Council_Mark_POS_RGB

6 March 2019

 

Dear Councillor,

In pursuance of the provisions of the Local Government Act, 1993 and the Regulations thereunder, notice is hereby given that a POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING of Penrith City Council is to be held in the Passadena Room, Civic Centre, 601 High Street, Penrith on Monday 11 March 2019 at 7:00PM.

Attention is directed to the statement accompanying this notice of the business proposed to be transacted at the meeting.

Yours faithfully

 

 

Warwick Winn

General Manager

 

BUSINESS

 

1.           LEAVE OF ABSENCE

 

2.           APOLOGIES

 

3.           CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES

Policy Review Committee Meeting - 11 February 2019.

 

4.           DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

Pecuniary Interest (The Act requires Councillors who declare a pecuniary interest in an item to leave the meeting during discussion of that item)

Non-Pecuniary Conflict of Interest – Significant and Less than Significant (The Code of Conduct requires Councillors who declare a significant non-pecuniary conflict of interest in an item to leave the meeting during discussion of that item)

 

5.           ADDRESSING THE MEETING

 

6.           MAYORAL MINUTES

 

7.           NOTICES OF MOTION TO RESCIND A RESOLUTION

 

8.           NOTICES OF MOTION

 

9.           DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

10.         REQUESTS FOR REPORTS AND MEMORANDUMS

 

11.         URGENT BUSINESS

 

12.         CONFIDENTIAL BUSINESS


POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING

 

Monday 11 March 2019

 

table of contents

 

 

 

 

 

 

meeting calendar

 

 

confirmation of minutes

 

 

DELIVERY program reports

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                                                                               

                                                                                               


Council_Mark_POS_RGB2019 MEETING CALENDAR

January 2019 - December 2019

(Adopted by Council - 26 November 2018)

 

 

 

TIME

JAN

FEB

MAR

APRIL

MAY

JUNE

JULY

AUG

SEPT

OCT

NOV

DEC

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

 

Ordinary Council Meeting

7.00pm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

25@

25

29v

27#

24*

22

26@

  23^ü

28

25#+

16

Policy Review Committee

7.00pm

 

11

11

8

13

17

8

12

9

21

11

9

 

 

 v

Meeting at which the draft corporate planning documents (Delivery Program and Operational Plan) are endorsed for exhibition

 *

Meeting at which the draft corporate planning documents (Delivery Program and Operational Plan) are adopted

 #

Meetings at which the Operational Plan quarterly reviews (March and September) are presented

 @

Meetings at which the Delivery Program progress reports (including the Operational Plan quarterly reviews for December and June) are presented

 ^

Election of Mayor/Deputy Mayor

 ü

Meeting at which the 2018-2019 Annual Statements are presented

 

Meeting at which any comments on the 2018-2019 Annual Statements are adopted

 +

Meeting at which the Annual Report is presented

Briefing to consider Budget, draft fees & charges and corporate documents

-            Extraordinary Meetings are held as required;

-            Members of the public are invited to observe meetings of the Council (Ordinary and Policy Review Committee).

Should you wish to address Council, please contact Governance Coordinator, Adam Beggs on 4732 7597.

 


UNCONFIRMED MINUTES

 OF THE POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING OF PENRITH CITY COUNCIL HELD IN THE PASSADENA ROOM, PENRITH

ON MONDAY 11 FEBRUARY 2019 AT 7:02PM

PRESENT

His Worship the Mayor, Councillor Ross Fowler OAM, Deputy Mayor, Councillor Greg Davies, and Councillors Jim Aitken OAM, Bernard Bratusa, Brian Cartwright, Robin Cook, Marcus Cornish, Kevin Crameri OAM, Mark Davies, Tricia Hitchen, Karen McKeown OAM, and John Thain.    

 

APOLOGIES

PRC 1  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Brian Cartwright seconded Councillor Tricia  Hitchen that apologies be received for Councillors Kath Presdee, Aaron Duke, Todd Carney.

