Council_Mark_POS_RGB

7 November 2018

 

Dear Councillor,

In pursuance of the provisions of the Local Government Act, 1993 and the Regulations thereunder, notice is hereby given that a POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING of Penrith City Council is to be held in the Passadena Room, Civic Centre, 601 High Street, Penrith on Monday 12 November 2018 at 7:00PM.

Attention is directed to the statement accompanying this notice of the business proposed to be transacted at the meeting.

Yours faithfully

 

 

Warwick Winn

General Manager

 

BUSINESS

 

1.           LEAVE OF ABSENCE

 

2.           APOLOGIES

 

3.           CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES

Policy Review Committee Meeting - 8 October 2018.

 

4.           DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

Pecuniary Interest (The Act requires Councillors who declare a pecuniary interest in an item to leave the meeting during discussion of that item)

Non-Pecuniary Conflict of Interest – Significant and Less than Significant (The Code of Conduct requires Councillors who declare a significant non-pecuniary conflict of interest in an item to leave the meeting during discussion of that item)

 

5.           ADDRESSING THE MEETING

 

6.           MAYORAL MINUTES

 

7.           NOTICES OF MOTION TO RESCIND A RESOLUTION

 

8.           NOTICES OF MOTION

 

9.           DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

10.         REQUESTS FOR REPORTS AND MEMORANDUMS

 

11.         URGENT BUSINESS

 

12.         CONFIDENTIAL BUSINESS


POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING

 

Monday 12 November 2018

 

table of contents

 

 

 

 

 

 

meeting calendar

 

 

confirmation of minutes

 

 

DELIVERY program reports

 


Council_Mark_POS_RGB2018 MEETING CALENDAR

January 2018 - December 2018

(Adopted by Council - 27 November 2017 and amended)

 

 

 

TIME

JAN

FEB

MAR

APRIL

MAY

JUNE

JULY

AUG

SEPT

OCT

NOV

DEC

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

 

Ordinary Council Meeting

7.00pm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

17

 

 

26@

26

30v

28#

25*

23

27@

   

   24^ü

 

29

26#+

 

Policy Review Committee

7.00pm

 

12

12

16

14

4

9

13

3

8

12

10

 

 v

Meeting at which the draft corporate planning documents (Delivery Program and Operational Plan) are endorsed for exhibition

 *

Meeting at which the draft corporate planning documents (Delivery Program and Operational Plan) are adopted

 #

Meetings at which the Operational Plan quarterly reviews (May and September) are presented

 @

Meetings at which the Delivery Program progress reports (including the Operational Plan quarterly reviews for December and June) are presented

 ^

Election of Mayor/Deputy Mayor

 ü

Meeting at which the 2017-2018 Annual Statements are presented

 

Meeting at which any comments on the 2017-2018 Annual Statements are presented

 +

Meeting at which the Annual Report is presented

-            Extraordinary Meetings are held as required.

-            Members of the public are invited to observe meetings of the Council (Ordinary and Policy Review Committee).

Should you wish to address Council, please contact Governance Coordinator, Adam Beggs on 4732 7597

 


UNCONFIRMED MINUTES

 OF THE POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING OF PENRITH CITY COUNCIL HELD IN THE PASSADENA ROOM, PENRITH

ON MONDAY 8 OCTOBER 2018 AT 7:00PM

PRESENT

His Worship the Mayor, Councillor Ross Fowler OAM, Deputy Mayor, Councillor Greg Davies (arrived 7:03pm), and Councillors Jim Aitken OAM, Todd Carney, Brian Cartwright, Robin Cook, Marcus Cornish, Kevin Crameri OAM, Aaron Duke, Tricia Hitchen, Karen McKeown OAM (arrived 7:04pm), Kath Presdee and John Thain.    

 

LEAVE OF ABSENCE

Leave of Absence was previously granted to Councillor Mark Davies for the period 5 October 2018 to 19 October 2018 inclusive.

 

APOLOGIES

PRC45  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Tricia Hitchen seconded Councillor Brian Cartwright that apologies be received for Councillor Bernard Bratusa.

 

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES - Policy Review Committee Meeting - 3 September 2018

PRC46  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Todd Carney seconded Councillor Aaron Duke that the minutes of the Policy Review Committee Meeting of 3 September 2018 be confirmed.

 

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

 

There were no declarations of interest.

 

DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Outcome 7 - We have confidence in our Council

 

7        Penrith Whitewater Annual Report 2017-2018                                                               

PRC47  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Kath Presdee

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Penrith Whitewater Annual Report 2017-2018 be received

2.    Council agree to underwrite the operation of the Penrith Whitewater Stadium Limited until the presentation to Council of the Penrith Whitewater Stadium Limited Annual Report for 2018-19.

3.    Council note and support the appointment and re-appointment of the persons named in the report to the Board of Directors of Penrith Whitewater Stadium Ltd. 

 


 

Outcome 4 - We have safe, vibrant places

 

6        St Marys Town Centre Annual Report 2017-2018 and Business Plan 2018-2019

Councillor Jim Aitken OAM left the meeting, the time being 7:41pm.

Councillor Jim Aitken OAM returned to the meeting, the time being 7:42pm.

         

PRC48  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Marcus Cornish

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on St Marys Town Centre Annual Report 2017-2018 and Business Plan 2018-2019 be received.

2.    Council receive information on the Annual Report and Audited Financial Statement for 2017-2018 of the St Marys Town Centre Corporation.

3.    Council endorse the St Marys Town Centre Corporation’s Annual Business Plan 2018-2019.

 

Councillor Greg Davies left the meeting, the time being 7:48pm.

 

Councillor Tricia Hitchen left the meeting, the time being 7:48pm.

 

Councillor Greg Davies returned to the meeting, the time being 7:49pm.

 

Councillor Tricia Hitchen returned to the meeting, the time being 7:49pm.

 

5        The Village Cafe - North St Marys and Kingswood Progress                                      

PRC49  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Robin Cook seconded Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on The Village Cafe - North St Marys and Kingswood Progress be received.

 

2.    A further report be presented to Council regarding ongoing funding of the Village Café.

 

Outcome 2 - We plan for our future growth

 

1        LEP Review Report                                                                                                           

PRC50  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor John Thain seconded Councillor Greg Davies

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on LEP Review Report be received

2.    Council endorse the LEP Review Report – October 2018 at Attachment 1 to be sent to the Greater Sydney Commission and the Department of Planning and Environment for their consideration.

 

 

2        Planning Proposal - 92,94 and 96 Victoria Street Werrington                                     

PRC51  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Marcus Cornish

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Planning Proposal - 92,94 and 96 Victoria Street Werrington be received.

2.    Council endorse the Planning Proposal for 92, 94 and 96 Victoria Street, Werrington provided in the separate enclosure to this report.

3.    The General Manager be granted delegation to update and finalise the Planning Proposal referred to in resolution 2 prior to Council's submission of the Planning Proposal to the Minister for Planning and Parliamentary Counsel.

4.    Council officers forward the Planning Proposal to the Minister for Planning and Parliamentary Counsel with a request to make the local environmental plan amendment.

 

In accordance with Section 375A of the Local Government Act 1993, a DIVISION was then called with the following result:

For

Against

 

Councillor Kath Presdee

 

Councillor Robin Cook

 

Councillor Greg Davies

 

Councillor Todd Carney

 

Councillor Aaron Duke

 

Councillor Karen McKeown OAM

                                                        

Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM               

 

Councillor Ross Fowler OAM

 

Councillor Jim Aitken OAM

 

Councillor Brian Cartwright

 

Councillor Tricia Hitchen

 

Councillor Marcus Cornish

 

Councillor John Thain

 

 

3        Australian Arms Hotel Planning Proposal, 351 - 359 High Street, Penrith                 

PRC52  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Aaron Duke seconded Councillor Greg Davies

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Australian Arms Hotel Planning Proposal, 351 - 359 High Street, Penrith be received.

2.    Council endorse the Planning Proposal to amend the Height of Buildings and Floor Space Ratio controls for 351 - 359 High Street, Penrith (enclosed separately for the information of Councillors and available on Council’s website) and amended in accordance with this report.


3.    The Planning Proposal be submitted to the Department of Planning and Environment (DP&E) with a request to issue a Gateway Determination. The submission will include a request to issue Council with delegation for plan making authority.

4.    The General Manager be granted delegation to make any necessary changes to the Planning Proposal:

a.   prior to Council's submission of the Planning Proposal to the Minister for Planning, such as minor changes and formatting;

b.   as a result of any negotiated changes sought by DP&E in the lead up to the Gateway Determination;

c.   prior to public exhibition in response to the conditions of the Gateway Determination or negotiations with public authorities and other stakeholders.

5.    Consultation with the community and public agencies be undertaken in accordance with any Gateway Determination.

6.    A further report be presented to Council on the submissions received from public agencies and the community.

In accordance with Section 375A of the Local Government Act 1993, a DIVISION was then called with the following result:

For

Against

 

Councillor Kath Presdee

 

Councillor Robin Cook

 

Councillor Greg Davies

 

Councillor Todd Carney

 

Councillor Aaron Duke

 

Councillor Karen McKeown OAM

                                                        

Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM               

 

Councillor Ross Fowler OAM

 

Councillor Jim Aitken OAM

 

Councillor Brian Cartwright

 

Councillor Tricia Hitchen

 

Councillor Marcus Cornish

 

Councillor John Thain

 

 

4        RZ18/0008 - Planning Proposal to amend Penrith Local Environmental Plan 2010 - Reclassification of four (4) sites in St Marys and Penrith from Community to Operational land.

PRC53  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Jim Aitken OAM

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on RZ18/0008 - Planning Proposal to amend Penrith Local Environmental Plan 2010 - Reclassification of four (4) sites in St Marys and Penrith from Community to Operational land. be received

2.    Council endorse the attached Planning Proposal, that reclassifies four (4) sites in Penrith and St Marys and submit it to the Department of Planning and Environment seeking a Gateway Determination.

3.    The General Manger be granted delegation to update and finalise the Planning Proposal before submitting it to the Department of Planning and Environment seeking a Gateway Determination.

4.    Consultation with the community and public agencies be undertaken in accordance with any Gateway Determination issued by the Department of Planning and Environment.

5.    An independently chaired public hearing be held in accordance with the requirements of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act and Regulations.

6.    A planning consultant be engaged to independently chair the public hearing.

7.    A report be presented to Council on the submissions received during the public exhibition and the results of the public hearing.

 

In accordance with Section 375A of the Local Government Act 1993, a DIVISION was then called with the following result:

For

Against

 

Councillor Kath Presdee

 

Councillor Robin Cook

 

Councillor Greg Davies

 

Councillor Todd Carney

 

Councillor Aaron Duke

 

Councillor Karen McKeown OAM

                                                        

Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM               

 

Councillor Ross Fowler OAM

 

Councillor Jim Aitken OAM

 

Councillor Brian Cartwright

 

Councillor Tricia Hitchen

 

Councillor Marcus Cornish

 

Councillor John Thain

 

 

 

REQUESTS FOR REPORTS AND MEMORANDUMS

 

RR 1           Filling of Land  

Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM requested that a report be prepared on the policy and procedures relating to the regulation of illegal land filling.

