Council_Mark_POS_RGB

4 July 2018

 

Dear Councillor,

In pursuance of the provisions of the Local Government Act, 1993 and the Regulations thereunder, notice is hereby given that a POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING of Penrith City Council is to be held in the Passadena Room, Civic Centre, 601 High Street, Penrith on Monday 9 July 2018 at 7:00PM.

Attention is directed to the statement accompanying this notice of the business proposed to be transacted at the meeting.

Yours faithfully

 

 

Alan Stoneham

General Manager

 

BUSINESS

 

1.           LEAVE OF ABSENCE

 

2.           APOLOGIES

 

3.           CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES

Policy Review Committee Meeting - 4 June 2018.

 

4.           DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

Pecuniary Interest (The Act requires Councillors who declare a pecuniary interest in an item to leave the meeting during discussion of that item)

Non-Pecuniary Conflict of Interest – Significant and Less than Significant (The Code of Conduct requires Councillors who declare a significant non-pecuniary conflict of interest in an item to leave the meeting during discussion of that item)

 

5.           ADDRESSING THE MEETING

 

6.           MAYORAL MINUTES

 

7.           NOTICES OF MOTION TO RESCIND A RESOLUTION

 

8.           NOTICES OF MOTION

 

9.           DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

10.         REQUESTS FOR REPORTS AND MEMORANDUMS

 

11.         URGENT BUSINESS

 

12.         CONFIDENTIAL BUSINESS


POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING

 

Monday 9 July 2018

 

table of contents

 

 

 

 

 

 

meeting calendar

 

 

confirmation of minutes

 

 

DELIVERY program reports

 


Council_Mark_POS_RGB2018 MEETING CALENDAR

January 2018 - December 2018

(Adopted by Council - 27 November 2017)

 

 

 

TIME

JAN

FEB

MAR

APRIL

MAY

JUNE

JULY

AUG

SEPT

OCT

NOV

DEC

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

 

Ordinary Council Meeting

7.00pm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10

 

 

17

 

 

26@

26

30v

28#

25*

23

27@

   

   24^ü

 

29

26#+

 

Policy Review Committee

7.00pm

 

12

12

16

14

4

9

13

3

8

12

10

 

 v

Meeting at which the draft corporate planning documents (Delivery Program and Operational Plan) are endorsed for exhibition

 *

Meeting at which the draft corporate planning documents (Delivery Program and Operational Plan) are adopted

 #

Meetings at which the Operational Plan quarterly reviews (May and September) are presented

 @

Meetings at which the Delivery Program progress reports (including the Operational Plan quarterly reviews for December and June) are presented

 ^

Election of Mayor/Deputy Mayor

 ü

Meeting at which the 2017-2018 Annual Statements are presented

 

Meeting at which any comments on the 2017-2018 Annual Statements are presented

 +

Meeting at which the Annual Report is presented

-            Extraordinary Meetings are held as required.

-            Members of the public are invited to observe meetings of the Council (Ordinary and Policy Review Committee).

Should you wish to address Council, please contact Governance Coordinator, Adam Beggs on 4732 7597

 


UNCONFIRMED MINUTES

 OF THE POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING OF PENRITH CITY COUNCIL HELD IN THE PASSADENA ROOM, PENRITH

ON MONDAY 4 JUNE 2018 AT 7:00PM

PRESENT

His Worship the Mayor, Councillor John Thain, Deputy Mayor, Councillor Tricia Hitchen, and Councillors Jim Aitken OAM, Todd Carney, Brian Cartwright, Robin Cook, Kevin Crameri OAM, Greg Davies, Aaron Duke, Karen McKeown and Kath Presdee.

 

 

LEAVE OF ABSENCE

Leave of Absence was previously granted to Councillor Ross Fowler OAM for 4 June 2018.

 

APOLOGIES

PRC17  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Brian Cartwright seconded Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM that apologies be accepted from Councillors Bernard Bratusa, Marcus Cornish and Mark Davies.

 

 

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES - Policy Review Committee Meeting - 14 May 2018

PRC18  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Todd Carney seconded Councillor Kath Presdee that the minutes of the Policy Review Committee Meeting of 14 May 2018 be confirmed.

 

 

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

 

Councillor Tricia Hitchen declared a Non-Pecuniary Conflict of Interest – Significant  in Item 2 - Orchard Hills North Planning Proposal (Accelerated Housing Delivery Program site) as she is a resident of the area the subject of the report.  Councillor Hitchen stated that she would vacate the meeting during discussion of this Item.

 

Councillor Aaron Duke declared a Non-Pecuniary Conflict of Interest – Less than Significant  in Item 2 - Orchard Hills North Planning Proposal (Accelerated Housing Delivery Program site) as he has had meetings with the proponent of the development the subject of this report in the course of his employment.

 


 

 

DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Outcome 2 - We plan for our future growth

 

1        Annual Update Planning Proposal                                                                                  

PRC19  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Aaron Duke

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Annual Update Planning Proposal be received.

2.     Council endorses the Planning Proposal provided at Attachment 2.

 

3.     The General Manager be granted delegation to update and finalise the Planning Proposal referred to in resolution 2 prior to Council's submission of the Planning Proposal to the Minister for Planning.

 

4.     Council officers forward the Planning Proposal to the Minister for Planning with a request to issue a Gateway Determination. The submission will include a request to issue Council with Delegation for plan making authority.

 

5.     The General Manager be granted delegation to make any necessary changes to the Planning Proposal in the lead up to the Gateway Determination.

 

6.     The General Manager be granted delegation to make any necessary changes to the Planning Proposal prior to public exhibition in response to the conditions of the Gateway Determination or negotiations with public authorities and other stakeholders.

 

7.     Council publicly exhibits the Planning Proposal for a period to be specified in the Gateway Determination, and in accordance with the community consultation requirements of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 and the Environmental Planning and Assessment Regulation 2000.

 

8.     A further report be presented to Council following the public exhibition.

In accordance with Section 375A of the Local Government Act 1993, a DIVISION was then called with the following result:

For

Against

 

Councillor Kath Presdee

 

Councillor Robin Cook

 

Councillor Greg Davies

 

Councillor Todd Carney

 

Councillor Aaron Duke

 

Councillor Karen McKeown

                                                        

Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM               

 

Councillor Jim Aitken OAM

 

Councillor Brian Cartwright

 

Councillor Tricia Hitchen

 

Councillor John Thain

 

 

Having previously declared a Non-Pecuniary Conflict of Interest – Significant in Item 2, Councillor Tricia Hitchen left the meeting, the time being 7:06pm.