 

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES - Policy Review Committee Meeting - 10 December 2018

PRC 2  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Tricia  Hitchen seconded Councillor Brian Cartwright that the minutes of the Policy Review Committee Meeting of 10 December 2018 be confirmed.

 

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

 

There were no declarations of interest.

 

DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Outcome 2 - We plan for our future growth

 

1        Planning Proposal to reclassify Council-owned land at 11 - 13 Chesham Street, St Marys                                                                                                                                  

PRC 3  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Brian Cartwright seconded Councillor Tricia  Hitchen

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Planning Proposal to reclassify Council-owned land at 11 - 13 Chesham Street, St Marys be received.

2.    Council endorse the Planning Proposal for 11 - 13 Chesham Street, St Marys provided in the separate enclosure to this report.

3.    The General Manager be granted delegation to update and finalise the Planning Proposal referred to in resolution 2 prior to Council's submission of the Planning Proposal to the Minister for Planning and Parliamentary Counsel.

4.    Council officers forward the Planning Proposal to the Minister for Planning and Parliamentary Counsel with a request to make the local environmental plan amendment.

 

 

 

In accordance with Section 375A of the Local Government Act 1993, a DIVISION was then called with the following result:

For

Against

Councillor John Thain

 

Councillor Bernard Bratusa

 

Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM

 

Councillor Karen McKeown OAM

 

Councillor Greg Davies

 

Councillor Mark Davies

 

Councillor Ross Fowler OAM

 

Councillor Jim Aitken OAM

 

Councillor Tricia  Hitchen

 

Councillor Marcus Cornish

 

Councillor Brian Cartwright

 

Councillor Robin Cook

 

 

2        Amending Precinct Plan for the Central Precinct of St Marys Release Area            

PRC 4  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Marcus Cornish seconded Councillor Greg Davies

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Amending Precinct Plan for the Central Precinct of St Marys Release Area be received.

2.    The matter be deferred to a future Councillor Briefing.

In accordance with Section 375A of the Local Government Act 1993, a DIVISION was then called with the following result:

For

Against

Councillor John Thain

 

Councillor Bernard Bratusa

 

Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM

 

Councillor Karen McKeown OAM

 

Councillor Greg Davies

 

Councillor Mark Davies

 

Councillor Ross Fowler OAM

 

Councillor Jim Aitken OAM

 

Councillor Tricia  Hitchen

 

Councillor Marcus Cornish

 

Councillor Brian Cartwright

 

Councillor Robin Cook

 

 

Outcome 7 - We have confidence in our Council

 

3        Procurement Policy                                                                                                          

PRC 5  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Bernard Bratusa seconded Councillor John Thain

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Procurement Policy be received.

2.    The Procurement Policy be formally endorsed by the Policy Review Committee prior to being adopted by the Council.

3.    The Procurement Policy formally replace all Supply Policies and Guidelines and Sustainable Purchasing Policy once adopted by the Council.

 

 

There being no further business the Chairperson declared the meeting closed the time being 7:18pm.

    



DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

  

Outcome 4 - We have safe, vibrant places

 

1        Pedestrian Lighting Strategy                                                                                              1

 

Outcome 5 - We care about our environment

 

2        Compliance and Enforcement Policy and Guidelines                                                       9

 

3        Hawkesbury River County Council - Biosecurity Act update                                           12

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


 

 

Outcome 1 - We can work close to home

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


 

 

Outcome 2 - We plan for our future growth

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


 

 

Outcome 3 - We can get around the City

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


Outcome 4 - We have safe, vibrant places

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

1        Pedestrian Lighting Strategy                                                                                              1

 

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                   11 March 2019

 

 

 

1

Pedestrian Lighting Strategy   

 

Compiled by:               Rebekah Elliott, City Engagement Officer

Dimity  Mullane, City Project Officer

Authorised by:            Jeni Pollard, Place Manager  

 

Outcome

We have safe, vibrant places

Strategy

Help make our major centres and important community places safe and attractive

Service Activity

Support the revitalisation of Penrith City Centre and St Marys Town Centre

      

 

Executive Summary

The draft Penrith City Centre Pedestrian Lighting Strategy promotes pedestrian safety, amenity and way finding. It aims to enhance peoples’ experience of the Penrith City Centre at night, supporting the Night Time Economy Strategy and provides Council with a clear approach to addressing identified issues with the existing lighting levels within our city centre.

