Council_Mark_POS_RGB

5 December 2018

 

Dear Councillor,

In pursuance of the provisions of the Local Government Act, 1993 and the Regulations thereunder, notice is hereby given that a POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING of Penrith City Council is to be held in the Passadena Room, Civic Centre, 601 High Street, Penrith on Monday 10 December 2018 at 7:00PM.

Attention is directed to the statement accompanying this notice of the business proposed to be transacted at the meeting.

Yours faithfully

 

 

Warwick Winn

General Manager

 

BUSINESS

 

1.           LEAVE OF ABSENCE

 

2.           APOLOGIES

 

3.           CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES

Policy Review Committee Meeting - 12 November 2018.

 

4.           DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

Pecuniary Interest (The Act requires Councillors who declare a pecuniary interest in an item to leave the meeting during discussion of that item)

Non-Pecuniary Conflict of Interest – Significant and Less than Significant (The Code of Conduct requires Councillors who declare a significant non-pecuniary conflict of interest in an item to leave the meeting during discussion of that item)

 

5.           ADDRESSING THE MEETING

 

6.           MAYORAL MINUTES

 

7.           NOTICES OF MOTION TO RESCIND A RESOLUTION

 

8.           NOTICES OF MOTION

 

9.           DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

10.         REQUESTS FOR REPORTS AND MEMORANDUMS

 

11.         URGENT BUSINESS

 

12.         CONFIDENTIAL BUSINESS


POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING

 

Monday 10 December 2018

 

table of contents

 

 

 

 

 

 

meeting calendar

 

 

confirmation of minutes

 

 

DELIVERY program reports

 


Council_Mark_POS_RGB2018 MEETING CALENDAR

January 2018 - December 2018

(Adopted by Council - 27 November 2017 and amended)

 

 

 

TIME

JAN

FEB

MAR

APRIL

MAY

JUNE

JULY

AUG

SEPT

OCT

NOV

DEC

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

 

Ordinary Council Meeting

7.00pm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

17

 

 

26@

26

30v

28#

25*

23

27@

   

   24^ü

 

29

26#+

 

Policy Review Committee

7.00pm

 

12

12

16

14

4

9

13

3

8

12

10

 

 v

Meeting at which the draft corporate planning documents (Delivery Program and Operational Plan) are endorsed for exhibition

 *

Meeting at which the draft corporate planning documents (Delivery Program and Operational Plan) are adopted

 #

Meetings at which the Operational Plan quarterly reviews (May and September) are presented

 @

Meetings at which the Delivery Program progress reports (including the Operational Plan quarterly reviews for December and June) are presented

 ^

Election of Mayor/Deputy Mayor

 ü

Meeting at which the 2017-2018 Annual Statements are presented

 

Meeting at which any comments on the 2017-2018 Annual Statements are presented

 +

Meeting at which the Annual Report is presented

-            Extraordinary Meetings are held as required.

-            Members of the public are invited to observe meetings of the Council (Ordinary and Policy Review Committee).

Should you wish to address Council, please contact Governance Coordinator, Adam Beggs on 4732 7597

 


UNCONFIRMED MINUTES

 OF THE POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING OF PENRITH CITY COUNCIL HELD IN THE PASSADENA ROOM, PENRITH

ON MONDAY 12 NOVEMBER 2018 AT 7:00PM

PRESENT

His Worship the Mayor, Councillor Ross Fowler OAM, Deputy Mayor, Councillor Greg Davies, and Councillors Jim Aitken OAM, Todd Carney, Brian Cartwright, Robin Cook, Marcus Cornish, Mark Davies, Aaron Duke, Karen McKeown OAM, Kath Presdee and John Thain.    

 

APOLOGIES

PRC54  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Brian Cartwright seconded Councillor Todd Carney that apologies be received for Councillors Bernard Bratusa, Kevin Crameri OAM and Tricia Hitchen.

 

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES - Policy Review Committee Meeting - 8 October 2018

PRC55  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Aaron Duke seconded Councillor Kath Presdee that the minutes of the Policy Review Committee Meeting of 8 October 2018 be confirmed.

 

 

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

 

There were no declarations of interest.

 

DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Outcome 1 - We can work close to home

 

1        Penrith City Children's Services Cooperative Ltd                                                         

PRC56  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor John Thain seconded Councillor Marcus Cornish

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Penrith City Children's Services Cooperative Ltd be received.

2.    Council underwrite the operations of the PCCSC Ltd until the presentation to Council of the Penrith City Children’s Services Cooperative Ltd Annual Report for 2018-19.

3.     Children’s Services staff be congratulated for their continuous effort and work within Child Care Centres.

 




 

Outcome 5 - We care about our environment

 

5        Cumberland Zone Rural Fire District - Status of Current and Future Operations     

PRC57  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Todd Carney seconded Councillor Brian Cartwright

That:

1.      The information contained in the report on Cumberland Zone Rural Fire District - Status of Current and Future Operations be received.