 

 

There being no further business the Chairperson declared the meeting closed the time being 8:25pm.

    



DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

 

Outcome 1 - We can work close to home

 

1        Penrith City Children's Services Cooperative Ltd                                                              1



Outcome 2 - We plan for our future growth

 

2        Penrith DCP 2014 amendments - Public Exhibition Submissions                                    9



Outcome 4 - We have safe, vibrant places

 

3        Kingswood Place Plan 2018-22                                                                                       21

 

4        Oxley Park Place Plan Progress Report                                                                          26

 

 

Outcome 5 - We care about our environment

 

5        Cumberland Zone Rural Fire District - Status of Current and Future Operations           33



Outcome 7 - We have confidence in our Council

 

6        Penrith Performing and Visual Arts Ltd - 2017-2018 Annual Report                              39

 

7        Risk Management Policy and ARIC Annual Report                                                        49

 

 


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


Outcome 1 - We can work close to home

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

1        Penrith City Children's Services Cooperative Ltd                                                              1

 

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                            12 November 2018

 

 

 

1

Penrith City Children's Services Cooperative Ltd   

 

Compiled by:               Jade Bradbury, Business Co-ordinator Children's Services

Marlene Borg, Management Accountant Children's Services

Janet Keegan, Children's Services Manager

Authorised by:            Sandy Davies, Executive Manager - People & Capability  

 

Outcome

We can work close to home

Strategy

Provide access to lifelong learning to maximise opportunities for our community

Service Activity

Deliver high quality children's services

      

 

Executive Summary

This report provides information on Council’s children’s services that are managed by the Penrith City Children’s Services Cooperative (PCCSC) for the period July 2017 to June 2018. The report includes information on the financial operations of the services managed by the Cooperative. The report recommends that the information be received and that Council underwrite the operations of the PCCSC Ltd until the presentation to Council of the Penrith City Children’s Services Cooperative Ltd Annual Report for 2018-19.

Background

The PCCSC became effective on 1 January 2003 and was created to manage a number of children’s services on Council’s behalf including long day care, preschool, before and after school, vacation care and occasional care. The Board also took on management of the Glenmore Park Child and Family Centre in July 2015. The structure of the Cooperative is a Board of 11 Directors including parent representatives, three Councillors, a staff representative, community representatives and a representative of the General Manager. The Board meets on a bi-monthly basis and operates under Council delegation. The Board looks at broad policy matters, sets the direction for children’s services and makes major decisions about service provision. Parent advisory committees, elected annually at each site, provide valuable input into the operational aspects of individual services. 

 

On Council’s behalf, the Board manages 44 services in 26 facilities including 18 long day care centres, five preschools, 13 before and after school care services, seven vacation care and one occasional care service. In January 2017, the Board also took on the development and management of out of school hours services on school grounds at four local public schools. Approximately 4,000 children aged 0-12 years attend the services managed by the Board annually with approximately 339 full time equivalent staff employed in centre-based service delivery including permanent, temporary and casual employees. 

 

Children’s Services has a broad strategy in Council’s Delivery Program to deliver high quality children’s services. Linked to this strategy are the five major goals in the Board’s Strategic Plan – being a leader in quality, sound financial management, enabling a skilled workforce, being known as a provider of high quality not-for-profit services and having decision making processes that are open and transparent. It is pleasing that a number of key primary actions within these goals have been implemented during the period of review. A snapshot of activities are highlighted in this report. 

 

 

 

The Children’s Services Program 

The Children’s Services program is focused on delivering high quality children’s services that are affordable, accessible and viable. Utilisation of services drives income so is a key performance indicator. For the cumulative period July 2017 to June 2018, of the six components of children’s services managed by the Board, four achieved or exceeded projected utilisation targets with preschool and long day care slightly below.  

 

Building and Playground Upgrades

Children’s Services continuously strives to maintain services as aesthetically pleasing and safe environments for children, families and staff. To this end a significant number of building and playground upgrades, totalling $1,029,500 from the Cooperative’s reserves. have been completed during the financial year being reported on. The Board is making more provision than ever for building and playground upgrades to meet the ongoing challenge of ageing buildings. The former Emu Plains library building was renovated to accommodate Emu Village out of school hours service with a new playground and building upgrade which has been very well received by families, children and staff.  

 

Enrolment of Children from an Aboriginal Background and Children with Disability 

Of note during this reporting period is the increased enrolment of children from an Aboriginal background across Children’s Services with 6% of total enrolments at centres and children participating in children’s services programs being from an Aboriginal background.

 

Support to improve access for children with ongoing high support needs has been provided by the commonwealth funded Inclusion Development Fund (IDF) (previously the Inclusion Support Subsidy (ISS)) and the State Government Inclusion Support and Preschool Disability Support Programs. These build the capacity of services to include children with ongoing high support needs into mainstream services. IDF funding enables services to engage an additional staff member but there is still a significant shortfall in the funding received and the cost of employing additional staff which needs to be met by services. There has been an increase in the funding provided, reducing the call on the Council subsidy as It is the gap in funding that is provided by Council towards the Cooperative’s operations. During the year the services managed by the Cooperative enrolled over 95 children with additional needs and disability. 

 

Curriculum Implementation

Children’s Services continued to develop a comprehensive professional learning program for all educators and staff during the last financial year. The program has focused on developing programs that include ongoing training, mentoring and critical reflection.  Inspiring and innovative professional speakers and specialists were sought to deliver targeted training particularly in leadership. This had tangible results with embedded changes demonstrated in greater collaboration across children’s services in relation to leadership. Other projects that have added great value to curriculum implementation have been a music therapy partnership with Nordoff Robbins, a collaborative art project with Lewers Gallery and the Paint Penrith REaD project.   

 

The results for children’s services in the organisational employee engagement survey show that staff feel they have the training and knowledge to do their job and they understand how they contribute to the satisfaction of customers. Staff have done a great job in supporting families living in vulnerable circumstances and have, in turn, been supported by the Children’s Services CAPPS (children and parenting program support) coordinator, a position funded by the federal Department of Social Services.

 

Children’s Services has continued to show leadership, internally and externally, in relation to sustainability, from success in eliminating laminating in early childhood, reducing the use of paper, supporting children to understand the link between litter and waterways and an ethical purchases challenge. Children’s Services has been awarded a number of sustainability awards.   

 

Outcomes from Assessment and Rating

The National Quality Standard came into effect in 2012.  All services managed by the Cooperative have been assessed and rated under this system with 100% rated as meeting or exceeding the standard, which is well above the state and national averages.  

 

Children’s Services Business Approach

During the year, children’s services has strengthened its business model approach to the management of centres. Productivity initiatives have included information technology remediation, upgrades to the software for the management of children’s enrolments, attendance and family fees, as well as ongoing global contracts for cleaning, consumables and garden maintenance.  Several successful marketing and awareness campaigns were run during the financial year including bus sign advertising, parent testimonials and Hoyts Cinema promotion. Children’s Services had a presence at many community events during the year including the REAL festival, Cinema in the Park, Australia Day and Music by the River and was the catalyst for the success of children’s week, grandparents day and families week events. 

 

The New Child Care Subsidy

During the 2017-18 financial year children’s services was preparing and gearing up for one of the biggest changes for the sector for many years – the new Child Care Subsidy (CCS). CCS rolls all previous subsidies into one and there is an Activity Test for eligibility based around parent participation in the workforce, volunteering or studying.  Whilst many working families are much better off under CCS, some children living in vulnerable circumstances whose families don’t meet the activity test have their access to subsidised childcare significantly reduced. The Board has lobbied on this matter and called on government to ensure that children living in vulnerable situations have access to at least 15 hours a week of subsidised childcare.

 

Financial Results

The services managed by the Cooperative reported an operating surplus from ordinary activities of $40,000 for the 2017-18 year. This surplus result is after a contribution from Council of $90,000 as well as transfers to a number of operational reserves of $1,785,000 for future projects and transfers from reserves for current year projects. These reserves include provision for playground and building upgrades, bus replacement, centre equipment, advertising and marketing as well as ‘value add’ programs such as music and art.

 

Income derived from the provision of childcare, as represented by child care fees and child care benefit (CCB) was $21,306,000 which is an increase on original budget projections due to most service types meeting or exceeding their budgeted utilisation targets.  Grant funding of $2,695,000 was provided by both the State and Federal Government. This is decrease of  6.6% in terms of grant funding received compared to last financial year.

 

Employee Costs for 2017-18 were $19,885,000 which is an increase of 7.9% compared to the previous year.  As expected employee costs account for the largest category of expenditure and comprise 82.1% of the total cost of the Cooperative’s operations.  In 2017-18 the Cooperative Services made provision for $197,200 towards funding Employee Leave Entitlements (ELE) for children’s services staff. This allowed the Cooperative to fully fund leave entitlements attributable largely to annual leave and long service leave.  

 

Expenditure on materials, contracts and other expenses was $2,513,000 which is an increase of 27.2% upon last year’s result. This was largely the result of increased discretionary expenditure at a number of Children’s Centres in recognition of higher utilisation levels being achieved across the majority of services types as compared to the previous financial year.

 

Council’s commitment to directly supporting the initiatives undertaken by the Cooperative is reflected by the subsidy provided to the Cooperative’s operations of $90,000.  This subsidy provides essential funding for the Inclusion Development Fund (previously Inclusion Support Program). Council makes significant other financial contributions to children’s services overall which is outlined through the annual Operational Plan. The financial outcome for the services managed by the Cooperative for the financial year 2017-18 is considered a good result and is testament to the strong financial management of the Cooperative’s services. For the children’s services managed by the Cooperative, the maintenance of utilisation levels is critical to their financial viability and the external grant funding received is of high importance to be able to sustain service delivery at current high levels.

 

Conclusion

The establishment of the Penrith City Children’s Services Cooperative has proved to be an effective management model for the children’s services sponsored by Council. The small favourable outcome for the 2017-18 financial year is an excellent achievement given the current financial environment, and provides some necessary equity to position the services for the coming years. The Board of Directors is well aware of the complexities of the operation of children’s services and the challenges that this brings. Maintaining a balance between services that are viable, accessible and affordable is high on the Board’s agenda. Sustaining the high quality of service provision for which Council’s services are known is a key driver. Affordability continues to be the driving factor for utilisation levels across all service types and balancing this with viability is a key priority.

 

Lobbying and advocacy continue to ensure that issues related to children’s services, and particularly issues related to the not-for-profit sector and the Penrith context, are raised and have a high profile. Continued compliance with the National Law and Regulations is testament to the skill, motivation and dedication of the children’s services staff and the support provided by the Children’s Services internal management team. 