 

Following a presentation at a Councillor Briefing on 16 October 2017, Council officers have continued to work on developing the strategy to include specific options for the installation of creative lighting treatments within the Penrith City Centre.

 

The following report provides an update on the development of a Pedestrian Lighting Strategy including the project background, process undertaken to date, key findings and as requested by Councillor’s further information on the creative lighting treatments.

 

The report recommends that Council adopt the attached draft Penrith City Centre Pedestrian Lighting Strategy (Attachment 1).

Background

During the development of the Night Time Economy (NTE) Strategy for the Penrith City Centre, Council received feedback that indicated lighting in the city centre for pedestrians in some locations was considered inadequate. This feedback was focused on linkages between parking areas and night time destinations on Thursday, Friday and Saturday evenings. The impact of poor lighting can contribute to the negative perceptions of safety and amenity in the city centre at night and have a detrimental impact on economic and community activity. The NTE strategy also highlighted that the prevalence of roller shutters and the lack of lighting outside shopfronts added to the poor presentation of the city centre at night.

 

The NTE Strategy identified that lighting could also be used more effectively in creative and artistic ways to define Penrith’s identity as a regional city. In response to this feedback

Council commenced a process to develop a Pedestrian Lighting Strategy in 2017 for the Penrith City Centre.

 

The project had three key objectives. These were:

 

1.   To gain an understanding of the existing lighting levels in the Penrith City Centre;

2.   To gain an understanding of the appropriateness of the existing lighting levels in the context of the Australian Standards and the specific needs and condition of each street or area; and

3.   To develop a strategy that:

a.   Provides Council with a clear approach to addressing any issues with the existing lighting levels

b.   Promotes pedestrian safety, amenity and way finding

c.   Encourages a reduction in energy use, and

d.   Aims to enhance peoples’ experience of the Penrith City Centre at night and thus support the night time economy.

 

Scope of the Study

The area chosen for the audit is shown in the map below. In summary, the scope of the study was to include:

 

1.   Penrith City Centre – footpaths

2.   Peripheral residential streets

3.   Places where people may expect to congregate or travel through, in and around the city centre such as parks, car parks and plazas

 

Note – the focus of the study was on pedestrian lighting rather than lighting for vehicle movement. This meant that the audit focused on footpath areas rather than roadways.

 

Process

The development of the Lighting Strategy was undertaken by Ironbark Sustainability (Ironbark). Ironbark were chosen following a competitive selection process and had previously undertaken work for Council including the Sustainable Council Buildings Benchmarking Program (2015) and provided support for the recent residential street light upgrade program. Ironbark has completed a similar strategy for other local government areas including the City of Melbourne. Ironbark demonstrated throughout the process their capacity to manage the technical aspects of the work, starting with the lighting audit.

 

Findings from the Lighting Audit

Overall the lighting audit of pedestrian pathways in the Penrith City Centre and peripheral residential streets found the lighting assessed to be of a relatively high quality, commensurate with a city centre location.

 

The pedestrian lighting level audit assessed the lighting levels measured throughout the Penrith City Centre and adjoining peripheral residential areas against the five lighting sub categories for roadways, pedestrian paths and laneways in the Australian Standards for Pedestrian Category Areas (AS/NZs 1158.3 Pedestrian Area Lighting). The categories range from the highest standard of P1 to the lowest of P5. The lighting subcategory achieved in each area was then compared to the targets set in Council’s Public Domain Lighting Policy. To note, Council’s policy is consistent with the Australian Standards for Pedestrian Category Areas. 