2.      The Rural Fire Services Brigade be congratulated for their continuous effort and work for the community.

 

 

Outcome 7 - We have confidence in our Council

 

6        Penrith Performing and Visual Arts Ltd - 2017-2018 Annual Report                          

PRC58  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Marcus Cornish that the information in the report on the Penrith Performing and Visual Arts Ltd - 2017-2018 Annual Report be received and that Council agree to underwrite the operations of the Penrith Performing and Visual Arts Ltd until the presentation of the 2018/19 Annual Report.

 

7        Risk Management Policy and ARIC Annual Report                                                      

PRC59  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor John Thain seconded Councillor Kath Presdee

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Risk Management Policy and ARIC Annual Report be received.

2.    The Risk Management Policy be adopted.

3.    The information contained in the ARIC Annual Report be received.

 

 

Outcome 4 - We have safe, vibrant places

 

3        Kingswood Place Plan 2018-22

Councillor Mark Davies left the meeting, the time being 8:48pm, and did not return.                 

PRC60  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor John Thain seconded Councillor Robin Cook

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Kingswood Place Plan 2018-22 be received.

2.    That Council endorse the delivery of the Kingswood Place Plan 2018-22.

 

 

 

 

Outcome 2 - We plan for our future growth

 

2        Penrith DCP 2014 amendments - Public Exhibition Submissions                              

PRC61 His Worship the Mayor, Councillor Ross Fowler OAM advised the committee that this item has been withdrawn and will be deferred to a future Policy Review Committee Meeting.

 

 

Outcome 4 - We have safe, vibrant places

 

4        Oxley Park Place Plan Progress Report                                                                         

PRC62  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Karen McKeown OAM seconded Councillor Brian Cartwright

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Oxley Park Place Plan Progress Report be received.

2.    Council continue to receive updates on the Oxley Park Place Plan through the periodic Neighbourhood Renewal Program reporting and that a final report is presented to Council at the conclusion of the Plan in the second half of 2020.

 

 

There being no further business the Chairperson declared the meeting closed the time being 8:51pm.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                                            

    



DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

 

Outcome 2 - We plan for our future growth

 

1        Proposed Suburb Name for the Central Precinct of the St Marys Release Area             1

 

2        Penrith DCP 2014 amendment - Public Exhibition Submissions                                      4

 

 

Outcome 7 - We have confidence in our Council

 

3        Penrith Aquatic & Leisure Centre Annual Report 2017-2018                                          23

 

 


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


 

 

Outcome 1 - We can work close to home

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


Outcome 2 - We plan for our future growth

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

1        Proposed Suburb Name for the Central Precinct of the St Marys Release Area             1

 

2        Penrith DCP 2014 amendment - Public Exhibition Submissions                                      4

 

 

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                            10 December 2018

 

 

 

1

Proposed Suburb Name for the Central Precinct of the St Marys Release Area   

 

Compiled by:               Matthew Rose, Senior Planner

Authorised by:            Natasha Baker, City Planning Manager  

 

Outcome

We plan for our future growth

Strategy

Facilitate quality development in the City that considers the current and future needs of our community

Service Activity

Plan for and facilitate development in the City

 

Previous Items:           5- Proposed Suburb Name and Arrangements for the Central Precinct of St Marys Release Area- Ordinary Meeting- 28 May 2018 7:00PM    

 

Executive Summary

This report seeks Council’s feedback on the proposed suburb name and boundary arrangements for the Central Precinct of the St Marys Release Area.

Background

The St Marys Release Area is split into several precincts, including three residential precincts. These precincts are known as the East, West and Central Precincts. The East and West precincts are substantially developed and now form the respective suburbs of Ropes Crossing and Jordan Springs. The Central Precinct is currently located in the rural suburb of Llandilo, a historic arrangement that existed prior to the development of the release area (refer Attachment 1).

The development of the Central Precinct is underway but new suburb arrangements were not settled prior to development commencing. The current arrangement, with no road connecting Llandilo to the Central Precinct, is causing confusion for residents, their visitors, and the emergency and postal services. The emerging community also associate themselves with the existing community of Jordan Springs. It is also affecting property valuations and insurance arrangements. These issues have triggered the need to consider new suburb naming arrangements.

Lendlease, the developer of the Central Precinct, investigated several options for the naming of the Central Precinct, including its addition to the existing suburb of Jordan Springs and the creation of a new, separate suburb. These investigations included consultation with the Geographical Names Board, the official body for naming new or amended suburbs, and the emergency services on the suitability of one or two suburbs and a selection of proposed names themed around historic owners, uses or names for the site.

Lendlease settled on a proposal to expand the existing suburb of Jordan Springs to include the Central Precinct, the surrounding areas of open space, and Wianamatta Regional Park (refer Attachment 2). This proposal has received in principle support from the Geographical Names Board. The NSW Police and NSW Ambulance Service had no preference for either a single, combined suburb or two separate suburbs.

Lendlease sought Council’s endorsement of its proposal before submitting it to the Geographical Names Board for consideration in its formal place naming process. Council, after considering Lendlease’s proposal, confirmed its preference for two separate suburbs, each with its own unique name. Council also suggested some names for a new suburb containing the Central Precinct: Riley Commons and Wianamatta.

