growth in jobs and/or homes

·    Emphasise the need for certainty around corridors to ensure growth occurs in the right locations.

 

Western Parkland City

 

The vision for the Western Parkland City includes two North-South corridors being South Creek and a rail corridor, with the Western Sydney Airport and Badgerys Creek Aerotropolis becoming economic catalysts for the region.

 

The targeted economic sectors for the Western City include the following:

•    Advanced manufacturing

•    Aerospace and defence industries

•    Agricultural processing and export

•    Construction and infrastructure

•    Transport and warehousing

•    Visitor economy

•    Education and training

 

Response:

·    Support the vision for higher-order jobs and industry sectors in the Western City and future Western Economic Corridor

·    Identify that health is a key economic sector for all cities within the Metropolitan City Cluster therefore this should be recognised as a major economic industry for the Western City

 

Western Economic Corridor and Badgerys Creek Aerotropolis

 

The proposed Western Economic Corridor runs North-South from the Western Sydney Airport, reflecting the economic and employment opportunities arising from the airport and proposed Badgerys Creek Aerotropolis. The proposed aerotropolis will target industries in defence, aerospace, advanced manufacturing, logistics and trade, as well as provide opportunities for the growth of Greater Penrith, Liverpool and Campbelltown-Macarthur and the expansion of their commercial, retail and health and education assets.

 

The draft Region Plan also proposes to facilitate the creation of offices as a permissible use in an industrial area, where it does not compromise the operations of existing industrial activities.

 

Response:

·    Council’s position is that the Western Sydney Airport minimises impacts and maximises opportunities for Penrith’s residents. Council fully supports the concept of an aerotropolis as an economic catalyst bringing wider benefits to the Western Sydney region including higher-order jobs

·    Question the size of the Badgerys Creek Aerotropolis as shown throughout the document. Seek assurance that the Badgerys Creek Aerotropolis enhances and strengthens the role of centres including Penrith, Liverpool and Campbelltown-Macarthur and does not dilute their role or function

·    Seek further clarification on the roles, size and complementary nature between centres of the Metropolitan City Cluster

·    Raise caution regarding the permissibility of office uses in industrial areas due to the potential leakage of activity-generating and competing uses that should be located within centres.

 

Greater Penrith to St Marys Priority Growth Area

 

The draft Region Plan identifies a new Priority Growth Area Investigation from Greater Penrith to St Marys and is focused on future opportunities around existing and potential new east-west and north-south connections. The GSC will investigate the Greater Penrith to St Marys Priority Growth Area for redevelopment opportunities and identify the infrastructure required to support further growth.

 

Response:

·    Acknowledge the opportunity presented by the Priority Growth Area, particularly if North-South rail is provided

·    Emphasise the need to provide certainty for landowners without giving unrealistic aspirations

 

Metropolitan Rural Area

 

Urban development within the Metropolitan Rural Area is limited, except within three nominated Urban Investigation Areas. The Urban Investigation Areas have been identified due to their proximity to existing urban areas and the emerging Western Parkland City. The Urban Investigation Areas are:

·    Orchard Hills, north of the Defence Establishment and west of St Clair

·    East of The Northern Road at Luddenham between the Western Sydney Airport Priority Growth Area and the water pipeline, and

·    Horsley Park and Mount Vernon located west of the M7 motorway.

 

The Defence Establishment at Orchard Hills has been included in the Priority Growth Area Investigation to ensure coordination of existing and future land uses in the corridor.

 

Response:

·    Council to seek meaningful engagement with the GSC to better understand, explore and deliver the Urban Investigation Areas

·    Council is currently preparing a Housing Strategy and has begun an accelerated housing program to ensure the provision of new dwellings in greenfield areas in the short term. As part of this work, Council is investigating the current Metropolitan Rural Area boundary to define its edge. The proposed Urban Investigation Areas will be considered as part of this strategy

·    Continue to work closely with the GSC to define and reinforce the Metropolitan Rural Area boundary

 

Draft Western City District Plan

 

Council, along with Blue Mountains and Hawkesbury Councils, were previously identified as part of the West District. However, in response to the submissions received and to better facilitate planning around the Western Sydney Airport and growth corridor, the GSC merged the previous West and South West Districts to form the Western City District. The Western City District Plan is now the relevant district-level strategy for Penrith.

 

Where the draft Region Plan predominantly outlines the proposed strategies to deliver the vision for Greater Sydney, the Western City District Plan identifies the planning priorities and actions to give effect to the Region Plan. These actions and planning priorities are generally consistent with the previous draft West District Plan.

 

A review has been undertaken of the draft Western City District Plan with Council’s submission on the previous draft. Whilst some of Council’s feedback and recommendations have been considered, the following recommendations remain unaddressed:

·    Bolder jobs target for Greater Penrith and identifying a jobs target for the Western Sydney Airport Growth Area;

·    Acceleration of outcomes from Hawkesbury Nepean Flood Risk Management Strategy to ensure Greater Penrith reaches its full potential;

·    Facilitation of rail in operation from day one of the opening of Western Sydney Airport; and

·    Further clarification on the roles, size and complementary nature between the centres of the Metropolitan City Cluster (Greater Penrith, Liverpool, Campbelltown-Macarthur and Aerotropolis).

 

These matters that were previously raised will be reiterated in Council’s submission on the draft Western City District Plan.

 

The draft Western City District Plan’s objectives, planning priorities and actions seek to achieve better liveability and amenity outcomes for the community.  In order to deliver the objectives and outcomes of the Plan, the state planning framework needs to reflect these objectives, whilst state agencies need to align their planning and funding to see the Plan’s implementation.

 

Next steps

 

Staff will prepare submissions on the draft Region Plan and draft Western City District Plan elaborating further on the matters outlined within this report, as well as align the submissions with Council’s submission on Transport for NSW’s Future Transport Strategy and associated plans. The submissions will be made by the due date being 15 December 2017, however we will continue to pursue ongoing consultation with the GSC in the finalisation of the draft Plans.

 

The GSC have advised that the final Region and District Plans will be made effective by early 2018. The draft Western City District Plan outlines that once the District Plans are made, Council’s will have 2-3 years to update Local Environmental Plans to be consistent with the relevant District Plan.  Further updates will be provided to Council throughout 2018.

 

Conclusion

 

The draft Region Plan and draft Western City District Plans reflect integrated transport and land use planning for the first time. Both plans recognise Council’s advocacy activities, particularly in regard to North-South rail and the three cities concept.

 

Council’s submission will be calling for meaningful engagement in exploring and delivering the opportunities presented by the plans, with a focus on implementation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Submission on draft Greater Sydney Region Plan and draft Western City District Plan be received

2.    A submission be prepared based on the matters raised within this report and provided to the Greater Sydney Commission by 15 December 2017.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                         27 November 2017

 

 

 

4

Lot Consolidation and Subdivision into 57 x Torrens Title Residential Lots and Associated Road Construction, Drainage and Landscaping Works Lot 1001 DP 1131997 (No.27) Kent Road and Lot 14 DP 27107 (No. 326-330) Caddens Road, Claremont Meadows  Applicant:  Universal Property Group;  Owner:  Upg 33 Pty Ltd  

 

Compiled by:               Gavin Cherry, Development Assessment Co-ordinator

Authorised by:            Peter Wood, Development Services Manager  

 

Outcome

We plan for our future growth

Strategy

Facilitate quality development in the City that considers the current and future needs of our community

Service Activity

Assess development proposals efficiently and made decisions that are open and fair

     

Procedural note: Section 375A of the Local Government Act 1993 requires that a division be called in relation to this matter.

 

Executive Summary

This report seeks a resolution of Council to agree to enter into consent orders under Section 34 of the Land and Environment Court Act 1979 with respect to a Class 1 Land and Environment Court Appeal for Development Application DA16/0889. Development Application No. DA16/0889 includes the remediation of land, earthworks, road construction, landscaping works, drainage works and creation of 57 x allotments with temporary road works on four (4) of the proposed allotments at No. 27 Kent Road and Nos. 326 – 330 Caddens Road, Claremont Meadows 

The applicant has amended the development proposal to now ensure compliance with Penrith Development Control Plan 2014 and Penrith Local Environmental Plan 2010 and has suitably resolved all contentions raised during the course of the assessment. As a result it is recommended that Council agreed to enter into consent orders to enable determination of the development application and resolution of the Land and Environment Court appeal.

 

Background

On 30 August 2016 the applicant lodged with Council Development Application No. 16/0889 seeking approval for the consolidation of 2 x rural residential allotments for a torrens title subdivision comprising 55 x lots, associated road construction, drainage and landscaping works. The application included construction of two temporary roads across 4 x lots, a temporary sediment control basin across 1 x lot and a temporary stormwater detention and sediment basin across 3 x lots. This equated to 48 residential lots and 7 lots with temporary infrastructure. During the course of assessment, the applicant also included remediation of land as part of the development application.

 

A Class 1 appeal was lodged with the Land and Environment Court on 28 April 2017 based on a deemed refusal of the development application under Section 97(1)(b) of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979. The appeal was lodged as the application was unsupportable by Council officers’ due to inadequate information being submitted and noncompliance with Penrith Local Environmental Plan 2013 and Penrith Development Control Plan 2014 with respect to the proposed road pattern, lot dimensions and drainage strategy. 

 

A Statement of Facts and Contentions was prepared by Council officers and filed with the NSW Land and Environment Court on 23 May 2017. This statement outlined unresolved matters concerning non-compliant lot size and width dimensions with respect to Penrith Local Environmental Plan 2010 and Penrith Development Control Plan 2014, orderly development implications from irregular road alignments, unsupportable tree removal on adjoining lands and stormwater drainage matters.

Notification Process

The proposed development was notified to nearby and adjoining residents and exhibited between 16 September 2016 and 30 September 2016. One submission was received which raised concerns regarding the subdivision layout, road pattern and road widths. The concerns raised have been addressed and the proposal has been amended to ensure that road alignments comply with the road pattern outlined within the Penrith Development Control Plan 2014 and that the proposal will not jeopardise the orderly development of adjoining land.

 

The applicant also proposes remediation of land and this aspect was separately advertised, notified to nearby and adjoining residents and exhibited between 4 August and 4 September 2017 with no submissions received to this component of the proposed development.

 

LEP and DCP Compliance

 

Penrith Local Environmental Plan 2010 requires a minimum allotment size of 550m2. The proposed subdivision provides all residential allotments (excluding residue allotments) with a compliant minimum 550m2 lot size. A number of residue allotments are proposed to be created without development entitlement, which will then be consolidated into adjoining lands when they are redeveloped. This is required as a consequence of the existing allotment boundary alignments.  The proposed plan of subdivision identifies the residue allotments and indicates how their orderly development can occur when adjoining lands are developed.

 

Penrith Development Control Plan 2010, Chapter E2 – Claremont Meadows Stage 2 outlines requirements to be addressed in the subdivision of land. The DCP provides an indicative road pattern, subdivision pattern, landscaping and drainage requirements and locations for the provision of acoustic treatments (such as fencing). The proposed amended development proposal ensures compliance with the road pattern, subdivision pattern, landscaping, drainage and acoustic requirements within the DCP.

 

Conclusion

 

The applicant has now adequately responded to each of the contentions raised by Council through the amendment of the proposal to provide compliant allotments (size and dimensions), a compliant road pattern, amended works to protect adjoining trees and a stormwater drainage strategy for the site which enables discharge to Caddens Road rather than the construction of temporary on-site detention basins. 

 

In addition the application is supported by a Remedial Action Plan (RAP) to remediate the site with site clearance and validation required prior to the issue of a Construction Certificate. This will ensure that the land is made suitable for the proposed subdivision development and future housing construction on the created allotments. The amended proposal is now supported subject to the imposition of conditions of consent.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Lot Consolidation and Subdivision into 57 x Torrens Title Residential Lots and Associated Road Construction, Drainage and Landscaping Works Lot 1001 DP 1131997 (No.27) Kent Road and Lot 14 DP 27107 (No. 326-330) Caddens Road, Claremont Meadows be received

2.    Council agree to enter consent orders under Section 34 of the Land and Environment Court Act 1979.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

Proposed Plan of Subdivision

1 Page

Appendix

2.

Bulk Earthworks

1 Page

Appendix

3.

Stormwater Layout

2 Pages

Appendix

  


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                       27 November 2017

Appendix 1 - Proposed Plan of Subdivision

 

PDF Creator


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                       27 November 2017

Appendix 2 - Bulk Earthworks

 


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                       27 November 2017

Appendix 3 - Stormwater Layout

 


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                         27 November 2017

 

 

 

5

Caddens Voluntary Planning Agreement at the Corner of O'Connell Street and O'Connell Lane  Applicant:  LegPro;  Owner:  LegPro   

 

Compiled by:               Gavin Cherry, Development Assessment Co-ordinator

Authorised by:            Peter Wood, Development Services Manager  

 

Outcome

We plan for our future growth

Strategy

Facilitate quality development in the City that considers the current and future needs of our community

Service Activity

Assess development proposals efficiently and made decisions that are open and fair

     

Procedural note: Section 375A of the Local Government Act 1993 requires that a division be called in relation to this matter.

 

Executive Summary

On 26 June 2017, a proposed letter of offer to enter into a Voluntary Planning Agreement from Legacy Property Pty Ltd was reported to Council for initial agreement. The letter of offer included the following key aspects: -

-     Land dedication and embellishment of Hilltop Park to the value (land and works) of $1,575,681.00;

 

-     Embellishment of the planned southern sports fields to the value (works only) of $5,182,549.00;

 

-     Construction and upgrade works to O’Connell Street to the value of $7,156,608;

 

-     Land dedication and embellishment of all water management facilities identified within the contribution plan and additional water management facilities required as a consequence of the approved developments at no cost to Council;

 

-     Monetary contributions to the value of $2,015,162.

 

It was resolved at this meeting that the letter of offer be accepted in principle and that a voluntary planning agreement be prepared by the applicant, exhibited and reported back to an Ordinary Meeting of Council for approval and execution.

The draft Voluntary Planning Agreement was prepared by the applicant and placed on public exhibition from 16 September 2017 to 14 October 2017. No submissions have been received in response to this exhibition period.

The proposed Voluntary Planning Agreement is consistent with the terms contained within the original letter of offer and is considered to be a positive outcome for Council and the broader community. 

Agreed Requirements for the Preparation of the Voluntary Planning Agreement

The letter of offer reported to Council on 26 Jun 2017 contained details which were not accepted and in accordance with the recommendations contained within the report on 26 Jun 2017, the applicant was requested to address those matters in the drafting of the Voluntary Planning Agreement. The items requiring address by the applicant included the following:-

 

-     Amendment to the offer to ensure that all water quality treatment basins were maintained and managed by the applicant for 3 x years in accordance with the conditions of consent imposed within the issued notices of determination for subdivision works (Stages 1 – 6).

 

-     The applicant proposed to pay a cash contribution ($90,000) in lieu of the provision of an outstanding works bond as required by Condition No. 48 of Development Consent DA15/0992 (Stage 1). The bond is required as the stage 1 consent necessitates temporary turning heads at the end of the approved roads which would then be removed when the allotment on the corner of O’Connell Street and O’Connell Lane was developed. A bond is Council’s consistent approach and should also be maintained in this instance. 

 

-     The offer was conditional upon Council and traffic committee approving the full closures where required for the duration of works or the cost of these works would be increased to reflect additional traffic management requirements and staged construction. This is not suitable as the authority to authorise road closures is the NSW Roads and Maritime Services which can be rectified in the VPA preparation.

 

-     The benefit of the offer (noting the monetary deficit resulting from underground of services) is the construction of the full extent of O’Connell Street from the Archives site to O’Connell Lane and with this comes the onus to obtain owners consent for those works. As such support of the offer was recommended to be predicated on the applicant securing necessary owners consent and where consent is not obtained, either the terms of the VPA need to reflect this or the requirements of the adopted Contributions Plan in terms of works and monetary contributions must be complied with.

 

In response to these conditions of the issued agreement, the following is advised:-

 

-     The VPA has been drafted to provide a basin maintenance and management period of 36 months (3 years) which is consistent with the recommendations of the report to Council on 26 June 2017 and the resulting resolution of Council.

 

-     The applicant has provided a bank guarantee for outstanding works which enabled the release of the Stage 1 subdivision certificate. In addition, Clause 9.13 also establishes bond requirements for the construction of ‘O’Connell Street east.

 

-     The terms of the Voluntary Planning Agreement (Clause 9.4) requires the Council, acting reasonably, to assist the developer in obtaining approval from the Roads and Maritime Services for the closure of O’Connell Street East during construction. This is reasonable as Council will assist the developer where possible to progress this road closure and the upgrade works to the roads being the basis for this planning agreement. This is consistent with the recommendations of the report to Council on 26 June 2017 and the resulting resolution of Council.

 

-     Clause 9.12 of the Voluntary Planning Agreement states the following:-

 

“If no agreement can be reached by the Sunset Date in clause 9.11, then the Developer may instead elect to pay ordinary cash contributions to the same value as the O’Connell Street East Road Upgrade Works, as specified in Schedule 4 of this Deed.”

 

This clause was raised as a point of concern with the applicant as this clause would enable the applicant to pay a monetary amount for the road works being $7,156,608.00 rather than undertaking the road works in the event that owners consent could not be obtained from adjoining property owners. Owners consent to the proposed works is required as the concept plans prepared for the road works require vegetation removal and earthworks into adjoining lands.  The road works being undertaken by the applicant are critical to Council supporting the offer. In the event that the road works do not proceed then Council would be liable for the full construction costs of the road upgrade (potentially in excess of the above referenced figure) as well as absorbing partial costs associated with the undergrounding of electricity infrastructure as outlined within the report to Council on 26 June 2017.

 

While the applicant as yet has not provided evidence of owners consent from properties directly affected by the proposed works to O’Connell Street (east), the applicant has advised Council officers that discussions have occurred with affected owners and that in principle support for the proposed works has been given.  While Clause 9.12 does provide a level of risk to Council, the applicant cannot force owners consent from adjoining land owners to vegetation removal and battering works and it is reasonable that Council assist where possible and within the Council’s power, to secure owners consent to undertake those necessary works to upgrade O’Connell Street (east).

 

It is also noted that a Development Application (DA17/0995) was lodged on behalf of Western Sydney University on 19 October 2017 for the development of the Caddens Precinct Centre on the corner of O’Connell Street (east) and O’Connell Street (north). The proposed road works subject of this VPA will assist in the development of this Precinct Centre by upgrading perimeter road access being in the interests of the University to provide suitable access arrangements into this proposed development.

 

As a result there is a level of comfort that owners consent can and will be provided from the affected land owners on O’Connell Street (east) and that the financial implications of Clause 9.12 will not likely be realised. Nonetheless it is a necessary consideration in granting acceptance of the proposed Voluntary Planning Agreement.