 

Footpath lighting along city centre streets was assessed to be of high quality, with the highest subcategory achieved along most segments of the footpath. However, there was a level of variability in the lighting levels recorded. Most footpaths included some segments that fell below the P1 standards and even P2, which is the level required under Council’s lighting policy.

 

Lighting levels were lower on footpaths along the periphery residential streets with minimum standard observed. Council’s target has a required level of P3 in these areas with most falling below this standard and only achieving P4 or P5. This was in some instances due to the age of the Endeavour Energy asset or due to street trees casting shadows over the footpath.

 

Six public spaces were audited, three of these were found to fall below standards, including Memory Park and Woodriff Lane which have both been identified for creative lighting treatments to be discussed further in this report.

 

Pedestrian Lighting Strategy - Implementation

The Strategy will guide Council in achieving best practice in the management of pedestrian lighting assets, including street lighting, pathway and open space lighting, and car park lighting.

 

The role of the strategy is to promote pedestrian safety, improve amenity, assist with way finding, minimise energy use and enhance peoples experience in the city centre at night.

 

The strategy has three key focus areas:

·    Functional Lighting - identifies the key issues and actions relating to lighting which provides the ‘base’ level of illumination to assist pedestrians to move about safely and comfortably.

·    Creative Lighting - introducing lighting which makes the city centre attractive, reinforces a sense of place, is used to highlight certain spaces and as a mode of creative and artistic expression.

·    People Spaces - Identifies the key pedestrian precincts and provides guidance of the functional and/or creative lighting that should be considered.

 

Through the recent upgrade works in High Street some of the identified issues were able to be rectified through the construction process.

 

It is proposed that upgrades to pedestrian lighting and creative lighting installs will be scheduled and undertaken within existing program budgets with a program for creative lighting elements to be delivered through a planned program subject to funding opportunities. Staff will work collaboratively to identify potential funding opportunities to support the implementation of projects, where available.

Creative Lighting

Creative lighting in the public domain is an important feature identified in the draft Pedestrian Lighting Strategy. Creative lighting is used to make public spaces attractive, reinforces a sense of place, and is a mode for creative and artistic expression.

The strategy recommends that creative lighting be used to target or highlight specific locations and is to provide contrast to functional lighting with the key objective of highlighting or emphasising particular spaces or features within the public realm. The installation of creative lighting in the city centre will also address a number of priority actions identified in the NTE Strategy including:

·    Improved amenity

·    Wayfinding

·    Connections to parking

·    Safety

·    Activation

 

The public spaces suggested for a creative lighting treatment in the draft Strategy include:

·    Woodriff Lane

·    The Civic Arts Precinct

·    Lawler Park

·    Memory Park

·    High Street Precinct

·    Triangle Park

·    City Park

·    Judges Park

·    High Street to Great River Walk

To note the recent construction works in the city centre have included creative lighting elements as outlined in the draft Strategy. The installation of creative light bollards at the linear plazas in High Street was supported by a Federal Government grant and is almost completed. Triangle Park works included two lighting projectors and LED strip lighting to highlight street furniture in the park at night.

Whilst the upgrade works were underway, designs progressed on exploring creative lighting treatments at two pedestrian walkways that provide important links to the priority night time economy precincts of High Street and Woodriff Street to support afterhours access from High Street to parking in Allen Place and Judges Car Park.

At the Ordinary Council meeting on 17 December 2018, Council approved Works on Private Land to undertake the installation of creative lighting elements in both the Broadwalk Arcade and Woodriff Lane. Through a competitive selection process, Council engaged Steensen Varming in collaboration with KI Studio Pty Ltd to deliver the creative lighting treatments.