In response, Lendlease consulted current residents and purchasers of land within the Central Precinct, asking new residents for their views on the following names:

·    Jordan Springs

·    Llandilo

·    Riley Commons

·    Wianamatta

Lendlease’s consultation took place between 1-15 October 2018 and involved an online survey, emailed to 988 residents and purchasers, and a paper survey at a community event. The recorded results indicate that 82% of the 382 people who completed the online survey prefer Jordan Springs. At the community event, 74% of the 73 people asked, selected Jordan Springs. A full copy of the consultation report commissioned by LendLease is provided as Attachment 3.

The Geographic Names Board considered Lendlease’s proposed suburb name and arrangements at its 20 November 2018 meeting and is now seeking Council’s feedback on whether it wants to support Lendlease’s proposal or submit alternative name and suburb arrangements for the Board’s consideration.

Finalising the Proposed Suburb Name and Arrangements

The Geographic Names Board has advised that if Council does not object to Lendlease’s proposal, that it can commence its place naming process. This would include its own community consultation, independent of Lendlease, early in 2019. Subject to the number of submissions the Board receives, it anticipates completing the naming process by the middle of next year.

Alternatively, the Board is willing to consider an alternative proposal from Council, advising that it will need to meet the requirements of the Board’s Place Naming Policy and be supported by:

1.   Justification of the selected name, for example, research into historic names, owners and uses of the site,

2.   Identification of appropriate suburb boundaries, for example, along watercourses or with boundaries of existing suburbs,

3.   Evidence that the proposed suburb is of sufficient size and contains enough services, facilities and shops, and

4.   Council’s own community consultation.

The Board has indicated that it considers:

·    Riley Commons a duplicate name to the similar sounding suburb of Rileys Hill in northern NSW, and

·    The results of Lendlease’s community consultation to indicate that Wianamatta may not receive sufficient community support.

It is estimated that the required work can be completed early in the new year and will need approximately 100 staff hours dedicated to it. This includes the research into and preparation of the proposal and the presentation of the results to a future Council meeting. This estimate of staff hours excludes the community consultation exercise as a specialist consultant will be engaged to undertake this work and provide Council with a final report on its findings. It is estimated that this will cost approximately $10-15k.

The Board’s next meeting is in March 2019 and, if it considers Council’s proposal acceptable, it will commence its place naming process and undertake community consultation by the middle of the year. Council will be required to review and respond to any objections the Board receives.

Conclusion

Several options for the naming of the Central Precinct have been investigated, including the suitability of one or two suburbs and a selection of proposed names themed around historic owners, uses or names for the site. These investigations included consultation with the Geographical Names Board and the current residents and purchasers of the homes in the Central Precinct.

These investigations suggest that Lendlease’s proposal to expand the existing suburb of Jordan Springs to include the Central Precinct, the surrounding areas of open space, and Wianamatta Regional Park is the preferred outcome. The proposal has logical, easily identified boundaries, will be an appropriate size, and contain sufficient homes, shops, services and facilities (including the proposed primary school in Jordan Springs). In addition, the two residential areas are of similar age and style and the community already share open space and community facilities.

Lendlease’s proposal has received in principle support from the Geographical Names Board and Lendlease’s consultation reveals a strong community preference for this outcome. This outcome can also be delivered over the next 3-4 months, helping to resolve the confusion for residents, their visitors, and the emergency and postal services in a relatively brief time.

The consideration of an alternative proposal will require resourcing, removing staff from other projects, and funding of about $10-15k to undertake through community consultation. This process is likely to take 6-9 months to complete.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Proposed Suburb Name for the Central Precinct of the St Marys Release Area be received

2.    Council write to the Geographic Names Board confirming that it does not object to Lendlease’s proposal to expand the existing suburb of Jordan Springs to include the Central Precinct, the surrounding areas of open space, and Wianamatta Regional Park (refer Attachment 2).

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

Current Suburb Arrangement

1 Page

Attachments Included

2.

Proposed Suburb Arrangement

1 Page

Attachments Included

3.

Community Consultation Report

22 Pages

Attachments Included

  


Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                            10 December 2018

 

 

 

2

Penrith DCP 2014 amendment - Public Exhibition Submissions   

 

Compiled by:               Breannan Dent, Planner

Authorised by:            Natasha Baker, City Planning Manager  

 

Outcome

We plan for our future growth

Strategy

Facilitate quality development in the City that considers the current and future needs of our community

Service Activity

Plan for and facilitate development in the City

      

 

Executive Summary

 

At the Policy Review Committee meeting on July 2018, Council resolved to prepare and publicly exhibit draft amendments to Penrith Development Control Plan (DCP) 2014 regarding multi dwelling housing and boarding houses.

 

Amendments proposed to chapter “D2 Residential Development" of Penrith DCP 2014 regarding multi dwelling housing include:

·    increased lot frontage requirements;

·    allowing stacked car parking; and

·    incentives for basement car parking.

 

These controls were developed in response to resident feedback, previous submissions to development applications for multi dwelling housing and actions within the Oxley Park Place Plan 2017. A report on the progress of the Oxley Park Place Plan was presented to the Policy Review Committee meeting on 12 November 2018. The proposed controls seek to improve the amenity of future multi dwelling housing by applying to new development.

New controls proposed for boarding house developments include:

·    Local character;

·    Built form, scale and appearance;

·    Communal spaces;

·    Boarder amenity, safety and privacy;

·    Visual and acoustic impacts;

·    Traffic; and

·    The requirement for a Plan of Management.