 

Schedule 2 of the Draft Voluntary Planning Agreement

 

Schedule 2 of the Voluntary Planning Agreement outlines references to 2 x current development applications under assessment for the following works within the subdivision estate:-

 

-     DA17/0479 - Construction and Embellishment of Hilltop Park Including Landscaping, Playground Equipment and Infrastructure Works; and

 

-     DA17/0508 - Construction and Embellishment of Local Open Space for Sports Fields, Courts, Amenities Building, Playground, Car Parking and Associated Civil and Landscaping Works

 

The proposed landscape embellishment plans associated with the above development applications are included as attachments to this report for information. The assessment of the applications has been completed and reports for determination under delegated authority are currently being prepared with a recommendation for approval.

 

It is therefore proposed that the Voluntary Planning Agreement be agreed to but that execution of the VPA not be undertaken until the above referenced Development Applications have been favourably determined. This is to ensure that the VPA references to those applications within Schedule 2 is correct and valid.

 

Outcome of Exhibition Period

 

The draft Voluntary Planning Agreement was advertised and placed on public exhibition from 16 September 2017 to 14 October 2017. No submissions have been received in response to this exhibition period.

 

Legal Comment

 

The proposed Voluntary Planning Agreement was reviewed by Council’s Legal Services Manager and all items identified for address have been suitably resolved within the attached Voluntary Planning Agreement.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Caddens Voluntary Planning Agreement at the Corner of O'Connell Street and O'Connell Lane be received.

2.    Council authorise the General Manager and Mayor to sign the Voluntary Planning Agreement following determination of DA17/0479 and DA17/0508.

3.    In the event that DA17/0479 and DA17/0508 are not favourably determined, then the execution of the Voluntary Planning Agreement not occur until such time as alternate development applications for the embellishment of the Hilltop Park and Local Sports Fields are approved or the Voluntary Planning Agreement is revised to remove references to these applications.

4.    The Common Seal of the Council of the City of Penrith be affixed to the Voluntary Planning Agreement.

5.    A copy of the Voluntary Planning Agreement be provided to the Minister for Planning.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

Proposed Voluntary Planning Agreement

39 Pages

Attachments Included

2.

Schedule 6 - O'Connell Street Drawings

9 Pages

Attachments Included

3.

DA17/0479 - Proposed Landscape Embellishment Plan

1 Page

Attachments Included

4.

DA17/0508 - Proposed Landscape Embellishment Plan

1 Page

Attachments Included

   


Outcome 3 - We can get around the City

 

Item                                                                                                                                                Page

 

6        The NSW Future Transport Strategy 2056                                                                      31

 

 

 



Ordinary Meeting                                                                                         27 November 2017

 

 

 

6

The NSW Future Transport Strategy 2056   

 

Compiled by:               Walter Sinnadurai, Transportation Planner

Authorised by:            Adam Wilkinson, Engineering Services Manager  

 

Outcome

We can get around the City

Strategy

Improve passenger and freight transport connections in the region

Service Activity

Work with government to deliver regional transport infrastructure that meets the needs of our community

      

 

Executive Summary

The purpose of this report is to provide Council with an overview of the State’s recently released Draft Future Transport Strategy 2056. This document is accompanied by the release of the Draft Greater Sydney Services and Infrastructure Plan, Draft Regional NSW Services and Infrastructure Plan, and The Draft Road Safety Plan, all released on 23 October 2017 by Transport for NSW (TfNSW). 

 

The report recommends that the information be received and that the Engineering Services Manager be authorised to finalise a submission, based on this report, and forward it to TfNSW by the closing date of 3 December 2017.

Background

Council at its Ordinary Meeting of 15 October 2012, considered a detailed report on the NSW Long Term Transport Master Plan and subsequently endorsed the provision of a submission to TfNSW which was sent on 26 October 2012.  Following this, The State Government released the NSW Long Term Transport Master Plan in December 2012.

 

In June 2017, Council provided input into the development of the NSW Future Transport Strategy which builds on the accomplishments of the 2012 NSW Long Term Transport Master Plan. The present report seeks to build on the key recommendations of the 2017 input to the NSW Future Transport Strategy.

 

At a recent Councillor Briefing held on 13 November 2017, Council’s Engineering Services Manager presented to Council with an overview of the vision of the State Government’s plan for the next 40 years.

 

The plan released by TfNSW includes:

•    Draft Future Transport Strategy 2056;

•    Draft Greater Sydney Services and Infrastructure Plan; and

•    Draft Road Safety Plan

Current Situation

Draft Future Transport Strategy 2056

 

The Draft Future Transport Strategy (DFTS) is an update of NSW’s Long Term Transport Master Plan.  The DFTS outlines a 40-year vision and sets directions and outcomes framework for customer’s mobility in NSW, which will guide transport investment over the longer term. It will be delivered through a series of supporting plans.

 

The DFTS is made up of three draft documents – the draft Future Transport Strategy, Greater Sydney Services and Infrastructure Plan and the Regional NSW Services and Infrastructure as shown in the image below;

 

 

Draft Services and Infrastructure Plans (DSAIP)

The DSAIP sets out transport outcomes within Greater Sydney and Regional NSW underpinning the movement of people and freight to meet stakeholder’s needs and deliver responsive and innovative services.

Also, the DSAIP sets out plans for Greater Sydney to support the growth of our city, whilst maintaining the liveability for Sydney siders, sustaining and enhancing Sydney’s role as a global City and harnessing technology for the benefit of customers.

In parallel, the Greater Sydney Commission (GSC) has developed a strategic land use plan for the city in order to shape Sydney’s growth future. The GSC vision for Greater Sydney is a metropolis of three cities, providing convenient access to jobs and services for people across the city.  The cities include the Eastern Harbour City with the established Harbour CBD and economic corridors, the Central River City anchored by Greater Parramatta and the Olympic Peninsula (GPOP), and the emerging Western Parkland City focussed around the Metropolitan City Cluster of Western Sydney Airport-Badgerys Creek Aerotropolis, Greater Penrith, Liverpool and Campbelltown-Macarthur.

 

The Greater Sydney Commission's Region Plan establishes the vision for Greater Sydney as a 30-minute City. The 30 minute city is a guiding principle that provides people with access to education, jobs and services within 30 minutes by public transport regardless of where they live.  As the city transitions to a metropolis of three cities, convenient and reliable access for customers by public and active transport to their nearest centre is increasingly important.

DSAIP has been designed to improve the outcomes of our customer’s journeys through a range of initiatives extending across the 40 year timeframe.  The overarching policy and investment approach of DSAIP include initiatives that the NSW Government has committed to (over the next 10 years), initiatives for investigation (in the 0-10 year and 10-20 year timeframes) and visionary initiatives (in the 20+ year timeframe) that will be considered in the future.

 

Initiatives for investigation 0-10 years for Western Parkland City

Initiatives include early investment in strategic links, such as the north-south train link through the Western Parkland City, the train linking WSA-Badgerys Creek Aerotropolis to Parramatta, and the train link from Leppington to the WSA-Badgerys Creek Aerotropolis. Infrastructure to support rapid bus links between centres, to shape a sustainable urban form and support access to WSA. Supporting freight with upgrades to the Southern Sydney Freight Line. Protection of future transport corridors to support the affordable delivery of passenger and freight infrastructure in the future. These and many others are important initial steps to establishing a world class transport system.

 

Table 1 shows the comparison between the Council Infrastructure Priority list and the DSAIP, recommendations are made on initiative based investigations mentioned within the report between 0 – 10 years, 10- 20 years as follow:

 

Table 1- the comparison between the Council Infrastructure Priority list and the DSAIP.

 

Council Infrastructure Priorities

Draft Service And Infrastructure Plan (DSAIP)

Status

Time Frame – initiative for investigation

M4 Smart Motorways

Yes

Committed initiative 0 – 10 years

Western Sydney Infrastructure Plan

(The Northern Road, M12, Erskine Park Road, etc.)

Yes

Committed initiative 0 – 10 years

North-south passenger rail linking the south west Growth Centre to the North West Growth Centre, with St Mary to be extended to connect with Schofields

Yes

0 – 10  years

Rapid bus services from the Western Sydney Airport to Penrith and Blacktown

Yes

0 – 10 years

Bells Line of Road/ Castlereagh Corridor

Yes

0 – 10 years

M12 Motorway upgrade

Yes

0 – 10 years

Western Sydney freight line

Yes

0 – 10 years

Outer Sydney Orbital M9 (Motor Way and freight rail) from Box Hill to central cost corridor protection

Yes

0 – 10 years

Outer Sydney Orbital M9 (Motor Way and freight rail) from Box Hill to South Line and M31 Hume Motorway corridor protection

Yes

0 – 10 years

Outer Sydney Orbital M9 (Motorway and freight rail) from western line to WSA-Badgerys Creek Aerotropolis

Yes

10 – 20 years

Supporting infrastructure such as commuter parking

Not listed within DSAIP

Elizabeth Drive Upgrade

Not listed within DSAIP

Mulgoa Road/ Castlereagh Road

Not listed within DSAIP

Mamre Road

Not listed within DSAIP

 

30 Minute City

The vision for Greater Sydney as a 30 minute city is convenient and reliable access for customers by public and active transport to their nearest centre is increasingly important for Productivity, Liveability and Sustainabilty. The DSAIP underpins 12 transport initiatives for customers to experience in Greater Sydney. The 12 transport initiatives are as follow:

 

1.   New technology is harnessed to provide an integrated end to end journey experience for customers:

The emergence of mobility as a Service (MaaS) where customers can use a single account and ticketing interface to access a broad  range of transport modes.

 

2.   Future forms of mobility are available to customers and integrated with others modes of transport:

Transport technology roadmap and transport strategy future will identify range of new form of mobilty, harnessing the potential of these technologies so that they are available to customers and support the wider objectives for the city as a productive, liveable and sustainable.

 

3.   Ensuring walking or cycling is the most convenient option for short trips around centers and local areas supported by a safe road environment and suitable pahthways:

Provide stakeholders an attractive spaces to walk, prioritising pedestrian or cycling movement, implementing critical safety measures and imporve cycling access within ten kilometers of Metropolitan city centre.

 

4.   Vibrant centres supported by streets that balance the need for convenient access with enhancing the attractiveness of our places:

Balancing the customers need to apply the movement and place framework within centres.

 

5.   30 minutes access for customers to their nearest centre by public transport, seven days a week:

People in each of the three cities have access to jobs and significant services in ther nearest Metropolitan City centre or cluster.

 

6.   Fast and convenient interchanging with walking times of no longer than five minutes between services:

By providing open spaces for more direct paths between services, improve walking and cycling access arround interchanges, and enabling digital technology to disseminate personalised information to customers at interchanges.

 

7.   Efffective reliable and easy to understand jourerney for customers enabled by a simple hierarchy of service:

By connecting regional areas with Greater Sydeney, connecting the eastern, central and western cities as well as the center, connecting Metropolitan City Centers with local areas within 10km, by providing Cross-city trunk services, Regional services and CBD mass transit.

 

8.   Efficient and reliable frieght journeys supported by 24/7 rail access between key freight precincts and with convenient access to centres:

Customers will have 24/7 access to rail links.

 

9.   A safe transport system for every customer with zero death or serious injuries on the network by 2056:

Lifting road design standard, prioritising separation of different transport users to improve safety.

 

10. Fully accessible transport for all customers:

Planning services to ensure customers have equitable and safe access to transport including where on demand services may be implemented.

 

11. Transport services and infrastructure are delivered operated and maintained in a way that is affordable for customers and the community:

The financial sutainablilty of the transport system is essential to ensure high quality and affordable for customers.

 

12. A resilient transport system in Greater Sydeny that contributes to the NSW Government’s objective of net-zero emissions by 2050:

Climate changes and resillience are critical challenges facing the Greater Sydney transport system by planning services and infrastructure for a ‘30 minute city’, planning services and infrastructure, use of more efficient sustainable energy sources.

 

Draft Road Safety Plan (DRSP) 2021

The Transport for NSW Centre for Road Safety has released the ‘DRSP 2021’ for comment.  Only two weeks were provided for feedback and as such, Council officers provided a response to Transport for NSW on Monday 6 November 2017. 

 

The ‘DRSP 2021’ provided a summary of traffic crash and injury trends up to 2016 and listed current and planned future actions to reduce the chances of crash or injury in the traffic environment.  Research into international best practice strategies was cited in the report, with the overall goal for the road environment to be a “safe system”, where it is understood that humans are fragile, and should not encounter a physical force which could cause serious injury.  The key themes within the report were “Safer Roads”, “Safer People” and “Safer Vehicles”.

 

Council’s submission included several requests for measures which would reduce crash and injury risk in the local environment including:

 

-     Consideration of 30km/hr for some Town Centre environments.

-     Point to point safety cameras to reduce speeding.

-     Further research into the benefits of creating a bicycle network that is safe, convenient, easy and effective for short local trips in the local road network.

-     Further efforts in several road safety behavioural areas including fatigue for commuters and shift workers, addressing issues with unlicenced drivers, and focusing on aggressive driving, road rage and tailgating as key behavioural issues.

 

Council put forward the view that the $90mil per year commitment ($713 until 2022/23) for the Safer Roads program is hugely inadequate. The increase in labour and material costs would take up the increase in funding but as far as productive investment, and in order to achieve international best standard reductions in crash and injury rates, infrastructure spending must be significantly increased.

 

Council Submission

The commentary below will form the basis of Council’s submission to TfNSW;

The 30 Minute City

The Draft Future Transport Strategy (DFTS) focuses on the premise that 30 minute travel time to the city which is a guiding principle that provides people with access to education, jobs and services within 30 minutes by public transport regardless of where they live.  However, the DFTS has not provided a clear mechanism or an actual modelling test confirming such ideas proposed will actualy work and how the plan will be implemented for each decade until 2056. The statement of the ‘30 minute city’ needs to be supported with a clear mechanism and be provided with a timeframe for delivery of critical infrastructure and services.

M12 Motorway

Council understands that the M12 Motorway is a committed project under the Western Sydney Infrastructure Plan (in collaboration with the Commonwealth).  This project should be delivered before the Western Sydney Airport (WSA) opening and the M12 Motorway alignment should be included within “Committed initiatives (0-10)” Figure 7 under the Draft Services and Infrastructure Plans.

This will align the corridors to maximise opportunities for economic growth and employment and to support the growth of Greater Penrith.  Mamre Road is to be upgraded and connected to the M12 Motorway as it provides a critical north/south link to the M4 Motorway. 

North South Rail

North South Rail, beyond any other transport connection, offers significant opportunity for a fundamentally better region, north to south across outer Western Sydney than any other. A passenger rail line from Marsden Park to Campbelltown would provide a structuring element around which a whole new north to south economic corridor thick with jobs of the future, could be created.

Rail would also give workers and residents access to the jobs and services that are currently contained in the strategic centres across the two districts.

Significant growth has already occurred and reserving the corridor for North-South rail now, makes sense, in terms of cost and as a driver of development and employment. Cross regional road congestion is also a major source of frustration and lost productivity for Penrith and the West District.

Continuing down the path of our predecessors, with a single minded focus on radial access points into the Sydney CBD, will set the growth of Western Sydney back decades. That is why a bold new north-south cross-regional rail connection is the catalyst for realising the potential of Western Sydney. We strongly believe that true leadership is required to drive this transformative project.

Accelerating the identification and preservation of the passenger rail corridor is important to inform current planning processes, including the District Planning process for the West and South West Districts and the land use and infrastructure strategy for the Western Sydney Airport Growth Area (WSAGA).  Council also urges rail links from WSA to Leppington and WSA to St Marys should be prioritised over WSA to Parramatta as these links will unlock development and economic opportunities within the proposed Western Sydney Airport Economic Corridor.

Council also urges the Federal and State Governments to accelerate the delivery of passenger rail to support the WSA from day one of its operation and to facilitate the development of the WSAGA and the Penrith Health and Education Precinct (PHEP).

In considering the above, Council urges TfNSW that the North South Rail Line be prioritised within 0-2 years for corridor protection and 2-5 years for planning and implementation. This critical item of infrastructure must be in place prior to the opening of the Western Sydney Airport.

Outer Sydney Orbital Route (M9)

Similar to the much needed north-south rail connection through Western Sydney, the proposed Outer Sydney Orbital will provide a critical piece of infrastructure to service our growing region, aligning the corridors to maximize opportunities for economic growth and employment and to support the growth of Greater Penrith.

Accelerating the identification and preservation of the M9 corridor is important to inform current planning processes, including the District Planning process for the West and South West Districts and the land use and infrastructure strategy for the WSAGA. 

In considering the above, Council urges TfNSW that the Outer Sydney Orbital Route (M9) be prioritised within 0-2 years for corridor protection and 2-5 years for planning and 5-10 years for implementation.

Freight and Intermodal

Reservation of key corridors of land is required to provide for future development of the Outer Sydney Orbital with grade separated road interchanges at key access connections to serve regional travel, the north-south rail link and freight. Linking the Western Sydney Priority Growth Area (WSPGA) to the M4/M7/M5/M9, the broader rail network and Penrith to the South West and North West Growth Centres, will be critical.

Council urges TfNSW that the Western Sydney Freight Line be brought forward from 10-20 years to 0-10 years for investigation if the Western Sydney Airport Priority Growth Area is to become a national freight and logistics hub as indicated within the Greater Sydney Region Plan and Western City District Plan.

Bells Line of Road – Castlereagh Connection (BLoR – CC)

In relation to the proposed corridor for the BLoR – CC, Council acknowledges the significance of this corridor in terms of supporting the role of Greater Penrith and in connecting the Sydney Metropolitan Area with land west of the Great Divide.  As the BLoR – CC corridor will need to consider future north-south connections in Western Sydney, we support TfNSW’s approach to coordinating corridor planning and consultation across the whole region. A number of the principles are to be considered, in particular the need to maximise the role and function of the corridor in providing opportunities for flood evacuation in the Hawkesbury Nepean Valley and to minimise any potential adverse environmental, economic and social impacts, including any impacts on threatened species on the Cumberland Plain.

BLoR – CC connection should be prioritised within 0-5 years investigation to relieve capacity issues within Penrith and Hawkesbury LGAs related to flooding evacuation.

In considering the above, Council urges TfNSW that the BLoR - CC be prioritised within 0-2 years for corridor protection and 2-5 years for planning and implementation.

Werrington Arterial (WA): Western Sydney Employment Area (WSEA) and Western Sydney Airport Growth Area (WSAGA) Connectivity

The State Government should identify and reserve a dedicated corridor for the northern extension of Werrington Arterial (stage 2) strategic transport corridor to connect the WSEA and the WSAGA, and beyond to Sydney’s northwest and southwest growth centres.