 

 

2        Orchard Hills North Planning Proposal (Accelerated Housing Delivery Program site)                                                                                                                                     

PRC20  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Robin Cook

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Orchard Hills North Planning Proposal (Accelerated Housing Delivery Program site) be received.

 

2.     Council endorses the Planning Proposal (provided under separate cover and tabled tonight), which is subject to further changes as referred to in resolution 5.

 

3.     Council officers forward the Planning Proposal to the Minister for Planning with a request to issue a Gateway Determination. The submission will include a request to issue Council with Delegation for plan making authority.

 

4.     A report be presented to Council following receipt of the Gateway Determination seeking resolution to publicly exhibit a Development Control Plan and Contributions Plan with the Planning Proposal.

 

5.     The General Manager be granted delegation to make any necessary changes to the Planning Proposal referred to in resolution 2:

a.   prior to Council's submission of the Planning Proposal to the Minister for Planning, which will include the resolution of the proposed playing field configuration and provision, and the preparation of proposed LEP 2010 map tiles.

b.   as a result of negotiated changes sought by DPE in the lead up to the Gateway Determination.

c.   prior to public exhibition in response to the conditions of the Gateway Determination or negotiations public authorities and other stakeholders.

 

In accordance with Section 375A of the Local Government Act 1993, a DIVISION was then called with the following result:

For

Against

 

Councillor Kath Presdee

 

Councillor Robin Cook

 

Councillor Greg Davies

 

Councillor Todd Carney

 

Councillor Aaron Duke

 

Councillor Karen McKeown

                                                        

Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM               

 

Councillor Jim Aitken OAM

 

Councillor Brian Cartwright

 

Councillor John Thain

 

 

Councillor Tricia Hitchen returned to the meeting, the time being 7:29pm.

 

3        Reclassification of Council owned land at 11-13 Chesham Street, St Marys            

PRC21  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Todd Carney seconded Councillor Greg Davies

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Reclassification of Council owned land at 11-13 Chesham Street, St Marys be received

2.     A Planning Proposal reclassifying public land at 11-13 Chesham Street, St Marys from Community land to Operational land be submitted to the Department of Planning and Environment seeking a Gateway Determination.

3.     Consultation with the community and public agencies be undertaken in accordance with any Gateway Determination issued by the Department of Planning and Environment.

4.     An independently chaired public hearing be held at least 21 days after the close of the public exhibition period.

5.     A planning consultant be engaged to independently chair the public hearing.

6.     A report be presented to Council on the submissions received during the public exhibition and the results of the public hearing.

 

In accordance with Section 375A of the Local Government Act 1993, a DIVISION was then called with the following result:

For

Against

 

Councillor Kath Presdee

 

Councillor Robin Cook

 

Councillor Greg Davies

 

Councillor Todd Carney

 

Councillor Aaron Duke

 

Councillor Karen McKeown

                                                        

Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM               

 

Councillor Jim Aitken OAM

 

Councillor Brian Cartwright

 

Councillor Tricia Hitchen

 

Councillor John Thain

 

 


 

 

Outcome 4 - We have safe, vibrant places

 

4        Draft Street Performers Policy                                                                                         

PRC22  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Kath Presdee

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Draft Street Performers Policy be received

2.     The Draft Street Performers Policy be adopted.

 

 

URGENT BUSINESS

 

UB 1           Request for Leave of Absence   

Councillor Aaron Duke requested Leave of Absence for 23 July 2018.

PRC23  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Todd Carney seconded Councillor Greg Davies that the matter be brought forward and dealt with as a matter of urgency.

 

His Worship the Mayor, Councillor John Thain, ruled that the matter was urgent and should be dealt with at the meeting.

 

PRC24  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Todd Carney seconded Councillor Greg Davies that Leave of Absence be granted to Councillor Aaron Duke for 23 July 2018.

 

 

 

There being no further business the Chairperson declared the meeting closed the time being 7:37pm.

    



DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

 

Outcome 2 - We plan for our future growth

 

1        Boarding Houses and development contributions for local infrastructure      

Procedural note: Section 375A of the Local Government Act 1993 requires that a division be called in relation to this matter.                                                                  1

 

2        Amendments to Penrith Development Control Plan 2014 - Multi Dwelling Housing and Boarding Houses

Procedural note: Section 375A of the Local Government Act 1993 requires that a division be called in relation to this matter.                                                                  7

 

3        Submission on Proposed Amendments to Sydney Regional Environmental Plan No. 30 - St Marys                                                                                                                                10

 

 

 

Outcome 6 - We are healthy and share strong community spirit

 

4        NSW ICC World T20 2020 Cricket Legacy Fund                                                            28

 

 


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


 

 

Outcome 1 - We can work close to home

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


Outcome 2 - We plan for our future growth

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

1        Boarding Houses and development contributions for local infrastructure  

Procedural note: Section 375A of the Local Government Act 1993 requires that a division be called in relation to this matter.                                                                  1

 

2        Amendments to Penrith Development Control Plan 2014 - Multi Dwelling Housing and Boarding Houses

Procedural note: Section 375A of the Local Government Act 1993 requires that a division be called in relation to this matter.                                                                  7

 

3        Submission on Proposed Amendments to Sydney Regional Environmental Plan No. 30 - St Marys                                                                                                                                10

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                         9 July 2018

 

 

 

1

Boarding Houses and development contributions for local infrastructure   

 

Compiled by:               Anthony Milanoli, Senior Environmental Planner

Authorised by:            Natasha Baker, City Planning Manager  

 

Outcome

We plan for our future growth

Strategy

Ensure services, facilities and infrastructure meet the changing needs of our community

Service Activity

Ensure our policies, strategies and plans provide for the services and infrastructure our City needs

     

Procedural note: Section 375A of the Local Government Act 1993 requires that a division be called in relation to this matter.

 

Executive Summary

The purpose of this report is to examine the merit and scope for levying development contributions on new boarding house developments.

 

Boarding houses provide leased accommodation to one or more lodgers for 3 months or longer. Boarding houses may incorporate shared facilities (such as a communal living room, bathroom, kitchen or laundry), and some rooms with private kitchen and bathroom facilities.

 

In the past, Penrith City received few boarding house proposals, however 14 applications were lodged in 2017 and a further six were submitted by April 2018. Given the recent growth in the number of boarding house proposals, it is timely that we determine whether development contributions should be levied to address demand for local facilities arising from tenants.