 

It is proposed that these new controls be located in chapter “D5 Other Land Uses” of Penrith DCP 2014. The submissions will be tabled on the night.

 

Controls for boarding houses were developed as a result of recent increases in boarding house development within Penrith which have caused social, public health, amenity and local character integration issues. The proposed controls are intended to resolve these issues and respond to community concerns.

 

The draft amendments were publicly exhibited from Monday 20 August 2018 to Monday 17 September 2018. Six submissions were received in response to the proposed multi dwelling housing controls and no submissions were received on the proposed boarding house controls.

 

The key issues raised in the submissions include:

-     Concerns that stacked parking will result in poorer outcomes

-     Support for basement car parking provisions

-     Concerns that increased lot frontage widths will impact the financial viability of developments, negatively impact on property values, and result in reduced amenity

-     A request to review other controls relating to multi dwelling housing including landscaping, solar access, setbacks, waste and parking rates

-     Administrative matters regarding the public exhibition

 

No changes to the publicly exhibited amendments have been proposed in response to the submissions received. It is recommended that Council adopt the draft amendments to Penrith DCP 2014 as exhibited.

 

Background

Proposed amendments to controls for multi dwelling housing

Since 2017, Council has been working closely with the Oxley Park community as part of Neighbourhood Renewal initiatives. Through this work, the community raised issues regarding the reduction of available on-street car parking, as a result of increased multi dwelling housing development.

 

In September 2017, Council adopted the Oxley Park Place Plan, which includes actions to deliver key improvements in the neighbourhood. The plan contains one short term and one long term action relating to the current planning framework. The short term action resolved to prepare an amendment to DCP 2014 to introduce wider lot frontages and limit stacked parking in Oxley Park. The second action was to review residential development through the Local Housing Strategy and update Multi Dwelling Housing controls to enable more satisfactory development outcomes long term.

 

Although these controls were reviewed in the context of Oxley Park, it was considered appropriate to apply the amended controls more broadly across Penrith to deliver better amenity outcomes for multi dwelling housing developments across the city. This was also consistent with feedback received from the community on development applications.

 

Council officers also consulted with local developers who had experience with multi dwelling housing. A developer forum was held to seek industry feedback before the public exhibition. Feedback provided in the forum helped to inform the proposed amendments.

 

The amended controls form part of chapter “D2 Residential Development” of Penrith DCP 2014.  In summary the proposed amendments include:

·    Increased lot frontage requirement from 15 metres to 22 metres;

·    Allowing the provision of stacked car parking arrangements; and

·    Incentives for the provision of basement car parking.

 

The intention of the proposed amendments to the Multi Dwelling Housing chapter in DCP 2014 is to:

·    Improve amenity by increasing lot frontage requirements;

·    Ensure stacked spaces are used for car parking to reduce on-street parking;

·    Allow improved amenity and development outcomes; and

·    Ensure future development does not contribute to the existing lack of available on-street car parking or declining residential amenity.

 

Proposed insertion of controls for boarding houses

There has been increasing interest in boarding house developments due to provisions introduced by the NSW Government in 2009 for boarding houses under State Environmental Planning Policy (SEPP) (Affordable Rental Housing) 2009. The SEPP provides provisions under which Council is not able to refuse consent for boarding house development applications, provided the applicant meets these provisions. These provisions include building heights, landscaped areas, solar access, private open space, parking and accommodation size.

 

The new controls proposed for boarding house development include:

·    Local character;

·    Built form, scale and appearance;

·    Tenant amenity, safety and privacy;

·    Visual and acoustic amenity;

·    Location; and

·    Requirements for a Plan of Management.

 

The new controls proposed to be inserted into chapter “D5 Other Land Uses” for boarding houses are intended to supplement the SEPP controls, respond to potential impacts and provide guidance on addressing local character. The proposed controls cannot override the SEPP, as the SEPP prevails. 

At the Policy Review Committee meeting on 9 July 2018, Council resolved to prepare and publicly exhibit amendments to Penrith DCP 2014 relating to multi dwelling housing and boarding houses.

 

Public Exhibition and Submissions

In accordance with the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 and Environmental Planning and Assessment Regulation 2000, public exhibition of the draft amendments was carried out from Monday 20 August 2018 to Monday 17 September 2018. Six submissions regarding the proposed multi dwelling housing amendments were received in response to the public exhibition. These submissions will be tabled on the night. No submissions were received for the proposed controls relating to boarding houses.

 

Submissions were received from affected residents and local property developers. The submissions raised the following issues:

 

Parking

 

Issue

Response

Two submissions supported the inclusion of basement car parking to accommodate on-site car parking.

 

One submission questioned why basement car parking wasn’t permissible for all lots.

The amended control to specify Council’s approach to assessing basement car parking is intended to act as an incentive for developers to amalgamate lots.

 

Lots under 22 metres in width are considered not to have the necessary width to accommodate basement car parking, in addition to other demands on lot frontage including stormwater, utilities and waste facilities.

 

The wording of the amendment in the DCP is “Basement carparking may be permitted on development lots with a minimum lot frontage of 22m”. Exceptions to this may be considered if it is proven that the lot can accommodate basement car parking without compromising on other required features.