The WA corridor would ultimately link the M4 Motorway at Claremont Meadows with the Castlereagh Freeway corridor in the vicinity of Marsden Park. This missing Stage 2 connection between Great Western Highway and Christie Street will facilitate access to the North-West and South-West Growth Centres, and accommodate the expected growth in the Penrith region.

In considering the above, Council urges TfNSW that the Werrington Arterial Stage 2 be prioritised within 0-2 years for corridor protection and 2-5 years for planning and implementation.

Public Transport

The following public transport actions and initiatives should be addressed as part of the NSW Future Transport Strategy:

1.   Additional Penrith – Sydney CBD express rail services

2.   Express bus services

3.   Analysis and expansion of commuter parking provision at Penrith, St Marys, Kingswood and Emu Plains stations

4.   Bus priority measures on key road links

5.   Strategic bus corridors for release areas and existing suburbs

6.   Disability Discrimination Act: infrastructure upgrades to meet the DDA obligations with public transport facilities (in particular all bus stops).

7.   CBD free shuttle bus service

8.   Kingswood Railway Station - establishment of primary stop for hospital connection

9.   Provision of railway underpass for buses at Belmore Street Penrith

10. Integrated ticketing system for Western Sydney

Road Safety

We have included several measures to reduce the risk of serious injuries and fatalities in our LGA namely:

-     Consideration of 30km/hr for some Town Centre environments.

-     Point to point safety cameras to reduce speeding.

-     Further research into the benefits of creating a bicycle network that is safe, convenient, easy and effective for short local trips in the local road network.

-     Further efforts in several road safety behavioural areas including fatigue for commuters and shift workers, addressing issues with unlicenced drivers, and focusing on aggressive driving, road rage and tailgating as key behavioural issues.

Council also put forward the view that the $90mil per year commitment ($713 until 2022/23) for the Safer Roads program is hugely inadequate. The increase in labour and material costs would take up the increase in funding but as far as productive investment, and in order to achieve international best standard reductions in crash and injury rates, infrastructure spending must be significantly increased.

Transport Priorities for Penrith

It is Council’s very clear view that its response to the Draft Future Transport Strategy needs to place a strong focus on the transport issues and tasks of particular relevance to the local Penrith area.

The effective delivery of transport infrastructure and services for the Greater Penrith regional area is vital for the City and its residents, and also to provide appropriate transport “self-sufficiency” in terms of cross regional journeys, public/private transport options and support for localised employment opportunities. Council believes that such localised services and infrastructure will provide a very important and cost-effective offset to the demand for capacity on an otherwise radial and Sydney CBD centric transport model.

Car Parking

The following actions and initiatives in relation to car parking are also essential elements to be included in the development of the NSW Future Transport Strategy:

1.   Commuter Car Parking Policy

2.   Metropolitan Parking Strategy

Active Transport

The following active transport initiatives will need to be included in the NSW Future Transport Strategy.

NSW Bike Plan - River Cities Program - 10 year program for shared-use paths, including:

·    Between Coreen Avenue, North Penrith and Andrews Road, Cranebrook

·    Along York Road, between South Penrith and Glenmore Park

·    Along Dunheved Road, between North Penrith and Werrington

·    Along Great Western Highway, between St Marys and Colyton

·    The River Precinct

Conclusion

The Draft Future Transport Strategy (DFTS) 2056 needs to be well planned and achievable. However, the DFTS lacks a precise timeframe for starting or project delivery model for each of the stages. In addition, there is no identification of a clear mechanism or an actual modelling test confirming how the proposal will actually work and how the plan will be implemented for each decade untill 2056.

It is fundamentally important that all road and rail corridors are confirmed and locked away now. To delay such dedication will continue to frustrate land use planning for our City and the Region.

The community deserves certainty in both corridor protection and timeframes for the devliery of such critical transport infrastructure.  Council accordingly calls for the Draft Future Transport 2056 Plan, to clearly articulate timeframes and timely mechanisms for the delivery of infrastructure and initiatives over the next 40 years.

The key issues identified within the body of this report will be included in Council’s submission to TfNSW and Council officers will continue to work with TfNSW to ensure that the future upgrade delivers appropriate outcomes for all stakeholders.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on The NSW Future Transport Strategy 2056 be received

2.    Council’s Engineering Services Manager be authorised to finalise a submission, based on this report, to the TfNSW by 3 December 2017.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.  


Outcome 4 - We have safe, vibrant places

 

Item                                                                                                                                                Page

 

7        Dedication of Council Land for Road Widening Purposes - Erskine Park Road Upgrade                                                                                                                                            43

 

8        Grant application: CreateNSW funding for Arts Cart mobile project                               47

 

9        Establishment of Additional Alcohol Free Zone on Henry Street, Penrith                      49

 

10      Jordan Springs Community Hub - Licence Agreement for U3A Nepean Blue Mountains Incorporated                                                                                                                     51

 

11      Tender Reference RFT17/18-06 - CRM based Field Services Management Solution   57

 

12      Vegetation Management to reduce fire risk                                                                     69

 

13      Management of 'Stand-Alone' Trees                                                                                71

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



Ordinary Meeting                                                                                         27 November 2017

 

 

 

7

Dedication of Council Land for Road Widening Purposes - Erskine Park Road Upgrade   

 

Compiled by:               Julie Connell, Property Portfolio Coordinator 

Authorised by:            Angus Fulton, Property Development Manager  

 

Outcome

We have safe, vibrant places

Strategy

Help make our major centres and important community places safe and attractive

Service Activity

Use Council's property portfolio to help make our major centres and important community places safe and attractive

      

 

Executive Summary

This report seeks Council’s concurrence for the dedication of part Lot 348 DP708572 known as 143-174 Explorers Way, St Clair for the purposes of road widening associated with the intersection upgrade of Erskine Park Road and Explorers Way, St Clair.

Background

The Australian Government is funding a $200 Million Local Roads Package (LRP) as part of the Western Sydney Infrastructure Plan (WSIP). Funding of $25.7 Million has been allocated for Council to improve road safety and traffic flow efficiency at key intersections along Erskine Park Road.

 

The intersections and works include: -

1.   Erskine Park Road and Bennett Road Intersection – upgrade the intersection and install new traffic signals.

2.   Erskine Park Road and Peppertree Drive Intersection – upgrade the existing intersection to a new seagull intersection.

3.   Erskine Park Road and Coonawarra Drive Intersection – upgrade the existing intersection to a new seagull intersection.

4.   Erskine Park Road & Explorers Way Intersection – upgrade the intersection and install new traffic signals.

5.   Erskine Park Road between Coonawarra Drive and Bennett Road – upgrade to four lane median separated dual carriageway (two lanes in each direction) and new shared user path.

 

At the completion of the upgrade, Erskine Park Road will be a four lane dual carriageway road between Bennett Road and Explorers Way to join the existing four lane section towards the M4 Motorway and Swallow Drive.

 

The upgrade will significantly improve road safety and traffic efficiency.

 

Property Acquisition

 

To facilitate delivery of intersection 4 (Erskine Park Road & Explorers Way), partial acquisition is required of two properties for road widening.

 

The proposed acquisitions are shown in Annexure 1 and comprise the following: -

 

1.         Council Owned – Public Reserve - Community Land - 143-174 Explorers Way St Clair - Part of Lot 348 DP708572 – Total area of 366sqm (proposed lot 3); and

 

2.         Private Ownership – Common Property (Strata) of 158 Explorers Way, St Clair – Pt SP84166 – Total area of 23.6sqm (proposed lot 4).

 

An aerial of both properties is further shown in Annexure 2.

 

Council’s Property Development Department is presently negotiating with the Strata Scheme for the acquisition of the property at 158 Explorers Way, with a further report to be presented to Council at a later date to facilitate the acquisition of that property.

 

Road Dedication

 

Under Section 47F of the Local Government Act 1993, Council is permitted to dedicate community land as public road for the purpose of widening existing an existing public road.

 

Council’s land at 143-174 Explorers Way is currently a public reserve and classified as Community land. The road widening of 366sqm represents a minor dedication (5.3%) of the overall site area of 6901sqm. The proposed road widening is permitted within the Plan of Management and provides no negative impact to the operation and enjoyment of the reserve.

 

Upon endorsement of the road dedication by Council, the plan will be registered, and the proposed lot 3 will be gazetted as public road in accordance with the provisions of Section 10 of the Roads Act 1993.

 

Council’s concurrence is therefore sought for the dedication of part Lot 348 DP708572 known as 143-174 Explorers Way, St Clair for the purposes of road widening associated with the intersection upgrade of Erskine Park Road and Explorers Way, St Clair.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Dedication of Council Land for Road Widening Purposes - Erskine Park Road Upgrade be received

2.    Council dedicate part lot 348 DP708572 for the purposes of Public Road and Gazette the land as public road in accordance with the terms and conditions listed in the report.

3.    The Common Seal of the Council of the City of Penrith be placed on all necessary documentation.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

Acquisition Plan

1 Page

Appendix

2.

Aerial - Properties subject to Road Widening

1 Page

Appendix

  


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                       27 November 2017

Appendix 1 - Acquisition Plan

 


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                       27 November 2017

Appendix 2 - Aerial - Properties subject to Road Widening

 

PDF Creator


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                         27 November 2017

 

 

 

8

Grant application: CreateNSW funding for Arts Cart mobile project   

 

Compiled by:               Donita Hulme, Cultural Engagement Officer

Authorised by:            Jeni Pollard, Place Manager  

 

Outcome

We have safe, vibrant places

Strategy

Work with our communities to improve wellbeing and infrastructure in their neighbourhoods

Service Activity

Deliver projects that address local issues and improve the wellbeing of local communities

      

 

Executive Summary

This report provides information on the funding application for a mobile engagement project targeting socially isolated residents in two neighbourhoods of Penrith: Kingswood and North St Marys.

 

CreateNSW funding is available through their Arts and Cultural Projects grant category. An application for $60,000 will be submitted on 11 December 2017 for ARTS CART, an arts-based, mobile project for residents living in areas of multiple disadvantage. ARTS CART is also a test model for mobile community engagement.

 

The ARTS CART will tour two neighbourhoods with a welcoming ‘pop-up space’ space that brings residents together with each other, a skilled duo of artists and a Neighbourhood Renewal officer for regular workshops in their local park (immediate vicinity). Use of Council’s Mobile Playvan is planned for this test project and as such workshops would be delivered on Mondays which is the Playvan program’s off day. Negotiations with Children’s Services will determine the costs associated with using this Council resource and will most likely include refuelling and contributions to maintenance.

 

Community Cultural Development (CCD) will also be submitting a funding application at the same time to CreateNSW for an exciting arts project that focuses on working with Aboriginal women.

 

This report recommends that the provided information be received and that Council endorse the funding application.

Background

The Neighbourhood Renewal Program provides an integrated model of placemaking, creative community engagement, cultural development and meaningful participation across 12 identified neighbourhoods in Penrith City. The program responds to Council’s commitment to resourcing older established neighbourhoods and takes a place-based approached to addressing disadvantage in these communities. By engaging with residents, the program identifies local assets and strengths as well as needs and issues (social, economic, physical environment).

 

This project builds on the Neighbourhood Renewal approach of developing trust and relationships with residents through meaningful engagement, empowering opportunities and active responses to their Council-specific feedback.

 

The Neighbourhood Renewal program encompasses 12 identified neighbourhoods with existing resources currently allowing for meaningful engagement with residents in 2-3 focus areas per year.

 

The mobile model being tested through ARTS CART has the potential to amplify the impact of existing Neighbourhood Renewal initiated activities in focus neighbourhoods and to extend the program’s reach into our other neighbourhoods.

 

Conclusion

 

If successful, funding for this project will enable an innovative project that will provide positive impacts for residents and also test a model for extending the resources of Neighbourhood Renewal.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Grant application: CreateNSW funding for Arts Cart mobile project be received

2.     Council endorse the grant application for $60,000 to CreateNSW for the ARTS CART project.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                         27 November 2017

 

 

 

9

Establishment of Additional Alcohol Free Zone on Henry Street, Penrith   

 

Compiled by:               Allison Kyriakakis, Community Safety Coordinator

Olivia Kidon, Community Safety Co-ordinator

Authorised by:            Jeni Pollard, Place Manager  

 

Outcome

We have safe, vibrant places

Strategy

Make our public places safe and attractive

Service Activity

Maintain a Community Safety Plan for the City

      

 

Executive Summary

At the Ordinary Meeting of 25 September 2017, Council supported the re-establishment of 85 alcohol-free public spaces across the city for the four (4) year period from 1 November 2017 to 31 October 2021. This included the re-establishment of 54 Alcohol Free Zones (applicable for public roads, footpaths and car parks) and 31 Alcohol Prohibited Areas (applicable for parks, reserves and public open spaces).

 

During the consultation process for the re-establishment of the abovementioned locations, representations were received from Penrith Local Area Command requesting an additional Alcohol Free Zone on Henry Street, Penrith, from Lawson Street to Station Street in the Penrith city centre. 

 

In accordance with the NSW Government Ministerial Guidelines for the Establishment of Alcohol Free Zones an additional public exhibition period and consultation process was required to establish the newly requested location as alcohol-free. At the meeting of 25 September 2017, Council recommended that the additional consultation process be undertaken for the establishment of an Alcohol Free Zone on Henry Street, Penrith. 

 

This process has now been completed. No submissions were received.   

 

This report recommends that:

1.   The information contained in the report Establishment of Additional Alcohol Free Zone on Henry Street, Penrith be received.

2.   Council support the establishment of an additional Alcohol Free Zone on Henry Street, Penrith, from Lawson Street to Station Street.

 

Background

Alcohol Free Zones and Alcohol Prohibited Areas are a public awareness and enforcement tool to assist the police in responding to alcohol-related antisocial behaviour in public places with reported issues. They are one part of a broader range of community safety strategies designed to encourage safer public spaces across the city. 

 

Local police from Penrith and St Marys Local Area Commands continue to support the establishment of alcohol-free public spaces to assist in minimising opportunities for alcohol-related antisocial behaviour to occur.

 

Following the conclusion of the recent consultation process for the re-establishment of the Alcohol Free Zones and Alcohol Prohibited Area across the city, representations were received from Penrith Local Area Command requesting the establishment of an additional Alcohol Free Zone on Henry Street between Lawson Street and Station Street, Penrith.

 

In accordance with Ministerial Guidelines, the Penrith Police request for an additional Alcohol Free Zone on Henry Street is supported by data and would provide consistent coverage and enforcement for this area in the Penrith City Centre as areas adjacent to this location have previously been established as alcohol-free.

 

In accordance with Ministerial Guidelines, this location was the subject of further consultation and a public exhibition period. A public notice was advertised in the Western Weekender on 6 October 2017 inviting community comment on the proposal, allowing a 30-day timeframe for submissions. Council also wrote to the relevant stakeholders to seek input on the proposal to establish this additional Alcohol Free Zone.

 

This process has now been completed. No submissions were received.

 

Conclusion

 

Following the request from Penrith Local Area Command for an additional Alcohol Free Zone on Henry Street, Penrith, a further consultation process was conducted for this location in accordance with Ministerial Guidelines. This process has now been completed with no submissions received.

 

This report recommends that Council support the establishment of an additional Alcohol Free Zone on Henry Street, Penrith, from Lawson Street and Station Street, Penrith.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Establishment of Additional Alcohol Free Zone on Henry Street, Penrith be received

2.    Council support the establishment of an additional Alcohol Free Zone on Henry Street, Penrith, from Lawson Street to Station Street.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                         27 November 2017

 

 

 

10

Jordan Springs Community Hub - Licence Agreement for U3A Nepean Blue Mountains Incorporated   

 

Compiled by:               Judy Cobb, Neighbourhood Facilities Co-ordinator

Andrew Robinson, Facilities Manager

Authorised by:            Brian Steffen, Executive Manager - City Assets  

 

Outcome

We have safe, vibrant places

Strategy

Work with our communities to improve wellbeing and infrastructure in their neighbourhoods

Service Activity

Manage the use of Council's community buildings

      

 

Executive Summary

Construction of Jordan Springs Community Hub is nearing completion with handover scheduled for December 2017 (subject to Council’s agreeance on a defects rectification period). The residents of Jordan Springs are aware that transfer of ownership to Council is imminent and are keen to utilise the facility.

 

Councillors considered a Briefing Paper on 6 July 2015 where support was sought to commence formal negotiations with U3A Nepean Blue Mountains Inc (U3A) on the development of a draft licence agreement to enable U3A to take on the role of host organisation at Jordan Springs Community Hub (JSCH). Negotiations have concluded and a licence agreement has now been developed.

 

This report recommends that Council endorse the execution of a Licence Agreement with U3A for their sole use of the office at Jordan Springs Community Hub (Part of Lot 6, DP 1176874, 2- 6 Cullen Avenue, Jordan Springs) for the provision of a host service. The agreement sets out the responsibilities of both parties.  The licence agreement is for a period of one year, as requested by U3A, but has the option to be extended for a further two years.

 

Should Council endorse the execution of the agreement, the main role of U3A will be to activate the JSCH by keeping the facility open on weekdays between 9am and 3pm, welcoming residents and visitors upon arrival, providing information on booking processes and availability, and assisting Council with WHS and pre/post function inspections. 

 

Council will be responsible for the management and operation of the facility (e.g. booking management, financial management, risk management, cleaning, conflict resolution between users, and management of relations with neighbouring residents etc) and for supporting U3A as the host organisation.

 

In exchange for the provision of the host service the agreement identifies that Council will provide U3A with 18 hours of ‘in kind’ hire equivalent per week at JSCH for U3A activities.  To ensure equitable access by other user groups, the agreement also states that unused hours cannot be carried over, must be spread equitably across morning, afternoon and evening booking periods, and must be held in various meeting rooms in the facility.

 

Council is required to publicly advertise their intention to enter into a licence agreement with U3A for a 28-day period.  Subject to Council’s approval, the public exhibition period will run concurrently with the transfer of ownership and handover progress. Lendlease has agreed for Council to erect the required signage at the facility while it is still in their ownership.

 

The licence agreement will not be signed until the transfer of ownership has been finalised or in the instance that an objection is received during the public exhibition period. A subsequent report will be presented to Council for their consideration should this occur.

 

Background

 

a)      The Facility

 

Jordan Springs Community Hub is located in the Jordan Springs Village Centre precinct and will be the principal neighbourhood facility for the residents of Jordan Springs and the Central Precinct.  Construction of this “works in kind’ project is nearing completion with transfer of ownership scheduled for mid-December 2017 and subject to Council’s acceptance of a defect rectification period. 