 

Councils are empowered to levy contributions for local infrastructure required by new development under s7.11 of the EP&A Act (previously s94).  Occupants of lower income housing (such as boarding houses), typically use public facilities at higher than average rates due to their more limited incomes and the smaller private recreation space available on their site. This utilisation and need establishes a strong nexus between the boarding house development and the ability to levy contributions for additional facilities. Many neighbouring city councils (such as Blacktown, Fairfield and Parramatta), apply development contributions on boarding houses.

 

Our contributions plans permit levying boarding house developments to fund enhanced local infrastructure. If an occupancy rate of 1.34 persons per boarding room applies, the total contribution owing under City-wide Plans would be $3,763 per bedroom/boarding room under City-wide s7.11 Plans for Local and District Open Space and Cultural Facilities.

 

This report concludes that, in the short term, existing contributions plans should apply to boarding house developments immediately. In the medium term (by October 2018), upon conclusion of the Recreation Strategy, the local and district open space contributions plans will be amended to incorporate more explicit reference to boarding house occupancy rates and contributions owing. Work has already commenced on amending these plans.

Background

On 19 February 2018, a Councillor Briefing outlined the recent increase in the numbers of boarding house proposals being lodged with Council and the potential implications. Among the questions councillors raised at the Briefing was whether boarding houses should be subject to development contributions. This report examines that question, while Other issues associated with boarding houses are addressed in a separate report by City Planning.

 

What are boarding houses?

Penrith LEP 2010 defines boarding houses as:

“a building that:

(a) is wholly or partly let in lodgings, and

(b) provides lodgers with a principal place of residence for 3 months or more, and

(c) may have shared facilities, such as a communal living room, bathroom, kitchen or laundry, and

(d) has rooms, some or all of which may have private kitchen and bathroom facilities, that accommodate one or more lodgers,

but does not include backpackers’ accommodation, a group home, hotel or motel accommodation, seniors housing or a serviced apartment”

 

Penrith City’s experience with boarding houses

Until 2017, Penrith City – and most of suburban Sydney – received few if any development applications (DAs) for new boarding houses. Only one application per year was received in 2011, 2013 and 2015, rising to 4 applications in 2016. In 2017, however, 14 DAs for boarding houses were submitted to Council, and as of May 2018, a further 6 DAs were submitted and four pre-lodgement meetings held or scheduled regarding other sites. All applications have been for sites in older, established suburbs.

 

Interest in boarding houses as a small-scale/mums and dads’ investor option has received growing attention in journals and newspapers and may have stimulated the recent increase in applications. Acute housing affordability issues in Sydney may also be stimulating tenant demand. Discussions with other western Sydney councils such as Blacktown and Parramatta confirmed they have also received increased numbers of development applications for boarding houses in the past two years.

 

Development contributions and boarding houses

The Environmental Planning and Assessment Act (EP&A Act) empowers councils to levy contributions for local infrastructure required by new development. Previously known as “section 94 Contributions” (after the section of the Act addressing the subject), from 1 March 2018, this levy is known as section 7.11 contributions or local infrastructure contributions. Currently 10 x development contributions plans apply to new development across Penrith City. The contributions Plans which may apply to any new development vary according to the type of development or its location. In the case of residential development (including boarding houses), the following contributions plans may apply:

 

·    Claremont Meadows Stage 2 – which funds infrastructure within that estate;

·    The Cultural Facilities Plan – which funds the Joan and St Marys Corner facilities

·    The District Open Space Plan – which funds City-wide recreation facilities

·    The Local Open Space Plan – which funds local recreation facilities; and

·    The WELL Precinct Plan – which funds infrastructure within that precinct

 

The recent growth in DAs for boarding houses has prompted questions about whether s7.11 contributions should apply. The following table and accompanying text address this question:

 

S7.11 Plan

Do contributions apply to boarding houses? Why?

Comments/other issues

Cultural Facilities

Yes.

 

Clause 7.1 describes development to be levied as “new residential development, including but not limited to, housing for older people, multi-unit housing (including integrated housing), shop top housing, dual occupancy and subdivision”.

Boarding houses satisfy the definition of “multi-unit housing”.

The Plan is based on additional demand “per person”.

The Plan applies where residential development (including a boarding house) is permitted.

Contributions for boarding houses under this Plan would be $164 per person.

District and Local Open Space

Yes.

 

The Plans generally apply wherever residential development (including a boarding house) is permitted.

Clause 1.3 of the Plans describes a contribution rate “per person”.

Clause 1.3.1 describes development types (including multi-unit housing) and occupancy rates, for the purposes of calculating contributions. While boarding houses are not a separate land use, they satisfy the definition of “multi-unit housing”, which is a land use listed for levying.

 

Clause 2.3 of the Plans states the Contributions Plans’ purposes include to provide for collection of contributions on an equitable basis. This equity relates to all development which generates additional demand financially contributing to enhanced recreation facilities and not being subsidised by existing residents or other new development.

 

The Plans contain a blanket occupancy rate for multi-unit housing of 2 persons per dwelling. This rate is not appropriate for boarding house bedrooms. An occupancy rate of 1.34 persons per bedroom/boarding room is considered reasonable and appropriate, subject to Council resolution.

 

 

The current contribution rate per person under the DOS Plan is $1,942 per person and $702 per person under the LOS Plan.

 

 

TOTAL

Contribution under the above 3 City-wide Plans

 

$3,763 per additional boarding room for development in an established area of Penrith City (as of 1 July 2018).

Claremont Meadows and

WELL Precinct

Yes.

The plans are applied on a “per hectare” basis, and, in the case of the WELL Precinct, also on a per person and multi-unit housing basis.

WELL Precinct contribution is capped at $30K per lot /dwg and $17,644 per boarding room.

Claremont Meadows contribution per person = $4,973.

 

Cultural Facilities Plan

This Plan levies contributions to meet increased demand for cultural facilities generated by all new residential development. Contributions raised under the Plan fund repayment of that proportion of the cost of The Joan and St Marys Corner related to residential growth from 2003 to 2022. Given the scope of its application, it would be reasonable, defensible and appropriate to levy contributions for boarding houses under the Cultural Facilities Plan.