Stacked car parking cannot be accommodated on 15 metre frontage width sites.

 

Stacked parking should not be permissible.

The controls provide the option of side-by-side parking as an alternative where stacked parking is not appropriate.

 

Stacked parking provides flexibility for developers and residents in the provision and use of car parking spaces.

Garages would be used for storage and living space instead of car parking if a space was stacked in front of them

The current controls allow stacked parking in front of garages.

 

It is not within Council’s abilities to enforce the use of the space.

 

Amending DCP 2014 to prevent all stacked car parking was also considered. During the developer forum, developers confirmed that stacked car parking in front of garages provides flexibility in the provision and use of car parking spaces. 

Amending the stacked car parking controls will mean that garages will need to be located closer to the property boundary. One submission requested a control amendment for zero side setbacks for garages.

DCP 2014 Section 2.4.6 includes the following “8) Zero setbacks from the side boundary are not permissible except for single garages or carports with an open appearance according to - Garage design, not taller than 2.1 m at the boundary.” This control has not been amended.

 

The proposed minimum 22 metre lot width requirement also allows more flexibility for developers to locate garages in the available space.

Residents will park on the street regardless of car parking arrangements for new development

The proposed amendment seeks to encourage alternative parking arrangements to reduce the need for on street parking.

 

 

 

 

 

Minimum Lot Frontage Width

Issue

Response

The purchase of a second property may be required to achieve a 22 metre lot frontage.

 

This may affect the financial feasibility of development.

Any additional amount paid by a developer to acquire a second adjoining property is anticipated to be accommodated by profits received from the increased yield facilitated by the larger site.

 

A report carried out by SGS Economics and Planning on the financial viability of the proposed controls includes a test on the financial impacts of lot amalgamation. The report concludes that due to increased development yield, amalgamation of properties will be financially feasible for developers. This report is provided in Attachment 1.

 

In addition, the proposed amendments also include considerations for sites where it is not possible for developers to purchase neighbouring properties.

The proposed amendments will have the effect of reducing property values

The proposed amendments do not remove the potential for the development of dwellings on the lot, they are intended to reshape how development is delivered.

 

The assessment of property values is the responsibility of the NSW Government’s Valuer General.

The proposed amendments will have the effect of reducing housing diversity and preventing development of “boutique” housing options.

The controls allow for flexibility for development of narrow isolated lots and lots where developers are not able to purchase a second property. This feature of the amendments, combined with the existing housing stock will ensure the supply of diverse housing options in Penrith.

 

The Local Housing Strategy will also assess the diversity of housing stock and determine the demand for different housing. The strategy will make recommendations to ensure appropriate development is supplied.

Increased density is becoming “overdevelopment”.

Multi dwelling housing is permissible in R3 Medium Density and R4 High Density zones under Penrith Local Environmental Plan (LEP) 2010. These zones were assigned to particular areas due to the ability of the area to accommodate the density created by these development types. The development yield of individual properties is consistent with the existing zoning.

 

Further responses to manage the impacts of increasing population density include ensuring that Penrith’s local controls, including LEP 2010 and DCP 2014, support the provision of better residential amenity.

Larger lots mean increased internal demand on driveways and parking arrangements and larger lots would result in a decrease of amenity for residents and the community.

Penrith DCP 2014 sets out parking rates and access requirements based on driveway length and development density to ensure that increased density requires increased provision of passing bays and similar structures within the development to accommodate increased usage.

 

On 15 metre wide lots it is not possible to provide these facilities, despite a need for them, as the site is not wide enough.

 

Increasing lot width allows for improved adaptability of sites to accommodate resident needs with respect to parking, vehicle manoeuvring, privacy and private open space.

 

It is intended that the proposed controls will improve amenity for residents on developments that comply with Penrith DCP 2014.

Lot amalgamation and increased yield will attract larger development organisations who will decrease residential amenity.

Penrith DCP 2014 applies to all developments, irrespective of the size of the development organisation.

 

 

Further amendments to other existing controls

Issue

Response

Three submissions requested amendments to other controls for Multi Dwelling Housing which do not form part of these amendments. These include requirements for:

·    40% landscaped area;

·    Solar access, particularly with respect to private open space;

·    Side and Front setbacks;

·    waste storage areas; and

·    the amount of parking per dwelling.

Council is currently preparing a Local Housing Strategy to inform future decisions regarding residential development across Penrith. A broader and comprehensive review of the residential chapter of Penrith DCP 2014 will be undertaken in response to the outcomes of the Local Housing Strategy.

 

The controls subject to this amendment are considered to be more urgent in response to community concerns.

 

 

Administration matters

Issue

Response

Revising the planning controls is a “band aid solution”, given that issues caused by on street parking and lack of amenity are already prevalent and much of the available developable land has already been developed.

In May 2018, it was identified that approximately 40% of Oxley Park remains developable, which is where significant impacts have occurred as a result of increased density. The amendments are intended to provide an interim solution for the remaining 40% of developable land in Oxley Park while more comprehensive changes to the DCP are considered in response to the outcomes of the Local Housing Strategy.