 

This facility is identified in a Planning Agreement between Council and Lend Lease and a subsequent Deed of Variation.  The land, once transferred to Council’s ownership, will be classified as Community Land.  Council Officers have conducted regular inspections of the facility during the construction stage and are confident that handover will occur as planned.

 

It is anticipated that a ‘soft opening’ of JSCH will occur in January 2018 with the public being invited to view the facility and find out about booking processes, activities and volunteering. Regular user groups, who have already booked with Council through the Expression of Interest process, also plan to commence in January. The official opening ceremony is currently being planned in partnership with Lend Lease for early April 2018.

 

b)      Management and Operation

 

Councillors considered a Briefing Paper on 6 July 2015, where support was sought to commence formal negotiations with U3A Nepean Blue Mountains Inc on the development of a draft licence agreement which enables U3A to take on the role of host organisation at Jordan Springs Community Hub. 

 

The Briefing Paper summarised a range of management models including:

 

·    Management by a Section 355 Committee

·    Management by an external organisation (under licence agreement)

·    Management by Council

·    Management by Council in partnership with a Host Organisation

 

Councillors were advised that government agencies and community organisations, who attended concept and design workshops for the JSCH, were asked to express interest, through a confidential survey, to provide ‘host services’ at the facility. Unfortunately, no organisation indicated that they were able to do so.

 

Council Officers then engaged in more detailed discussion with four well established reputable local organisations, namely The Australian Foundation for Disability, Nepean Community & Neighbourhood Services, the Nepean Area Disabilities Organisation, and U3A Nepean Blue Mountains Inc.

 

Though all four organisations expressed an interest in delivering some services from the facility, U3A was the only organisation that demonstrated a willingness to take on a host role during the specified hours of Monday to Friday between 9:00am - 3:00pm.

 

c)      Consultation with U3A

 

U3A is a local non-profit organisation providing lifelong learning opportunities for residents over the age of 50. The organisation’s head office is located at the Council owned School of Arts Building on Castlereagh Street Penrith.

Though U3A has access to a large pool of senior volunteers, they have recognised the importance of also having younger volunteers at JSCH.  Therefore, the organisation’s constitution was recently changed to include associate memberships for younger people.  This is a significant step for U3A and will allow them to recruit younger people from the Jordan Springs area who are interested in volunteering at their local neighbourhood facility.

 

d)   Licence Agreement

 

Council and U3A representatives have contributed equally to the development of the licence agreement which clearly outlines the roles and responsibilities of both parties.  This agreement has been drawn up by Council’s legal team and approved by U3A’s legal representative.

 

In accordance with Section 47A of the Local Government Act 1993, Council is required to publicly advertise the intention to enter into a Licence Agreement with U3A for sole use of the office at JSCH to provide a host service. The Public Notice must be advertised in the local newspaper, to the adjoining residential property owners, and on appropriate signage erected at the site, thereby allowing the public 28 days to lodge submissions concerning this matter. 

 

Lendlease have agreed for Council to erect the required signage at the facility while it is still in their ownership. 

 

Current Situation

 

The residents of Jordan Springs are aware that construction of the JSCH is nearing completion. Regular user groups are ready to commence activities as soon as the building is open and a number of booking enquiries have been received from residents who are keen to use the facility.  U3A volunteers are also being actively recruited to become host volunteers.

 

Therefore, to minimise any delay between the handover and opening the facility, it is proposed that Council publicly advertise the public notice concurrently with the transfer of ownership and handover process.  Any submissions received during the 28 days exhibition period will be responded to by the Facilities Department.  Any opposition to the licence agreement will be referred to Council for their consideration in a separate report.

 

Upon successful completion of the public exhibition process (with no objections received), and the successful transfer of ownership, it is proposed that a Licence Agreement, based on the following terms and conditions, be signed:

 

Licensee

U3A Nepean Blue Mountains Inc

Premises

Part of Lot 6, DP 1176874, 2- 6 Cullen Avenue, Jordan Springs (known as Jordan Springs Community Hub)

ABN

35 956 305 595

Address

3 Castlereagh Street, Penrith 2750

Licence Term

1 year

Licence Option

1 year extension, based on same terms and conditions, with adjusted dates, terminating at the end of 2020

Licence Commencement Date

Upon successful transfer of ownership to Council

Licence Termination Date

One year from commencement date or with 30 days written notice by either party

 

 

 

Licence Fee

$1.10 pa (GST incl)

Licensee Responsibilities

·    Cannot assign license agreement

·    Permitted use only

·    Public liability insurance cover for a minimum of $10 million dollars

·    Open the facility to the public Monday - Friday between the hours of 9am - 3pm unless otherwise negotiated with Council.

·    Meet and greet the public as they enter the facility.

·    Provide customers with information relating to booking procedures, fees, terms and conditions of hire, availability etc.

·    Assist groups and hirers in contributing to a well presented and organised facility.

·    Conduct and document weekly pre/post function inspections and WHS inspections.

·    Recruit, roster and manage host volunteers.

·    Assist Council with the implementation a training programs for host volunteers.

·    Adhere to Council’s procedures relating to keys, swipe cards, alarm call outs, reporting damages/vandalism, room bookings etc.

·    Adhere to Council’s Code of Conduct.

·    Ensure that the presentation of the licenced office is to an acceptable standard at all times.

·    Must submit booking applications forms for hire of meeting spaces for all U3A activities (including booking with subsidised hire) through Council’s standard booking processes.

·    Payment of the adopted not-for-profit hire fee for any meeting room hire that exceed the agreed 18 hours of ‘in kind’ hire per week

·    Adhere to Council’s Terms and Conditions of Hire including standard booking processes.  Booking requests for specific times or rooms is not guaranteed.

 

Licensor Responsibilities

·    Management and operation of Jordan Springs Community Hub (including bookings, financial management, cleaning, risk management, all reporting, managing conflict, maintaining relations with neighbouring residents, etc).

·    Major repairs and minor maintenance of roofing, structural, electrical, plumbing, ceilings, external structures, and surrounding landscaping.

·    Payment of land tax, insurance, rates, water, electricity, internet, garbage and alarm line charges.

·    Provision of a fully furnished office (including desks, chairs, IT equipment, printer, etc.) at the facility for the purposes of carrying out the host service.

·    Payment of all operating and office sundries associated with the provision of the Host Services.

·    Development and implementation of a training program for U3A volunteers regarding the operation of the facility and their responsibilities as host volunteers.

·    Regular liaison and support to U3A as Host Organisation.

·    Provision of 18 hours of ‘in kind’ hire equivalent per week at JSCH for approved Licensee activities.

·    Regular audits and inspections of the JSCH with U3A Nepean Blue Mountains Inc

 

 

Community Value

 

The fees structure for Jordan Springs Community Hub was adopted by Council during the 2017/18 management planning process.  The adopted fees for this facility align with the fees identified for meeting spaces, of a similar size/design, located in other neighbourhood facilities.  The average cost for a not for profit community organisation, such as U3A, to hire a meeting room/hall at JSCH will be approximately $18.00/hr per room.

 

The provision of the host service, as outlined in the terms and conditions listed above, was valued at approximately $31,012.80pa (based on Social and Community State Award, 38 hours per week, Grade 1/entry level, Clerical Services, $19.88/hr). The volunteers however will not have the same level of responsibility as that of a clerical worker engaged under the SACS award.  U3A will also have sole access to a fully furnished and serviced office.  The value of having an onsite presence however is essential to creating an active and vibrant facility and will assist in achieving the best outcomes for local residents.

 

Council Officers and U3A representatives have agreed that a dollar value could not be placed on the host service.  Therefore, a figure of 18 hours per week of ‘in kind’ hire equivalent was mutually agreed to.  To ensure equitable access by other user groups, unused hours cannot be carried over to the next week, must be spread equitably across morning, afternoon, and evening booking periods, and must be held various meeting rooms located in the facility.

 

Financial Services Manager’s Comment

 

The proposed Licence agreement provides for U3A to activate the JSCH by keeping the facility open on weekdays between 9am and 3pm, welcoming residents and visitors upon arrival, providing information on booking processes and availability, and assisting Council with WHS and pre/post function inspections. In exchange for the host service the agreement identifies that Council will provide U3A with 18 hours of ‘in kind’ hire equivalent per week at JSCH for U3A activities. The approximate value of the “in kind hire” is $16,848pa based on 2017-18 hire fees. Upon execution, the budget will be adjusted to reflect the terms of the Licence agreement.

 

 

 

 

Conclusion

 

Jordan Springs Community Hub (JSCH) will exemplify sustainability in its delivery of the built form, social infrastructure and learning opportunities.  It will be Council’s 39th neighbourhood facility and the largest of its kind in the Penrith LGA.

 

Experience has shown the importance of thinking through how a neighbourhood facility will be managed, operated and maintained as part of the design process.  Planning and negotiations regarding the management structure for this important facility therefore commence in 2015.  Activation was identified as the key element to establishing a vibrant community hub.

 

A hybrid model of facility management and operation has been proposed for Jordan Springs Community Hub whereby, under Council’s leadership and management, the facility will be open and activated through a partnership with U3A Nepean Blue Mountains Inc as the host organisation.  

 

The roles, functions and responsibilities of the arrangement are summarised in this report. This unique approach to facility provision aims to ensure that the best outcome is achieved for the residents of Jordan Springs.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Jordan Springs Community Hub - Licence Agreement for U3A Nepean Blue Mountains Incorporated be received

2.    Council endorse the execution of a Licence Agreement with U3A Nepean Blue Mountains Inc (U3A) as detailed in the report.

 

3.    The Common Seal of the Council of the City of Penrith be placed on all necessary documentation.

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                         27 November 2017

 

 

 

11

Tender Reference RFT17/18-06 - CRM based Field Services Management Solution   

 

Compiled by:               John Gordon, City Presentation Manager

Jane Howard, ICT Operations Manager

Lyndall Ryman, Parks Secretary

Shivani  Chand , ICT Business Analyst

Harold Dulay, Acting Team Leader - Solutions Delivery

Authorised by:            Brian Steffen, Executive Manager - City Assets

Andrew Moore, Chief Financial Officer   

 

Outcome

We have safe, vibrant places

Strategy

Make our public places safe and attractive

Service Activity

Maintain Council's public spaces

      

 

Executive Summary

Tender, RFT 17/18-06 Field Service Management, was advertised in the Western Weekender on 31 August 2017, the e-tendering and Apet 360 sites on 4 September 2017 and The Sydney Morning Herald on 5 September 2017 with the tender closing on 12 October 2017.

Council currently maintains over 1,100 open space sites covering 1,200 hectares in area, 1,086km of roads, 654km of paths, 313 Council buildings, 260 pieces of fleet and plant, and 798 pieces of minor plant and equipment. These numbers are expected to increase over the next 3-5 years as additional open spaces and facilities are transferred to Council to maintain from developers.

 

Staff productivity and time efficiency improvements are essential for Council to maintain these assets and ensure services are provided to the community at an appropriate level, whilst minimising the increase in resource requirements to meet these levels. Committing to achieving the production and efficiency improvement was a central element of our response to the NSW Governments Fit for the Future reforms, our own Capacity Review and have underpinned our Long Term Financial Plans and organisational sustainability.

 

This report advises Council of the outcome of the tender process and recommends that the tender from Velrada be approved as the preferred tenderer for implementation, support and services of our Dynamics 365 platform subject to the signing of a contract.

Background

At present, a significant proportion of Council’s outdoor staff receive maintenance job requests and work orders through email and paper based mediums. These tasks are either entered into Council’s record system (ECM) and Council’s asset management system (Works and Assets) by internal staff or coordinators before being reproduced on paper for each crew.

 

Communication between different crews and departments is performed via paper-based ‘Internal Memos’. With increasing operational challenges and an increasing asset base there are opportunities for Council to implement a contemporary and best practice field service management (FSM) solution. The solution will improve access to and management of information, improve business productivity and provide productivity savings with increased staff morale.

The solution will enable Council to increase its compliance with legislative obligations, update and streamline business processes.

 

Furthermore, to allow for a more streamlined and effective response to customer work requests, the FSM solution had to be able to exchange data with the Customer Relationship Management (CRM) system or intrinsically part of an established CRM.

 

By way of summary, the purpose of each of the solutions are as follows:

 

·    Field Services Management/Mobility for Outdoor Staff (FSM) Solution

 

Work Management and Location enabled services, skill based routing; Mobile Apps to support mobility, improved workflow, improved efficiencies and improved engagement with Field staff and Depot staff.

 

·    Customer Relationship Management (CRM) Solution

 

This solution to support case management and relevant citizen/customer web portals. Integration components to support exchange of information between Council’s other technology systems like our Technology One Asset Management system and Computer Telephony Integration (CTI) for our telephony systems Skype for Business and Enghouse TouchPoint.

 

Tender Approach

 

Accordingly, Council sought Tenders for the supply and implementation of a system capable of meeting the requirements for an FSM solution and a CRM solution for an initial contract period of six (6) years, with an option to extend for a further two (2) x two (2) year periods.

 

The purpose of this Request for Tender is to seek the services of vendors of a FSM solution for our field services team and also provides a platform to be used as a CRM which integrates to existing systems and that aligns to ICT Strategy.

 

Into the future it is believed that a CRM system may be rolled out to the entire organisation and we have asked for a solution that would allow for a future roll out of a CRM at council’s option.

 

Hence, the awarding of the tender would include in the first part the approval of a preferred tenderer for the implementation, support and service of the FSM solution. In the second part only the acceptance of the CRM solution pricing from a preferred tenderer subject to Council signing successfully an agreement for the holistic implementation of the CRM solution. The preferred tenderers for the FSM and CRM solutions can be different vendors or the same vendor.

 

The tender allowed for the submission of 4 tender types of solutions to be evaluated. These solutions comprised of the following:

·    Type 1: CRM based FSM solution

 

A: CRM with an FSM intrinsically part of the same base platform

B: CRM and FSM solutions as modules

 

·    Type 2: FSM standalone but the vendor will need to demonstrate how it could partner with a CRM provider

 

·    Type 3: CRM standalone but the vendor will need to demonstrate how it could partner with an FSM provider

 

·    Type 4:  Council selection of best of breed FSM & CRM solutions to work in conjunction with selected vendors

 

All prospective tenderers were invited to attend a pre-tender briefing on 11 September 2017.

 

Tender Evaluation

Evaluation Panel

A procurement plan detailing the tender governance, evaluation committee composition and evaluation methodology was prepared and approved by the City Presentations Manager, and ICT Operations Manager prior to tender publication.

 

The Tender Evaluation Committee, consisted of a wide cross-section of Council staff, Governance and Chair of the evaluation committee was John Gordon (City Presentation),

Harold Dulay (Project Manager/ICT Lead), Jane Howard (ICT Operations Manager), Lyndall Ryman (Business Lead – City Presentation), Shivani Chand (ICT Business Analyst), Aruna Bonasu (ICT Business Analyst), John Reilly (Operations Coordinator – Public Space Maintenance), Simon Dane (Strategic Asset Management Officer), Arthur Kirk (GIS Coordinator), Angela Hume (Customer Experience Manager), David Parry (Customer Experience Team Leader) and Patrick Robles (Finance subject matter expert).

 

Laura Stott and Allyce Langton from Council’s Procurement team performed the role of tender administration and probity for this tender.

 

The evaluation criteria advertised and used in assessing the tenders received included over 300 functional, non-functional and commercial requirements in a range of categories including:

1. Access Control

2. Auditing

3. Behaviour/Workflow/Business Rules

4. Data

5. Integration

6. Portal

7. Reporting

8. Searching & Sorting

9. Usability

10. Risk – Project, Commercial & Operational

11. Future product strategy

12. Financial 

 

The tender approach entailed selecting for both an FSM and CRM product. It was strategic for Council to go to tender to procure for both FSM and CRM solutions as they are tightly coupled together and complement each other, where the CRM can be a platform that can be extended across the organisation. The implementation of the FSM solution will occur first and the CRM solution is expected to be implemented in the next 12-months, subject to funding being identified and allocated.

 

It is recommended that Council approve the preferred tenderer for the implementation, support and service of the FSM solution. With respect to the CRM solution, it is recommended that Council also accepts the preferred tenderer’s overall daily rate for the future implementation of an organisational CRM solution. However, Council will only activate the organisational CRM solution implementation with the preferred tenderer at the accepted daily rate subject to the successful execution of an agreement or as Council sees the need to do so in a business case being approved and a budget being allocated.

 

Tender Evaluation Process

 

The evaluation methodology used ensured that the recommended vendor is strategically aligned, meets most if not all of the project requirements, presented a viable technology solution and had an implementation team that council is satisfied can deliver the required solution and presents the most advantageous option for Council.

 

The tender evaluation was completed in stages which is outlined below: 

 

Stage 1 – Once the tender responses were received the Procurement team in conjunction with the Financial Services Team assessed the vendors based on the compliance and conformity of the tender submissions against the published tender specifications.

 

Stage 2 – Conforming tenders were then assessed to confirm that they met strategic intent i.e. alignment to the ICT strategic requirements and the identified 47 key requirements to provide further guidance on strategic alignment and system integration capabilities.

 

Stage 3 – These conforming and strategically aligned tender submissions were added to an evaluation spreadsheet which was distributed to the wider tender evaluation committee to determine a vendor shortlist to be invited to present their proposed solution. 

 

Stage 4 – The tender evaluation team’s scores from the evaluation spreadsheet were added to provide a ranked short list of vendors who were invited to present at the ‘Short Listed Vendor Presentations’. After every presentation, the tender evaluation team were given the opportunity to rate the presentations and if they felt the need to, adjust their scores in the evaluation spreadsheet taking into account further information received in the presentation. At the end of all the presentations the final scores were submitted. These scores along with the prices provided by the short listed vendors were then accounted for into the final calculations to determine the recommended vendor. 

 

Stage 5 – Included the independent financial health and reference checks of the recommended vendor. 

Summary of Tenders received

 

Over 100 companies downloaded the Tender documents with 20 companies attending the pre-tender briefing. The open tender resulted in sixteen (16) firms making a submission:

 

 

Company

Company Location

Directors/Company Owners

Tender Type

Aten Systems Pty Ltd
ABN: 11147604948

Suite 305,

14-16 Lexington Drive

BELLA VISTA NSW 2153

Andy Alibhai

Chirag Lakhani

 

2

Business Aspect Group Pty Ltd
ABN: 73149208131

67 High Street

TOOWONG QLD 4066

Laurence Baynham

1

Computer Systems (Australia) Pty Limited
ABN: 44003147153

21 Annie Street
WICKHAM NSW 2293

 

Mr John Schneider

Mrs Elizabeth Schneider

John Donahoe

Michael Scarpelli

Chris Bedi

1

CRM Online Australia Pty Ltd
ABN: 86120621258

Unit 2 /12 Cowcher Place

BELMONT 6104 WA

Glenn David Richmond

1

Dialog Pty Ltd (BCC)

ABN: 16010089175

Level 7

35 Boundary Street

SOUTH BRISBANE QLD 4101

Alan Key

Robert Tisdall

1

Empired Limited

ABN: 81090503843

Level 7, The Quadrant

1 William Street

Perth WA 6000

 

Russell Baskerville

Mel Ashton

John Bardwell

Richard Bevan

Chris Ryan

Response spreadsheet not submitted.