District and Local Open Space Contributions Plans 2007

These Plans apply to all new residential development and fund the embellishment of existing recreation facilities across Penrith City to meet demand from new residents. At the time these Contributions Plans were adopted, the Affordable Rental Housing SEPP (2009) – which describes development standards applying to boarding houses - did not exist and boarding houses were not separately defined under the Penrith Urban Land LEP 1998. The definition of “multi-unit dwellings” (being “3 or more dwellings”) and “dwelling” (being “a room or number of rooms capable of being occupied as a separate domicile”) therefore includes a boarding house with 3 or more rooms. Consequently, a boarding house constituted a multi-unit dwelling and is thus within the range of development types to which all our current s7.11 Plans apply.

 

Considering the Plans’ purposes, calculation of need on a per person basis and that boarding houses constitute multi-unit dwellings, it is appropriate to levy contributions for boarding houses under the Plans, subject to levying on a per person/ bedroom basis, rather than per dwelling.

 

Claremont Meadows and WELL Precinct Plans

The Claremont Meadows and WELL Precinct s7.11 Plans levy contributions for new facilities such as transport, open space and community centres. While levying contributions on boarding houses in these areas is permissible, it is unlikely to eventuate, as no boarding house applications have been submitted for new release areas. Boarding house proposals have been focused on older, established suburbs with larger sites, close to transport and retail facilities, as required under locational criteria which must be satisfied.

 

As a release area, new lots in the WELL Precinct are levied at a maximum of $30K per lot/dwelling, in accordance with the limit imposed by the Minister for Planning in June 2010. As a result, any boarding house proposals on a new lot or redeveloped dwelling in the WELL Precinct would pay a maximum of $30,000 per lot. The per person contribution in the WELL Precinct is $13,294. Accordingly, applying an occupancy rate of 1.34 persons per boarding room, 1.70 bedrooms/boarding rooms could be developed before the cap was exceeded. As outlined elsewhere in this report, however, boarding houses have not been developed in new release areas due to the much smaller lots sizes and initial site acquisition costs per square metre being much higher than in older, established areas.

 

Affordable Rental Housing State Environmental Planning Policy (SEPP) and Development Contributions

The Affordable Rental Housing SEPP describes the development standards for boarding houses. In response to a request for clarification on several boarding house issues arising from a Councillor Briefing, on 5 June 2018, the Parliamentary Secretary for Planning (Scot Macdonald, MLC), confirmed that the SEPP “does not prevent a Council from levying contributions for Boarding Houses”.

 

Nexus between boarding houses and development contributions

Development contributions may only be levied on any new development if a “nexus” or link exists between the development and the need for additional local infrastructure. Key characteristics demonstrating the nexus between boarding houses and demand for augmented local infrastructure include:

 

1.   Affordable housing tenants (such as boarding house lodgers) are greater users of public facilities such as cultural facilities and community centres due to lower incomes minimising their ability to privately fund their recreation or cultural needs;

 

2.   Boarding house occupants are more likely to utilise local public open space facilities due to the very limited physical space within their private rooms or on site. The SEPP describes minimum open space required in boarding houses as being 20m2, limiting the scope for private recreation.

 

3.   Boarding house occupants are more likely to be engaged with local community facilities and the services they provide, because their tenure is longer than transient occupants of motels, hotels or serviced apartments. Boarding houses provide a principal place of residence for at least 3 months, whereas occupants of hotels, motels and serviced apartments usually reside for only days or weeks at most.

 

The above material demonstrates the nexus between new boarding house occupants and the need for additional local infrastructure funded by contributions plans.

 

Occupancy Rate of Boarding Houses

The Councillor Briefing on boarding houses on 19 February 2018 identified a need to determine an occupancy rate for boarding house rooms if contributions were to apply. Residential development contributions plans levy based on the number of additional persons created on the site by the proposal. Different dwelling types accommodate different numbers of residents. Contributions are then calculated by multiplying the occupancy rate per dwelling x the number of additional dwellings x the financial levy per person.

 

Based on 18 boarding house proposals submitted to date in Penrith City, Community Development has calculated the average occupancy rate per new boarding house room is 1.34 persons. It is therefore reasonable and conservative to assume an occupancy rate for boarding houses of 1.34 persons per bedroom.

 

Comparable Councils’ approaches

The table below summarises the approaches of comparable neighbouring councils to the issue of applying development contributions to new boarding house developments:

 

Council

Contributions approach to boarding houses

Blacktown City

Imposes a contribution on a per person basis but does not specifically identify boarding house as a discreet land use in the Contributions Plan.

Parramatta City

Applies a 1% flat rate levy for any development – including boarding houses - valued over $200K. Boarding houses are not described as a discrete land use.

Fairfield City

Imposes a contribution for boarding houses.

Identifies a boarding house as a discreet land use in the s7.11 Contributions Plan.

Applies an occupancy rate of 1 person per room/dwelling.

The Hills Shire

In established areas applies a s7.12 (s94A) flat rate levy.

Applies a 1% levy to development over $200K, including boarding houses.

For release areas, does not describe boarding houses as a discreet land use, but describes multi-unit dwellings as having a number of bedrooms (1- 4  bedrooms).

 

Cumberland (Holroyd)

Does not describe boarding houses as a discrete land use.

Refers to dwelling types with a number of bedrooms (1 – 3+ bedrooms)

Liverpool City

Does not describe boarding houses as a discrete land use in the Contributions Plan.

 

Next steps

If Council wished to levy development contributions on boarding houses, the next steps would involve two stages:

 

 

Stage 1 (short term response)

·    Resolve that the Cultural Facilities, District Open Space, Local Open Space, Claremont Meadows and WELL Precinct s7.11 Plans contribution rates apply to boarding houses; and

·    Resolve to apply an occupancy rate of 1.34 persons per each additional boarding room created.

 

This approach would be consistent with Council’s resolution regarding secondary dwellings/granny flats, which are subject to contributions without being a defined, discrete use under the Plans. Council resolved secondary dwellings should be subject to development contributions due to the additional demand for local infrastructure they generate and the number of proposals being received. There have been no legal challenges to the imposition of development contributions on secondary dwellings since Council’s resolution.

 

Stage 2 (medium term) solution

·    Amend the District and Local open space contributions plans (following conclusion of the Recreation and Open Space Strategy in September 2018), to include explicit land use occupancy rates for boarding houses. Work has already commenced on amending these plans.  After public exhibition of a draft Plan and adoption of a final plan, the amended Plan is expected to take effect by October 2018.