 

The proposed amendments are intended to prevent problems from compounding as a result of future development and also to prevent issues from affecting other medium and high density zones in Penrith.

Notification provided to affected property owners of the proposed amendments.

Notification of the public exhibition of proposed amendments was advertised in the Western Weekender on 16 August 2018 and 9 September 2018 as per the Environmental Planning and Assessment Regulation 2000.

 

Information has also been available on Council’s website and Your Say pages from 16 August 2018.

 

Residents in Oxley Park received an update on the progress of the Oxley Park Place Plan via a community newsletter sent out in September 2018. The newsletter included information on the public exhibition of the proposed amendments.

A savings provision should be inserted to ensure that the proposed amendments only apply to development applications submitted after the date the DCP comes into effect, and not to development applications submitted prior to these amendments.

The proposed amendments will apply only to development applications lodged after Penrith DCP 2014 amendments have come into effect, as per the Environmental Planning and Assessment Regulation 2000.

 

As such, a savings provision is unnecessary.

 

No further changes to the Penrith DCP 2014 are recommended as a result of the public exhibition and submissions received, however issues raised relating to other multi dwelling housing controls will be considered as part of a more comprehensive review of Penrith DCP 2014 in the future following the outcomes from the Local Housing Strategy.

 

Conclusion

It is recommended that Council endorse the proposed amendments, as exhibited, and as provided in Attachment 2.

 

Should Council resolve to adopt the amendments, an advertisement will be placed in the local newspaper no more than 28 days after the resolution. The proposed amendments will become effective on the date that the advertisement is published.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Penrith DCP 2014 amendment - Public Exhibition Submissions be received

2.    Council adopt the amendments to Penrith Development Control Plan 2014, as exhibited.

3.    The General Manager be delegated authority to make any necessary minor changes required to the Development Control Plan 2014 in accordance with Council’s adopted policy position before notification in the newspaper

4.    In accordance with the Environmental Planning and Assessment Regulation 2000, Council give public notice of its decision in a local newspaper within 28 days, with the Development Control Plan coming into effect immediately upon notification in the newspaper.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

Penrith Housing Market Review Feasibility Testing

18 Pages

Attachments Included

2.

Draft Amendments - Penrith DCP 2014

28 Pages

Attachments Included

   


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


 

 

Outcome 3 - We can get around the City

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


 

 

Outcome 4 - We have safe, vibrant places

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


 

 

Outcome 5 - We care about our environment

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


 

 

Outcome 6 - We are healthy and share strong community spirit

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


Outcome 7 - We have confidence in our Council

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

3        Penrith Aquatic & Leisure Centre Annual Report 2017-2018                                          23

 

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                            10 December 2018

 

 

 

3

Penrith Aquatic & Leisure Centre Annual Report 2017-2018   

 

Compiled by:               Paul McAlary, Acting General Manager - Penrith Aquatic and Leisure Limited

Authorised by:            Wayne Mitchell, Executive Manager - Environment & City Development  

 

Outcome

We have confidence in our Council

Strategy

Be open and fair in our decisions and our dealings with people

Service Activity

Promote ethical behaviour and open and fair decision making

 

Presenters:                  Paul McAlary, Acting General Manager - Penrith Aquatic and Leisure Limited - Annual Report and Board of Directors      

 

Executive Summary

This report to Council details the performance of Penrith Aquatic and Leisure Limited (PAL)

Trading as ‘Ripples’) for the financial year ended 30 June 2018 a 2019 progress report and redevelopment plans for the future.

 

In relation to the 30 June 2018 financial year, the company recorded a loss of $37,000 after the Council subsidy. The variance is a result of higher than budgeted costs for Insurance, staff training and welfare, water rates and electricity.

 

PAL received several awards throughout 2017-2018, including:

 

·    2017 National Swim Australia ‘SwimSafer’ Award Winner

·    2017 National Swim Australia ‘Outstanding Community Service Award Winner

·    2017 NSW Austswim Recognised Swim Centre of the Year

·    2017 National Austswim Recognised Swim Centre of the Year Finalist

·    2017 Local Business Awards – Specialised Business for Learn to Swim

 

The first 4 months of the 2018/19 year represents a continuation of the business improvement trend in the areas of Learn To Swim and Hydrotherapy services. Both of which have performed better than budget. Unfortunately our Fitness area is down on budget and reflects the saturation of competitors in the Gym market.

 

Focus on asset redevelopment continues with the following projects completed or under way.

 

·    51 Additional parking spaces at St Marys, which was completed in September 2018.

·    Waterpark at St Marys – The project is made possible through $1.2m of section 94 funds. The projects anticipated hand over is January 2019.

·    New Gym equipment at St Marys $230k with expected delivery January 2019.

·    Refurbishment of Gym area including roof and façade upgrade. Which will go out for tender February/March.

 

Alan Brown and Wayne Mitchell have been re-appointed as Company Directors and the Board recommends Council endorse these appointments. The Board also requests Council agree to underwrite the operations of PAL until the presentation of its 2019-2020 Annual Report.