Their brief has been to deliver lighting treatments that will integrate into the urban fabric and landscape of the existing spaces, delivering a low-cost high impact solution. The consultants were requested to deliver a design with minimal structural and building impact on surrounding private property.

The intent of the creative lighting treatments is to be unobtrusive during the day while providing a playful and lively experience at night time. They are to create an entry into the recently upgraded High Street precinct of our city centre and assist in the creation of a safe night time environment establishing an atmosphere of warmth, welcome and safety.

 

To date the consultant has presented concept lighting designs for the two pedestrian laneways to internal and external stakeholders including property managers and the Penrith CBD Corporation. The concept development has been well received, with further attention required to the holistic management of the Broadwalk arcade including maintenance and placemaking outcomes. This is currently being scoped with the relevant department.

 

The concept development in Woodriff Lane is to utilise existing lighting poles and install a lampshade effect creating a playful, decorative solution that will encourage people to firstly feel safe and secondly to explore the surrounding businesses. 

 

The indicative concept for Broadwalk involves a treatment on Judges Car Park façade and directional pavement treatment linking the Broadwalk to High Street. Staff will continue to work with the consultant and property owners to further develop both concepts with a focus on a placemaking approach focusing on creating the link between both pedestrian arcades and High Street. The concept design documentation is attached for information (Attachment 2).

 

Conclusion

The draft Penrith City Council Pedestrian Lighting Strategy supports Council in further activating our city centre and night time economy, particularly through the installation of creative lighting elements to further facilitate activation, improve safety and the amenity of key public spaces at night.

It is proposed that upgrades to lighting and creative lighting installs will be scheduled and undertaken within existing delivery program budgets this year and next financial year. Staff will work collaboratively to identify potential funding opportunities to support the implementation of projects, where available.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Pedestrian Lighting Strategy be received.

2.    The draft Penrith City Centre Pedestrian Lighting Strategy be adopted.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

Draft Pedestrian Lighting Strategy

75 Pages

Attachments Included

2.

Lighting Concepts

2 Pages

Attachments Included

   


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


Outcome 5 - We care about our environment

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

2        Compliance and Enforcement Policy and Guidelines                                                       9

 

3        Hawkesbury River County Council - Biosecurity Act update                                           12

 

 

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                   11 March 2019

 

 

 

2

Compliance and Enforcement Policy and Guidelines   

 

Compiled by:               Greg McCarthy , Environmental Health and Compliance Manager 

Authorised by:            Wayne Mitchell, Executive Manager - Environment & City Development  

 

Outcome

We care for our environment

Strategy

Protect the environment of our City

Service Activity

Help minimise impacts on the environment from unauthorised activities

      

 

Executive Summary

Regulatory and compliance functions come with significant responsibilities under multiple Acts and statutes. This is an important and critical service that Council provides and one that our community must have confidence in.

Compliance has to be consistent, transparent and supported by robust policies and procedures to protect both Council’s interests and the staff working in this environment. Such policies have been developed in recent years and are based on recommendations by the NSW Government. Key reference documents have included the Model Compliance and Enforcement Policy by the NSW Ombudsman and the Model Code of Conduct by the Office of Local Government. These polices however are recommended to Council and can be adapted to some extent to suit the circumstances and values of our Council and City. It is also good practice for the Council to regularly review these policies to ensure they are contemporary and achieving the desired outcome.

 

A new Compliance and Enforcement Policy has been drafted that is consistent with the Ombudsman’s model policy.

 

The policy has been prepared following consultation with Councillors and Council staff. It is recommended the attached policy be adopted by Council.

 

Background

Penrith City Council is an enforcement authority and its officers are required to make decisions about appropriate enforcement actions when non-compliant issues are identified. Sometimes regulatory and enforcement actions can be complex and difficult to investigate and resolve.

Council has a responsibility under Section 8 of the Local Government Act 1993 to ensure its regulatory activities are carried out in a consistent manner and without bias. To facilitate these requirements, the Compliance and Enforcement Policy was developed and adopted in February 2016 with consideration of the “Model Policy” prepared for Local Councils by the NSW Ombudsman.

 

The policy addresses a number of important enforcement issues including:

·    Councils compliance and enforcement principles

·    Risk based regulation

·    Dealing with Unlawful activity

·    Managing unreasonable complainant conduct

·    Anonymous reports

·    Deciding on Enforcement action

·    Taking Legal Action

·    Shared Enforcement responsibilities

·    Private Certifiers

·    Building Certificates

·    Role of Councillors in Enforcement

 

Draft New Compliance and Enforcement Policy

 

A special briefing on Compliance and Enforcement and an initial draft policy was tabled to Council on 5 December 2018. Feedback from Councillors from the briefing and subsequent consultation with staff has been considered and an updated policy has been prepared.

 

The Current Compliance and Enforcement Policy is three years old and scheduled for review in accordance with our policy register requirements. In that time there has been a new model policy released by the NSW Ombudsman and various other legislative changes. A contemporary new draft policy has been developed and is attached to this report for consideration (Attachment No. 1).

 

Some key changes to the draft policy include:

 

Risk Based Approach - The categorisation of complaints has been removed and replaced with risk-based approach that references a risk matrix for decision about the urgency or priority of investigations.

 

Private Certifiers - A different approach to complaints involving private certifiers. The role and responsibility of Private Certifiers is still acknowledged; it does suggest that Council will investigate if the complaint has not been addressed within a reasonable timeframe. Proposed changes to the Environmental Planning & Assessment Act will help to assist in this situation. The current policy suggests that all complaints be directed to the relevant certifier except for emergency situation such as a safety issue or a pollution event. This is an enhanced service and as such may require additional resources. Workloads in this regard will need to be monitored.

 

Taking Enforcement Action

A revised section on determining what enforcement action to take. These include considerations about the alleged offence and impact, the alleged offender, the impact of any enforcement action, and potential for remedy.

 

Councillors and Enforcement

This policy includes an additional section on the role of Councillors in enforcement which builds on the current references in the “Interaction Between Councillors and Staff Policy”

 

Supporting Guidelines

 

An internal supporting document known as the ‘Compliance and Enforcement Guidelines’ (Attachment No. 2) has also been updated to provide further details for Council Officers on compliance and enforcement options and conducting investigations. This document will also help to facilitate a consistent approach for departments with regulatory responsibilities and will ensure officers deliver the objectives of the policy. The attached version has been adapted for Council using the December 2015 NSW Ombudsman Enforcement Guidelines. The guidelines are intended to be a dynamic document that will continue to be reviewed and updated as needed by the relevant departments to ensure they remain contemporary.

 


 

Legal Services Support

 

The Legal Services Manager supports the revised policy. It will provide Compliance Officers with support and consistency in managing compliance matters. Importantly the policy is designed to ensure there is an escalated approach to enforcement action, with the flexibility of taking immediate enforcement action, include legal proceedings, where the gravity of the alleged offence calls for such action.

 

The policy will also demonstrate the Council’s approach to compliance and enforcement action. Courts will expect compliance and enforcement action to be conducted in accordance with the policy, and the Courts will expect for litigation to be conducted as a last resort, or where the gravity of the alleged offence warrants that action.

 

Conclusion

 

Council has a responsibility as an enforcement authority to ensure compliance and enforcement decisions and actions are applied consistently. Community confidence in this function is important. Clear policy is needed to ensure a consistent and transparent approach is taken by all involved. A revised “Compliance and Enforcement Policy” is recommended for consideration to ensure our approach is consistent with best practice in Local Government.

 

The policy has been prepared incorporating feedback from Councillors and ongoing consultation with an internal working group.

 

It is recommended the attached policy be adopted by Council.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Compliance and Enforcement Policy and Guidelines be received.

2.    Council adopt the attached Compliance and Enforcement Policy.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

DRAFT Compliance and Enforcement Policy Feb 2019

17 Pages

Attachments Included

2.

DRAFT Compliance and Enforcement Guidelines Feb 2019

36 Pages

Attachments Included

  


Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                   11 March 2019

 

 

 

3

Hawkesbury River County Council - Biosecurity Act update   

 

Compiled by:               Murray  Halls, Acting City Presentation Manager - Public Spaces Maintenance

Authorised by:            Brian Steffen, Executive Manager - City Assets  

 

Outcome

We care for our environment

Strategy

Protect the environment of our City

Service Activity

Maintain Council's natural areas

      

 

Presenter: Chris Dewhurst, General Manager – Hawkesbury River County Council

 

Executive Summary

The General Manager of the Hawkesbury River County Council (HRCC) will be briefing Council on their updated approach to providing contemporary weed management education.  Known as Community Based Social marketing (CBSM), this approach helps to identify barriers that local landholders face in introducing effective weed management practices on their properties.

Background

The Hawkesbury River County Council is a single purpose authority aiming to administer the Biosecurity Act 2015.  The HRCC provides a broad range of weed management services for member Councils – Penrith City Council, Blacktown City Council, Hawkesbury Council and the Hills Shire Council.  Each council pays an annual contribution charge of $175,000 to HRCC.

 

The organisation takes a nil-tenure, landscape approach to weed management across the region, with a focus on early detection of new incursions and containment of high-risk plant species that impact on biodiversity, agriculture and property.

 

An important strategy in the management of weeds centres around community engagement and education. A key component of the work undertaken by the HRCC surrounds community awareness, with the aim being to provide the community with an effective level of understanding of weed awareness and management strategies.

 

Penrith City Council currently undertakes a range of education programs through its Bushcare management team that engages school children, community groups and Bushcare volunteers.  These programs focus on the impact of weeds, weed identification and active participation in weed management programs.

 

Public Education and Awareness Campaign

 

HRCC’s traditional education and awareness programmes were recently subject to a dramatic shift from previous years.  The NSW Department of Primary Industries (DPI) is driving a new initiative known as Community Based Social Marketing (CBSM) to help identify the barriers that landholders face that prevent them from undertaking effective weed management practices on their properties.

 

HRCC is well advanced in its development of two (2) of these projects:

 

·    Fireweed in commercial turf supplies; &

·    toxic weeds on horse properties

 

 

The organisation was scheduled to commence delivery of these community based social marketing programs in 2019.

 

HRCC is keen to present to Council how CBSM will be localised in Penrith, and their attempts to incorporate priority weeds.

 

Conclusion

The presentation by the General Manager of the Hawkesbury River County Council will provide Councillors with an overview of HRCC’s new Community Based Social Marketing education initiative.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the information contained in the report on Hawkesbury River County Council - Biosecurity Act update be received.

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.  


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


 

 

Outcome 6 - We are healthy and share strong community spirit

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


 

 

Outcome 7 - We have confidence in our Council

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled



 

ATTACHMENTS  

 

 

Date of Meeting:     Monday 11 March 2019

Report Title:            Pedestrian Lighting Strategy

Attachments:           Draft Pedestrian Lighting Strategy

                                Lighting Concepts



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                                 11 March 2019

Attachment 1 - Draft Pedestrian Lighting Strategy

 

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Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                                 11 March 2019

Attachment 2 - Lighting Concepts

 



 

ATTACHMENTS  

 

 

Date of Meeting:     Monday 11 March 2019

Report Title:            Compliance and Enforcement Policy and Guidelines

Attachments:           DRAFT Compliance and Enforcement Policy Feb 2019

                                DRAFT Compliance and Enforcement Guidelines Feb 2019



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                                 11 March 2019

Attachment 1 - DRAFT Compliance and Enforcement Policy Feb 2019

 

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Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                                 11 March 2019

Attachment 2 - DRAFT Compliance and Enforcement Guidelines Feb 2019

 

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