 

Conclusion

This report concludes that combined development contributions of $3,763 per bedroom/boarding room should be applied under the current Cultural Facilities, Local and District Open Space Contributions Plans, subject to Council’s resolution. Levying would be reasonable, equitable, and consistent with the purpose and provisions of those plans. In the medium term, the Local and District Open Space Plans should be amended to make explicit reference to occupancy rates applying to boarding houses for calculating contributions. Work has already commenced on amending these plans.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Boarding Houses and development contributions for local infrastructure be received.

2.    Council resolve to levy development contributions on any currently undetermined and future boarding house applications under the Cultural Facilities, District Open Space, Local Open Space, Claremont Meadows and WELL Precinct Contributions Plans, as relevant, at an occupancy rate of 1.34 persons per bedroom/boarding room, or for new lots in the WELL Precinct at $30K per new lot, as per the Ministerial Direction.

3.    As part of the next amendment to the District Open Space and Local Open Space Contributions Plans that occupancy rates associated with all relevant land use types be incorporated.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                         9 July 2018

 

 

 

2

Amendments to Penrith Development Control Plan 2014 - Multi Dwelling Housing and Boarding Houses   

 

Compiled by:               Breannan Dent, Planner

Authorised by:            Natasha Baker, City Planning Manager  

 

Outcome

We plan for our future growth

Strategy

Facilitate quality development in the City that considers the current and future needs of our community

Service Activity

Plan for and facilitate development in the City

     

Procedural note: Section 375A of the Local Government Act 1993 requires that a division be called in relation to this matter.

 

Executive Summary

The purpose of this report is to seek Council’s endorsement to publicly exhibit amendments to Penrith Development Control Plan (DCP) 2014 relating to multi dwelling housing and boarding houses.

The proposed amendments relate to multi dwelling housing controls resulting from the community feedback on the Oxley Park Place Plan 2017. It is proposed to amend controls for site frontage width, stacked car parking, and basement car parking for multi dwelling housing.

The proposed amendments also relate to introducing a Boarding House section in Penrith DCP 2014. Recent increase in boarding house developments has created social, public health, amenity and local character integration issues.

It is recommended amendments to Penrith DCP 2014 be placed on public exhibition for a period of 28 days in accordance with the EP&A Act and Regulation.

Multi Dwelling Housing

Recent interest in medium density developments in Oxley Park has changed the streetscape of the area from detached dwellings to townhouses. This has resulted in the reduction of available on-street car parking.

Most lots in Oxley Park and St Marys comply with the minimum requirement to carry out a town house development. They are generally above 800m2 in area and between 15 and 18 metres wide. Narrow lot widths result in challenges to the provision of driveways, bin storage, setbacks, car spaces, landscaping, drainage infrastructure and utilities.

Lots under 18m wide and over 800m2 can be found across Penrith. Therefore, any response to the amenity impacts of multi dwelling development on narrow lots should apply across Penrith.

Council has previously requested that comments be sought from the development industry on proposed controls for multi dwelling housing. A developer forum was undertaken and the feedback has informed the proposed amendments and provided items for consideration in future strategies.

The amended controls are intended to:

·    increase amenity by increasing lot frontage sizes,

·    ensure stacked spaces are used for car parking to reduce on-street parking, and

·    allow improved amenity and development outcomes.

Further DCP controls will be reviewed through the Local Housing Strategy, including:

-      percentage of accessible dwellings,

-      waste controls,

-      side setbacks,

-      building separation and articulation controls, and

-      deep soil requirements.

A copy of the amended DCP chapter is provided as Attachment 1.

Boarding Houses

Boarding houses provide leased accommodation to one or more lodgers for 3 months or longer. Boarding houses may incorporate shared facilities (such as a communal living room, bathroom, kitchen or laundry), and some rooms with private kitchen and bathroom facilities.

There has been an increasing interest in Boarding House developments under the State Environmental Planning Policy (Affordable Rental Housing) 2009 (the SEPP). The SEPP provides conditions under which Council is not able to refuse consent for boarding house development applications.

In the past, Penrith City has received very few boarding house proposals. However, this financial year, proposed boarding houses added a total of 105 rooms in residential areas. Over the last three years, 552 new rooms in boarding houses have been proposed.

Boarding houses should be designed, maintained and managed to reduce negative social, public health and amenity impacts. Penrith DCP 2014 does not provide a clear method for responding to these impacts. Attachment 2 provides a map showing the clustering of boarding house developments in Kingswood, where increasing density compounds potential impacts.

A new section is proposed in Penrith DCP 2014 that will supplement the SEPP controls, respond to potential impacts and provide guidance on addressing local character.

Currently, council officers rely on other general land use provisions in the DCP and external documents to guide boarding house developments.

 

The amended controls are intended to provide:

·    development that is contextual, local and of it’s place,

·    optimal outcomes for tenants,

·    mitigated impacts on neighbouring properties,

·    responses to increasing density,

·    high amenity, health and safety for tenants and neighbours.

The proposed amendments are designed to complement the SEPP. A copy of the amended DCP chapter is provided as Attachment 3.

Conclusions

Proposed amendments to the multi dwelling housing section in Penrith DCP 2014 are proposed as an interim measure to manage the impact of future development in relation to on street parking, lot frontage width and building separation. Further review of the amendments will be undertaken through the Local Housing Strategy.

A new section is proposed on boarding houses which will, in conjunction with the SEPP, improve the development application process by providing clear guidelines for developers. This will achieve better outcomes of boarding house development for tenants and other nearby residences.

This report seeks Council’s endorsement to publicly exhibit amendments to Penrith Development Control Plan (DCP) 2014 relating to multi dwelling housing and boarding houses.

 

RECOMMENDATIONS

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Amendments to Penrith Development Control Plan 2014 - Multi Dwelling Housing and Boarding Houses be received.

2.    The General Manager be authorised to make any minor changes to the draft Penrith Development Control Plan 2014 prior to exhibition.

3.    Amendments to draft Penrith Development Control Plan 2014 (provided as Attachment 2, 4 and tabled tonight) be publicly exhibited, in accordance with the relevant provisions of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act, 1979 and associated Regulations.

4.    A further report be presented to Council following the public exhibition.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

Multi Dwelling Housing - Penrith DCP 2014 - Chapter D2 Amendments

80 Pages

Attachments Included

2.

Boarding Houses - Map of proposed Boarding Houses

2 Pages

Attachments Included

3.