 

The Board is under no illusion that the year ahead will hold challenges in its quest to ensure the children’s services remain viable within a climate of increased competition, legislation and regulation requirements and the challenge to maintain a skilled workforce. Some known challenges for children’s services for the year ahead include the second phase of the federal Jobs for Families Package and potential changes to state government Legacy funding. The Board will need to keep abreast of emerging issues so that sound change management practices are adopted and the high quality of service provision is sustained. 

 

During the financial year 2017-18, there were no significant changes in the operations of the Cooperative. The Annual General Meeting was held in October 2018. New Rules were adopted at the October 2018 AGM to bring them into line with new legislation. Council’s representatives on the Board of Directors are Councillors Ross Fowler OAM, Councillor Todd Carney and Councillor Kath Presdee. The General Manager’s representative and Company Secretary is now Council’s Chief Financial Officer, Andrew Moore.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Penrith City Children's Services Cooperative Ltd be received.

2.    Council underwrite the operations of the PCCSC Ltd until the presentation to Council of the Penrith City Children’s Services Cooperative Ltd Annual Report for 2018-19.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.  


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


Outcome 2 - We plan for our future growth

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

2        Penrith DCP 2014 amendments - Public Exhibition Submissions                                    9

 

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                            12 November 2018

 

 

 

2

Penrith DCP 2014 amendments - Public Exhibition Submissions   

 

Compiled by:               Breannan Dent, Planner

Authorised by:            Natasha Baker, City Planning Manager  

 

Outcome

We plan for our future growth

Strategy

Facilitate quality development in the City that considers the current and future needs of our community

Service Activity

Plan for and facilitate development in the City

      

 

Executive Summary

At the Policy Review Committee meeting on July 2018, Council resolved to prepare and publicly exhibit draft amendments to Penrith Development Control Plan (DCP) 2014 regarding multi dwelling housing and boarding houses.

 

Amendments proposed to chapter “D2 Residential Development" of Penrith DCP 2014 regarding multi dwelling housing include:

·    increased lot frontage requirements;

·    allowing stacked car parking; and

·    incentives for basement car parking.

 

These controls were developed in response to resident feedback, previous submissions to development applications for multi dwelling housing, and in response to actions within the Oxley Park Place Plan 2017. A report on the progress of the Oxley Park Place Plan will also be presented to Council tonight. The proposed controls seek to improve the amenity of future multi dwelling housing by applying to new development.

New controls proposed for boarding house developments include:

·    Local character;

·    Built form, scale and appearance;

·    Communal spaces;

·    Boarder amenity, safety and privacy;

·    Visual and acoustic impacts;

·    Traffic; and

·    The requirement for a Plan of Management.

 

It is proposed that these new controls be located in chapter “D5 Other Land Uses” of Penrith DCP 2014. The submissions will be tabled on the night.

 

Controls for boarding houses were developed as a result of recent increases in boarding house development within Penrith which have caused social, public health, amenity and local character integration issues. The proposed controls are intended to resolve these issues and respond to community concerns.

 

The draft amendments were publicly exhibited from Monday 20 August 2018 to Monday 17 September 2018. Six submissions were received in response to the proposed multi dwelling housing controls and no submissions were received on the proposed boarding house controls.

The key issues raised in the submissions include:

-     Concerns that stacked parking will result in poorer outcomes

-     Support for basement car parking provisions

-     Concerns that increased lot frontage widths will impact the financial viability of developments, negatively impact on property values, and result in reduced amenity

-     A request to review other controls relating to multi dwelling housing including landscaping, solar access, setbacks, waste and parking rates

-     Administrative matters regarding the public exhibition

 

No changes to the publicly exhibited amendments have been proposed in response to the submissions received. It is recommended that Council adopt the draft amendments to Penrith DCP 2014 as exhibited.

 

Background

Proposed amendments to controls for multi dwelling housing

Since 2017, Council has been working closely with the Oxley Park community as part of Neighbourhood Renewal initiatives. Through this work, the community raised issues regarding the reduction of available on-street car parking, as a result of increased multi dwelling housing development.

 

In September 2017, Council adopted the Oxley Park Place Plan, which includes actions to deliver key improvements in the neighbourhood. The plan contains one short term and one long term action relating to the current planning framework. The short term action resolved to prepare an amendment to DCP 2014 to introduce wider lot frontages and limit stacked parking in Oxley Park. The second action was to review residential development through the Local Housing Strategy and update Multi Dwelling Housing controls to enable more satisfactory development outcomes long term.

 

Although these controls were reviewed in the context of Oxley Park, it was considered appropriate to apply the amended controls more broadly across Penrith to deliver better amenity outcomes for multi dwelling housing developments across the city. This was also consistent with feedback received from the community on development applications.

 

Council officers also consulted with local developers who had experience with multi dwelling housing. A developer forum was held to seek industry feedback before the public exhibition. Feedback provided in the forum helped to inform the proposed amendments.

 

The amended controls form part of chapter “D2 Residential Development” of Penrith DCP 2014.  In summary the proposed amendments include:

·    Increased lot frontage requirement from 15 metres to 22 metres;

·    Allowing the provision of stacked car parking arrangements; and

·    Incentives for the provision of basement car parking.

 

The intention of the proposed amendments to the Multi Dwelling Housing chapter in DCP 2014 is to:

·    Improve amenity by increasing lot frontage requirements;

·    Ensure stacked spaces are used for car parking to reduce on-street parking;

·    Allow improved amenity and development outcomes; and

·    Ensure future development does not contribute to the existing lack of available on-street car parking or declining residential amenity.



Proposed insertion of controls for boarding houses

There has been increasing interest in boarding house developments due to provisions introduced by the NSW Government in 2009 for boarding houses under State Environmental Planning Policy (SEPP) (Affordable Rental Housing) 2009. The SEPP provides provisions under which Council is not able to refuse consent for boarding house development applications, provided the applicant meets these provisions. These provisions include building heights, landscaped areas, solar access, private open space, parking and accommodation size.

 

The new controls proposed for boarding house development include:

·    Local character;

·    Built form, scale and appearance;

·    Tenant amenity, safety and privacy;

·    Visual and acoustic amenity;

·    Location; and

·    Requirements for a Plan of Management.

 

The new controls proposed to be inserted into chapter “D5 Other Land Uses” for boarding houses are intended to supplement the SEPP controls, respond to potential impacts and provide guidance on addressing local character. The proposed controls cannot override the SEPP, as the SEPP prevails. 

At the Policy Review Committee meeting on 9 July 2018, Council resolved to prepare and publicly exhibit amendments to Penrith DCP 2014 relating to multi dwelling housing and boarding houses.

 

Public Exhibition and Submissions

In accordance with the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 and Environmental Planning and Assessment Regulation 2000, public exhibition of the draft amendments was carried out from Monday 20 August 2018 to Monday 17 September 2018. Six submissions regarding the proposed multi dwelling housing amendments were received in response to the public exhibition. These submissions will be tabled on the night. No submissions were received for the proposed controls relating to boarding houses.

 

Submissions were received from affected residents and local property developers. The submissions raised the following issues:

 

Parking

 

Issue

Response

Two submissions supported the inclusion of basement car parking to accommodate on-site car parking.

 

One submission questioned why basement car parking wasn’t permissible for all lots.

The amended control to specify Council’s approach to assessing basement car parking is intended to act as an incentive for developers to amalgamate lots.

 

Lots under 22 metres in width are considered not to have the necessary width to accommodate basement car parking, in addition to other demands on lot frontage including stormwater, utilities and waste facilities.

 

The wording of the amendment in the DCP is “Basement carparking may be permitted on development lots with a minimum lot frontage of 22m”. Exceptions to this may be considered if it is proven that the lot can accommodate basement car parking without compromising on other required features.

Stacked car parking cannot be accommodated on 15 metre frontage width sites.

 

Stacked parking should not be permissible.

The controls provide the option of side-by-side parking as an alternative where stacked parking is not appropriate.

 

Stacked parking provides flexibility for developers and residents in the provision and use of car parking spaces.

Garages would be used for storage and living space instead of car parking if a space was stacked in front of them

The current controls allow stacked parking in front of garages.

 

It is not within Council’s abilities to enforce the use of the space.

 

Amending DCP 2014 to prevent all stacked car parking was also considered. During the developer forum, developers confirmed that stacked car parking in front of garages provides flexibility in the provision and use of car parking spaces. 

Amending the stacked car parking controls will mean that garages will need to be located closer to the property boundary. One submission requested a control amendment for zero side setbacks for garages.

DCP 2014 Section 2.4.6 includes the following “8) Zero setbacks from the side boundary are not permissible except for single garages or carports with an open appearance according to - Garage design, not taller than 2.1 m at the boundary.” This control has not been amended.

 

The proposed minimum 22 metre lot width requirement also allows more flexibility for developers to locate garages in the available space.

Residents will park on the street regardless of car parking arrangements for new development

The proposed amendment seeks to encourage alternative parking arrangements to reduce the need for on street parking.

 

 

 

 

 

Minimum Lot Frontage Width

Issue

Response

The purchase of a second property may be required to achieve a 22 metre lot frontage.

 

This may affect the financial feasibility of development.

Any additional amount paid by a developer to acquire a second adjoining property is anticipated to be accommodated by profits received from the increased yield facilitated by the larger site.

 

A report carried out by SGS Economics and Planning on the financial viability of the proposed controls includes a test on the financial impacts of lot amalgamation. The report concludes that due to increased development yield, amalgamation of properties will be financially feasible for developers. This report is provided in Attachment 1.

 

In addition, the proposed amendments also include considerations for sites where it is not possible for developers to purchase neighbouring properties.

The proposed amendments will have the effect of reducing property values

The proposed amendments do not remove the potential for the development of dwellings on the lot, they are intended to reshape how development is delivered.

 

The assessment of property values is the responsibility of the NSW Government’s Valuer General.

The proposed amendments will have the effect of reducing housing diversity and preventing development of “boutique” housing options.

The controls allow for flexibility for development of narrow isolated lots and lots where developers are not able to purchase a second property. This feature of the amendments, combined with the existing housing stock will ensure the supply of diverse housing options in Penrith.

 

The Local Housing Strategy will also assess the diversity of housing stock and determine the demand for different housing. The strategy will make recommendations to ensure appropriate development is supplied.

Increased density is becoming “overdevelopment”.

Multi dwelling housing is permissible in R3 Medium Density and R4 High Density zones under Penrith Local Environmental Plan (LEP) 2010. These zones were assigned to particular areas due to the ability of the area to accommodate the density created by these development types. The development yield of individual properties is consistent with the existing zoning.

 

Further responses to manage the impacts of increasing population density include ensuring that Penrith’s local controls, including LEP 2010 and DCP 2014, support the provision of better residential amenity.

Larger lots mean increased internal demand on driveways and parking arrangements and larger lots would result in a decrease of amenity for residents and the community.

Penrith DCP 2014 sets out parking rates and access requirements based on driveway length and development density to ensure that increased density requires increased provision of passing bays and similar structures within the development to accommodate increased usage.

 

On 15 metre wide lots it is not possible to provide these facilities, despite a need for them, as the site is not wide enough.

 

Increasing lot width allows for improved adaptability of sites to accommodate resident needs with respect to parking, vehicle manoeuvring, privacy and private open space.