IFS Australia Pty Ltd

ABN: 9808888970

Ground Floor

7 Northcliff Street

MILSONS POINT NSW 2061

Lars Wollung

Per Franzen

Craig Conway

Mans Hultman

Neil Masom Obe

Jonas Persson

Johannes Reichel

Markus Roithmeier

2

IPP Technologies

ABN: 87064517013

Suite 1.6

64 Talavera Road

MACQUARIE PARK NSW 2113

Subba Rao Varigonda

Saryu Rao Varigonda

Keshav Gautam

1

MagiaCX Solutions Pty Ltd

ABN: 66162641198

168/580 Hay Street

PERTH WA 6000

Peter Crew

Stephen Solomon

Leona Chauhan

Roger Miller

Evert Fernandes

2 & 3

NTT DATA Australia Pty Ltd

ABN: 83111691448

Level 12

15 Castlereagh Street

SYDNEY NSW 2000

Ricky Au

Greg Purdy 

Tetsu Sato

3

Open Office

ABN: 24191392900

Level 1/253 Wellington Road

MULGRAVE VICTORIA 3170

Phillip Anthony Simone

1

Sognos Solutions Pty Ltd

ABN: 53611121870

Level 9, Avaya House

123 Epping Road

NORTH RYDE NSW 2113

Rick Mark Vosila

Riddhi Kunal Joshi

Rick Vosila

1

Technology1

ABN: 84010487180

Level 4, 76 Berry Street

NORTH SYDNEY NSW 2060

Adrian Di Marco
Ron McLean
John Mactaggart
Kevin Blinco
Richard Anstey
Jane Andrews

1

Telstra Corp Ltd

ABN: 33051775556

400 George Street

SYDNEY NSW 2000

Andrew Penn
Warwick Bray
Alexandra Badenoch
Robyn Denholm
Stephen Elop
Will Irving
Carmel Mulhern

Joe Pollard

Brendon Riley

Cynthia Whelan

1

The Artis Group

ABN: 21116237284

Level 4,

655 Pacific Highway

ST LEONARDS NSW 2065

Chris Greatrex

Michael O’Sullivan

Roger Davies

1

Velrada

ABN: 38136050701

Level 18

197 Street

GEORGES TERRACE Perth 6000

Robert Evans

Andrew Crampton

Dominic Nolan

1

Evaluation of Tenders

In evaluating the received tenders, the submissions were assessed in a sequential order as per the evaluation process stages outlined earlier in the report. Those tenders that met the requirements of each stage were deemed to still to be relevant for further evaluation and therefore progressed in the evaluation stages. Otherwise, tenderers that did not meet the stage requirements were determined by the Tender Evaluation Committee that there was no further advantage to Council in considering the respective tender.

Stage 1 – The Supply Team and Financial Services Team assessed for compliance and conformity of all submitted tenders. This process resulted in the following tenders not conforming to the tender specifications and therefore were not included in any further stages of the tender evaluation process:

·    Computer Systems (Australia) Pty Limited

·    Empired Limited

Stage 2 – ICT Strategic Alignment assessment of vendor responses were undertaken by the full Tender Evaluation Committee based on strategic alignment considerations and key requirements as published in the tender specifications and criteria. It was identified that the following vendors did not demonstrate that they were capable of fulfilling the requirements of the tender in one or more of the areas on strategic intent including alignment to information system architecture, future product development and availability of local resources:

·    Aten Systems Pty Ltd

·    CRM Online Australia Pty Ltd

·    IPP Technologies

·    Open Office

·    TechnologyOne

·    Telstra Corp Ltd

Stage 3 – The remaining complying and strategically aligned tender submissions shown below were then assessed against all the detailed evaluation criteria through an evaluation spreadsheet which was distributed to the Tender Evaluation Committee to determine a vendor short list, who would then be invited to present their proposed solution:

·    Business Aspect Group Pty Ltd

·    Dialog Pty Ltd (BCC)

·    IFS Australia Pty Ltd

·    MagiaCX Solutions Pty Ltd

·    NTT DATA Australia Pty Ltd

·    Sognos Solutions Pty Ltd

·    The Artis Group

·    Velrada

 

Short Listed Tenders

Stage 4 – Evaluation scores from Stage 3 were calculated and ranked to determine the short list of vendors who were invited to present. As per the results of the evaluation from Stage 3, it was determined by the Tender Evaluation Committee that there was no benefit to Council in further considering the tenders from the following companies:

·    Business Aspect Group Pty Ltd

·    Dialog Pty Ltd (BCC)

·    NTT DATA Australia Pty Ltd

·    The Artis Group

Although the above tenders were conforming with respect to the tender specifications and were strategically aligned, the Tender Evaluation Committee were of the view that due to a range of circumstances including quality of responses, ability to deliver on the scope of requirements. Consideration was also given to the scoring of other tenderers. Accordingly, it was determined that there was no advantage in further considering these tenders.

The short listed vendors invited to present were therefore the following companies:

·    IFS Australia Pty Ltd

·    MagiaCX Solutions Pty Ltd

·    Sognos Solutions Pty Ltd

·    Velrada

At the vendor presentations the short listed companies demonstrated their solution and the Tender Evaluation Committee also had an opportunity to ask them questions and to gain a further understanding of the solutions proposed. The companies were scored on their ability to demonstrate the tender’s seven workplace scenarios. Based on the presentation the Tender Evaluation Committee reviewed the tenderer’s score against the evaluation criteria taking into account further information received in the presentations. Pricing information was not assessed until finalisation of all functional and non-functional requirements.

The tender allowed for the submission of 4 tender types to be evaluated. This approach allowed Council to assess all possible solutions available in the market place to determine best fit to Council’s needs. This is reflected in the pricing breakdown where some vendors provided the option of an individual FSM or CRM and/or bundled pricing for a combined solution. All tender types were considered together for comparison, however, each tender submission was individually assessed on its own merit in meeting the FSM and CRM criteria. The pricing table below was used for comparison purposes only and to assess the cost competitiveness of each vendor.

 

A listing of the shortlisted tenders received is detailed below (prices ex GST):

 

 

Company

Breakdown

Contract Day Rate

6 Year Price

10 Year Price

MagiaCX Solutions Pty Ltd
ABN: 66162641198

FSM

$1,000

$1,593,438

$2,920,975.5

CRM

$1,000

$699,124.19

$1,227,100.94

BUNDLE

$1,000

$1,905,262.19

$3,450,609.77

Solution Type:

MagiaCX offered an Oracle cloud based solution. This included the use of various modules and Oracle middleware to achieve integrations. In this solution the pricing is made up of implementation and service/support costs from MagiaCX and the licencing costs payable to MagiaCX as reseller of Oracle services.

Sognos Solutions Pty Ltd
ABN: 53611121870

FSM

$1,176

$3,293,706

$5,881,656

CRM

$1,176

$2,886,804

$5,464,404

BUNDLE

$1,176

$3,232,913

$5,494,858

Solution Type:

Sognos offered a Microsoft Dynamics 365 solution and associated mobile app. In this solution the pricing is made up of implementation and service/support costs from Sognos and the licencing that would be procured through Council’s existing Microsoft Enterprise Agreement and payable to Council’s current Microsoft Large Account Reseller. Both implementation costs and licencing fees are included in the totals shown under bundle.

IFS Australia Pty Ltd
ABN: 9808888970

FSM

$1,760

$3,046,000

$5,071,000

CRM

N/A

N/A

N/A

BUNDLE

N/A

N/A

N/A

Solution Type:

IFS Australia offered a proprietary based software solution and associated mobile app. In this solution the pricing is made up of implementation, service/support and licencing costs from IFS Australia.

Velrada
ABN:
38136050701

FSM

N/A

N/A

N/A

CRM

N/A

N/A

N/A

BUNDLE

$1,600

$2,674,564

$4,714,161

Solution Type:

Velrada offered a Microsoft Dynamics 365 solution and associated mobile app. In this solution the pricing is made up of implementation and service/support costs from Velrada and the licencing that would be procured through Council’s existing Microsoft Enterprise Agreement and payable to Council’s current Microsoft Large Account Reseller. Both implementation costs and licencing fees are included in the totals shown under bundle.

 

The tender requested pricing for 10 years with an initial contract period of six (6) years, with an option to extend for a further two (2) x two (2) year periods. Extensions will be subject to satisfactory performance and at Council’s discretion.

Due to the nature of software licence and subscription agreements only partial pricing for 6 years was received from shortlisted respondents. As the initial contract term is 6 years this was accepted by the Evaluation Team and Supply as an acceptable response. For comparison of 10 year costs, an annual rate using the average rate for the years provided, less implementation costs, was used. Later in the report more detail is provided as to the detail and the scope of the contract.

 

All final scores along with the prices provided by the shortlisted vendors were compiled in accordance with the Tender Evaluation Plan to determine the recommended vendor.

 

Stage 5 – Evaluation of Preferred Tenderer

 

The scope of this tender included a Software as a Service (SaaS) solution. Software as a Service is provided as a managed service, hosted on the vendors infrastructure and thus is not the purchase of software but is a subscription to software delivered via the internet (cloud service). It is proposed the contract will be for the following: implementation consultancy services, services/support and licence fees for the software subscription licenses for the SaaS solution.

In considering all the evaluation criteria pertaining to the published requirements, and consistent with overall costs and compliance with the requirements, the total price and contract day rate from Velrada, yielded the more cost-effective rate. 

 

Although MagiaCX provided a cheaper initial contract price its solution did not provide the same functionality as the Velrada solution and would require additional expenditure on other modules with MagiaCX in order to implement the broader organisational solution. The MagiaCX solution is made-up of multiple modules that does not result in a strong platform for providing an integrated FSM and CRM solution for council.

 

The Tender Evaluation Committee were of the view there was no advantage for Council in considering the other more expensive tenders.

 

Therefore, the recommended company, Velrada, was selected based on their:

 

1)   Compliance with the tender evaluation criteria,

2)   Demonstrated ability to meet Council’s requirements; and

3)   Competitive price for the services offered.

 

The recommended solution aligns with Council’s ICT Strategy and will be implemented on the Microsoft Dynamics 365 platform. The preferred tenderer, Velrada, will be engaged to implement and support the Dynamics 365 platform including the FSM solution and optionally the broader organisation wide CRM.

 

The Tender Evaluation Committee thoroughly reviewed the information provided pertaining to Council’s published requirements, past experience of the proposed tenderer and conducted reference checks. Velradas’ past projects include implementation of field service management solutions for Downer EDI and Sodexo. The reference checks returned positive feedback.

 

The proposed company has delivered multiple large-scale projects of similar nature including the delivery of Field Service Management and Customer Portals within various industries. Council Officers are satisfied with the result of their performance and reference checks.

 

The contract proposed to be entered with Velrada would be for implementation consultancy services and services/support fees. Given that the solution is a Microsoft product, the licencing for this product will be purchased through Council’s existing Microsoft Enterprise Agreement (EA) and payable to Council’s current Microsoft Large Account Reseller. Table 3 below details the estimated 6-year cost for each of these components. Licence fees for year 1 is fixed based on 4 months of service consumption until May 2018, at which point the Microsoft EA will expire and be due for renewal. Licencing costs beyond May 2018 is indicative only based on current Microsoft EA pricing. It is intended that as part of renewing the Microsoft EA, Council would continue to procure the Microsoft EA through Local Government Procurement (LGP) to ensure we continue to benefit from the most cost competitive pricing for our Microsoft licences.

 

The service/support fees and the implementation consultancy services will be determined in the project plan based on service levels required by Council and the day rate set out in Table 1 as offered by Velrada. The implementation consultancy services are expected to only apply for year 1. The service/support fees including such things as support and maintenance of the products, is expected to commence after the project warranty period. This may occur within year 1 or from the commencement of year 2. The timing of when this commences will be determined during project planning phase. Those costs set out in Table 2 for year 2 reflect the ongoing cost post implementation of the solution.

 

The implementation consultancy services and service/support fees may be able to be reduced during the detailed design phase of the project and are being purchased on a day rate basis up to the maximum shown in Table 2. As anticipated in the tender there may be the need for consultancy services on an ongoing basis over the life of the contract for further works on implementing the wider CRM for the whole organisation and other works required for the maintenance, development and other services over and above standard operations management. The contract will provide for these services to be purchased at the agreed day rate set out in Table 1 as offered by Velrada. Additionally, at council’s discretion, Velrada may be engaged for the implementation of the wider CRM as per the agreed day rate and subject to council signing successfully an agreement with Velrada for these specific works.

 

 

Price Element

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

Year 6

Implementation Plan Fees – Bundle

$490,000

 

 

 

 

Service Fees – Bundle

0

$60,000

$60,000

$60,000

$60,000

$60,000

Licence Fees – Bundle*

$347,919

$347,919

$347,919

$347,919

$347,919

$347,919

Total

$634,966

$407,919

$407,919

$407,919

$407,919

$407,919

* First year licence costs after the first 4 months will not be known until after renewal of the Microsoft EA through LGP.

 

To implement the Velrada solution the year 1 external implementation cost and internal implementation project costs (including mobility devices and services, systems integration, training and internal project resourcing) totalling to $1,737,890 will be funded from Council’s Productivity Reserve.

 

ICT Operations Manager’s Comment

 

ICT staff were an integral part of the tender formulation evaluation process. Specific requirements were included to ensure business requirements and alignment to Council’s ICT Strategy were met. Based on the evaluation plan and tender responses, ICT endorse the decision to recommend Velrada.

 

Financial Services Manager’s Comment

 

Included in the assessment of tenders was the commissioning of independent reference checks, financial analysis, and performance analysis on Velrada.  These checks were completed by Corporate Scorecard Pty Ltd and have been reviewed by Council’s Financial Services team.

 

Based on the above review, no concerns were raised as to the ability of Velrada to perform the works described. However, as the proposed contract is multi-year, it is recommended that, if the contract is to be awarded to Velrada, a reporting covenant be imposed requiring Velrada to participate in an ongoing financial monitoring regime throughout the course of the contract, requiring the provision of Financial Statements and other information to support ongoing financial reviews (at the request of the Council). A termination clause should be included in contracts in the event of an unsatisfactory assessment.

 

Further, as the contract has the potential to be a software related contract, it is recommended that, if the Council proceeds, the contract should have appropriate provisions for access to any source code and configurations management documentation in the event of failure or non-performance by the subject.

 

The implementation of the Field Services Management solution is anticipated to commence in 2018. The costs in this report consists of fixed and variable components, including the number of days to implement the system. Funding for the identified external vendor and internal project implementation costs, of $1,737,890 is proposed to be funded from Council’s Productivity Reserve. The annual costs over the system life can be accommodated from within existing annual operational budgets.

 

Tender Advisory Group (TAG) Comment

 

The Tender Advisory Group’s objective is to support the Council to achieve fair and equitable tender processes. The TAG, consisting of the Governance Manager, Glenn McCarthy and Supply Coordinator, Michael Doggett, met to consider the report and recommendations in relation to the tender for a CRM based Field Services Management Solution. The TAG reviewed the evaluation process outlined within the report and is satisfied that the selection criteria have been correctly applied in making the recommendations.

 

Conclusion

Based on the detailed evaluation of the tenders received, analysis of compliance to requirements, costs and referee checks, the Tender Evaluation Committee recommends that Council approve Velrada as the preferred tenderer subject to execution of a formal agreement. In alignment with the tender requirements the contract will be for a period of six (6) years, with an option to extend for a further two (2) x two (2) year periods subject to satisfactory performance and in accordance with this report.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Tender Reference RFT17/18-06 - CRM based Field Services Management Solution be received.

2.    Velrada be approved as the preferred tenderer for implementation, support and services of our Dynamics 365 platform including the FSM and CRM solutions in accordance with this report.

3.    Approval be given for the ICT Operations Manager to enter into a formal agreement with Velrada subject to satisfactory agreement of terms as outlined in this report.

4.    Council allocate $1,737,890 from the Productivity Reserve to fund the vendor and internal implementation costs of this project.

5.    The Common Seal of the Council of the City of Penrith be placed on all documentation if necessary.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                         27 November 2017

 

 

 

12

Vegetation Management to reduce fire risk   

 

Compiled by:               John Gordon, City Presentation Manager

Authorised by:            Brian Steffen, Executive Manager - City Assets 

Requested By:            Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM

 

Outcome

We have safe, vibrant places

Strategy

Improve our public spaces and places

Service Activity

Manage trees across the City

      

 

Executive Summary

Council has previously received a report on vegetation management to reduce fire risk, with a focus on road reserves in Londonderry and Llandilo. Further, Council resolved (Ordinary meeting 22 May) that Council officers undertake further discussions with the NSW Rural Fire Service (NSW RFS) in relation to this matter. The purpose of this report is to provide Council with an update on the progress of the development of strategies to reduce fire risk on roadsides.

Background

Council Officers have previously sought advice from the NSW RFS in relation to the effectiveness of clearing road reserves for bush fire protection. The advice received indicated that:

 

·    Roadside vegetation management has a number of pros and cons;

·    The decision to undertake roadside vegetation management activities (or not) should not be applied broadly, rather applied individually to specific roads or road networks;

·    Roadside vegetation management can take form in a number of ways including tree / canopy management, spray / burn and slashing;  

·    Roadside vegetation management may serve both as a “fire break” and may also offer a safer area for firefighting operations;

·    There are many considerations for roadside vegetation management including environmental, traffic management, WHS and cost effectiveness; and

·    The RFS have assisted local government with roadside vegetation management activities including spray/burn and slashing in rural and far western NSW.

 

Subsequent discussions with the NSW RFS have confirmed that the NSW RFS is committed to providing assistance to land owners, including Council with a range of hazard reductions and mitigation activities. Any mitigation activities that are undertaken must be in accordance with relevant legislation, and from a bushfire mitigation perspective, a Hazard Reduction Certificate or a Review of Environmental Factors will be required to ensure the most appropriate outcome is achieved for the environment.

 

Bushfire risks in the Cumberland Zone, along with recommended treatments are captured in the Cumberland Zone Bushfire Risk Management Plan prepared by the Cumberland Zone Bushfire Management Committee and involve a robust consultation process with the local community and owners of large land holdings, including Council.