Boarding Houses - Penrith DCP 2014 - Chapter D5 Amendment

27 Pages

Attachments Included

  


Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                         9 July 2018

 

 

3

Submission on Proposed Amendments to Sydney Regional Environmental Plan No. 30 - St Marys   

 

Compiled by:               Matthew Rose, Senior Planner

Authorised by:            Natasha Baker, City Planning Manager  

 

Outcome

We plan for our future growth

Strategy

Ensure services, facilities and infrastructure meet the changing needs of our community

Service Activity

Seek to influence planning legislation and related government policies to ensure the best outcomes for our community

      

Executive Summary

This report presents a draft submission to the NSW Department of Planning and Environment on the proposed amendments to Sydney Regional Environmental Plan No. 30 – St Marys (or the SREP). The SREP, like Council’s Local Environmental Plan, sets the planning framework for the development of the release area.

The developer, Lendlease Pty Ltd, has written to the Minister for Planning requesting three changes to the SREP. These changes focus on the Central Precinct of the release area which is currently made up of two areas, employment in the north and residential to the south. Lendlease has requested that the land zoned for employment be rezoned to allow development for about 500 homes. The other proposed amendments include adjustments to the areas zoned to provide drainage infrastructure and an amendment to facilitate the transfer of about 1-hectare of land to the Wianamatta Regional Park. The Minister agreed to publicly exhibit the proposed amendments and has also consulted Council directly.

The draft submission outlines the importance of retaining and managing existing employment land and its contribution to addressing the observed job deficit in Penrith and the provision of jobs closer to home. It recommends that the rezoning of the employment lands is not supported. Given the NSW Department of Planning and Environment is the planning authority for this amendment, the submission also sets out several matters that should be addressed if the Department decide to rezone the employment area. For example, additional housing in the Central Precinct will require the provision of appropriate open space, affordable housing, community facilities and infrastructure to service the future community.

The proposed changes to drainage areas and the transfer of land to the Regional Park are supported. These changes reflect contemporary planning for the release area and result in extra areas of Cumberland Plain Woodland receiving the same protection as the Wianamatta Regional Park.

This report concludes by recommending that the draft submission on the proposed changes be endorsed and submitted for the Department’s consideration in determining the matter.

Background

The St Marys Release Area is split into several precincts each zoned to deliver different outcomes. The East, West and Central Precincts provide opportunities for residential development. The North and South Dunheved Precincts and part of the Central Precinct provide for employment generating uses. The Site also contains areas of Regional Open Space in the South Creek Corridor and the Wianamatta Regional Park.

The planning document managing the development of the release area is Sydney Regional Environmental Plan No. 30 – St Marys (or the SREP). The SREP, like Council’s Local Environmental Plan, sets environmental, social and economic outcomes for the release area. For example, the SREP aims to facilitate:

·     Residential development that provides a choice of housing and lot types and sizes.

·     Employment generating development that provides one job (within or close to the release area) for every resident worker.

Lendlease has written to the Minister for Planning requesting three changes to the SREP. These changes focus on the Central Precinct of the release area. This Precinct is approximately 133 hectares and contains two different areas, employment in the north and residential in the south. Approximately 95 hectares is zoned “Urban” and is forecast to provide about 1,450 dwellings when complete. The other area, about 38 hectares, is zoned “Employment” and is intended to assist with the provision of jobs within the release area.

The changes can be summarised as:

1.    rezoning 38.4 hectares of land within the Central Precinct from the Employment zone to the Urban zone to facilitate the delivery of a further 500 dwellings,

2.    changes to the size and location of areas zoned Drainage to reflect an updated stormwater management system, and

3.    rezoning of approximately 1.2 hectares of land in Jordan Springs from the Urban zone to the Regional Park zone to facilitate its transfer to the NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service as an addition to Wianamatta Regional Park.

Lendlease has justified the proposed rezoning of the employment area on the grounds of:

·     Providing an additional, diverse housing supply to meet current demand and deliver a wider choice of different, more affordable housing types,

·     Reducing potential land use conflicts between the developing residential area and planned employment area, and

·     The suitability of the planned employment area noting its remote, out of centre location and poor access to transport infrastructure.

The proposed changes to employment lands is supported by a 2015 Employment Development Strategy and a proposed program of job creation initiatives. The Strategy is a document required by the NSW Department of Planning and Environment (the Department) to assist its monitoring of Lendlease’s delivery of the job target set by the SREP. Lendlease advises that the program of initiatives is valued at $1,580,000 and would create about 1,165 jobs.

The Minister for Planning has agreed to publicly exhibit the proposed amendments and has also consulted Council directly. This makes the Department the relevant planning authority for determining the proposed amendments.

Summary of the draft submission

Employment Area

The draft submission presents a case against the proposed rezoning and justifies the retention of the employment area, noting that:

·     The Western City District Plan sets a specific planning priority for retaining and managing existing employment land, requiring it to be safeguarded from competing pressures, especially residential and mixed-use zones.

·     The proposed rezoning is premature and precedes any strategic employment lands study.

·     The site will potentially be serviced by or have easy access to new and improved transport connections, making the planned employment area more competitive and connected, through:

Improvements to local road infrastructure required to service the St Marys Release Area, including a direct link to the Dunheved Business Park, and

Longer term through the significant infrastructure proposed to service the Western Sydney Airport, including the nearby Outer Sydney Orbital and freight rail line.

·     At a local level there are insufficient jobs for the resident workforce with nearly 65% of Penrith’s employed residents travelling outside the area for work each day. The opportunities presented by the retention of the employment land will contribute to current job targets.

·     Anecdotal evidence suggests that there is an increasing demand and rents for smaller industrial units or business premises, which often provide the next step for home businesses and other small enterprises. The retention of the employment land will provide space for smaller industrial units or business premises and other evolving business practices.

·     The 2015 Employment Development Strategy supporting the proposed rezoning is not a contemporary document as it does not consider the planning priorities set by the Western City District Plan or the infrastructure proposed to service the airport.

·     The assumptions about job creation activity may not be accurate. For example, the proposal assumes that 15% of new homes are operating a home business, whilst data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics indicates that the current rate of home businesses in Penrith is about 1.7%.

·     The proposed initiatives for creating jobs place a heavy reliance on upskilling and placement activities in place of job creation.

 

Other considerations around the proposed rezoning of the employment land include:

·     Housing: Any additional homes should be considered in the context of Council’s Local Housing Strategy.

·     Alternative land uses: There is no sequential analysis included in the rezoning that has considered alternative land uses that could also generate jobs.

·     Flood evacuation: Areas of the Central Precinct may need to be evacuated during a probable maximum flood event and could have potential impacts on regional flood evacuation efforts. Infrastructure NSW and the NSW State Emergency Service are currently considering this matter.