 

It is intended that the proposed controls will improve amenity for residents on developments that comply with Penrith DCP 2014.

Lot amalgamation and increased yield will attract larger development organisations who will decrease residential amenity.

Penrith DCP 2014 applies to all developments, irrespective of the size of the development organisation.

 

 

Further amendments to other existing controls

Issue

Response

Three submissions requested amendments to other controls for Multi Dwelling Housing which do not form part of these amendments. These include requirements for:

·    40% landscaped area;

·    Solar access, particularly with respect to private open space;

·    Side and Front setbacks;

·    waste storage areas; and

·    the amount of parking per dwelling.

Council is currently preparing a Local Housing Strategy to inform future decisions regarding residential development across Penrith. A broader and comprehensive review of the residential chapter of Penrith DCP 2014 will be undertaken in response to the outcomes of the Local Housing Strategy.

 

The controls subject to this amendment are considered to be more urgent in response to community concerns.

 

 

Administration matters

Issue

Response

Revising the planning controls is a “band aid solution”, given that issues caused by on street parking and lack of amenity are already prevalent and much of the available developable land has already been developed.

In May 2018, it was identified that approximately 40% of Oxley Park remains developable, which is where significant impacts have occurred as a result of increased density. The amendments are intended to provide an interim solution for the remaining 40% of developable land in Oxley Park while more comprehensive changes to the DCP are considered in response to the outcomes of the Local Housing Strategy.

 

The proposed amendments are intended to prevent problems from compounding as a result of future development and also to prevent issues from affecting other medium and high density zones in Penrith.

Notification provided to affected property owners of the proposed amendments.

Notification of the public exhibition of proposed amendments was advertised in the Western Weekender on 16 August 2018 and 9 September 2018 as per the Environmental Planning and Assessment Regulation 2000.

 

Information has also been available on Council’s website and Your Say pages from 16 August 2018.

 

Residents in Oxley Park received an update on the progress of the Oxley Park Place Plan via a community newsletter sent out in September 2018. The newsletter included information on the public exhibition of the proposed amendments.

A savings provision should be inserted to ensure that the proposed amendments only apply to development applications submitted after the date the DCP comes into effect, and not to development applications submitted prior to these amendments.

The proposed amendments will apply only to development applications lodged after Penrith DCP 2014 amendments have come into effect, as per the Environmental Planning and Assessment Regulation 2000.

 

As such, a savings provision is unnecessary.

 

No further changes to the Penrith DCP 2014 are recommended as a result of the public exhibition and submissions received, however issues raised relating to other multi dwelling housing controls will be considered as part of a more comprehensive review of Penrith DCP 2014 in the future following the outcomes from the Local Housing Strategy.

 

Conclusion

It is recommended that Council endorse the proposed amendments, as exhibited, and as provided in Attachment 2.

 

Should Council resolve to adopt the amendments, an advertisement will be placed in the local newspaper no more than 28 days after the resolution. The proposed amendments will become effective on the date that the advertisement is published.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Penrith DCP 2014 amendments - Public Exhibition Submissions be received.

2.    Council adopt the amendments to Penrith Development Control Plan 2014, as exhibited.

3.    The General Manager be delegated authority to make any necessary minor changes required to the Development Control Plan 2014 in accordance with Council’s adopted policy position before notification in the newspaper

4.    In accordance with the Environmental Planning and Assessment Regulation 2000, Council give public notice of its decision in a local newspaper within 28 days, with the Development Control Plan coming into effect immediately upon notification in the newspaper.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

Penrith Housing Market Review - Feasibility Testing

18 Pages

Attachments Included

2.

Draft Amendments - Penrith DCP 2014

28 Pages

Attachments Included

   


 

 

Outcome 3 - We can get around the City

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


Outcome 4 - We have safe, vibrant places

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

3        Kingswood Place Plan 2018-22                                                                                       21

 

4        Oxley Park Place Plan Progress Report                                                                          26

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                            12 November 2018

 

 

 

3

Kingswood Place Plan 2018-22   

 

Compiled by:               Lila Kennelly, Community Engagement Officer

Authorised by:            Jeni Pollard, Place Manager  

 

Outcome

We have safe, vibrant places

Strategy

Work with our communities to improve wellbeing and infrastructure in their neighbourhoods

Service Activity

Work with local communities to identify priority issues in their area

      

 

Executive Summary

This report provides Council with an overview of the Neighbourhood Renewal Program’s work in Kingswood. The report provides an outline of the Kingswood Place Plan (2018-22) and the extensive community engagement process that led to its development.

 

Over the last 12 months, the Neighbourhood Renewal Program delivered a project called Capture Kingswood and invited people in Kingswood to share their priorities and aspirations for the neighbourhood. The project reached over 2,000 people living, working and studying in Kingswood and their feedback was used to develop the Kingswood Place Plan (2018-22), which seeks to coordinate Council’s response to local priorities.

 

The priorities identified by people in Kingswood include community safety, opportunities for community connection, getting around easily and safely, having a say, and taking pride in public spaces. This report recommends that Council receive the information and endorse the delivery of the Kingswood Place Plan (2018-22).

Background

Council’s Neighbourhood Renewal Program supports positive change in the City’s most disadvantaged communities by working with local residents to enhance the wellbeing of their neighbourhoods as healthy, safe and vibrant places. The program provides an integrated model of community engagement, and community cultural development that identifies local priorities and delivers low cost, high impact collaborative projects and infrastructure across the City’s 12 most disadvantaged neighbourhoods.

 

Sitting within the Place Management Department, Neighbourhood Renewal responds to Council’s long-standing commitment to resourcing older established neighbourhoods and providing opportunities for resident participation.

 

In 2015, Council endorsed the pilot of a new Neighbourhood Renewal approach in Colyton, North St Marys and Kingswood. The pilot seeks to generate outcomes for vulnerable communities by working with residents and services over a 3-year period in each place to increase local capacity for driving positive change. Team Colyton was initially established as part of the pilot in 2015-16, followed by #NorthStMarysMatters in 2016-17, and Kingswood in 2017-18.

A further report will be provided to Council with a review of the program, including the current pilot areas of Colyton, North St Marys and Kingswood and will recommend the next sites for Neighbourhood Renewal Program activity.

 

Kingswood is currently experiencing rapid change and development, with a growing, culturally and socio-economically diverse population. The neighbourhood includes places of concentrated disadvantage, alongside older more established areas, new development sites and a traders precinct. It is a priority neighbourhood for Council’s Place Management department, with the Neighbourhood Renewal, Community Safety, and City Renewal teams currently providing a special focus on the area.  

Capture Kingswood – Community Engagement Process

Across 2017-18, Neighbourhood Renewal delivered Capture Kingswood, a creative community engagement program aimed at building relationships and identifying local priorities and aspirations for Kingswood. A report containing a detailed overview of the community engagement process and the priorities identified by local people is included as an attachment (Attachment 1).

 

Over a period of 6 months, Neighbourhood Renewal held an extensive series of pop-up engagement opportunities and community events to meet people living, working and studying in Kingswood to identify their priorities for the area. An online engagement campaign on the Your Say Penrith platform and via social media also complimented the face to face engagement events.

A local family attend a community event in Wainwright Park as part of Capture Kingswood.

The Neighbourhood Renewal team engaged with a diverse range of residents, reaching over 2,000 people with the Capture Kingswood events and online campaign. People living, working, and studying in Kingswood were invited to capture their experiences of the neighbourhood. This included young people, families, students, staff working at the hospital, older people and those from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds, all who shared their experiences and identified local strengths and priorities for change.

 

 

Overall, the comments shared by local people highlighted the following themes:

·    Community Safety
Around 23% of comments specifically referred to feeling unsafe, the majority of these comments were made by women. 

·    Community Connection
Close to 30% of comments related to the importance of feeling connected in the local community.

·    Public Space and Amenity
Close to 50% of all comments were about the importance of public space, local amenity, and ease of access in the area.

Comments were clustered spatially, highlighting priority places within the neighbourhood. The highest number of comments registered were located in the areas around Bringelly Rd, Santley Cres, the Nepean Hospital precinct, and Chapman Gardens.

While people in Kingswood shared some concerns for the area, the majority of people shared a positive experience of their neighbourhood. Kingswood’s public spaces, growing multicultural community, the local shops, institutions, and train station were highly valued as local strengths.

Kingswood Place Plan – Overview

The Kingswood Place Plan (2018-22) was developed in response to the priorities and strengths shared by people through Capture Kingswood and is included as an attachment to this report (Attachment 2). The purpose of the Place Plan is to coordinate Council’s response to local priorities. It provides a framework for a range of Council departments to collaborate and coordinate actions that reflect the community’s vision for Kingswood.

 

The objective for the Kingswood Place Plan (2018-22) is to serve as a mechanism for driving impact in a changing area, promoting positive narratives, contributing to a greater sense of liveability, and responding to the things that matter to people living, working and studying in Kingswood.

 

 

Kingswood Place Plan - Community Vision Statement

 

 

The community vision statement above highlights key areas for action by a cross functional team of Council. Ongoing meetings will be held to share information and updates related to the Kingswood Place Plan (2018-22) and foster ongoing opportunities for collaboration and communication between Council departments.

A series of short term (1-2 years), and medium – longer term (3-4 years) actions are included in the Place Plan, recognising the importance of a sustained, long term focus to drive positive outcomes. For example, it is recognised that a range of actions will contribute to residents feeling safer and more connected in Kingswood. It is also recognised that shifting the narrative within the community is complex and will require time and a range of complementary responses from Council and other stakeholders including residents and businesses.

 

Neighbourhood Renewal staff have liaised internally across Council and with relevant external stakeholders during the development of the Kingswood Place Plan 2018-22. The key community priorities identified through Capture Kingswood were discussed with stakeholders, such as The Quarter. Place Management presented to representatives of The Quarter about Capture Kingswood’s findings in September 2018 and continue to liaise with Economic Initiatives regarding The Quarter Action Plan. Neighbourhood Renewal will continue to meet with stakeholders to progress the Place Plan’s delivery and encourage ongoing opportunities for communication and collaboration between Council and others.

 

Several actions within the Kingswood Place Plan 2018-22, including the delivery of Community Action Training and The Village Café, offer further opportunities for community engagement and collaboration with residents. These actions will ensure Place Plan continues to respond to the needs of the changing community and provide opportunities for resident participation. 

 

Council Officers utilise creative engagement methods with residents at a Capture Kingswood event in June 2018 aimed at promoting positive perceptions of safety in the evening.

 

Neighbourhood Renewal have started to address local concerns about safety and community connection. A twilight event was held in June 2018 with a focus on promoting positive perceptions of safety in the community. To date, four sessions of the Village Café have been held to further understand how residents stay well and provide opportunities for residents to connect. Feedback regarding these opportunities have been overwhelmingly positive. Many residents have reported making new connections and feeling more included in their community.

 

Neighbourhood Renewal will also focus on building the community leadership capacity of Kingswood residents through the delivery of Community Action Training. The purpose of this 6-week course is to empower residents to run their own community events and projects, similar to Team Colyton and #NorthStMarysMatters. The training will equip residents with the skills they need to advocate for their community and create the change they want to see.

 

The impact of the Kingswood Place Plan (2018-22) will be assessed against the baseline data gathered through Capture Kingswood as well as through ongoing review and feedback with residents.

 

Place Management will continue to bring Council departments together to oversee the progress of the actions within the Place Plan and liaise with residents to track how the initiative supports positive outcomes for the community. Council will be provided with updates on the progress of the Place Plan within the Neighbourhood Renewal reporting framework.

 

Conclusion

This report has provided Council with an overview of the Kingswood Place Plan (2018-22), developed in response to the community priorities and vision shared by people in Kingswood. The report summarises the feedback shared by a range of people living, working and studying in Kingswood through Neighbourhood Renewal’s Capture Kingswood engagement project.

 

The Kingswood Place Plan (2018-22) will bring together a cross functional team of Council with the aim of coordinating actions in response to local priorities.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Kingswood Place Plan 2018-22 be received.

2.    Council endorse the delivery of the Kingswood Place Plan 2018-22.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

Capture Kingswood Engagement Report

9 Pages

Attachments Included

2.

Kingswood Place Plan 2017-18

10 Pages

Attachments Included

  


Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                            12 November 2018

 

 

 

4

Oxley Park Place Plan Progress Report   

 

Compiled by:               Rubie Ireson, Community Engagement Officer

Lila Kennelly, Community Engagement Officer

Authorised by:            Jeni Pollard, Place Manager  

 

Outcome

We have safe, vibrant places

Strategy

Work with our communities to improve wellbeing and infrastructure in their neighbourhoods

Service Activity

Deliver projects that address local issues and improve the wellbeing of local communities

 

Previous Items:           4- Oxley Park Place Plan Progress- Policy Review Committee- 14 May 2018 7:00PM    

 

Executive Summary

This report provides Council with an update on the Oxley Park Place Plan and the related actions undertaken to date. The Oxley Park Place Plan was endorsed by Council at the Policy Review Committee Meeting on 11 September 2017 and a progress report was provided to Council on the 14 of May 2018. 

 

The Oxley Park Place Plan was developed in response to issues raised by residents and brings together a cross functional team of Council staff and relevant managers to deliver key improvements in the neighbourhood. This report provides Council with an overview of the key achievements delivered through the Oxley Park Place Plan since May 2018, and the highlights of the process to date.

 

The report recommends that Council receive the information contained and continue to receive updates of the Oxley Park Place Plan through the periodic Neighbourhood Renewal Program reporting, and that a final report is presented to Council at the conclusion of the Plan in the second half of 2020. 

Background

In 1998, Council zoned Oxley Park as “2(c) Residential (Low-Medium Density)” under LEP 1998 (Urban Lands). This zone was applied in the context of the NSW  State Government’s planned railway station for Oxley Park, which subsequently did not progress. This zone allowed villa style development / multi-unit housing with a single storey appearance.

 

In 2015, this zone was translated to R3 Medium Density zone (template zone) in Amendment 4 to Penrith LEP 2010. The R3 Medium density zone permitted town houses in addition to the then permissible villa development.

 

In recent years, there has been a significant acceleration of development in Oxley Park, changing the streetscape from one of detached dwellings with larger front yards and back yards to many more villas and town houses with a greater reliance on on-street parking. This change has caused significant concern for some residents, particularly those who have seen and felt the impact over a number of years.

 

In early 2017, the Place Management Department undertook a series of community engagement activities in Oxley Park in response to a growing number of concerns from residents. This included a resident led tour of the area to identify local priorities.

 

 

 

Council staff from Place Management, Engineering Services, Environmental Health and Compliance, and Waste Services at a community engagement event at Ridge Park in May 2018.

The Oxley Park Place Plan was developed in response to the issues raised by local residents during the community engagement process and provides a coordinated action plan, bringing together a number of key Council departments to form a cross functional response team. The Place Plan was endorsed by Council in September 2017. This report details the progress of the Oxley Park Place Plan delivery to date, with a focus on the activities that have taken place between May and November of 2018.

Oxley Park Place Plan - Key Priorities

The Oxley Park Place Plan was developed to include short term (June 2018) and longer term (June 2020) actions that respond to the key priorities identified by residents. These priorities informed the following vision statements outlined in the Plan:

 

·    We can get around easily and safely

·    Our children have great places to play and make lasting memories

·    Our local shops reflect the pride we have in our neighbourhood

·    We know how to advocate for what we need

·    Our Council is planning for our future

 

There has been significant progress since the report was endorsed by Council in September 2017. The actions in the Plan focus on responding directly to compliance issues, illegal dumping, road safety and parking concerns and the need to improve public amenity and increase community leadership capacity and connection.

 

A detailed overview of the Place Plan actions undertaken to date is included as an attachment to this report (Appendix 1).

 

Major achievements to date

The cross-functional team led by Place Management have noted the following major achievements between May and November 2018 in Oxley Park:

 

·    Waste Rangers continue to conduct daily inspections in Oxley Park, completing illegal dumping blitzes and enforcement measures.

·    Council’s Waste Services team have visited 126 properties to date in Oxley Park to provide education about waste services and kerb-side clean ups.

·    Two additional parking spaces are now available at Sydney Street shops and a further two spaces will be available after safety improvements are made to the Brisbane Street pedestrian crossing. 

·    Engineering Services conducted a general review of the line marking across Oxley Park in September 2018. Markings across the suburb have now been refreshed.

·    Two new bus shelters have been installed on Brisbane Street in response to requests from the community    

·    In response to equipment theft at Brisbane Street playground, the Neighbourhood Renewal Team distributed letters to residents encouraging the community to report any issues in their area and held a pop-up engagement afternoon at the park, where they spoke with approximately 40 local residents about the issue. 

·    In May 2018, Council’s Neighbourhood Renewal Team delivered a Community Leadership Training Course over 4 weeks with 13 residents. Course participants delivered their own Neighbourhood BBQ in June 2018, with 150 local people attending.

·    An upgrade of Sydney Street shops was completed in July 2018 through Council’s Local Charm project.

·    A community arts project was completed in June 2018 through Council’s Magnetic Places, resulting in a mural at Cec Blinkhorn Oval.

·    The Place Management team worked with key staff from Waste Services, Environmental Health and Compliance and Engineering Services to deliver 5 pop up engagement events throughout May 2018, to provide residents with the opportunity to meet their neighbours and speak to Council staff about their neighbourhood.

·    Neighbourhood Renewal facilitated a ‘Grant Information Night’ in August 2018 at Ridge Park Hall for 15 residents interested in running their own community projects.

·    Draft Development Control Plan 2014 amendments for Multi Dwelling Housing have been publicly exhibited with a report on the submissions will be presented at tonight’s meeting.

 

Overall, feedback from local residents has been very positive. Many residents have reported observing noticeable differences in their neighbourhood and have expressed gratitude for the changes they have seen.

“It is so clear to me how much Penrith Council genuinely cares about hearing from the community and involving them in decisions. It’s very impressive really”.

-     Resident in his 30s with children at the local school.

 

 

While significant improvements have taken place in Oxley Park, a small number of residents continue to raise concerns about their experience of the changes in their neighbourhood.  Staff in the Neighbourhood Renewal Program continue to respond to concerns where possible and build trust and connection between Council and the residents.

 

 

Oxley Park residents participating in Community Action Training, facilitated by Neighbourhood Renewal from May-June 2018.

 

Next Steps

The Oxley Park Place Plan has resulted in stronger connections with the local community and increased community leadership capacity. Participants in Neighbourhood Renewal’s Community Leadership Training have expressed interest in having ongoing involvement with Neighbourhood Renewal through community events and projects. Local residents have started planning a community event that raises awareness about domestic violence that will be delivered at the end of November 2018. They will also be involved in the delivery of Place Management’s Good Neighbour campaign that will be launched in March 2019.

 

Place Management will maintain ongoing communication with Council’s cross-functional team to monitor and respond to ongoing issues as they arise in Oxley Park. It is proposed that Council continue to receive updates on the Oxley Park Place Plan through the periodic Neighbourhood Renewal Program reporting and that a final report is presented to Council at the end of the plan in the second half of 2020.

 

Conclusion

This report has provided Council with an update on the Oxley Park Place Plan. It summarises the actions undertaken between May and November 2018 and the overall achievements of the Oxley Park Place Plan in responding to resident concerns regarding growth and change in the neighbourhood. A cross-functional team within Council have undertaken a range of short term and longer-term actions to respond to resident requests. The Oxley Park Place Plan (Appendix 1) provides a detailed summary of the current status of all the action undertaken thus far.

 

To date, all actions within the Oxley Park Place Plan have either been completed or are currently underway, many ahead of schedule. Feedback from local residents indicates that the community are noticing change in their area and are very grateful for the practical steps Council has taken to respond to community priorities and ideas. Place Management will continue to work across Council to support the ongoing actions of the cross-functional teams.

 

 

Local residents facilitating a Neighbourhood BBQ in June 2018 for their local community

 

The report recommends that Council receive the information contained and continue to receive updates on the Oxley Park Place Plan through the periodic Neighbourhood Renewal Program reporting and that a final report is presented to Council at the conclusion of the Plan in the second half of 2020. 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Oxley Park Place Plan Progress Report be received.

2.    Council continue to receive updates on the Oxley Park Place Plan through the periodic Neighbourhood Renewal Program reporting and that a final report is presented to Council at the conclusion of the Plan in the second half of 2020.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

Oxley Park Place Plan November 2018

7 Pages

Attachments Included

   


Outcome 5 - We care about our environment

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

5        Cumberland Zone Rural Fire District - Status of Current and Future Operations           33

 

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                            12 November 2018

 

 

 

5

Cumberland Zone Rural Fire District - Status of Current and Future Operations   

 

Compiled by:               Laurie Cafarella, Security and Emergency Management Co-ordinator

Authorised by:            Hans Meijer, City Assets Manager  

 

Outcome

We care for our environment

Strategy

Minimise risks to our community from natural disasters and a changing climate

Service Activity

Help protect our community by supporting emergency services to prepare for and respond to emergencies

 

Presenters:                  Superintendent Simon Davis, District Manager - Cumberland Zone Rural Fire District -         

 

Executive Summary

This report provides NSW RFS Superintendent Simon Davis, District Manager of the Cumberland Zone Rural Fire District, an opportunity to present Councillors with an overview of current operations within the zone, and the capability and capacity of the NSW Rural Fire Service and its volunteer fire fighters, within the Penrith Local Government Area.

Background

Under the provisions of Section 12A of the Rural Fires Act 1997, the Councils of the Cumberland Zone Fire Fighting District, which include Blacktown, Fairfield and Penrith City Councils, entered into an agreement with the NSW Rural Fire Service (RFS). This agreement details the level of service that will be provided by each party for the proper management of RFS operations within the district.

 

On 24 December 2017, during the extreme heatwave and wind conditions that prevailed at the time, a significant bushfire event occurred at Mayfair Road, Mulgoa. The bushfire spread rapidly and burned over several days, potentially endangering the village of Mulgoa.

 

The swift response by the NSW RFS, which included the deployment of a significant number of volunteer fire fighters and aircraft, combined with support from other emergency agencies and Council, enabled this fire and its impacts to be contained to bushland within the locality.

 

Since then there has been a major upgrade to the Incident Control Centre and Emergency Operations Centre and several new initiatives have been developed by the NSW RFS to enhance current operations and provide a more proactive strategy in the lead up to, and during, the fire season.

 

Consequently, Superintendent Simon Davis has sought the opportunity to provide a briefing to Councillors on this recent fire, and provide an overview of the services provided by the NSW RFS within the zone and the Penrith Local Government Area, working in partnership with Local Government serving the community.

 

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the information contained in the report on Cumberland Zone Rural Fire District - Status of Current and Future Operations be received.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.  


 

 

Outcome 6 - We are healthy and share strong community spirit

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


Outcome 7 - We have confidence in our Council

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

6        Penrith Performing and Visual Arts Ltd - 2017-2018 Annual Report                              39

 

7        Risk Management Policy and ARIC Annual Report                                                        49

 

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                            12 November 2018

 

 

 

6

Penrith Performing and Visual Arts Ltd - 2017-2018 Annual Report   

 

Compiled by:               Erich Weller, Community and Cultural Development Manager

Authorised by:            Vicki O’Kelly, Executive Manager - Community and Chief Operating Officer  

 

Outcome

We have confidence in our Council

Strategy

Be open and fair in our decisions and our dealings with people

Service Activity

Promote ethical behaviour and open and fair decision making

 

Presenters:                  Ms Hania Radvan - Chief Executive Officer - Penrith Performing and Visual Arts Ltd

                                      The Hon Peter Anderson AM - Chairman - Penrith Performing and Visual Arts Ltd      

 

Executive Summary

The report details the performance of the Penrith Performing and Visual Arts Ltd (PP&VA) for the financial year 1 July 2017 to 30 June 2018.

 

Ms Hania Radvan, CEO and the Hon Peter Anderson AM, Chairman of the PP&VA Ltd, will give a presentation on a number of the highlights from the 2017/18 year.

 

The report recommends that the information in the report be received and that Council agree to underwrite the operations of the Penrith Performing and Visual Arts Ltd until the presentation of the 2018/19 Annual Report.

Background

Penrith Performing & Visual Arts (PP&VA) established in 2006, brought together Penrith’s leading cultural organisations, individually operating since the seventies, eighties and nineties. Operating across two sites, spanning the Nepean River, PP&VA brings together the development, production and presentation of performing and visual arts all underscored by education and access programs, including the Penrith Conservatorium of Music and Q Theatre programs as well as operation of the Council-owned physical assets including management of the Penrith Regional Gallery and The Lewers Bequest art collection.

In 2017-18, the PP&VA delivered in accordance with the Strategic Plan developed to guide operations for the period 2016-2018 and which also is the foundation of a multi-year funding agreement with Create NSW (previously Arts NSW) for the same period. Key Strategic Directions and Goals under this plan were reported at adoption by the Board and remain unchanged. A summarised version of the Strategic Plan is available at: http://thejoan.com.au/about-us/penrith-performing-visual-arts-ltd/ppva-strategic-plan/ for reference. Going forward the PP&VA has been advised by Create NSW that funding will continue (be rolled over) for an additional year – 2019. It is likely (but as yet not confirmed) that a further year of funding will be ‘rolled over’ (2020). This would repeat the previous cycle (2011- 2015), with two additional years tacked onto the end of a triennial, and development of an interim plan to bridge the gap. The Company will look to develop a 3 to 5 year Strategic Plan in early 2019 for the period 2020-2024.

 

As reported mid-year we experienced some key changes in leadership at the end of 2017 resulting in minor adjustments to staffing structure, which were approved by the Board at its December meeting in order to position us for further growth.  The changes enabled us to create smaller focussed teams for the Conservatorium, New Work (including Q Theatre programs) and Programming as well as enable higher duties management opportunities for emerging leaders. Details were provided at our mid-year update report to Council.

 

Increasingly wanting to focus on our core programs and extend these beyond our physical sites, we undertook preliminary work to refresh our public messaging and update our ‘brand’ graphic designs as a contemporary, familial suite. This work will come to fruition in 2019 as we roll out a suite of new web sites – thejoan.com.au; qtheatre.com.au; penrithconservatorium.com.au and penrithregionalgallery.com.au – all connecting with ppandva.com.au. The Company regularly invests in professional web infrastructure as technology continues to evolve at a rapid pace – and internet capability is critical in particular for ticket sales. This however will be the first time that the same ‘back end’ infrastructure will be used across all our programs and sites, with a clear and consistent internal logic and consistent tone, design and navigation across our entire organisation. This way we hope to capitalise on patron loyalty and maximise potential to cross fertilize across our programs. It will also be the first time that the Q Theatre and Conservatorium will have dedicated sites which will better position us to tell a deeper story of programs and artistic development.

 

The company continues to focus on increasing the depth, quality, diversity and reach of experiences offered rather than merely maintain or increase numbers. PP&VA relies on key cultural, corporate and community partnerships to achieve its ambitions and goals. We continue to work with the Australian Chamber Orchestra, Penrith Symphony, Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences, Western Sydney University, State Archives and many others as partners in specific program delivery. Celestino and Southlands continue to be important corporate partners.  Partnerships will continue to be critical into the future and are an ongoing focus across all areas with investment in a strategic consultant during this period to assist us to review our programs and materials as well as research opportunities and write grant applications, and the introduction of an ongoing part time Relationships Manager to undertake work in this area and work alongside our part time PR assistant.

 

Having identified key infrastructure challenges in 2017, the period has also seen a long list of works furthered or completed. We thank Council for the partnership and support to make this work possible. In addition, the commissioning and receipt of an independent consultant’s report into the Penrith Regional Gallery Collection (a key Penrith City Council asset managed by the PP&VA) funded through a small grant from the Community Heritage program, revealed an urgent need to review and improve Collection arrangements.  This work was outside of our previously identified priorities, and as such beyond Council’s budget capacity. PP&VA submitted successful applications to the State Government’s Creative Capital program and the Australian Government’s Stronger Communities program to undertake the most urgent recommendations. Together with a donation of racks from Sydney’s privately owned White Rabbit Gallery and matched funding from the PP&VA (always a funding requirement for such programs) we were lucky enough to undertake the $250,000 project, now nearing completion. Together with the Heating, Ventilation and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) upgrade, the new lighting tracks, the kitchen rebuild currently underway, last year’s paving extension and the soon to be completed car park upgrade (to assist in disability access and set down), the Gallery infrastructure has been much improved. Much of this work is such that it will help us run the facility to a more consistently professional standard, and also improve the visitor experience. The improved climate control across the site, together with the improved storage and racking in the Collection store, will help safeguard this valuable $4M plus Collection as an asset for future generations and ongoing exhibition.

 

“We come to the gallery and cafe often and love it!”

“It's great to have free entry to such interesting artwork”

Public feedback gathered through visitor surveys

At The Joan, as the statistics show, we have seen steady growth, although much of the growth is also looking forward to strong commercial hire bookings for 2019. The Venue Services team have built a more regular meeting hiring base and changes in management practice, as well as the commercial environment, have resulted in a core of regular commercial hirers bringing quality professional performances for Penrith audiences to enjoy.  Our community hiring base remains strong, and with strong competition for dates, many keenly book in for the following year as soon as the current year’s event is settled. Our new venue management system has become a critical tool and we increased our subscription to ensure all staff have improved access, although unfortunately a number of staff have been too busy to undertake the specialised training. This will likely occur in the 2018/19 year. In 2019 it, and the ticketing system, will finally be rolled out to the Gallery site and programs also.

“The best part other than the on stage, the staff at the Joan are very helpful
 and seem happy to be there which is rare these days.”

 “Whenever I attend shows at The Joan I always enjoy the experience.
Staff are always friendly and welcoming and there is always a relaxed atmosphere.”

“When we took our seats in the wonderfully intimate theatre, our busy day was wiped from our minds as we were privileged to experience such amazing talent, fantastic staging, lighting, special effects and scripting! We were totally captivated from the outset of the performance and cannot praise the actors and all behind the scenes highly enough.”

 

Email and survey patron feedback

 

Artistic highlights of the period include:

·    Richard Goodwin’s extraordinary Navigator brought together selected artworks, models and maquettes produced over the past 25 years from this major Australian artist’s series’: Ulysses, Drone Dorje, Mystic Alien, Parasite and Porosity. Whilst in Lewers’ House, and in association with the John F. Kennedy Library Foundation and WS Productions, we presented an exhibition of iconic photographs to celebrate the 100th birthday of John Fitzgerald Kennedy, the 35th president of the United States.  The exhibition featured 77 framed photographs culled from Getty Images, noted photojournalist archives and Kennedy Presidential Library collections of over 36,000 images along with a selection of ephemera. As the first Australian venue we were able to assist the US consulate to frame and prepare this exhibition to be tour ready, a task wholly underwritten by a Consulate grant.

·    The inaugural Southlands Breakthrough Award Open Studio in August 2017offered a celebration of early career artists’ works in development – from Blush Opera, Anisaa Vylet and Victoria Garcia.  As a result Victoria then had a work within Landing Points and will again be involved in The Ideal Home. Southlands agreed to continue the Award for 2018 and together we supported three artists selected from a competitive open call, and again across our core three artforms of music, visual arts and theatre: Krystie Steve, Amala Groom and Monikka Eliah and introduced mentors – Salote Tawale, Paul Mac and Wesley Enoch.

·    Emu Island – Modernism in Place, highlighted the cultural significance of the Gallery’s history and site to Modernism in Australia as a place of lively debate, artistic creation and exhibition. Coming up against the Nepean River, early settlers thought the land on the mountainside was an island inhabited by Emus hence ‘Emu Island’. The place was considered to be land’s end, but as the home of artists Margo and Gerald Lewers it became the place for new beginnings. The legacy of Sydney modernism was highlighted through the work of eight young contemporary artists who continue to grapple with modernist ideals in Young Moderns within the Lewers House Gallery. In Ancher House Ian Milliss, once the youngest member of the legendary 1960s artist venue, Central Street Gallery, which revolutionised abstract art practice in Sydney exhibited Shifting Dirt.  an extraordinary text based exhibition which reached into a workers’ history of place based modernism developed as a result of his 2017 residency through which he was provided access to the Gallery’s modernist art collection and archive.

·    The Originate ensemble continued Q Theatre’s work to support artistic careers with early career artists developing and presenting How To make a Happy Meal in the Mullins studio under the able direction of Nick Atkins. This year we also added a live blog developed by our marketing coordinator, Malvina Tan who attended several workshops and rehearsals to provide commentary on the process.

·    The second year of Night Garden saw over 350 participants attend the event. The galleries and gardens were filled with engaged conversation from students, teachers and families. 4 returning schools: Caroline Chisholm, St Dominic’s College, St Clair High and Nepean Creative and Performing Arts HS; and one new school - Blaxland High participated in the second iteration of this event.  Once again we embedded professional development opportunities into this youth focused event with student hosts, identified by their CREW lanyards who helped with install, supervised their work including talking about their work to audience members. The student crew play a pivotal function helping many first time visitors to feel included and welcome at the Gallery.  In a new initiative - nominated students took over the Gallery’s Instagram page taking photos of the night (monitored by Gallery staff).

“The night was a huge success with many of our students saying that the exhibition had provided them with inspiration, creativity and motivation to expand both artistically and musically. It is a great achievement and honour for all of the involved students to have their artworks displayed at our local Regional Gallery's exhibition and provide a venue to perform. “
Year nine student St Clair H/S

·      Celestino continued their valuable sponsorship of tickets addressing disadvantage enabling almost 450 students across this period (from two years of partnership for 2017 and 2018) an exceptional experience of professional theatre, often their very first such experience. Saltbush, Billionaire Boy and The Arrival were all primary age focussed professional touring shows with strong curriculum linked education outcomes. The outings were made even more memorable for Saltbush through the provision of branded canvas library bags with puzzle rulers and colouring pencils. Feedback continues to be overwhelmingly positive with a high degree of teacher and student enthusiasm and gratitude.

 

·      Following on from a pop up box office at Westfield at the launch of the 2018 season, and in a bid to grow a new kids and families audience in 2018 our talented StudioQ teaching artists have begun occasional school holiday storytelling shifts at Westfield Penrith, supported by Dymocks - and linking in to our next approaching kids performance. Aside from the positive engagement with families the sessions have also seen spikes in ticket sales. Recently we also participated in similar fashion in a Council run children’s event in The Mondo, and were pleased to have the second largest crowds after the petting zoo.

·      Daisy Moon was Born This Way – our Q Theatre produced performance in late 2017 attracted positive reviews. The play was a commission from up and coming Australian playwright Emily Sheehan exploring highly relevant subject matter – likened to puberty blues for the Gaga age it attracted a younger audience (teens) and families and positive reviews.

·      The Joan’s now well established window vinyl treatments have assisted in arresting the spread of pop up banners in the foyer as well as presenting a clear message that we are on and open. With the growth of commercial hirers they have become useful updates to the program, enabling us to ‘sell’ windows and thus ensuring that past shows are updated throughout the year with future events. With the increase in commercial hirers at The Joan, marketing services are in demand. Services provided include bespoke segmented database eDM (electronic Direct Mail), full database eDM, advertising placement, media release writing and distribution, coordination and installation of window vinyl signage, social media campaigns, extended website listings and distribution services. Naturally we charge for all services including a healthy commission.

·      At the Gallery, 2018 saw the further development to stage 2 of the Early Childhood Professional Development Program pioneered with Council’s partnership at childcare centres, with a more sustainable mentorship program ensuring early childhood workers were taught the skills to deliver enhanced visual arts based learning programs themselves. Additionally further accredited teacher development programs were delivered in partnership with WSU.

·      Hanli Sean Botha produced our 2018 opening fine music event, Secrets Through a Soundglass, featuring the extraordinary talents of the Sydney Art Quartet and new experimental fine music commissions as part of a doctoral research project undertaken at WSU. This partnership project enabled us to present new music by a range of accomplished Australian composers and attract a distinctly different audience back to our venue.

·      Morning Melodies continues to grow from strength to strength – with each performance almost at capacity, and keen competition for seats.  This loyal audience returns each month and year after year. Whilst the majority of the audience is local, some groups attending regularly travel great distances to The Joan because our venue (and program) is their preference over others much closer to home.

·      Tactile, curated by Marian Simpson, our Exhibition Manager across Lewers House and the Loungeroom galleries broke norms by encouraging visitors to touch the artworks. The interactivity was appreciated and commented on by many and the accessibility of the work enabled special group visits by those living with disability as well as schoolchildren and many families. 

Key infrastructure wins:

 

·    Council awarded a Federal grant to undertake HVAC upgrade at Penrith Regional Gallery

·    Creative Capital and Stronger Communities Program 3 funding to undertake Collection store upgrade at Penrith Regional Gallery

·    Replacement of lighting tracks at Gallery by Council

·    Installation of electronic winch system in the Q Theatre by Council

·    Further work towards completion of the HVAC project at The Joan by Council subcontractor

·    Installation of an improved wheelchair ramp in Richard Bonynge Concert Hall in partnership with Council and supported by a SCP3 grant

·    Replacement of function chairs in Orchestral and Ensemble rooms as well as Allan Mullins Studio by Company

·    Purchase of new foyer furniture at The Joan to increase patron amenity by Company

·    Replacement of function chairs at The Gallery by Company and SCP3 funding

 

Key infrastructure challenges include:

·   Parking at The Gallery continues to be an issue – especially for functions and events. This is a limitation, along with the Gallery’s location within a residential environment that is something we must be mindful of, but cannot easily resolve.

·   High visitation impact on Gallery gardens and site – being open 7 days a week and 52 weeks a year results in a lack of down times – and in the garden in particular the high traffic can be detrimental. Again we do not seek to reverse the visitation trend – but must seek to develop a management plan that limits damage and offers periodic rest periods across the site over time.

·   Lack of ongoing social amenity to complement the cultural program at The Joan, as well as problematic design (Box Office and bar locations) is a key issue for us to address. Ongoing hospitality at The Joan (café/restaurant) remains a priority to shift usage, visitation and public amenity. We see there is an increasing urgency for us to address these gaps and grow a more regular and consistent casual performance program to increase the liveability and amenity for the rapidly growing residential population in our immediate vicinity.

Key operational actions:

 

1.   Operational, HR and business capacity

·    We have now appointed an Operations Director, Mr Dave Garner (expanding his previous role as Business Manager) to lead all practical day to day delivery across Venue Services, WHS, Finance and HR. supported by a team of excellent managers – technical, finance, administration and venue managers for The Joan and the Gallery, this new structure implemented in the 2018-19 financial year positions us for further growth. In the transition phase the CEO remains embedded across processes as we review delegations and look to implement a new financial system.

·    We have recently invested in a new Point of Sale system at The Joan and will roll out iPad based tills from 2019 in our bars.  Following this we expect to extend the POS to our Gallery shop.

·    A new elevated work Platform at The Joan and a stock picker at The Gallery have increased our safety processes for theatres backstage and Collection and install processes.

·    We are currently exploring a shift in educational booking systems to better support our tuition and workshop business as utilising our ticketing system for this purpose is time consuming and complex. We hope to have a new solution in place during 2019.

·    We have expanded our Marketing and Communications team to include an extra part time Marketing Coordinator and the previously mentioned Relationships Manager. This in part reflects our growing business servicing hirers and the ever growing need for active content and responsive, timely interaction on social media. In addition we are increasingly using specialist agencies to ensure deeper media penetration and public awareness for key creative projects.

 

2.   Outcomes of additional Council funding

·    Curatorial – in 2018, partnered with the Nepean Science Hub and supported by Inspiring Australia and Celestino we employed Christine Ghali, part time Gallery Education Coordinator as a Curator on the additional funds (one day per week) to help develop a program of Arts+Science installations and interactive activities in the Atrium Foyer. Working alongside a Science Producer (funded through Inspiring Australia) Curious? a series of installations proved very popular with visitors stopping to interact with the touch screens, build their own DNA helix or draw a constellation. As an emerging curator the opportunity to work on a significant project enabled Christine to consolidate and extend her skills. Christine sourced new equipment including LED plinths and touch screens to enable the installations deferring the need to install exhibition walls which are still being researched. Additionally it enabled us to learn in a more detailed fashion, the particular challenges of curating work into public spaces designed for a different purpose. However the one day a week focus proved challenging on top of regular education work so we will shortly advertise a part time curatorial position to encompass this work and support the general visual arts program.

·    Education – the restructure of the Conservatorium alongside the move of Studio Q to sit within the new work/Q Theatre program has brought clearer focus and capacity to our teaching artists alongside the significant visual arts program. We have stabilised some arrangements and begun to draw up our own curriculum in order to build an expanded offer as proposed.

·    WHS – At The Joan we have designed and filled new positions and recruited new staff to hours that reflect our public facing hours during term time. At the Gallery we have increased casual staffing whilst redesigning positions that will enable us to shift to overlapping part timers in 2019. Setting up mobile phone accounts and numbers for after hour access has also been introduced, as The Joan in particular with two Conservatorium floors plus three theatres can be difficult for patrons on rehearsal/tuition evenings with one dedicated front of house staff member (and a second staffer in the office).

 

3.   Ticketing and access

For the period 1 July 2017 to 30 June 2018, the company can report the following:

In total, 201 performances ran across 101 seasons attracting 50,315 ticketed attendances and earning $1,554,197 in (GBO).

Analysis of our ticketing database reveals that across all ticketing sales in 2017-18, the top 10 postcodes continue to feature 2750 in the number one spot, with Penrith LGA postcodes continuing to represent the highest proportion of top ten postcode buying patrons (74 %), and seven of the postcodes in the top ten supplemented by lower Blue Mountains postcodes for Blaxland, Glenbrook and Springwood.  Together these attendees, totalling 31,778 show us that 63% of our regular audience is from these local postcodes.

The Joan presents (where we ‘buy’ in the performance and take all or some of the financial risk) attracted a total GBO of $566,366 and ticketed attendance of 20,282 across 106 performances.

This represents a 10% growth in GBO over the previous year and a 21% growth in activity (performance number) with almost 8% growth in attendances.

In addition combined Hirers (community, education and commercial) attracted a total GBO of $987,826 and ticketed attendance of 30,033 across 94 performances.

This included 13 professional touring performances from commercial promoters to a combined audience of 4987 and attracting a GBO of around $341,250. Aside from one small comedy act in the Mullins and pre national tour try-out season in the Q Theatre, these hires were exclusively for major sell-out or close to sell-out premium acts in the Richard Bonynge Concert Hall.  By comparison in the previous financial year only 4 commercial hirers presented 6 performances - but in the first 6 months of 2018 alone we enjoyed 8 performances from 6 commercial promoters.

A very positive trend for audiences and our bottom line which continues into 2019 with over 20 shows booked so far.

Total participation figures for the period (both sites):

 

2017/18

 

 

 

Jul-Sept

Oct-Dec

Jan-Mar

Apr-Jun

TOTAL

Increase over 16/17

Onsite

76612

65721

44922

70525

257780

1.4%

Digital

108379

134390

138733

137610

519112

55%

Total

184991

200111

183655

248587

817,344

39%

Previous year comparison

 

2016/17

 

Jul-Sept

Oct-Dec

Jan-Mar

Apr-Jun

TOTAL

Onsite

102214

80927

30946

40259

254346

Digital

111707

63250

74701

85041

334699

Total

213921

144177

105647

125300

589,045

 

4.   Community

The Joan continued to support community performing arts hirers by offering reduced rate hires to enable access to our venues and professional ticketing services. Subsidies are offered to non-professional performers and pro-am companies as well as teaching institutions. Key community hirers include ongoing regular support to Penrith Symphony Orchestra who both rehearse and perform regularly at The Joan as ‘Orchestra in Residence’ and Penrith Musical Comedy Company. Together these pro-am companies provide a breadth of larger scale musical theatre and orchestral experiences for local audiences which would otherwise not be possible to offer.

 

Annual data will be provided to Council on each financial year to ensure base lines continue to be met. The initial report for 2017-18 showed a total financial subsidy of $300,552.20 leveraging $485,618 in rental income and supporting 12,594 performers to an audience of 62,859.

 

Key events such as the Blue Mountains Nepean Dance Festival and the Band Association of NSW State Championships as well as the annual/biannual school and dance school concert seasons are all supported. Whilst the rental is subsidised full recovery is applied to outlays (staff costs) and as we require full compliance with minimum WHS standards.  We are pleased to have many repeat clients, and several returning clients after absences.

 

Our rates review examined market rates (accessible through participation in a regular research report undertaken by PAC (Performing Arts Centres) Australia of which we are a long term member). As a result we have opted to keep hiring rates static for a further year in 2019, whilst tightening policy and developing more subtlety around community subsidy and adopting small increases to Box Office charges to reflect our rising costs. These will shortly be communicated at the conclusion of the 2018 season to all our ongoing and repeat clients.

 

5.   Strategic Directions

The Company deferred Strategic Planning due to the Create NSW advice on rolled over funding for 2019, but is about to enter into a Strategic Planning Period for operations from 2020 onwards. The period will commence with a focus on audience research and development across both sites and all programs, and we have contracted independent expert consultant Merryn Carter to work with us to lead this. Merryn will follow this detailed work with strategic planning for the Company – offering us the opportunity to ensure that our next plan is firmly focussed on our community impact.

 

Nonetheless as an arts company we will continue to develop artistic opportunity and artist engagements as the means by which we deliver our outcomes. We must remain mindful of our responsibilities to support those who make our work possible. Nationally artist employment conditions and annual earnings have diminished by over 20% in real terms over the period 2007-08 to 2014-15 (ref: Making Art Work: An economic study of professional artists in Australia © David Throsby and Katya Petetskaya, 2017).

 

In order to secure increased funding from Create NSW, or indeed project funds from the Australia Council we must propose increasingly significant creative programs of increased international, national or regional significance. Our partnership with the Blue Mountains Nepean Health District and Penrith Multicultural Agency which will underpin The Long Table in 2019 secured us Strategic Funding in a very competitive environment and will enable us to develop and deliver community engaged professional practice that will in turn activate The Joan’s Atrium Foyer. We hope this work will also underpin ongoing community relationships. Similarly at the Gallery we have commenced a longer term Aboriginal project, The Hat Project, supported by Council’s Carolyn Gartside and Karen Harris, which is representative of our commitment to ongoing engagement and support of our local Aboriginal community as artists.

 

In December 2018 Gallery Director, Dr Lee-Anne Hall will conclude her contract at the Gallery. We are currently in the process of recruiting an Interim Director with strong interest in the Expressions of Interest already apparent and the Board is seeking independent reports as part of a review process before designing and recruiting for a new Director. Given the approaching 40th anniversary and the recent infrastructure work listed elsewhere in this report it is timely to look at programming, capacity, artistic and community priorities before defining the role into the future.  Certainly the Company and context have changed in the last six years since Dr Hall’s appointment.

 

6.   Governance

There were no changes to Board membership this year and the Community Advisory Committee membership has remained as advised last year. Next year will see us enact our new cycle of renewal with half of our Board Community directors (3 members) two year terms concluding.

 

At the October 2018 Annual General Meeting, the current auditors, Berger Piepers were re-appointed as auditors for the Penrith Performing & Visual Arts Ltd for the coming financial year.

 

 

 

2017/18 Financial Result

The financial year end saw us return a surplus of $91,481.  In accordance with previously articulated priorities the Board elected to transfer $88,000 to the Capital Equipment Reserve.

 

It is worth noting that the Company invested $195,134 in the acquisition of plant and equipment this financial year, offset in part by the Creative Capital funding of $43,600 brought to account in the same period. In addition to the Collection store project, major expenses include approximately $50,000 to urgently replace the chairs in all orchestral, ensemble and Mullins Studio rooms – as the Joan Stage 2 purple chairs were increasingly dangerous and many had already collapsed.

 

The accepted arts sector benchmark for Reserves and Surpluses (liquid assets) is 20% of turnover (generally considered within the sector as expenses which this financial year equalled $3,905,070). PP&VA currently has a total of $1,928,633 in accumulated funds. However the majority of Reserves ($1,659,167) relate to Collection items ($1,471,167) managed on behalf of Penrith City Council and acquired for the most part through the Australian Government’s Cultural Gifts Program which prohibits sale.

 

The Retained Surplus ($269,466) and Capital Equipment Reserve ($188,000) bring the Company to 11.7% or just over half the benchmark.

 

Benchmarks are assessable under both Australian Government and State Government funding programs and therefore it is recommended that the Company continues to grow Reserves over time.

 

The financial result reflects ongoing careful management and strict internal controls particularly given the highly capricious nature of theatrical entrepreneurial delivery and reliance on third parties for our variable earned income

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the information in the report on the Penrith Performing and Visual Arts Ltd - 2017-2018 Annual Report be received and that Council agree to underwrite the operations of the Penrith Performing and Visual Arts Ltd until the presentation of the 2018/19 Annual Report.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                            12 November 2018

 

 

 

7

Risk Management Policy and ARIC Annual Report   

 

Compiled by:               Anthony Robinson, Risk and Audit Coordinator

Authorised by:            Stephen Britten, Chief Governance Officer

Matthew Bullivant, Legal Services Manager  

 

Outcome

We have confidence in our Council

Strategy

Be open and fair in our decision making and our dealings with people

Service Activity

Administer risk management policies, systems and processes to promote a consistent approach to risk management, including independent review, to ensure first line controls are appropriate

      

 

Executive Summary

There are two parts to this report.

The first part of the report relates to the development and review of the Risk Management Policy as part of a Risk Review Project completed in 2017. The draft policy has been endorsed by the Audit, Risk & Improvement Committee following several revisions. The report recommends that the Risk Management Policy be adopted by the Policy Review Committee.

The second part to the report relates to the Audit, Risk and Improvement Committee (ARIC) Charter, which requires that the Chair of the Committee present an Annual Report to the Council each year. The report recommends that the attached Audit, Risk and Improvement Committee Annual Report be received by the Policy Review Committee.

The Chair of the ARIC, Mr Bruce Turner, AM will give a presentation to the Policy Review Committee in relation to the ARIC annual report.

Background

Draft Risk Management Policy

Council’s current Enterprise Risk Management (ERM) Policy was adopted by Council in July 2007 and updated in 2010. However, following the receipt of independent advice from a consultant in November 2016, the Risk Review Project was initiated in early 2017 with the aim of overhauling Council’s ERM Framework and risk registers. This involved modernising and simplifying the ERM policy and procedure documents.

The attached Draft Risk Management Policy is part of the newly developed ERM Framework which will replace the existing documents. The policy outlines Council’s approach to managing its risks and establishes clear roles and responsibilities for managers and staff. The document is consistent with Australian Standard 31000:2009 Risk Management – Principles & Guidelines and reflects the outcomes of the Risk Review Project. The draft policy has been subject to the following review steps:

1.   Presented to the Corporate Leadership Team at the meeting held on 10/08/2017 and approved as part of finalising the Risk Review Project.

2.   Presented to the Audit, Risk & Improvement Committee (ARIC) at the meeting held on 13/12/2017 and endorsed subject to several amendments.

3.   Following an ARIC request at the meeting held on 7/03/2018, the draft policy incorporating the ARIC’s requested amendments was circulated to the independent members for further review.

4.   At the ARIC meeting held on 6/06/2018, an independent member noted that the document needed to contain a clear statement that the General Manager has a leadership role in development and application of the ERM Framework. The GM concurred, and this was expressed within the document, with no need to return to ARIC.

In addition to the attached policy, the remodelled ERM Framework also includes a Risk Management Strategy & Plan (RMS&P). This is a much more detailed operational document which supports the Risk Management Policy. The RMS&P was presented to the ARIC at the meeting held on 7/03/2018 and endorsed subject to several amendments.

ARIC Annual Report

 

The ARIC Charter requires that, at its first meeting after 30 June each year, the Chair presents an ARIC Annual Report to the ARIC for endorsement, and subsequently to the Policy Review Committee of Council.

 

The Chair, Mr Bruce Turner, AM presented the annual report to the ARIC at its meeting on 5 September 2018, where the ARIC endorsed that report.

 

The ARIC Chair’s Annual Committee Report is attached for review, and Mr Bruce Turner, AM will provide a brief presentation.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Risk Management Policy and ARIC Annual Report be received.

2.    The Risk Management Policy be adopted.

3.    The information contained in the ARIC Annual Report be received.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

ERM Framework - Risk Management Policy (DRAFT v6.0)

6 Pages

Attachments Included

2.

ARIC Annual Report 2017/18

2 Pages

Attachments Included

   


 

ATTACHMENTS  

 

 

Date of Meeting:     Monday 12 November 2018

Report Title:            Penrith DCP 2014 amendments - Public Exhibition Submissions

Attachments:           Penrith Housing Market Review - Feasibility Testing

                                Draft Amendments - Penrith DCP 2014



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                          12 November 2018

Attachment 1 - Penrith Housing Market Review - Feasibility Testing

 

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Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                          12 November 2018

Attachment 2 - Draft Amendments - Penrith DCP 2014

 

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ATTACHMENTS  

 

 

Date of Meeting:     Monday 12 November 2018

Report Title:            Kingswood Place Plan 2018-22

Attachments:           Capture Kingswood Engagement Report

                                Kingswood Place Plan 2017-18



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                          12 November 2018

Attachment 1 - Capture Kingswood Engagement Report

 

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Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             12 November 2018

Attachment 2 - Kingswood Place Plan 2017-18

 

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ATTACHMENTS  

 

 

Date of Meeting:     Monday 12 November 2018

Report Title:            Oxley Park Place Plan Progress Report

Attachments:           Oxley Park Place Plan November 2018



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             12 November 2018

Attachment 1 - Oxley Park Place Plan November 2018

 

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ATTACHMENTS  

 

 

Date of Meeting:     Monday 12 November 2018

Report Title:            Risk Management Policy and ARIC Annual Report

Attachments:           ERM Framework - Risk Management Policy (DRAFT v6.0)

                                ARIC Annual Report 2017/18



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                          12 November 2018

Attachment 1 - ERM Framework - Risk Management Policy (DRAFT v6.0)

 

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Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             12 November 2018

Attachment 2 - ARIC Annual Report 2017/18

 

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