 

The Cumberland Zone Bushfire Management Committee will shortly be reviewing its Bushfire Risk Management Plan for the Cumberland Zone and Council will have an opportunity to participate in this process and ensure that the issue of road reserve management is considered.

 

In addition to a review of the Bushfire Risk Management Plan, Council also has the opportunity to develop bushfire risk management strategies in conjunction with the development of a Roadside Environmental Management Framework. Council was recently successful in obtaining a $50,000 grant from the NSW Environmental Trust for this purpose. The focus of this framework will include:

 

·    Cost savings - reduced maintenance costs by decreasing the need for mowing and weed control, stabilising banks and preventing road pavement waterlogging

·    Safety - reducing road accidents by decreasing headlight glare, reducing driver monotony, highlighting road delineation and bushfire risk management

·    Environment - seed source, wildlife habitat conservation of endangered species

·    Community and commercial uses - scenic amenity, shelter, shade and privacy, horse riding, cycling and walking.

 

It is anticipated that the review of the Bushfire Risk Management plan will inform and compliment the development of the Roadside Environmental Management Framework and provide an opportunity for Council to ensure that the management of trees in road reserves is given due consideration.  

 

Conclusion

 

The revision of the Cumberland Zone Bushfire Risk Management Plan and the development of a Roadside Environmental Management Strategy provide Council with the opportunity to have significant input into plans that will clearly articulate strategies for the future management of roadside vegetation to reduce fire risk. It is recommended that the information in this report be received and that a further report be provide to Council once clearly defined strategies are developed.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the information contained in the report on Vegetation Management to reduce fire risk be received.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                         27 November 2017

 

 

 

13

Management of 'Stand-Alone' Trees   

 

Compiled by:               John Gordon, City Presentation Manager

Authorised by:            Brian Steffen, Executive Manager - City Assets 

Requested By:            Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM

 

Outcome

We have safe, vibrant places

Strategy

Make our public places safe and attractive

Service Activity

Manage public trees across the City

      

 

Executive Summary

The purpose of this report is to respond to a request from Councillor Crameri OAM to provide information to Council on the possibility of having large stand-alone trees in the Penrith Local Government area removed as they are a hazard to power lines and houses if they fall.

 

Large ‘stand-alone’ trees exist in many areas of the City. They are located on roadsides, in parks, in natural areas and on private properties. Many of these trees would have the potential to impact on dwellings or critical infrastructure if they fell.

 

Council currently has in place a range of mechanisms to manage the potential risk associated with ‘stand-alone’ trees and both private and public property.

 

Council’s draft Street and Park Tree Management Plan is currently on exhibition and will shortly be presented to Council for endorsement. Whilst the draft plan does not specifically address the issue of ‘stand-alone’ trees it does address the criteria for species selection and the need to carefully assess the location and potential impact of tree selection before making decisions to plant. Council has in the past made poor planting decisions e.g. planting inappropriate species under powerlines.

 

As part of the recent establishment of the City Assets Department it has been determined that trees need to be recognised as an asset class and that the principles of asset management that would typically apply to a building or a road, equally apply to trees. This will ensure a focus on whole of life management of trees within an asset management framework to help realise their full benefits and value.

 

A Tree Preservation Order applies to all trees on private property across Penrith City. This promotes replanting and good management of trees, helping balance the demands of our lifestyle with all the benefits trees represent for us and future generations.

 

Many street trees, some trees in parks and reserves and many trees in private ownership are growing near overhead powerlines. Energy / service providers maintain clearances around their power lines by pruning these trees. The lopping of trees near wires can have a significant adverse effect on the health and amenity of the trees. Council has limited control over these activities but endeavours to work with energy supply companies and their contractors to ensure the damage to trees is minimised.

 

In response to a bushfire disaster a number of years ago the NSW Government introduced the 10/50 Vegetation Clearing Scheme. This scheme gives people living near the bush an additional way of being better prepared for bush fires.

The report recommends that Council’s Draft Street and Park Tree Management Plan be amended to reference ‘stand-alone’ trees and that the future development of Asset Management Plans for Trees incorporates risk management strategies (such as species selection) to limit the potential for large, ‘stand-alone’ trees to be planted in high risk locations.

Background

Penrith City Council covers an area of approximately 407 km2 with a population of some 200,000 people making it one of Sydney’s larger local government authorities.  

 

This large population base and geographic area presents challenges for the management of trees, with varied public perceptions as to the role and functions of the Cities tree network.

 The Cities open space network of 1,234ha contains the vast majority of our cities tree stock, although many reside within our roads and streets and on private property.

 

Collectively, these trees contribute significantly to our urban setting and lifestyle. They offer a visual softening of the hard built environment while contributing to the improvement and quality of our atmosphere, along with providing habitat for many of our fauna species and are an integral component of Councils’ Cooling the City Strategy.

       

Our trees are often compromised by the amount of physical area in which they have to grow and by poor soil conditions. This presents many challenges in ensuring these trees grow into healthy specimen trees.

 

The trees themselves can cause problems for adjoining properties including damage to structures and/or services. More minor issues such as leaf drop, minor twig and branch drop are often frustrating for residents living in proximity to the trees to the point that tree removal is sometimes requested. 

 

These tree maintenance problems can be minimised through effective planning and tree species selection including a professional and programmed approach to tree establishment and care.

 

Trees are a long term investment, so they must be suited to the environment in which they are planted. Planting decisions have the potential to impact the City for many years into the future. 

 

Penrith City Council has responsibility for a large number of trees, many planted and some self-sown, on Council land. Trees may come to the attention of Council for numerous reasons including failure or imminent failure, dropping of branches, obstruction of road sight distances, interference with vehicular traffic, damage to public or private assets through root growth or dropping of limbs, alleged fire hazard, presence of pests, obstruction of solar access or views, and obstruction of access to private property.  Many trees on private property also present similar challenges for their owners, with approximately 1500 requests received annually for the pruning and/or removal of trees on private property under the provisions of Council’s Tree Preservation Order.

 

While trees may present a number of risks, they are also valued for their contribution to habitat and streetscape character and Council’s Cooling the City Strategy.

 

With the significant investment in street and park trees by Council an integrated system of tree management is required, including the critical aspects planning, selection, planting, removal and care.

 

Trees, landscaped reserves and streets, not only improve the appearance and the environmental quality of an area, they have an impact on critical social issues such as health care, education, crime and safety, and economic development. 

 

It should also be noted that Council has recently adopted the ‘Cooling the City’ strategy that supports the planting of trees to address the Urban Heat island effect. The implementation of this policy needs to be balanced with appropriate species type and programmed tree management to minimise the future risk of tree failure.

 

Street and Park Tree Management Plan

 

Council’s draft Street and Park Tree Management Plan is currently on exhibition and will shortly be presented to Council for endorsement. Whilst the draft plan does not specifically address the issue of ‘stand-alone’ trees it does address the criteria for species selection and the need to carefully assess the location and potential impact of tree selection before making decisions to plant. Council has in the past made poor planting decisions, planting inappropriate species under powerlines. A risk based approach to future tree planting is recommended in the draft plan. It should be noted that the plan only relates to trees in the ownership of Council and does not impact on the tree selection and planting decisions made by private property owners.

 

Trees as Assets

 

As part of the recent establishment of the City Assets Department it has been determined that trees need to be recognised as an asset class and that the principles of asset management that would typically apply to a building or a road, equally apply to trees. This will force a focus on whole of life management of trees within an asset management framework to help realise their full benefits and value.

 

There is recognition that a significant program of work will be required to establish the necessary baseline information and planning framework. This will include the completion of a city wide tree inventory to quantify and identify our existing tree population and to identify important information including the age of trees, species diversity and any risks that may need to be addressed. As part of this data collection process it is envisaged that ‘stand-alone’ trees on public land be identified and risk profiled to determine a future management strategy.

 

This baseline information will be used to inform the development of a Street Tree Masterplan or Strategy to allow for the strategic management of trees within the City, including annual planting programs outlining locations, species and planting specifications, pest and disease management and control, and preventative maintenance programs to effectively and efficiently manage risks associated with public trees. Identifying species that will thrive in the forecast climate for Penrith will also be important to ensure their survival over time.

 

All of the information generated through this process will need to be included within Councils asset management system and the GIS to assist with ongoing maintenance and monitoring.

 

Tree Preservation Order

 

A Tree Preservation Order applies to all trees on private property across Penrith City. This promotes replanting and good management of trees, helping balance the demands of our lifestyle with all the benefits trees represent for us and future generations.

 

Under Council’s Tree Preservation Order it is an offence to prune, ring-bark, cut down, remove or injure any tree higher than 3 metres, except with written consent from Council.

 

Council receives many requests annually to remove ‘stand-alone’ trees from private property. Where it is clear that these trees were once part of a forest environment and/or represent a hazard due to their proximity to dwellings, road and wires, approval is routinely given for their removal. The cost for the management and removal of trees on private property is the responsibility of the owner of the tree.

 

Council has no capacity to force the owners of privately owned healthy ‘stand-alone’ trees to remove them from their property. Council can however issue orders to a property owner to remove a tree if it is obvious that a tree is dead or in such poor health that it represents a significant risk.

 

Trees and Powerlines

 

Many street trees, some trees in parks and reserves and many trees in private ownership are growing near overhead powerlines. Energy / service providers maintain clearances around their power lines by pruning these trees. The lopping of trees near wires can have a significant adverse effect on the health and amenity of the trees. Council has limited control over these activities but  endeavours to work with energy supply companies and their contractors to ensure the damage to trees is minimised. Council staff do regularly refer trees to Endeavour Energy for assessment if it is thought that the health or condition of a tree is compromised and that any tree failure may impact on the electrical network. In these circumstances the energy supplier works with Council to facilitate the removal of the tree and the maintenance of electrical supply.

 

Stand Alone Trees

 

Large ‘stand-alone’ trees exist in many areas of the City. They are located on roadsides, in parks, in natural areas and on private properties. Many of these trees would have the potential to impact on dwellings or critical infrastructure if they fell.

 

Whilst it is not possible to provide an accurate number of ‘stand-alone’ trees across the City on both public and private land, it is estimated that the number would be in the thousands.

‘Stand-alone’ trees most at risk are those whose environment has recently changed. When trees that were living in a forest loose the protection of a rim of trees and become ‘stand-alone’ in new housing developments or become the edge trees of the forest they are made more vulnerable to strong weather events such as storms and wind. Trees can also lose the physical protection of surrounding trees that had kept them from breaking or falling. Land clearing may also wound a trees root system or trunk, providing an opportunity for wood decay to develop. Soil compaction and poor drainage associated with development can also impact on the health of ‘stand-alone’ trees and male them susceptible to future failure.

Council currently has in place a range of mechanisms to manage the potential risk associated with ‘stand-alone’ trees and both private and public property.

 

Council preference is for power cables to be placed underground. Underground directional boring is a proven method for laying cables and other services that minimises damage to soil profile and tree roots.

 

NSW Government Policy

 

In response to a bushfire disaster a number of years ago the NSW Government introduced the 10/50 Vegetation Clearing Scheme.

 

The 10/50 Vegetation Clearing Scheme gives people living near the bush an additional way of being better prepared for bush fires.

The scheme allows people in a designated area to:

 

·    Clear trees on their property within 10 metres of a home, without seeking approval; and

 

·    Clear underlying vegetation such as shrubs (but not trees) on their property within 50 metres of a home, without seeking approval.

 

The scheme is managed and administered by the NSW Rural Fire Service (RFS).

 

Following a number of severe storms in recent years the NSW Government had discussed the implementation of a similar scheme to enable residents to remove trees on their property without approval to manage potential threats posed by vegetation during storm events. To date this legislation has not progressed.

 

Conclusion

 

‘Stand-alone’ trees that were once part of a forest environment have the potential to be a hazard during extreme weather events. ‘Stand-alone’ trees can be found in large numbers on both publicly owned and privately owned land across the City. The removal of all ‘stand-alone’ trees on public land and private land that have the potential to fall is not a practical approach to risk management. Council has the capacity under the provisions of its Tree Preservation Order to support applications from private landowners to remove ‘stand-alone’ trees that have the potential to damage infrastructure. Further, the capacity exists to incorporate strategies in the Street and Park Tree Management Plan that limit the potential for inappropriate species selection and planting locations.

 

These strategies, coupled with the management of trees as a specific asset class will assist in the managing the potential for trees to impact on houses and infrastructure if they fall.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Management of 'Stand-Alone' Trees be received

2.    Council’s Draft Street and Park Tree Management Plan be amended to reference the management of ‘stand-alone’ trees.

3.    The future development of Asset Management Plans for Trees incorporate risk management strategies (species selection) to limit the potential for large, ‘stand-alone’ trees to be planted in high risk locations.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

Draft Street Tree Management Plan

37 Pages

Attachments Included

2.

Draft Street and Park Tree Management Plan Appendix

23 Pages

Attachments Included

   


 

 

 

 

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Outcome 5 - We care about our environment

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

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Outcome 6 - We are healthy and share strong community spirit

 

Item                                                                                                                                                Page

 

14      The Hat Project - Aboriginal Community, Culture and Creativity - Grant Application     81

 

 

 



Ordinary Meeting                                                                                         27 November 2017

 

 

 

14

The Hat Project - Aboriginal Community, Culture and Creativity - Grant Application   

 

Compiled by:               Karen Harris, Senior Cultural Development Officer

Authorised by:            Erich Weller, Acting Executive Manager - Community and Chief Operating Officer  

 

Outcome

We are healthy and share strong community spirit

Strategy

Enhance the cultural vitality of the City

Service Activity

Support and implement initiatives which contribute to culture and creativity

      

 

Executive Summary

The report provides information on a CreateNSW funding application for $30,000 for the Hat Project under the Arts and Cultural Projects category. Applications close on 11 December 2017.

 

For the Aboriginal women participants and the stakeholders the project involves building sustainable relationships, breaking down barriers, enabling professional arts development, and promoting personal and collective wellbeing. 

 

The Hat Project will offer a journey of personal reflections upon community and church in the lives of Aboriginal people.  Through a series of workshops a professional milliner, Aboriginal women artists, elders and participants will meet together, learn new creative skills and have the opportunity to reflect on the meanings of family and identity and how these have shaped their identities.

 

Place Management is also applying for a grant under the same CreateNSW funding category.  This grant application is the subject of a separate report in tonight’s Business Paper. Initial feedback from Create NSW has been positive to the Place Management project application as well as the Hat Project, the application covered in this report.

 

The report recommends that the information contained in the report on The Hat Project - Aboriginal Community, Culture and Creativity - Grant Application be received.  The report also recommends that Council endorse the grant application for $30,000 to CreateNSW for ‘The Hat’ project – Aboriginal Community, Culture and Creativity.

Background

The guiding principles for Council in collaborating with Aboriginal and Torres Strait organisations and residents is expressed in Council’s Statement of Recognition of Penrith City’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cultural Heritage.  The Statement is based on the principles of recognising Aboriginal self-determination and the spirit of Reconciliation.   

 

The Hat Project concept was developed during a series of meetings starting in April 2017 with the Penrith Regional Gallery and the Lewers Bequest Director, Council Officers and Aboriginal participants who were invited to discuss ways in which to join together and develop sustainable creative partnerships.  Opportunities for professional arts development, improved access to cultural resources and developing new audiences and exhibitions were also seen as important outcomes.

 

The Hat Project is particularly concerned with a period of time in Australia’s past when Sunday was a day of rest, and when people dressed in their best clothes for church and for family gatherings, picnic and race days.   The Christian church and its association with mission communities has left a mixed legacy for many Aboriginal people.  Remembered is both the joy of community, family and shared faith, but also the loss of traditional practices and paternalistic control. During this time many Aboriginal women were sent to rural homesteads as domestic servants and often became very skilled at dressmaking and millinery.

 

The Hat Project

 

A core group of four Senior/Elder women Aboriginal artists will be supported by a lead multi-disciplinary Aboriginal Artist, whose work explores traditional art forms in a contemporary frame expanding the definition of Aboriginal ‘art’.  Bringing together these dynamic Aboriginal women artists and elders with a professional Milliner will enable the telling and sharing of their stories and imparting their knowledge and skills to Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal participants within the hat making workshop series.  The medium of the hat offers the distinctive form for self-expression of individual lives, memories and reflections. 

 

This project is also supported by the Deerubbin Local Aboriginal Land Council. 

 

Another component to this exciting partnership is that individual participant oral histories will be recorded, edited and placed on a text panel to accompany the exhibition of these personalised hats, to be exhibited at the Penrith Regional Gallery with the possible option of touring selected NSW Regional Art Galleries. 

 

The Hat Project again provides an opportunity for Council to recognise our evolving partnership and relationship with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and organisations. The project is a positive initiative shaped by local Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and organisations to respond to issues that meet their needs and aspirations.

 

The Project has been developed as a time limited project which will be staged over one (1) year within the NSW Government Create NSW Arts and Cultural Projects Program.  The funding application is for $30,000. Council officers have received positive feedback from CreateNSW in relation to this project.

 

Summary

 

This report provides an overview of a funding application to CreateNSW for $30,000 to further develop and implement The Hat Project – Aboriginal Community, Culture and Creativity.  The project funding is for one year.

 

The Hat Project will offer a journey of personal reflections upon community and church in the lives of Aboriginal people.  Through a series of workshops a professional milliner, Aboriginal women artists, elders and participants will meet together, learn new creative skills and have the opportunity to reflect on the meanings of family and religion and how these have shaped their identities.

 

Key partners in The Hat Project are the Penrith Regional Gallery and the Lewers Bequest.

 

 

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on The Hat Project - Aboriginal Community, Culture and Creativity - Grant Application be received.

2.    Council endorse the grant application for $30,000 to CreateNSW for ‘The Hat’ project – Aboriginal Community, Culture and Creativity.

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.  


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


Outcome 7 - We have confidence in our Council

 

Item                                                                                                                                                Page

 

15      Proposed Council Meeting Calendar for 2018                                                                 87

 

16      2016-17 Penrith City Council Annual Report                                                                   91

 

17      Organisational Performance Report and Financial Review - September 2017              93

 

18      Tender Reference RFT17/18-04 - Information Management System                             99

 

19      Development and Project Management Services, Expression of Interest Reference 16/17-01                                                                                                                                    104

 

20      Appointment of Audit, Risk & Improvement Committee Members                                116

 

21      Summary of Investments & Banking for the period 1 October to 31 October 2017      120

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



Ordinary Meeting                                                                                         27 November 2017

 

 

 

15

Proposed Council Meeting Calendar for 2018   

 

Compiled by:               Adam Beggs, Governance Coordinator

Authorised by:            Glenn McCarthy, Governance Manager  

 

Outcome

We have confidence in our Council

Strategy

Demonstrate transparency and ethical behaviour

Service Activity

Manage Council's reporting system and meeting processes

      

 

Executive Summary

The purpose of this report is to propose a Meeting Calendar for 2018. The report recommends that the draft Meeting Calendar be adopted. If adopted, Council will have had 14 Ordinary Council Meetings, 9 Policy Review Committee (PRC) Meetings and a number of other meetings, including Councillor Briefings, Working Parties and Committees.

 

In preparing the draft Meeting Calendar, staff have taken into consideration a number of statutory deadlines where certain reports have to be presented to Council, in addition to public holidays and other known commitments, including significant conferences.

Background

Section 365 of the Local Government Act 1993 states that the Council is required to meet at least 10 times each year, each time in a different month.

 

Since 2013, the adopted Calendar has held an approach of, where possible, holding 1 PRC and 1 Ordinary meeting a month, primarily held on the second and fourth Monday of every month with other meetings held on the remaining Mondays as required. 

 

Current Position

This year Council will have met for 13 Ordinary meetings, 9 PRC meetings, 16 Councillor Briefings and 9 Finance and Economic Opportunities Working Parties which represents a total of 46 meetings for the year. Additionally, Council held 1 Extraordinary meeting on 10 July 2017 to consider the Union Road Request for Proposal (RFP), after the Policy Review Committee on the same night.

 

For the most part it appears that the basis of this years’ meeting calendar has been successful, with only a small number of changes required to the meeting calendar throughout the year, namely an additional Councillor Briefing, held on the same evening as a Policy Review Committee meeting. Council staff will continue to strive to provide information to Councillors in 2018 while managing the number of meetings held. In terms of the length of meetings, there was no significant increase or decrease across the meetings from the previous year.

 

It is proposed in 2018 that the Meeting Calendar will continue to be based around holding 1 PRC and 1 Ordinary meeting a month (except in April). Where possible these meetings will occur on the second and fourth Monday of every month. It is considered that this approach will continue to provide a level of consistency for Councillors and the community alike. It is proposed that other Mondays will be utilised for Councillor Briefings, working parties and committees as required. There will be circumstances throughout the year where this approach may be varied, namely due to public holidays or significant conference dates. The Ordinary Council meetings are proposed to continue to commence at 7.30pm and the PRC Meetings at 7.00pm.

 

For 2018 it is proposed to have a total of 42 meetings, which results in 4 less meetings than will be held this year. The difference in the number of meetings can be attributed to a number of additional Councillor Briefing and Working Party meetings held this year on Monday evenings after other meetings.

 

Draft 2018 Meeting Calendar

A draft Meeting Calendar has been prepared for 2018 and is based on the following assumptions:

 

·   Commencing with a Councillor Briefing on 5 February 2018

 

·   where possible Policy Review Committee meetings being held on the 2nd Monday of each month and Ordinary meetings on the 4th Monday of each month

 

·   at least one Ordinary Council Meeting each month (except for January)

 

·   the Mayoral and Deputy Mayoral Election being held on the fourth Monday in September (24 September 2018), commencing at 7pm

 

·   an Ordinary Meeting being held on 10 September to deal with any end of term items prior to the Mayoral and Deputy Mayoral Election on 24 September

 

·   meetings where possible alternating so that there are not successive meetings of the same type from week to week

 

·   the meeting cycle concluding with an Ordinary Council Meeting on the third Monday in December – i.e. 17 December 2018 (commencing at 7pm).

 

The draft calendar has been discussed with the relevant staff and all statutory and operating obligations are able to be met, including adherence to key dates for consideration of the various corporate planning documents.

 

In compiling the Calendar, consideration has been given to:

 

1.   Public Holidays

·   Friday 26 January 2018 – Australia Day

·   Friday 30 March 2018 – Good Friday

·   Monday 2 April 2018 – Easter Monday

·   Wednesday 25 April 2018 – Anzac Day

·   Monday 11 June 2018 – Queen’s Birthday

·   Monday 1 October 2018 – Labour Day 

 

2.   Other known likely commitments such as:

·   Local Government NSW (LG NSW) Annual Conference, Location TBA (21-23 October 2018)

·   UDIA Conference, Melbourne (20-22 March 2018)

·   National General Assembly, Canberra (17-20 June 2018)

·   Floodplain Management Conference, Gold Coast (29 May - 1 June 2018)

 

 

 

Conclusion

The draft Meeting Calendar for 2018 (as appended) has been prepared in accordance with the Local Government Act 1993 and Council policy. It incorporates at least one Ordinary Council Meeting for the months of February through to December.

 

It is proposed that 12 Ordinary Council meetings and 11 Policy Review Committee meetings will be held in 2018 in addition to a number of other forums such as Councillor Briefings, Working Parties and Committees.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Proposed Council Meeting Calendar for 2018 be received.

2.    The draft Meeting Calendar for 2018 be adopted.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

Proposed 2018 Meeting Calendar

1 Page

Appendix

  


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                       27 November 2017

Appendix 1 - Proposed 2018 Meeting Calendar

 

PDF Creator


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                         27 November 2017

 

 

 

16

2016-17 Penrith City Council Annual Report   

 

Compiled by:               Craig Shepherd, Corporate Planning Coordinator

Authorised by:            Erich Weller, Acting Executive Manager - Community and Chief Operating Officer  

 

Outcome

We have confidence in our Council

Strategy

Deliver our services to provide best value for money

Service Activity

Tell our community and stakeholders about how we are delivering on our commitments to them

      

 

Executive Summary

Under the Local Government Act (1993), Council must produce an Annual Report each year and submit it to the Office of Local Government by 30 November.  The report must focus on our performance in implementing our adopted Delivery Program and Operational Plan, but must also include a range of other information as specified in the Local Government Act and Regulations, and other legislation.   

 

Content for the Annual Report has been drawn from the Delivery Program Progress Reports, and supplemented with additional information sought from management and staff in order to meet our legislative reporting requirements and ensure our community has a good understanding of our activities. 

 

The 2016-17 Annual Report is provided as an attachment to this report.

 

It is recommended that the information contained in the report on 2016-17 Penrith City Council Annual Report be received; and that the 2016-17 Annual Report be endorsed for submission to the NSW Office of Local Government by 30 November 2017.

Background

Council’s Annual Report must be presented to the Minister for Local Government and posted on Council’s website within 5 months of the end of the financial year.  The Local Government Act and Regulations, along with other legislation, set out the information that must be included in the Report. 

 

The Annual Report focuses on what we have achieved in implementing our Delivery Program and Operational Plan from July 2016 to June 2017 and includes highlights, challenges, information about the Penrith local government area and information on several other statutory matters including financial results for the reporting period.  

 

This year’s Annual Report has a revised format, which includes;

·    appendices to improve finding and accessing of information

·    a dedicated sustainability report (Appendix 8) highlighting how Council is contributing to a more sustainable way of doing business

·    a 2013-17 Delivery Program Scorecard (Appendix 9) illustrating how Council performed on its actions over the four years.

 

The format and content of the Annual Report has been built on feedback from the Australasian Reporting Awards (ARA) and internal stakeholders.  This year’s Annual Report aims to be a comprehensive and visual representation of Council’s activities, services and achievements. 

 
Achievements and Challenges

This year’s Annual Report highlights the success we have had as an organisation. Some of these highlights are:

·    Adoption of the Penrith Disability Inclusion Action Plan 2017-21

·    All Council’s child care services met or exceeded the National Quality Standards

·    Adoption of the Economic Development Strategy

·    Adoption of our new 10-year Community Plan and 2017-21 Delivery Program

·    Resurfaced or reconstructed 265,000m2 of road

·    Constructed 3.5km of pathways

·    Installed 8 new playgrounds

·    Upgraded 19 of Council’s buildings

·    Installation of solar panels on 9 of Council’s buildings

·    $7.1M in landfill fees saved through use of household organics and recycling bins

·    Delivered a program of 62 community and civic events

 

Council also acknowledges that there are challenges moving forward. Some of these challenges are:

·    Ensuring sustainable and equitable growth of the City

·    Managing the transport and parking needs of the City

·    Maintaining of facilities to meet community expectations and needs

 

Although we do our best to anticipate what needs to be done each year, inevitably unexpected challenges and opportunities will arise which need to be addressed.  In some cases these affect our ability to undertake the work we had planned for, in others we are able to respond without affecting our agreed program of works.

 

As 2016-17 is the final year of the 2013-17 Delivery Program, this Annual Report includes a scorecard of how Council performed in delivering the identified actions, with just over 80% completed and 10% of actions ongoing.

Conclusion

The Annual Report is an opportunity to share with the community the things we have achieved, the challenges we have faced and how we have operated as an organisation.  The Annual Report will be fully accessible and available via our website.  

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on 2016-17 Penrith City Council Annual Report be received

2.    The 2016-17 Annual Report be endorsed for submission to the NSW Office of Local Government by 30 November 2017.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

Draft 2016-17 Annual Report

144 Pages

Attachments Included

  


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                         27 November 2017

 

 

 

17

Organisational Performance Report and Financial Review - September 2017   

 

Compiled by:               Neil Farquharson, Financial Services Manager

Geraldine Brown, Budget Accountant

Craig Shepherd, Corporate Planning Coordinator

Authorised by:            Andrew Moore, Chief Financial Officer   

 

Outcome

We have confidence in our Council

Strategy

Manage our money and our assets to be sustainable now and into the future

Service Activity

Support financial sustainability through financial planning and budget management

      

 

Executive Summary

This report outlines Council’s progress towards implementing its four-year Delivery Program for the period of 1 July to 30 September 2017. The report should be read in conjunction with the Organisational Performance Report – September 2017, which records our progress in implementing the organisation’s operating and capital projects.

 

At 30 September 2017, 98% of Council’s 222 projects were ‘on target’ or ‘completed’. 

 

Council adopted a balanced budget for 2017-18. The September Quarter has resulted in a surplus for the quarter and the full year of $194,467.

 

This report recommends that the Organisational Performance Report – September 2017 is received, and that the revised budget estimates identified in the report and detailed in the Organisational Performance Report – September 2017 be adopted.  

Organisational Performance Summary

The Organisational Performance Report provides information on Council’s progress, achievements and challenges for the three-month period between 1 July 2017 to 30 September 2017. At 30 September 2017, 98% the 221 Capital and Operating projects were ‘on target’ or ‘completed’.

 

Table 1 provides a performance summary, which overall demonstrates that Council is successfully delivering its services and programs. 

 

Completed

On Target

Attention Required

Total

No

%

No

%

No

%

Capital Projects

13

14

78

85

1

1

92

Operating Projects

13

10

114

88

3

2

130

Totals

26

12

192

86

4

2

222

 

Table 1

As shown in the table above1 capital project and 3 operating projects have been identified as ‘requiring attention’. Detailed comments, including proposed remedial actions, are outlined in the Exception Report which forms part of the Organisational Performance Report – September 2017.

Organisational Highlights

Council’s programs and services delivered a number of significant achievements during the past six months. These include:

 

·      Council's Environmental Health team receiving three prestigious awards

·      Launching the Disability Inclusion Action Plan 2017 2021

·      Installation of solar power at nine community facilities

·      Completion of the large fishing platform at Regatta Park

·      Establishment of the Innovation Performance Team

·      Relocation of the Emu Village Before and After School and Vacation Care from the historic Emu Plains school house to the former Emu Plains library branch building

·      Adoption of a new, future-focused Penrith Waste and Resource Recovery Strategy for the next 10 years (2017-2026).

Changes to the Delivery Program

A number of minor amendments to the Delivery Program are recommended, to reflect slight changes to the organisational structure and associated reallocation of service activities and actions.  None of these changes impact the work to be carried out under this plan or the services that will be delivered to the Community.  These changes will be reflected in future Organisational Performance Reports.  A detailed list of changes is provided below;

·    Page 13 – Insert ‘Innovative Performance’ into the organisational structure under Executive Manager Community and Chief Operating Officer

·    Page 21 – update projected figures in table relating to Fit for the Future

·    Page 42 - Service activity 4.1.7 Maintain a Community Safety Plan for the City will now be the responsibility of the Community Safety function

·    Page 46 - Service activity 5.1.7 Help minimise impacts on the environment from unauthorised activities will now be the responsibility of the Development Compliance function

·    Page 53 - Replace references to Business Performance with Innovative Performance.

·    Page 54 - Service activity 7.1.12 Undertake audits to ensure Council's operations are ethical and efficient will now be the responsibility of the Internal Audit function

·    Service activity 7.1.13 Manage insurance and claims will now be the responsibility of the Insurance function

·    Service activity 7.1.14 Support compliance and risk management across Council will now be the responsibility of the Risk Management function

·    Page 568 - Service activity 7.3.1 and associated actions will now read as below and will be the responsibility of the Innovative Performance function:

7.3.1 Support the business performance of the organisation

§ 7.3.1a Develop a process improvement program

§ 7.3.1b:

Ø “Introduce a business performance measurement and reporting framework’ moved to the responsibility of Corporate Planning as 7.3.2a.

Ø “Implement a corporate process mapping tool” added to the responsibility of the Innovative Performance Team and is now 7.3.1b

§ 7.3.1c Compliment the work specification program with effective business planning is to be deleted

Financial Position Summary

Council delivered a balanced budget in the adoption of the 2017-18 Operational Plan, which included a number of allocations to Reserves. The September quarter has presented a number of both favourable and unfavourable variations to the predicted annual budget as is often the case with this Review, as many of the estimates and assumptions included in the budget development are finalised. The combined result of these changes is a projected surplus of $194,467 for 2017-18 after the proposed allocation in the Reserve included in this Review. This allocation represents the continued implementation of the adopted strategies of the Financial Capacity Review that has underpinned our Long Term Financial Plan and “FIT” status and is considered an essential step in positioning Council to address any current and emerging priorities as part of future Quarterly Reviews.  

 

The most notable favourable variations in this Review include additional rates ($717,330) and roads maintenance ($25,000) income, RFS annual allocation ($64,010), confirmation of the 2017-18 Financial Assistance Grant ($251,586), and savings in debt servicing costs ($38,810). The favourable budget position at this early stage of the financial year also presents the opportunity to transfer $900,000 to Reserve to provide capacity to respond to current and emerging priorities.

 

As reported to Council at the Ordinary Meeting of 25 September, advice was also received confirming Council’s 2017-18 Financial Assistance Grant (FAG). The grant received for 2017-18 is $10.87m, and is $293,496 above the estimate included in the 2017-18 budget. The previous Council report proposed that these changes be incorporated into the September Quarterly Review and this includes increasing the general component by $251,586 against general revenue, and increasing the roads budget by $41,910 to match the actual FAG roads component received as has been Council practice in the past.

 

Net organisational salary savings of $257,432 have also been identified in this quarter. In keeping with Council’s adopted practice these salary savings will be retained within the employee cost budget at this stage and not be reallocated. Council’s LTFP has foreshadowed that increases to the annual Employee Leave Entitlement (ELE) provision will be required and a strategy to increase this provision has been implemented. Council is committed to ensuring that sufficient provision is made for ELE and therefore it is proposed that any remaining salary savings, once provision for current year payments are made, will be transferred to the ELE Reserve as part of the June 2018 Review. 

 

The financial strategies developed over the past two years rely not just on the 2016-17 SRV, but also on reform within the organisation’s processes, systems, procedures, culture and structure.  Reform in these areas has already commenced and will continue over the next 4 years.  The organisation aims to match the funds from the 2016-17 SRV with savings from better ways of doing things, harnessing technology improvements, implementing new systems and reviewing service delivery.  These savings will provide the capacity to continue to service our growing City, ensuring the 2016-17 SRV funds are directed towards the City shaping and future-proofing priorities. The original 2017-18 budget included $2.9m in productivity initiative savings. In conjunction with the September 2017 Quarterly Review process, further productivity initiatives have been identified, investigated, confirmed and included in proposed budget adjustments for the quarter resulting in total saving of $3.9m included in the 2017-18 budget.

In addition to these adjustments a total of $12.3m of capital and operating projects revotes is proposed as a result of the September quarter review as the works are not expected to be completed in the current financial year.  Further details of significant proposed major variations are provided later in this report with all variations and revotes detailed in the Organisational Performance Report – September 2017.

This report recommends that the revised budget estimates, including revotes, identified in the report, and detailed in the Organisational Performance Report – September 2017 be adopted.

Financial Position for the September quarter

The financial position of Council for the quarter is expressed by providing information in compliance with Quarterly Budget Review Statement (QBRS) requirements on:

·    Budget position (whether balanced/surplus/deficit)

·    Significant variations

·    Identified revotes

·    Funding summary

·    Reserve movements for the quarter

·    Capital and Operating budget projects list for the quarter

·    Key performance indicators

·    Income and expenses

·    Income and expenses by program

·    Capital budget

·    Cash and investments

·    Contracts and other expenses

·    Consultancy and legal expenses.

Budget Position

 

$000s

Original Budget Position

0

September Quarter Variations

0

September Review Variations

194.5

Revised Surplus/(Deficit)

194.5

 

The predicted cumulative result for the year as at September 2017 is a surplus of $194,467 after the recommended variations for the quarter. Commentary is provided below on some of the more significant issues in the review (F= Favourable, U= Unfavourable, A= Allocation). Further details together with all proposed variations, variations with no impact on available funds, revotes, and reserve movements are detailed in the Organisational Performance Report – September 2017.

 

Net Employee Costs

During the first quarter of 2017-18 salary savings have been realised primarily due to vacancies across a number of departments. The majority of these vacant positions are in the process of being filled.  It is recommended that some of the identified salary savings are retained in the individual departments to enable the engagement of consultants or temporary staff to ensure the delivery of key Operational Plan tasks and projects. The salary savings net of those being retained by departments is a total of $257,432.

 

It is proposed as part of the September Quarterly Review that the salary savings of $257,432 identified are retained within the employee costs area to assist with year-end employee cost balancing and to supplement the budget for resignations and retirements. Any remaining savings at year end will then be transferred to the ELE Reserve.

 


 

Rates Income $717,330 F (0.51%)

Rates income is approximately $717,000 more than initial forecasts comprising the continuation of additional unbudgeted income from the second half of 2016-17, and business growth from the approval of a State Significant Development for industrial purposes for a rural residential property along Mamre Road netting over $200,000 which was not included in original estimates.

 

RFS Annual Allocation $64,010 F (10.9%)

The NSW Rural Fire Fighting Fund Allocation for 2017-18 has been approved by the Minister for Emergency Services and received by Council. The adoption of a percentage based methodology to determine Council's contribution has had a favourable effect on the required annual allocation with a change in service. Going forward this will reduce the volatility of movements in the contributions to Council, and therefore improve our ability to budget accordingly for statutory contributions.

 

Debt Servicing $38,810 F (0.48%)

There are general revenue debt service savings in the September Quarterly Review as the June 2017 borrowings were negotiated at rates below original estimates. Council was offered a rate just above 3% by NSW Treasury Corporation for a fixed 10 year term on its $2,200,000 annual borrowings for infrastructure, and slightly higher by CBA for the remaining 8 year term for $6million of loans that became due for renegotiation in June.

 

Roads Maintenance Income $25,000 F (28%)

Significant intake of user fees and charges income relating to roads and footpaths have resulted in revenue being higher than estimated budgets for the quarter. A proposed increase to the income budget has been made to consolidate this additional income.

 

Financial Assistance Grant $251,586 F (3%)

As reported to the Council at the Ordinary Meeting on 25 September 2017 advice has now been received confirming Council’s 2017-18 Financial Assistance Grant. The Financial Assistance Grant (FAG) allocated this year is $251,586 more than estimated during the budget process for the General component and $41,910 more than estimated during the budget process for the Roads component. It is proposed that these changes will be incorporated into the September 2017 Quarterly Review and that this will include adjusting the roads budget to match the actual FAG Roads component received, as has been Council’s practice in the past.

 

Transfer to Reserve $900,000 A

The development of the annual budget each year requires a number of assumptions to be made in relation both expenditure and income that are dependent on factors that are outside Council’s control. To safeguard against movements in these assumptions and forecasts it is proposed that $900,000 be transferred to Reserve. In addition, this allocation will provide capacity to respond to some current and emerging priorities, including some of the priority resource requests. 

 

Other variations with no impact on Available Funds and Proposed Revotes

A number of other variations, proposed as part of this review, do not have an impact on the available funds. Details of these adjustments are provided in the Organisational Performance report – September 2017.  In addition to these adjustments a total of $12,315,522 of planned capital and operating projects are proposed for revote this quarter and a full listing can be found in the attachment. The total value of revotes for the year to date (including the proposed September Quarter revotes) is $12,315,522, compared to $4,869,385 for the same period in 2016-17.

Conclusion

The Organisational Performance Report –September 2017 indicates that the performance of Council’s capital and operating projects are on track to meet Council’s challenging annual program. Strong financial management combined with the fine tuning and confirmation of budget assumptions have contributed to a surplus being projected to June 2018.

 

The Organisational Performance Report – September 2017 will be placed on Council’s website, and will be available in hard copy on request.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Organisational Performance Report and Financial Review - September 2017 be received.

2.    The Organisational Performance Report and Financial Review - September 2017 as at 30 September 2017, including the revised estimates outlined in this report, and detailed in the Organisational Performance Report be adopted.        

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

2017-18 Organisational Report - September 2017

60 Pages

Attachments Included

  


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                         27 November 2017

 

 

 

18

Tender Reference RFT17/18-04 - Information Management System   

 

Compiled by:               Kerry Hiatt, Information Management Co-ordinator

Russell Cook, ICT Procurement Lead

Harold Dulay, Acting Team Leader - Solutions Delivery

Jonna Datu-Mansfield, ICT Business Analyst

Authorised by:            Stephen Britten, Chief Governance Officer

Glenn McCarthy, Governance Manager

Jane Howard, ICT Operations Manager  

 

Outcome

We have confidence in our Council

Strategy

Be open and fair in our decisions and our dealings with people

Service Activity

Manage Council's records responsibly

      

 

Executive Summary

An open tender, RFT 17/18-04 Provision of an Information Management System, was advertised in the Western Weekender on 9 August 2017 and Sydney Morning Herald on 15 August 2017 with the tender closing on 18 September 2017.

 

Council’s current Electronic Document and Records Management System (EDRMS) is the latest installed version of the solution first implemented in 2005. This system is a large standalone system that requires a significant ongoing investment in training, systems and infrastructure management. While it does enable compliance with statutory record keeping obligations, it does not align to Council’s ICT strategy and does not support streamlining of current processes, automation, or contemporary best practices in user experience, information and systems management.

 

This report advises Council of the outcome of the tender process and recommends that the tender from Aten Systems Pty Ltd be accepted for the full scope of works outlined in the tender RFT 17/18-04 Provision of an Information Management System.

Background

In the 12 years since the original implementation of the EDRMS at Council, legislative, business and technology requirements have evolved. This has resulted in the system no longer meeting current or future needs. Council sought Tenders for the supply and implementation of a system for a contract period of six (6) years, with an option to extend for a further two (2) x two (2) year periods. After publication of the tender the supplier of the current EDRMS notified Council of its intention not to bid. The tender closed on 18 September 2017.

 

The solution being sought would enable Council to increase its compliance with legislative obligations, update and streamline business processes and improve Council’s risk profile for information storage and retrieval. The solution specified is a core component in an ongoing Information Systems improvement program of works that is increasing efficiency and customer experience across Council.

 

The proposed solution has been specified to deliver:

·    Better management of information

·    Improved search and retrieval of information

·    Replacement of uncontrolled network drives

·    Central repository of electronic and physical information.

·    Better insight into needed information

·    Easy integration to organisation’s systems (email, Ms office, intranet, SharePoint, etc.)

·    Decreased organisational risks

·    Improved integrity of information

·    Increased security and access control capabilities

·    Increased usability of the system.

·    Improved compliance levels

·    Improved email compliance

·    Improved document compliance level

·    Improved business productivity (through reduction of paper based forms), and;

·    Simplified business processes and diminished duplication of information.

Tender Evaluation Process

A procurement plan detailing the tender governance, evaluation committee composition and evaluation methodology was prepared and approved by the project sponsor, Governance Manager, Glenn McCarthy, and ICT Operations Manager, Jane Howard, prior to tender publication.

 

The Tender Evaluation Committee, consisted of a wide cross-section of Council staff, Harold Dulay (Project Manager), Jane Howard (ICT Operations Manager), Russell Cook (Procurement Lead), Kerry Hiatt (Business Lead – Information Management), Jeannie Thomas (ICT Lead), Jonna Datu-Mansfield (ICT Business Analyst), Melinda Brown (Information Management subject matter expert), Jackie Shepherd (Governance subject matter expert), Michael Jackson (Design and Projects Manager) and Cheryl Freeburn (Finance subject matter expert). Governance and Chair of the Evaluation Committee was Glenn McCarthy (Governance Manager and Project Sponsor).

 

Laura Stott, from Council’s Procurement team performed the role of tender administration and probity for this tender.

 

The evaluation criteria advertised and used in assessing the tenders received included over 300 functional, non-functional and commercial requirements in a range of categories including:

1.       Records Capture, Classification, Metadata, Retention and Disposal

2.       Searching and Retrieval

3.       Compliance, Security and Audit

4.       Migration, Integration and Workflow

5.       System and Hosting

6.       Usability

7.       Physical Files

8.       Risk – Operational and Commercial 

9.       Future product strategy

10.     Costs

 

In considering the best value for money, the evaluation committee assessed responses on all of the above evaluation criteria. Value for money denotes the solution that is most advantageous to Council in consideration of being fit for purpose with respect to lifecycle costs.

 

Tender Submissions

The scope of this tender included a Software as a Service solution. Software as a Service is provided as managed service, hosted on the vendors infrastructure and thus is not the purchase of software but is a subscription to a software delivered via the internet (cloud service). This is a specialised field with only a limited number of firms known to be capable and experienced in this area.  It was expected that a small number of complying tenders would be received. The tender resulted in two (2) firms making a submission.

 

A listing of the tenders received is detailed below in price order (ex GST).

 

 

Company

Contract day rate

3 Year Price

10 Year Price

Company Location

Directors

Aten Systems Pty Ltd
ABN: 11 147 604 948

$1280

$1,863,757

$4,415,893

Suite 305, 14-16 Lexington Drive, Bella Vista NSW 2153

Andy Alibhai

Chirag Lakhani

Information Proficiency
ABN: 39 770 312 922

$1400

$2,435,085

$5,797,507

3 Victoria St Midland WA 6056

Lisa Read-White

Alex White

 

For comparison purposes the tender requested pricing schedules as to what vendors believed would be the 10 years costs. However, due to the nature of software licence and subscription agreements complete pricing was only provided for 3 years. The Evaluation Team extrapolated the costs to 10 years for comparison purposes, using a CPI rise and fall of 3% p.a annual indexation. This pricing was used for comparison purposes only. Later in the report more detail is provided as to the detail of the scope of the contract.

 

It is proposed the contract will be for the following: Software subscription licenses, implementation services and support services.

 

Consistent with overall costs and compliance with the requirements, the total price and contract day rate from Aten Systems Pty Ltd, is the more cost effective rate.

 

The Tender Evaluation Committee recommend Aten Systems Pty Ltd, based on their:

1)   Overall compliance with the tender evaluation criteria,

2)   Demonstrated ability to meet Council’s requirements; and

3)   Competitive price for the services offered.

 

The Tender Evaluation Committee thoroughly reviewed the information provided pertaining to Council’s published requirements, past experience of the proposed tenderer and conducted reference checks. Past projects included implementation of similar information systems for the City of Canterbury-Bankstown and Rous County Councils.

 

The proposed company has delivered multiple projects of similar nature Council in the past. The Tender Evaluation Committee is satisfied with their performance and reference checks have also returned positive feedback.

 

The contract proposed to be entered with Aten Systems Pty Ltd would be for implementation consultancy services, services and licence fees. Table 2 below details the estimated 3 year cost for each of these components. Licence fees are fixed for 3 years and will be determined prior to the 4th year but not to increase by more than 10%. The service fees and the implementation consultancy services will be determined in the project plan based on service levels required by Council and the day rate set out in Table 1 as offered by Aten. The implementation consultancy services are expected to only apply for years 1 and 2. The Service fees including such things as support and maintenance of the products is expected to be more expensive in year 1. Those costs set out in Table in years 2 reflect the ongoing cost post implementation and after application of indexation.

The implementation consultancy services and service fees may be able to be reduced during the detailed design phase of the project and are being purchased on a day rate basis up to the maximum shown in Table 2. As anticipated in the tender there may be the need for consultancy services on an ongoing basis over the life of the contract. The contract will provide for these services to be purchased at the agreed day rate.

 

Price Element

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 4

Implementation Consultancy Services

391,040

166,400

 

 

Service Fees*

162,880

126,566

130,363

134,274

Licence Fees

186,968

186,968

186,968

191,329

TOTAL

740,888

479,934

317,331

325,603

* Year 1 includes 1 off costs, in future years, service fees will continue to increase by CPI.

 

To implement the Information Management System solution the year 1 vendor costs and internal project costs (including services, systems integration, training and internal project resourcing) totalling $1,417,450 will be funded from Council’s Productivity Reserve.

ICT Operations Manager’s Comment

ICT staff were an integral part of the tender formulation evaluation process. Specific requirements were included to ensure business requirements and alignment to Council’s ICT Strategy were met. Based on the evaluation plan and tender responses, ICT endorse the decision to recommend Aten Systems Pty Ltd.

Financial Services Manager’s Comment

Included in the assessment of tenders was the commissioning of independent reference checks, financial analysis, and performance analysis on Aten Systems Pty Ltd.  These checks were completed by Corporate Scorecard Pty Ltd and have been reviewed by Council’s Financial Services team. Based on this review, concerns were raised as to the ability of Aten Systems Pty Ltd to perform the works described.

 

The mitigation measures for these risks have been agreed with the recommended vendor. Some the key risk mitigation mechanisms include the recommendation that, if the contract is to be awarded to Aten Systems Pty Ltd, a reporting covenant be imposed requiring Aten Systems Pty Ltd to participate in an ongoing financial monitoring regime throughout the course of the contract, requiring the provision of Financial Statements and other information to support ongoing financial reviews (at the request of the Council). A termination clause will be included in contracts in the event of an unsatisfactory assessment.

 

Additionally, subject to Aten Systems Pty Ltd successfully signing a contract with Council, a Deed between Council and each of the Directors of Aten Systems Pty Ltd will be executed in respect of outstanding director salary liability risks. The requirement for this Deed is as a consequence of the potential for these director salary liabilities being drawn down in bulk which could then result in the company facing issues to continue operating as a going concern.

 

Further, as the contract has the potential to be a software related contract, it is recommended that, if the Council proceeds, the contract should have appropriate provisions for access to any source code and configurations management documentation in the event of failure or non-performance by the subject.

 

The replacement of the Information Management System is anticipated to commence in 2018. The costs in this report consists of fixed and variable components, including the number of days to implement the system. Funding for the identified vendor and internal project implementation costs, of $1,417,450 is proposed to be funded from Council’s Productivity Reserve. The annual costs over the system life can be accommodated from within existing annual operational budgets.

Tender Advisory Group (TAG) Comment

The Tender Advisory Group’s objective is to support the Council to achieve fair and equitable tender processes. The TAG, consisting of the Financial Services Manager, Neil Farquharson, and Legal Services Manager, Matthew Bullivant, met to consider the report and recommendations in relation to the tender for Information Management System. The TAG reviewed the evaluation process outlined within the report and is satisfied that the selection criteria have been correctly applied in making the recommendations.

 

Conclusion

Based on the detailed evaluation of the tenders received, analysis of compliance to requirements, costs and referee checks, the Tender Evaluation Committee recommends that Council approve Aten Systems Pty Ltd as the preferred tenderer subject to execution of a formal agreement. In alignment with the tender requirements the contract will be for a period of six (6) years, with an option to extend for a further two (2) x two (2) year periods subject to satisfactory performance and in accordance with this report.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Tender Reference RFT17/18-04 - Information Management System be received.

2.    Aten Systems Pty Ltd be approved as the preferred tenderer for implementation and support of our Information Management System in accordance with this report.

3.    Approval be given for the Governance Manager to enter into a formal agreement with Aten Systems Pty Ltd subject to satisfactory agreement of terms as outlined in this report.

4.    Council allocate $1,417,450 from the Productivity Reserve to fund the vendor and internal implementation costs of this project.

5.    The Common Seal of the Council of the City of Penrith be placed on all documentation if necessary.

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                         27 November 2017

 

 

 

19

Development and Project Management Services, Expression of Interest Reference 16/17-01   

 

Compiled by:               David Ellks, Property Projects Co-ordinator

Authorised by:            Angus Fulton, Property Development Manager  

 

Outcome

We have confidence in our Council

Strategy

Manage our money and our assets to be sustainable now and into the future

Service Activity

Manage Council's property portfolio to reduce reliance on rate income

      

 

Executive Summary

This report recommends a series of panels of pre-qualified Development Managers (DMs) and Project Managers (PMs) be established for Council’s Property Development Projects, and is submitted following a briefing on the purpose and operation of the panels to the Finance and Economic Opportunities Working Party (F&EOWP) meeting held 30 October 2017.

Council has a large program of Property Development projects that are required to achieve its strategic objectives. The human resources required to undertake the scope and range of foreseen projects is extensive. In resourcing this function, it is acknowledged that work flows will be sporadic, and therefore providing a lean staff establishment to be supplemented by increased capacity, and provide specialised experience to match specific projects, has been endorsed as the most efficient and effective model. The panels proposed will provide a select pool of appropriately experienced and priced consultants from which Council can obtain competitive proposals for providing the necessary additional DM and PM services.

Council’s tendering guidelines are being followed for the establishment and operation of the panels. This will enable select tenders to be called where the services are estimated to cost $150,000 (GST inclusive) or greater, which will still remain the subject of future Council reports for determination.

The duration of the panels will be three (3) years from the date of inception, and Council reserves the right to obtain quotes from consultants not on the panel.

The EOI was advertised locally and nationally on 27 July 2017 in the Western Weekender, Australian Financial Review and on the e-tendering and Apet360 websites, and on 1 August 2017 in the Sydney Morning Herald. A total of 51 Expressions of Interest were received, with 1 response from a local company.

Background

Following the receipt of a report on 25 September 2017 recommending the establishment of the DM and PM panels, Councillors requested a further report be provided prior to the recommendation being considered at an Ordinary Meeting. That further report was provided to the F&EOWP meeting held 30 October 2017.

 

The F&EOWP report noted that Property Department is undertaking a program of property projects to achieve Council’s property investment target. The human resources required to undertake the scope and range of foreseen projects is extensive and beyond Council’s internal capacity and experience.

During a presentation by the Chair of the Property Development Advisory Panel (PDAP) on 21 August 2017, it was highlighted that Council’s internal resources are lean and will need to be supplemented by external Development Managers and Project Managers with the appropriate capabilities and experience to suit the needs of specific projects.

The Expression of Interest for Development Managers and Project Managers requested submissions from firms and individuals with the required level of capacity and capability to supplement Council’s internal Property Development team, to enable greater responsiveness and specialised skill to facilitate multiple property projects at any given time. Proponents were required to provide a schedule of rates for the purpose of assessing value for money.

Benefits

The benefits pursued from establishing the pre-qualified panels are:

·    To minimise the time it takes to procure the appropriate DM and PM resources.

·    The ability to call for select tenders for companies with specific skill sets and knowledge bases.

·    Improved estimating of services costs.

·    Achieve efficiencies with procurement and resources.

 

The research into the consultants who are best placed to provide competitive proposals for Council’s additional DM and PM service needs due to their experience and rates has been completed by undertaking the EOI stage.

 

By conducting the public EOI in accordance with Council’s tendering guidelines means Council can now call for select tenders from the pre-qualified panel. It is important to note that Council is not precluded from undertaking a full open tender beyond the consultants on the panel for projects as it sees fit.

 

The EOI required proponents to provide schedules of rates to assessing value for money based on experience, understanding of needs and price. The schedules of rates will help Council to more accurately estimate the potential cost of service packages.

 

The EOI also required Proponents to accept Council’s standard terms of engagement, plus noted panel members will be required to register on Vendor Panel and with BNG Conserve. These requirements will help achieve efficiencies with procurement and making effective use of Council’s systems.

Project Types and Number of Panels

A panel of DMs (who will focus on leading projects and delivering benefits) and a panel of PMs (who will focus on managing projects within time, cost and quality constraints) will be established for the seven (7) different types of projects commonly undertaken by Council, these being:

A.   Complex, large scale city shaping / urban renewal style projects of regional significance on large land parcels involving infrastructure upgrades and a mix of uses in multiple buildings delivered in stages over a number of years.

B.   Single building developments or redevelopments where Council is the developer and the head contract value is less than $20m.

C.  Single building developments or redevelopments where Council is the developer and the head contract value exceeds $20m.

D.  Land disposals, joint ventures or Public Private Partnerships for a specific development involving a 3rd party.

E.   Small scale subdivisions (20 lots or less) for a variety of uses.

F.   Medium to large scale subdivisions (greater than 20 lots) delivered in 1 or more stages.

G.  Preparing one or more lots for taking to the market, or development by Council.