Background

This report follows the Twenty Fourth Annual General Meeting of PAL held on 16 October 2018 for the financial year ended 30 June 2018. PAL was formed 24 years ago to manage Penrith City Council (PCC) public pool operations at St Marys, specifically the indoor and outdoor pools, spas, sauna, gym and subsequently the Hydrotherapy centre. In 2013 this role was expanded to include management of PCC, s public pool operations at Penrith. Penrith City Council continues to own and maintain all the major pool assets at both facilities.

 

PAL’s principle objectives are to provide equitable access to the aquatic, health and fitness assets under its management, create best value packages to members of the community, to provide consistent with PCC’s Community Strategic Plan and comply with appropriate legislation. Our goal is to encourage safe, family and community wide participation, whilst supporting the needs of local sporting entities such as swim clubs and other competitive aquatic users.

 

As PCC Councillors are aware, Ripples operations are subsidised by the Council.

This subsidy allows community members to access leisure and fitness facilities that encourage active exercise, at a reasonable price.

 

The Chairman and Acting General Manager, Alan Brown and Paul McAlary respectively, will be in attendance tonight to make a short presentation. Extracts from the Company’s most recent Annual General Meeting and Financial Report are also provided below.

 

Chairman’s Report

 

It gives me great pleasure to provide a summary of the 2018 financial year, being our 24th year of service for the residents of the Penrith Local Government Area.

 

Ripples remains the standard in Fun, Fitness and Health. We are the only gym operator in our area that carries peak ‘gold standard’ accreditation from Fitness Australia, we provide

Over 60 group sessions per week and service well in excess of 1,000 members. Our Learn to Swim program is by far the largest in the area. In peak season we conduct approximately 550 classes each week, teaching vital life skills to 2,500 children ranging from toddlers to adults. Ripples is well integrated with the local sporting communities through sponsorship of its swim squads and access to professional coaching. Our swim program engages over 100 participants via Ripples Swim Club. Ripples Hydrotherapy Centre at St Marys is the largest of its kind in the LGA.

 

It continues to provide access to professional rehabilitation services, treating sports injuries, accident victims along with an aging population. We operate the only NDIS accredited facility

In the area.

 

Ripples employs over 100 employees throughout the year reaching 150 in peak season and includes senior school age, university students, young mothers, qualified professionals with many Juniors also obtaining vital on the job training.

 

Financially, the 2018 year continued the trend of growth seen in the 2017 year. Before PCC subsidy, total revenue 2018 of $4,593,906 and operating expenses 2018 $5,654,578 representing a net operating deficit of $1,060,672.

 

Both the Penrith and St Marys facilities are aging facilities and will require significant redevelopment to keep pace with modern standards and community expectation. This is particularly relevant with our area forecast to grow significantly in the next 10-15 years and whilst expansion and improvement might not lead to profit and loss statements free of council subsidy, our view is that failure to re-invest in aquatic facilities will decrease rate payer satisfaction and be one less opportunity to encourage healthy life styles in Penrith. While we have been unsuccessful to date in attracting significant State or Federal assistance to redevelop, we have built a Water Park at Penrith which has re-engaged community interest and off the back of this we have a Water Park under construction at St Marys for completion in January 2019.

 

Penrith City Council continues to underwrite the Company’s operation, this year providing a grant of $1,024,000. I take this opportunity to express our gratitude to Councillors and Council Officers for their guidance and support over the past twelve months. I would also like to thank other Council staff and contractors for the hard work they have contributed in improving the amenities of the Ripple facilities. We look forward to another year where we continue to strengthen the bond our management team have developed with Council I would also like to pass on my thanks to each of the Board Members who have again attended to their duties freely to the benefit of the community.

Finally, I want to congratulate our General Manager, Paul Sheen, his Business Manager Paul McAlary and his team for their dedication and hard work that has led to the continued improved financial performance.

 

Alan Brown

Chairman

Penrith Aquatic and Leisure Limited

 

General Manager’s Report

 

It is with a great deal of pleasure that I present the 2018 financial summary, major projects,

Challenges for the future and progress report for the 2019 financial year to date.

 

·    2018 was somewhat of a mixed year for PAL

·    Some of the positive issues were – new uniform

·    2017 National Swim Australia ‘SwimSafer’ Award Winner

·    2017 National Swim Australia ‘Outstanding Community Service Award Winner

·    2017 NSW Austswim Recognised Swim Centre of the Year

·    2017 National Austswim Recognised Swim Centre of the Year Finalist

·    2017 Local Business Awards – Specialised Business for Learn to Swim

 

2018 Financial summary

 

2018 result sees continued revenue improvement in all key areas of the business except Fitness. When compared to the prior year, we achieved revenue growth of 5.4%.

 

·    Learn to Swim / Recreational Aquatics (Revenue up $52,609 to prior year)

 

The performance of our Learn to Swim team continues to be the backbone of the overall aquatic result. The drivers of our success are new participants via our Water Safety Roadshows championing ‘Swim, Safe, Survive’ in local pre and primary schools, active retention strategies and tight expense control. Our achievements have been recognised within the industry.

 

Recreational aquatics remains a challenge with the vast majority of our competitors operating out of modern purpose built infrastructure. To counter these effects we have achieved some success with the completion of the Penrith Waterpark and results have been encouraging enough to proceed with the St Marys Waterpark, currently under construction.