As Council is not the planning authority, the submission advocates that the following matters are considered should the Department support a residential zone:

·     A monetary contribution towards employment generating initiatives to help meet any shortfall in job creation – to be identified through an update of the 2015 Employment Development Strategy.

·     The provision of appropriate local open space and community facilities to service and support the new community.

·     The delivery of affordable housing, at least 3% of the proposed homes (as identified in Council’s Sustainability Blueprint for New Release Areas).

·     Local transport upgrades within the release area, noting that local transport upgrades outside of but required to service the release area are already the subject of local Development Agreement.

·     The identification of the uplift in land value generated by the rezoning and the implementation of a “value capture” scheme to provide additional public benefit for the future and surrounding communities.

Drainage Areas

No objection is raised to the proposed revision of the size and location of the lands zoned drainage. These changes reflect revised water quality modelling for the Release Area based around contemporary stormwater management practices and improvements in technology. The proposed relocation and re-sizing of these areas facilitate a more logical and practical location for what will become Council-owned drainage infrastructure. They also result in a 2.65 hectare increase in the Wianamatta Regional Park providing the opportunity to protect extra areas of Cumberland Plain Woodland.

Regional Park

No objection is raised to the proposed rezoning of the 1.2 hectares of land from Urban to Regional Park. This change will provide the opportunity to transfer the land to the NSW Office of Environment and Heritage as an extension to the Wianamatta Regional Park. This will promote the retention and protection of the Cumberland Plain Woodland and associated wetland located on this land.

Conclusion

The draft submission presents a case against the proposed rezoning and justifies the retention of the employment area. The submission also addresses matters relating to housing delivery and flood evacuation. Finally, and given that Council is not the planning authority for land that the SREP applies to, the submission advocates for development contributions, open space and community facility provision, affordable housing and local transport upgrades should the rezoning of the employment land proceed.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Submission on Proposed Amendments to Sydney Regional Environmental Plan No. 30 - St Marys be received.

2.    The draft submission (provided as an Appendix) be endorsed and submitted to the NSW Department of Planning and Environment.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

Draft Submission

6 Pages

Appendix

  


Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                                      9 July 2018

Appendix 1 - Draft Submission

 

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Outcome 3 - We can get around the City

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

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Outcome 4 - We have safe, vibrant places

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

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Outcome 5 - We care about our environment

 

 

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Outcome 6 - We are healthy and share strong community spirit

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

4        NSW ICC World T20 2020 Cricket Legacy Fund                                                            28

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                         9 July 2018

 

 

 

4

NSW ICC World T20 2020 Cricket Legacy Fund   

 

Compiled by:               Virginia Tuckerman, Recreation Co-ordinator

Authorised by:            Brian Steffen, Executive Manager - City Assets  

 

Outcome

We are healthy and share strong community spirit

Strategy

Provide opportunities for our community to be healthy and active

Service Activity

Plan and advocate for sport and recreation facilities, services, programs and events for the City

      

 

Executive Summary

The NSW ICC World T20 2020 Cricket Legacy Fund (the Fund) grant program has been established by NSW Government to be administered in the lead up to the 2020 World T20 tournament. The Fund aims to aid community cricket clubs, associations and local councils.

 

The Fund aims to improve cricket facilities and supporting infrastructure, increase participation opportunities, improve female player pathways and enable hosting elite cricket content in Regional NSW.

 

The following projects in the Penrith Local Government Area have been identified by Council Officers, NSW Cricket, Penrith Cricket Club and Penrith Junior Cricket Association as potential grant applications which meet the stipulated criteria:

 

Rance Oval, Werrington

Installation of automated sub surface irrigation to the oval and construction of Stage 2 amenities including; public amenities, accessible toilets, unisex umpires’ facilities, showers and store.

 

Village Oval, Jordan Springs

Installation of a concrete synthetic wicket.

 

Council Officers have identified that existing budgets are available which can be used as contributing funds for these grant applications.

 

The deadline for grant applications close on Friday 13 July 2018, and successful projects must be completed within 2 years from the date the funding contract is accepted.

 

This report recommends that Council receive the information provided and, endorse the allocation of a $424,500 contribution from existing Council budgets to enable grant applications to be submitted by Penrith Cricket Club and Council, for the projects that have been identified.

Background

The NSW ICC World T20 2020 Cricket Legacy Fund (the Fund) has been announced by the NSW Government this has been established to deliver long term benefits to NSW communities and has the potential to support all cricket participants – from grassroots through to elite athletes.

 

The fund will deliver up to $6 million over three years to support facility development in local clubs, increase participation, improve female player and official pathways and enable hosting of elite cricket content in Regional NSW.

 

Project Partnerships are encouraged and identification of all project partners is required. Potential partners may include Councils, Cricket NSW, Cricket Australia, schools, other landowners, local businesses and community organisations.

 

The types of projects that are eligible to be funded are:

 

1.   Infrastructure

2.   Female Programs and Resources

3.   Regional Event Content (Penrith LGA is not included in this region)

 

Funding from the Infrastructure stream can be used for cricket facility development or enhancement. Funds can be used to upgrade existing wickets and ovals, amenities or facilities required for playing cricket, or for the development and construction of new ovals, amenities or facilities,

 

Upgrades and improvements could include cricket nets, pitch covers, oval drainage, irrigation or resurfacing, match official amenities, seating, lights, fencing, change rooms, or storage spaces.

 

Applications must contribute 50% or more of the funding required for their project, and this can include contributions from voluntary labour, donated materials and/or equipment or other resources including Council funding. The Fund may fund up to 50% of the net project costs, with a maximum funding contribution of $250,000 per project. The minimum amount an applicant can apply for is $15,000.

 

Funding from the Female Program fund can be used to support the purchase of equipment and resources, and the development of programs aligned to growing female participation. Purchase of club cricket equipment for female cricket teams, subsidised female player and official registration fees, courses, scholarships and support for female participation programs, reducing barriers for participation.

 

Over the three years of the program, each council may only be awarded a maximum of $300,000.

 

All projects will be assessed against all other projects lodged based on the applicant’s ability to deliver, maintain a budget for the project and meeting the key objectives these being:

·    Project delivers against Fund objectives

·    Project will address an identified need to provide increased opportunities for a range of participants to take part in cricket related activities.

·    Project will address an identified need for the local community.

·    Compliance with Cricket Australia’s Community Cricket Facility Guidelines.

·    The applicant demonstrates the capacity and experience to deliver the project. Evidence of project partners will be considered as adding to the applicant’s capacity to deliver the project.

·    The applicant can demonstrate current levels of usage and proposed levels of usage following project completion

·    The budget for the projects is reasonable and cost effective.

·    The project includes measures for success.

Current Situation

Council Officers have reviewed current and future Parks Asset Renewal Program, Public Amenity Replacement Program, Local Open Space 7.11 Plan, Grant Funded Projects Reserve, recommendations in relation to the Penrith LGA from Cricket NSW state wide infrastructure audit, as well as held consultation with NSW Cricket, Penrith Cricket Club and Penrith Junior Cricket Association to identify projects as potential grant applications to the first round of the Fund. The projects proposed are listed below.

 

Rance Oval - Werrington

The Penrith Cricket Club has identified the need for the replacement of the existing Public Amenities as the current facilities on site, as their highest priority. The current facilities on site have reached the end of their useful life and do not meet current need or accessible requirements.

 

In addition, the need has been identified to deliver Stage 2 of the amenity project which includes installation of; player showers, toilets, unisex umpires changeroom and store room.

 

Furthermore, the installation of automated sub surface irrigation system has been identified by both the Club and Council Officers to effectively and efficiently improve the playing properties of the surface, contribute to the increased sustainability of the fields and create a safer environment in which to participate.  

 

The estimated cost of the installation of automated irrigation system, public amenity replacement including accessible facilities, construction of player showers, umpires changeroom and storeroom is $526,270 exc GST.

 

Proposed contributing Council funds for the application total $417,000, including $190,000 which is proposed to be included in Council’s 2019 - 2020 7.11 Local Open Space Plan and $220,000 which is proposed to be included in Council’s 2019 – 2020 Public Amenity Replacement Program as well as $7,000 allocated in the 2018-2019 Parks Asset Renewal Program.

 

NSW Cricket have indicated that they would like to be a partner in this program and are most likely to contribute 25% of the cost of the irrigation works through their Cricket NSW Facility Grants Program. This is a likely contribution of $26,570. It is proposed that the funding shortfall of $82,700 exc GST will be sought from the Fund by Penrith Cricket Club.

 

Village Oval, Jordan Springs

Penrith Junior Cricket Association and NSW Cricket has identified the need for the provision of an additional synthetic cricket wicket to be installed at Village Oval, Jordan Springs.

 

The Association provides weekly programs for approximately 980 members in 82 teams. Specifically, cricket’s proposed program at the Village Oval will provide afternoon training, skills and weekly competition matches for players from U8s – U16s. The fields may also be used to host Cricket Australia and Cricket NSW programs such as T20 Blast and In2Cricket.Their seasonal summer allocation was adopted at Councils Ordinary Meeting on 27 March 2017.

 

The estimated cost of the project to provide a concrete synthetic wicket is $30,000. Proposed contributing funds for the project total $7,500 from the 2018 – 2019 Grants Reserve. NSW Cricket have also confirmed that they would like to partner with us on this project indicating a contribution of $7,500 facilitated through the NSW Cricket Facility Grants Program. It is proposed that the funding shortfall of $15,000 will be sought from the Fund by Council Officers.

 

City Assets Manager’s Comment

Sourcing funding from the Fund will maximise works that can be delivered within the existing Parks Asset Renewal and Public Amenities Replacement Programs.

 

Financial Services Manager’s Comment

The Fund provides community cricket clubs, associations and Council with an opportunity to apply for funding to enhance Council’s asset renewal programs and help alleviate identified funding shortfalls in the proposed asset improvements.

 

Both projects identified either renew, upgrade or improve existing assets and address identified priorities. The proposed works at Rance Oval, Werrington are estimated to cost $526,270 with funding through existing programs and Cricket NSW Facilities Grant totalling $443,570.  It is proposed the $82,700 shortfall is the subject of a grant application to the Fund by Penrith Cricket Club. The proposed works at Village Oval, Jordan Springs is estimated to cost $30,000.  A proposed allocation of $7,500 from Councils Grant Funded Projects Reserve together with a Cricket NSW contribution of $7,500 will provide the matching funds for a proposed $15,000 grant application. The allocation from Reserve will bring the 2018-19 Budgeted closing balance of the Grant Funded Projects Reserve to $216,301.

 

Upon project completion, ongoing asset maintenance costs are expected to be managed within existing budgets and asset renewal plans are to be updated to reflect the expected life of the new and upgraded facilities.

 

Conclusion

A contribution of $424,500 from existing Council budgets, and a contribution of $34,070 from Cricket NSW will enable Penrith Cricket Club and Council Officers to apply for grants totalling $97,700 from the Fund for projects with a total estimated cost of $556,270.

 

The nature of the projects that have been identified will address need identified by Penrith Cricket Club, the Penrith Junior Cricket Association, and NSW Cricket and will improve the usage capacity of the venues, supporting participation by over 2500 players training and competing in cricket.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on NSW ICC World T20 2020 Cricket Legacy Fund be received.

2.    Council endorse the allocation of identified / existing budgets as contributing funds to enable grant applications for projects at;

-     Rance Oval public amenity replacement, showers, umpires change room, store room and installation of an automated irrigation system. $7,000 from 2018 - 2019 Parks Asset Renewal, $190,000 from 2019 -2020 Section 7.11 Local Open Space Plan and $220,000 from 2019 – 2020 Public Amenities Replacement Program.


-     Village Oval synthetic cricket wicket installation. $7,500 2018-2019 Grant Funded Projects Reserve.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.  


 

 

 

 

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Outcome 7 - We have confidence in our Council

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled



 

ATTACHMENTS  

 

 

Date of Meeting:     Monday 9 July 2018

Report Title:            Amendments to Penrith Development Control Plan 2014 - Multi Dwelling Housing and Boarding Houses

Attachments:           Multi Dwelling Housing - Penrith DCP 2014 - Chapter D2 Amendments

                                Boarding Houses - Map of proposed Boarding Houses

                                Boarding Houses - Penrith DCP 2014 - Chapter D5 Amendment



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                                      9 July 2018

Attachment 1 - Multi Dwelling Housing - Penrith DCP 2014 - Chapter D2 Amendments

 

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Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               9 July 2018

Attachment 2 - Boarding Houses - Map of proposed Boarding Houses

 


Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                                      9 July 2018

Attachment 3 - Boarding Houses - Penrith DCP 2014 - Chapter D5 Amendment

 

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