 

·    Fitness (Revenue down $21,898 to prior year )

 

Challenges in the gym are similar to recreational aquatics and new competitors which highlight the need to provide the latest fitness equipment. Despite the challenges of an extremely competitive market (7 gyms in St Marys area) the team continues to work on promotions, member retention and additional classes based on demand.

 

This challenge has also been meet with the decision to invest in new gym equipment

Of $230K, placing us with the latest and greatest in new technology. Installation expected January 2019.

 

·    Hydrotherapy (Revenue up $200,898 to prior year)

 

Hydrotherapy centre continuous to go from strength to strength with the current business model performing beyond expectations.

We will shortly be in a position where demand exceeds capacity and this area will need some close consideration.

 

Challenges and issues

 

Our biggest challenge remains our aging facility and equipment which opens opportunity for competitors. To a certain extent, competitors have been encouraged by limitations of our facilities. Our Penrith facility is still an entirely outdoor operation. The St Marys facility is modern by Penrith standards, but is no longer cutting edge. By contrast, many of our competitors are operating out of more modern premises.

 

While we have been able to strategically improve in 2018/17/16 via better programs, management systems, targeted marketing and business partnerships, there is no way around infrastructure limitations without some form of capital injection.

 

This has been recognised by PAL and PCC, with Masterplans for the development of both sites.

 

 The challenge to achieving full scale redevelopment goals is the level of funding required. Based on recent funding submissions and feedback, it is increasingly unlikely that full scale re-investment will occur in the next 5 years. While it is important that we continue to pursue every possible funding opportunity (with the assistance of PCC), it is also important we do not stand idle.

The recent success with the Penrith Water Park and now St Marys Water Park is a good example of this.

 

2019 progress report

 

The first 4 months of the 2018/19 year shows the continuing trend of 2018 with actual revenue down on budget by $50k operating expenses down on budget $15k leaving a net variance loss of $35k.

 

Revenue for Learn To Swim up $18k on budget, Hydrotherapy up on budget $37k with Fitness down on budget $50k. Gym memberships are on the rise from 710 in August to 773 in November 2018. This has been on the back of some good promotions i.e. 30 days for $30.00.

 

We anticipate this momentum will carry us through to the installation of new gym equipment scheduled for the New Year, with the month of February traditionally noted for the strong sales, in new memberships.

 

Efforts to improve our IT have also been ongoing with our key IT systems now having moved away from the local server to cloud based environments.

 

Board of Directors

 

The Constitution of the Company provides, in part that,

 

1.   Board members are elected for a 3 year term and retire on a rotational basis.

 

2.   All retiring Directors shall be eligible for re-appointment. Council should note that the Directors reaching the end of their term were Alan Brown and Wayne Mitchell.

These positions were declared vacant elections and both were re-appointed to the position of Company Director

 

It was resolved that PCC be requested to endorse the re-appointment of Alan Brown and Wayne Mitchell as continuing Directors of PAL.

 

Appreciation

 

I would like to personally acknowledge the gratuitous contribution of Ripples Directors, all of whom have made significant contributions during the year. I would also like to thank PCC and their support staff who continue to assist whenever required.

 

And last but not least, I would also like thank my management team and all staff at Ripples for their significant personal contributions during 2017/18. Without this team constantly challenging how we go about things and striving for improvement, we would not have achieved the results indicated.

 

Paul McAlary

Acting General Manager

Penrith Aquatic and Leisure Limited

 

Financial Services Manager’s Comment

 

The 2017-2018 Financial Statements of the City of Penrith Regional Indoor Aquatic and Recreation Centre Ltd have been independently externally audited and show the entity recording a deficit of $37k after Council’s subsidy of $1.02m (loss of $1.06m excluding the Council subsidy). This result is a decline in performance of $38k on the prior year and is represented by a $102k increase in expenses from operations, specifically related to electricity and gas $16k; insurance expenses $35k; water rates $21k and other expenses $30k. This was largely offset by an increase in Council’s subsidy by $70k on the prior year.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Penrith Aquatic & Leisure Centre Annual Report 2017-2018 be received.

2.    Council agree to underwrite the operations of Penrith Aquatic and Leisure Ltd until the presentation of the 2018-2019 Annual Report.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.  


 

ATTACHMENTS  

 

 

Date of Meeting:     Monday 10 December 2018

Report Title:            Proposed Suburb Name for the Central Precinct of the St Marys Release Area

Attachments:           Current Suburb Arrangement

                                Proposed Suburb Arrangement

                                Community Consultation Report



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                          10 December 2018

Attachment 1 - Current Suburb Arrangement

 

PDF Creator


Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                          10 December 2018

Attachment 2 - Proposed Suburb Arrangement

 

PDF Creator


Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                          10 December 2018

Attachment 3 - Community Consultation Report

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

ATTACHMENTS  

 

 

Date of Meeting:     Monday 10 December 2018

Report Title:            Penrith DCP 2014 amendment - Public Exhibition Submissions

Attachments:           Penrith Housing Market Review Feasibility Testing

                                Draft Amendments - Penrith DCP 2014



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                          10 December 2018

Attachment 1 - Penrith Housing Market Review Feasibility Testing

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                          10 December 2018

Attachment 2 - Draft Amendments - Penrith DCP 2014

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator