Council_Mark_POS_RGB

22 May 2019

 

Dear Councillor,

In pursuance of the provisions of the Local Government Act, 1993 and the Regulations thereunder, notice is hereby given that an ORDINARY MEETING of Penrith City Council is to be held in the Council Chambers, Civic Centre, 601 High Street, Penrith on Monday 27 May 2019 at 7:00PM.

Attention is directed to the statement accompanying this notice of the business proposed to be transacted at the meeting.

Yours faithfully

 

Warwick Winn

General Manager

 

BUSINESS

 

1.           LEAVE OF ABSENCE

 

2.           APOLOGIES

 

3.           CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES

Ordinary Meeting - 29 April 2019.

 

4.           DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

Pecuniary Interest (The Act requires Councillors who declare a pecuniary interest in an item to leave the meeting during discussion of that item)

Non-Pecuniary Conflict of Interest – Significant and Less than Significant (The Code of Conduct requires Councillors who declare a significant non-pecuniary conflict of interest in an item to leave the meeting during discussion of that item)

 

5.           ADDRESSING COUNCIL

 

6.           MAYORAL MINUTES

 

7.           NOTICES OF MOTION TO RESCIND A RESOLUTION

 

8.           NOTICES OF MOTION AND QUESTIONS ON NOTICE

 

9.           ADOPTION OF REPORTS AND RECOMMENDATION OF COMMITTEES

Penrith Community Safety Partnership Meeting - 3 April 2019.

Access Committee Meeting - 10 April 2019.

Local Traffic Committee Meeting - 6 May 2019.

 

10.         DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

11.         REQUESTS FOR REPORTS AND MEMORANDUMS

 

12.         URGENT BUSINESS

 

13.         COMMITTEE OF THE WHOLE


ORDINARY MEETING

 

Monday 27 May 2019

 

table of contents

 

 

 

 

ADVANCE AUSTRALIA FAIR

 

 

STATEMENT OF RECOGNITION OF PENRITH CITY’S ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER CULTURAL HERITAGE

 

 

PRAYER

 

 

COUNCIL CHAMBER seating arrangements

 

 

meeting calendar

 

 

confirmation of minutes

 

 

PROCEDURE FOR ADDRESSING COUNCIL MEETING

 

 

MAYORAL MINUTES

 

 

report and recommendations of committees

 

 

DELIVERY program reports


 

 

 

 

ADVANCE AUSTRALIA FAIR

 

 

Australians all let us rejoice,

For we are young and free;

We’ve golden soil and wealth for toil;

Our home is girt by sea;

Our land abounds in nature’s gifts

Of beauty rich and rare;

In history’s page, let every stage

Advance Australia Fair.

 

In joyful strains then let us sing,

Advance Australia Fair.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



Statement of Recognition of

Penrith City’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cultural Heritage

 

 

Council values the unique status of Aboriginal people as the original owners and custodians of lands and waters, including the land and waters of Penrith City.

 

Council values the unique status of Torres Strait Islander people as the original owners and custodians of the Torres Strait Islands and surrounding waters.

 

We work together for a united Australia and City that respects this land of ours, that values the diversity of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural heritage, and provides justice and equity for all.

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

PRAYER

 

 

 

“Sovereign God, tonight as we gather together as a Council we affirm that you are the giver and sustainer of life.  We come together as representatives of our community to make decisions that will benefit this city and the people within it. 

 

We come not in a spirit of competition, not as adversaries, but as colleagues.  Help us to treat each other with respect, with dignity, with interest and with honesty.  Help us not just to hear the words we say, but also to hear each others hearts.  We seek to be wise in all that we say and do.

 

As we meet, our concern is for this city.  Grant us wisdom, courage and strength.

 

Lord, help us.  We pray this in the name of Jesus Christ our Lord.  Amen.”

 

 

 

 

 


Council Chambers

Seating Arrangements


For members of the public addressing the meeting


 

 

 

Lectern


 

 

     Directors


 

 

 

General Manager
Warwick Winn

His Worship the Mayor Councillor Ross Fowler OAM



Governance Coordinator Adam Beggs






Minute Clerk

MediaClr Marcus Cornish

North Ward

 

Clr Bernard Bratusa

East Ward

 

 

Clr Tricia Hitchen

East Ward

 

 

Clr Brian Cartwright

South Ward

 

 

Clr Mark Davies

South Ward

 

 

Clr Jim Aitken OAM

Public GallerySouth Ward

 

 

Clr Kevin Crameri OAM

North Ward

 

 

Clr John Thain

North Ward

Clr Karen McKeown OAM

South Ward

 

Clr Aaron Duke

North Ward

 

Clr Todd Carney

East Ward

 

Clr Greg Davies

East Ward

 

Clr Robin Cook

East Ward

 

Clr Kath Presdee

ManagersSouth Ward

 

 

Directors


 


Oath of Office

 

I swear that I will undertake the duties of the office of Councillor in the best interests of the people of Penrith and the Penrith City Council and that I will faithfully and impartially carry out the functions, powers, authorities and discretions vested in me under the Local Government Act 1993 or any other Act to the best of my ability and judgment.

 

 

Affirmation of Office

 

I solemnly and sincerely declare and affirm that I will undertake the duties of the office of Councillor in the best interests of the people of Penrith and the Penrith City Council and that I will faithfully and impartially carry out the functions, powers, authorities and discretions vested in me under the Local Government Act 1993 or any other Act to the best of my ability and judgment.

 

 

2016 General Election – taken/made at the Ordinary Meeting of Council on 26 September 2016, Minute Number 272

 

2018 By-Election – taken/made by Councillor Brian Cartwright on 17 May 2018 and Councillor Robin Cook on 21 May 2018 before the Chief Governance Officer, Stephen Britten, an Australian Legal Practitioner

 

 

Local Government Act 1993, Section 233A

 


Council_Mark_POS_RGB2019 MEETING CALENDAR

January 2019 - December 2019

(Adopted by Council - 26 November 2018, Amended 1 May 2019)

 

 

 

TIME

JAN

FEB

MAR

APRIL

MAY

JUNE

JULY

AUG

SEPT

OCT

NOV

DEC

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

 

Ordinary Council Meeting

7.00pm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

25@

25

29v

27#

24*

22

26@

  23^ü

28

25#+

16

Policy Review Committee

7.00pm

 

11

11

8

 

17

8

12

9

21

11

9

 

 

 v

Meeting at which the draft corporate planning documents (Delivery Program and Operational Plan) are endorsed for exhibition

 *

Meeting at which the draft corporate planning documents (Delivery Program and Operational Plan) are adopted

 #

Meetings at which the Operational Plan quarterly reviews (March and September) are presented

 @

Meetings at which the Delivery Program progress reports (including the Operational Plan quarterly reviews for December and June) are presented

 ^

Election of Mayor/Deputy Mayor

 ü

Meeting at which the 2018-2019 Annual Statements are presented

 

Meeting at which any comments on the 2018-2019 Annual Statements are adopted

 +

Meeting at which the Annual Report is presented

Briefing to consider Budget, draft fees & charges and corporate documents

-            Extraordinary Meetings are held as required;

-            Members of the public are invited to observe meetings of the Council (Ordinary and Policy Review Committee).

Should you wish to address Council, please contact Governance Coordinator, Adam Beggs on 4732 7597.

 



UNCONFIRMED MINUTES

 OF THE ORDINARY MEETING OF PENRITH CITY COUNCIL HELD IN THE

COUNCIL CHAMBERS

ON MONDAY 29 APRIL 2019 AT 7:00PM

NATIONAL ANTHEM 

The meeting opened with the National Anthem.

STATEMENT OF RECOGNITION

His Worship the Mayor, Councillor Ross Fowler OAM read a statement of recognition of Penrith City’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cultural Heritage.

PRAYER

The Council Prayer was read by Rev Neil Checkley.

A minute’s silence was then observed in remembrance of the recent attacks in Sri Lanka.

PRESENT

His Worship the Mayor, Councillor Ross Fowler OAM, Deputy Mayor, Councillor Greg Davies, and Councillors Todd Carney, Brian Cartwright, Robin Cook, Marcus Cornish, Kevin Crameri OAM, Mark Davies, Tricia Hitchen, Karen McKeown OAM, Kath Presdee and John Thain.

 

LEAVE OF ABSENCE

Leave of Absence was previously granted to Councillor Aaron Duke for the 29 April 2019. 

APOLOGIES

59  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Karen McKeown OAM seconded Councillor Greg Davies that apologies be accepted for Councillors Jim Aitken OAM and Bernard Bratusa.

 

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES - Ordinary Meeting - 25 March 2019

60  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM seconded Councillor Karen McKeown OAM that the minutes of the Ordinary Meeting of 25 March 2019 be confirmed.

  

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

There were no declarations of interest.

 

Reports of Committees

 

1        Report and Recommendations of the Local Traffic Committee Meeting held on 1 April 2019                                                                     

61  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Tricia  Hitchen seconded Councillor Todd Carney that the recommendations contained in the Report and Recommendations of the Local Traffic Committee meeting held on 1 April, 2019 be adopted.

 

 

2        Report and Recommendations of the Policy Review Committee Meeting held on 8 April 2019                                                                     

62  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Kath Presdee seconded Councillor Todd Carney that the recommendations contained in the Report and Recommendations of the Policy Review Committee meeting held on 8 April, 2019 be adopted, with an amendment to Item 3 – Code of Meeting Practice and recommendation 4 to now read:

 

The Council’s Code of Meeting Practice, once adopted be used for all Council Committee Meetings, except for the provisions that relate to the requirement to web cast and record meetings.

 

 

DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Outcome 3 - We can get around the City

 

1        Additional Federal Roads to Recovery Funding for the period 2019/20 to 2023/24                                                                                      

63  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Marcus Cornish seconded Councillor Todd Carney

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Additional Federal Roads to Recovery Funding for the period 2019/20 to 2023/24 be received

2.    Council accept the allocation of $1,522,275 from the Australian Government under the Roads to Recovery Program over the 2019/20 to 2023/24 funding period

3.    Council write to the Federal Government formally thanking them for the additional funding under the Roads to Recovery Program.

 

 

Outcome 4 - We have safe, vibrant places

 

2        RFT18/19-22 for the construction of Mulgoa Park Amenities               

64  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Brian Cartwright seconded Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on RFT18/19-22 for the construction of Mulgoa Park Amenities be received

2.    The proposal and lump sum price from Westco Building Consultants Pty Ltd of $237,960 excluding GST be accepted for Construction of Toilet Amenities and Associated Works at Mulgoa Park, Mulgoa.

3.    The Common Seal of the Council of the City of Penrith be placed on all documentation as necessary.

 

 

 

 

Outcome 5 - We care about our environment

 

Procedural Motion

65  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Marcus Cornish that Item 3 – Recycling Processing Contract be deferred to Committee of the Whole for discussion and consideration of the item be deferred until after Committee of the Whole.

 

This item has been referred to Committee of the Whole as the report refers to commercial

information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed prejudice the commercial

position of the person who supplied it and discussion of the matter in open meeting would

be, on balance, contrary to the public interest.

 

 

4        Peach Tree and Lower Surveyors Creeks Flood Study                         

66  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Marcus Cornish seconded Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Peach Tree and Lower Surveyors Creeks Flood Study be received

2.    The Peach Tree and Lower Surveyors Creeks Flood Study Final Report April 2019 be adopted.

3.    The Peach Tree and Lower Surveyors Creeks Flood Study Final Report April 2019 be made available to the public through Council’s website.

4.    Council write to those who made a submission advising of Council’s resolution.

 

 

Outcome 7 - We have confidence in our Council

 

5        Audit, Risk and Improvement Committee                                                

67  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Kath Presdee seconded Councillor Brian Cartwright that the information contained in the report on Audit, Risk and Improvement Committee be received.

 

 

7        Licence Agreement to Transport for NSW (Sydney Trains) for site compound purposes - 641 High Street, Penrith (Part Lot 90 DP 1176539)                                                                                                       

68  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Kath Presdee seconded Councillor Brian Cartwright

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Licence Agreement to Transport for NSW (Sydney Trains) for site compound purposes - 641 High Street, Penrith (Part Lot 90 DP 1176539) be received.

2.    Subject to no objections being received, Council grant a licence to Transport for NSW – Sydney Trains on the terms and conditions detailed in this report.

3.    Council resolve to affix the Common Seal of the Council of the City of Penrith to any necessary documentation.

 

 

9        Summary of Investment & Banking for the Period 1 March 2019 to 31 March 2019                                                                                                  

69  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Kath Presdee seconded Councillor Brian Cartwright

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Summary of Investment & Banking for the Period 1 March 2019 to 31 March 2019 be received.

2.    The certificate of the Responsible Accounting Officer and Summary of Investments and Performance for the period 1 March 2019 to 31 March 2019 be noted and accepted.

3.    The graphical investment analysis as at 31 March 2019 be noted.

 

 

6        Property History - Part 240-250 Racecourse Road, Jamisontown (Part Lot 1 DP 1057945)                                                                              

70  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM seconded Councillor Greg Davies

          That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Property History - Part 240-250     Racecourse Road, Jamisontown (Part Lot 1 DP 1057945) be received.

 

2.    A copy of the report be sent to any residents who had made submission to Council on this matter.

 

 

8        Exhibition of Draft Delivery Program (2017-21) and Draft 2019-20 Operational Plan (including Draft 2019-20 Fees and Charges)             

71  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Mark Davies

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Exhibition of Draft Delivery Program (2017-21) and Draft 2019-20 Operational Plan (including Draft 2019-20 Fees and Charges) be received.

2.    In accordance with the Local Government Act 1993 and Local Government (General) Regulation 2005, the Draft Delivery Program 2017-21 (incorporating the Operational Plan for 2019-20 and Draft Fees and Charges 2019-20) be placed on Public Exhibition for 28 days commencing on Monday 6 May 2019 and closing on Monday 3 June 2019 (inclusive).

3.    The Public Exhibition arrangements are implemented as detailed in this report, and submissions from the community are invited.

 

 

 

 

REQUESTS FOR REPORTS AND MEMORANDUMS AND URGENT BUSINESS

 

UB 1           5th Annual Indian Cultural Festival     

Councillor Tricia  Hitchen has requested that Council allocate $500 from the East Ward Voted works to assist with the room hire at St Marys Memorial Hall for the 5th annual Indian Cultural Festival on 27 July 2019.

72  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Tricia  Hitchen seconded Councillor Robin Cook that the matter be brought forward and dealt with as a matter of urgency.

 

His Worship the Mayor, Councillor Ross Fowler OAM, ruled that the matter was urgent and should be dealt with at the meeting.

 

73  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Tricia  Hitchen seconded Councillor Robin Cook that Council allocate allocate $500 from the East Ward Voted works to assist with the room hire at St Marys Memorial Hall for the 5th annual Indian Cultural Festival on 27 July 2019.

 

 

RR 1           IPART Report   

Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM requested that a motion be developed and submitted to the LGA conference regarding the IPART Report delay.

 

RR 2           Accident History of Llandilo Road, Richmond Road and Blacktown Road     

Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM has requested that we receive a report on the road accident history of the area surrounding Llandilo Road, Richmond Road and Blacktown Road from the Police and RMS.

 

RR 3           Permit to Burn Regulation 

Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM has requested that Council review the Permit to Burn regulation to see if the time limit can be changed if the RFS is involved using it as a tracking exercise.

 

RR 4           Boarding Houses       

Councillor John Thain has requested that an urgent meeting be held with the Minister for Planning and the Mayor and Deputy Mayor regarding Boarding House issues in the Penrith LGA.

 

RR 5           Feasibility of Preparing Plans for small sporting clubs

Councillor  Todd Carney has requested for a report on the feasibility of preparing plans for small sporting clubs so they have something ready for grant applications when they become available.

 

RR 6           Sustainable Events Policy 

Councillor Robin Cook has requested a report and review of the Sustainable Events Policy with emphasis on sustainable catering.

 

RR 7           Report to Council on State Government promises during State Election        

Councillor Karen McKeown OAM has requested for a report to Council on the State Government’s promises during the State Government election.

 

RR 8           Community Bus Replacements  

Councillor Greg Davies has requested a report to Council on the state of our community buses with ongoing committee costs and if they need replacing.

 

RR 9           Code of Conduct and Meeting Procedures Policy

Councillor Greg Davies has requested that Council write to the State Government with a request that given they were the authors of the mandatory Code of Conduct and Meeting procedures policy for Local Government, that it be also adopted by the State Government in the interest of good governance.

 

RR 10         Llandilo Fire Shed     

Councillor Marcus Cornish has requested for a memorandum regarding an update on the relocation of the Llandilo Fire Shed.

 

RR 11         Provision of Rubbish Bins throughout Thornton

Councillor Mark Davies has requested for a memorandum regarding the provision of installing rubbish bins along footpaths and pathways in Thornton and why they weren’t installed initially. 

 

Committee of the Whole

 

74 RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Kath Presdee that the meeting adjourn to the Committee of the Whole to deal with the following matter, the time being 7:50pm.

 

1        Presence of the Public

 

CW1 RESOLVED on the motion of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Kath Presdee that the press and public be excluded from Committee of the Whole to deal with the following matter:

 

 

Outcome 5

 

2        Recycling Processing Contract                                                                                       

 

This item has been referred to committee of the whole as the report refers to commercial

information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed prejudice the commercial

position of the person who supplied it and discussion of the matter in open meeting would

be, on balance, contrary to the public interest.

 

The meeting resumed at 7:53pm and the General Manager reported that the Committee of the Whole met at 7:50pm on 29 April 2019, the following being present

 

His Worship the Mayor, Councillor Ross Fowler OAM, Deputy Mayor, Councillor Greg Davies, and Councillors Todd Carney, Brian Cartwright, Robin Cook, Marcus Cornish, Kevin Crameri OAM, Mark Davies, Tricia Hitchen, Karen McKeown OAM, Kath Presdee and John Thain.

 

and the Committee of the Whole excluded the press and public from the meeting for the reasons set out in CW1 and that the Committee of the Whole submitted the following recommendation to Council.

 

 

CONFIDENTIAL BUSINESS

 

2        Recycling Processing Contract

 

RECOMMENDED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Marcus Cornish

CW2  That the information contained in the verbal report on the recycling processing contract be noted.

 

 

ADOPTION OF Committee of the Whole

 

75 RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Marcus Cornish that the recommendations contained in the Committee of the Whole and shown as CW1 and CW2 be adopted.

 

 

Outcome 5 - We care about our environment

 

3        Recycling Processing Contract                                                                

76  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Marcus Cornish 

That:

1.   The information contained in the report on Recycling Processing Contract be received

2.   The 4-year Contract offer with VISY Recycling for recyclables processing commencing July 1 2019 ending June 30 2023 (with a 1 year extension at Council’s option) be accepted.

3.   Final contractual terms and conditions be as agreed by the Chief Governance Officer and the Waste and Resource Recovery Manager

4.   The Common Seal of the Council of the City of Penrith be placed on all necessary documentation. 

 

 

 

 

There being no further business the Chairperson declared the meeting closed the time being 7:54pm.

 



PENRITH CITY COUNCIL

 

Procedure for Addressing Meetings

 

Anyone can request permission to address a meeting, providing that the number of speakers is limited to three in support of any proposal and three against.

 

Any request about an issue or matter on the Agenda for the meeting can be lodged with the General Manager or Public Officer up until 12 noon on the day of the meeting.

 

Prior to the meeting the person who has requested permission to address the meeting will need to provide the Public Officer with a written statement of the points to be covered during the address in sufficient detail so as to inform the Councillors of the substance of the address and a written copy of any questions to be asked of the Council in order that responses to those questions can be provided in due course.

 

In addition, prior to addressing the meeting a person addressing Council or Committee will be informed that they do not enjoy any privilege and that permission to speak may be withdrawn should they make inappropriate comments.

 

It should be noted that persons who wish to address the Council are addressing a formal part of the Council Meeting. All persons addressing the Meeting should give consideration to their dress attire. Smart casual is a minimum that is thought to be appropriate when addressing such a forum.

 

It should be noted that speakers at meetings of the Council or Committee do not have absolute privilege (parliamentary privilege).  A speaker who makes any potentially offensive or defamatory remarks about any other person may render themselves open to legal action.

 

Prior to addressing the meeting the person will be required to sign the following statement:

 

“I (name) understand that the meeting I intend to address on (date) is a public meeting.  I also understand that should I say or present any material that is inappropriate, I may be subject to legal action.  I also acknowledge that I have been informed to obtain my own legal advice about the appropriateness of the material that I intend to present at the above mentioned meeting”.

 

Should a person fail to sign the above statement then permission to address either the Council or Committee will not be granted.

 

The Public Officer or Minute Clerk will speak to those people who have requested permission to address the meeting, prior to the meeting at 7.15pm.

 

It is up to the Council or Committee to decide if the request to address the meeting will be granted.

 

Where permission is to be granted the Council or Committee, at the appropriate time, will suspend only so much of the Standing Orders to allow the address to occur.

 

The Chairperson will then call the person up to the lectern or speaking area.

 

The person addressing the meeting needs to clearly indicate:

 

·       Their name;

 

·       Organisation or group they are representing (if applicable);

 

·       Details of the issue to be addressed and the item number of the report in the Business Paper;

 

·       Whether they are opposing or supporting the issue or matter (if applicable) and the action they would like the meeting to take;

 

·         The interest of the speaker (e.g. affected person, neighbour, applicant,    applicants spokesperson, interested citizen etc).

 

Each person then has five minutes to make their address.  Those addressing Council will be required to speak to the written statement they have submitted.  Permission to address Council is not to be taken as an opportunity to refute or otherwise the points made by previous speakers on the same issue. 

 

The Council or Committee can extend this time if they consider if appropriate, however, everyone needs to work on the basis that the address will be for five minutes only.

 

Councillors may have questions about the address so people are asked to remain at the lectern or in the speaking area until the Chairperson has thanked them.

 

When this occurs, they should then return to their seat.

 

Glenn McCarthy

Public Officer

02 4732 7649                                               

   


Reports of Committees

 

Item                                                                                                                                                Page

 

1        Report and Recommendations of the Penrith Community Safety Partnership Meeting held on 3 April 2019                                                                                                                   1

 

2        Report and Recommendations of the Access Committee Meeting held on 10 April 2019                                                                                                                                             5

 

3        Report and Recommendations of the Local Traffic Committee Meeting held on 6 May 2019                                                                                                                                           13

 

 

 

 

 



Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                    27 May 2019

 

REPORT AND RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE
 Penrith Community Safety Partnership MEETING

HELD ON 3 April, 2019

 

 

 

PRESENT

Karen McKeown OAM; Allison Kyriakakis, Penrith City Council; Erin Davidson, Penrith City Council; Gai Hawthorn, Penrith CBD Corporation; Jeni Pollard, Penrith City Council; Julie Page, Nepean Blue Mountains LHD – Needle and Syringe Program; Olivia Kidon, Penrith City Council; Sue Fryer, St Marys Town Centre; Tracy Leahy, Penrith City Council; Gordon Henwood, Penrith Valley Chamber of Commerce.   

 

LEAVE OF ABSENCE

Leave of Absence was previously granted to Councillor Ross Fowler OAM for the period 30 March 2019 to 7 April 2019 inclusive.

 

APOLOGIES

Wayne Willmington, Penrith Valley Chamber of Commerce; Samantha Shakespeare, Penrith Valley Chamber of Commerce; Brett McFadden, Nepean Police Area Command; Katerina Tahija, Penrith City Council.

 

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES - Penrith Community Safety Partnership Meeting - 7 November 2018

The minutes of the Penrith Community Safety Partnership Meeting of 7 November 2018 were confirmed.

 

 

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

 

 Nil.

 

DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Outcome 4 - We have safe, vibrant places

 

1        Update on the delivery of Community Safety projects

          Community Safety Plan 2018 – 2022

 

Olivia Kidon advised that the Community Safety Plan 2018-2022 was adopted by Council at the 26 November 2018 Ordinary meeting. The Plan has also been submitted to the NSW Department of Justice seeking endorsement as a Safer Community Compact.

 

Copies of the printed Plan were available at the meeting.

 

Olivia thanked the Partnership for their input and welcomed the opportunity to partner on the delivery of projects with Partnership members.

 

 

 

 

White Ribbon 2018

 

Olivia presented an overview of Council’s annual White Ribbon Day event, held on Sunday 25 November 2018. The event was successful with over 500 participants taking part in the morning walk. Speeches and the Oath were held prior to the walk to Tench Reserve, where a free breakfast BBQ was provided by the Outback Steakhouse.

 

Olivia acknowledged and thanked Superintendent Brett McFadden, Nepean Police Area Command; Mike Hicks, Outback Steakhouse; Zonta Club Nepean Valley and Chris Gardner, White Ribbon Ambassador for their support and attendance on the day.

 

Council staff also supported the residents of Oxley Park to host a local White Ribbon event on Friday 13 November 2018 at Ridge Park, Oxley Park. A free community barbeque and children’s activities were provided, in addition to a collective reciting of the White Ribbon oath.

 

In addition to White Ribbon Day activities, Council also held a ‘thank you’ afternoon tea to acknowledge the efforts of our local domestic and family violence support services. The event was held at Penrith Regional Gallery, Emu Plains on Tuesday 4 December 2018. Services were formally thanked with a speech by the Mayor of Penrith, Clr Ross Fowler, who acknowledged their ongoing work and support of victims of domestic and family violence.

 

Warner Graffiti Education Program

 

Olivia advised that the Warner Graffiti Education Program continues to receive positive feedback. The delivery of programs has commenced for the year with 33 primary schools and 11 secondary schools receiving the presentation, reaching approximately 4,300 students. An invitation was extended to Partnership members to attend a session in school. Members were encouraged to contact Community Safety staff for information.

 

Olivia also provided a comparison in graffiti removal statistics from 2017 to 2018, highlighting a downward trend. In 2017, 6667 graffiti removal jobs were completed and in 2018, 5972 jobs were completed. The group agreed that there has been a visible reduction of graffiti across the city over recent years.

 

Neighbour Day 2019

 

Allison Kyriakakis advised that Council’s second Neighbour Day event was held on Sunday 31 March at Ridge Park, Oxley Park. The event was held from 10.00am till 1.00pm, with approximately 80-100 residents in attendance over the course of the event.

 

The event was a fun opportunity for residents to meet with their neighbours through garden games including tug of war and sack races. A picnic style lunch was also provided.

 

The event also provided an opportunity to launch Council’s new Good Neighbour program. The program supports and encourages residents to host small neighbourhood gatherings to connect with their neighbours. Currently expressions of interest are being taken, with some trial events planned for local communities in the coming months.

 

Parklawn Place-Makers, North St Marys

 

Allison provided an update on the Parklawn Place-Makers project, a 12-month grant project funded under the NSW Department of Justice’s Community Safety Fund. The project includes community engagement, public amenity upgrades, and public art, and aims to improve perceptions of safety in Parklawn Place Shopping Precinct, North St Marys.

 

A series of eight (8) community engagement sessions have been run in Parklawn Place on a fortnightly basis, to support intergenerational interaction between residents and students from North St Marys Public School. The group also play a key role in shaping the public amenity enhancements in the space.

 

An artist has been engaged to apply public art to roller shutters of participating businesses. This artist is currently working with students from St Marys North Public School for design ideas. Other elements to the amenity enhancements include new tree plantings, pavement artworks, new street furniture, planter boxes and installation of solar lighting within the adjacent Parklawn Lane. All works are scheduled for completion by 30 June 2019.

 

Lights, Bollards, Activate

 

Council received grant funding from the Federal Government’s Safer Communities Infrastructure Fund to install custom-designed bollard lighting along High Street near the NK and Parker Arcades.

 

The bollards have been installed and decorative sheaths will be overlayed on each bollard in the coming weeks. The bollards provide a creative lighting option and vehicle mitigation measure. Hours of operation for the lighting can be programmed and adjusted to suit special events and uses of the space. Bollards will be fully operational by the end of June 2019.

 

‘Illuminate Kingswood’ - NSW Community Safety Fund 2018

 

Council received advice in March that our application for funding under the NSW Department of Justice Community Safety Fund was unsuccessful. Council applied for funding for ‘Illuminate Kingswood’. The proposed project aimed to enhance safety in Kingswood through creative space activation, amenity enhancements, and opportunities for community engagement. The Place Management Team will continue to explore other opportunities to deliver space activation activities and events in Kingswood.

 

Kingswood Pedestrian Lighting Project

 

Council was successful in receiving $400,000 grant funding under the Federal Government’s Safer Communities Fund to upgrade pedestrian lighting in Kingswood. The project aims to enhance night-time safety and will focus on pedestrian lighting upgrades in identified sections of Bringelly Road and Somerset Street and adjoining public spaces in Kingswood. The project has been funded for completion by 31 March 2020.

 

RECOMMENDED

That the information contained in the report on Update on the delivery of Community Safety projects be received.

 

 

GENERAL BUSINESS

 

GB 1           Gai Hawthorn – Penrith CBD Corporation   

Gai noted that there has been an increase in vandalism within the Penrith CBD in the past three (3) weeks with a reported break and enter and glass etchings on a few businesses.

 

 


 

 

GB 2           Julie Page – Nepean Blue Mountains LHD – Needle and Syringe   Program   

Julie advised that a new community sharps disposal bin has been installed at Governor Phillip, Lemongrove.

 

A representative from the needle and syringe program will also be attending the next Village Café in Kingswood to talk to residents about community sharps.

 

 

GB 3           Tracy Leahy – Penrith City Council     

Tracy advised that new signage has been developed to assist Council in managing issues associated with homelessness in identified public spaces.

 

Local services are working with individuals that require assistance and the shower bus is accessible on Monday, Wednesday and Friday. Christ Mission Possible provide meal services three (3) days per week from Allen Place car park.

 

 

 

There being no further business the Chairperson declared the meeting closed the time being 3.53pm.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the recommendations contained in the Report and Recommendations of the Penrith Community Safety Partnership meeting held on 3 April, 2019 be adopted.

 

 

 


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                    27 May 2019

 

REPORT AND RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE
 Access Committee MEETING

HELD ON 10 April, 2019

 

 

 

PRESENT

Councillor Tricia Hitchen (Chair), Allan Windley, Anthony Mulholland, Carole Grayson, Councillor Robin Cook (5.05pm), Dianne Brookes (5.10pm).    

 

IN ATTENDANCE

 

Tracy Leahy – Acting Community and Cultural Development Manager, Melissa McSeveny – Social Planning Coordinator, Claire Galvin – Disability Inclusion Officer, Graham Howe – Building Assets Coordinator, Craig Squires – Building Certification and Fire Safety Coordinator, Lucy Goldstein – Development Assessment Planner, Jake Bentley – Graduate Development Assessment Planner.

 

GUESTS

 

George Mavros – Australian Ramp and Access Solutions

Jamie Gordon – Scentre Group Development and Strategic Asset Management

 

APOLOGIES

Apologies were accepted from Farah Madon and Hans Meijer.

 

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES - Access Committee Meeting - 13 February 2019

The minutes of the Access Committee Meeting of 13 February 2019 were confirmed.

 

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

 

Nil.

 

DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Outcome 6 - We are healthy and share strong community spirit

 

3        Portable Lift and Change Facilities - Australian Ramp and Access Solutions                                                                                                      

Claire Galvin introduced George Mavros from Australian Ramp and Access Solutions (AR&AS).  George Mavros presented the background to AR&AS and his role and qualifications.

 

Councillor Cook arrived at the meeting at 5.05pm.

 

George Mavros described the portable bathroom pod.  The unit comes on a tilt trailer and can be fixed onto the back of a building. There are jacks to level the unit off and it is a one-man operation.  The timing can be set for the closing of the door to the unit.

 

Dianne Brookes arrived at the meeting at 5.10pm.

 

The idea of a group of councils purchasing a changing places accessible unit between them was discussed.  AR&AS staff could maintain the unit as the pumps need regular maintenance. They can also train people to use the unit.

 

Claire Galvin advised that it was recommended she introduce George Mavros to disability inclusion officers from surrounding councils.

 

Councillor Hitchen requested that costing be obtained for supply of a portable lift and change facilities unit.

 

George Mavros advised that if he had an indication that Penrith was going ahead with another two or three councils then he could get a unit positioned in the area.  George Mavros will also speak to the leagues clubs.  The company has also acquired a ramp business and would be interested in talking about that further.

 

Councillor Hitchen thanked George Mavros for his presentation.

 

RECOMMENDED

That:

1.       The information contained in the report on Portable Lift and Change Facilities - Australian Ramp and Access Solutions be received.

 

2.       Claire Galvin continue to negotiate with Australian Ramp and Access Solutions to obtain pricing options and come back to the Committee with costings.

 

George Mavros left the meeting at 5.26pm.

 

Outcome 2 - We plan for our future growth

 

1        Development Applications Referred to the Access Committee

                                                                                                                                       

DA19/0178      Alterations and Additions to the south-west portion of the Westfield Penrith Shopping Centre known as the Mondo Precinct, 569-595 High Street Penrith

Peter Wood introduced Jamie Gordon, Scentre Group Development and Strategic Asset Management, who spoke on the development application lodged for the Mondo Precinct.

 

The development proposal is for a family friendly dining precinct. Approximately five food and beverage tenancies will be delivered along the carpark on two levels. The roof top zone will become a bar precinct.  The visual lines of the area will be maintained.

 

Jamie Gordon advised that the old awning structure and hedge would be removed.  A hoarding will be erected but the Mondo will not be closed during construction.  A 3m footpath will be maintained which will turn into gravel.  There will be a metre of Astroturf and the magnolia will be preserved.

 

Anthony Mulholland enquired if there would be anyone to guide the visually impaired people as they are used to travelling on that pathway.  Jamie Gordon advised that the construction manager had not yet been employed but generally there are ambassadors to assist people in these circumstances.

 


 

 

2        Referrals to the Access Committee                                                         

Peter Wood, Council’s Development Services Manager, gave a presentation on referrals to the Access Committee and the types of development applications that are brought to the Committee. 

 

The Development Services Department assesses development applications and construction certificates against legislation and policies of Federal, State and Local Government with most under the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979.  Larger scale proposals and those with public access are brought to the Access Committee.

 

The Access Committee is encouraged to focus on a strategic approach and informing policy to provide relevant and contemporary controls for assessing accessibility whilst commenting on key public buildings.

 

Peter Wood explained why assessments are important and the development types which are brought to the Committee. Classification types referred to the Access Committee include Class 9 – Public Buildings, Class 6 – buildings for the sale of good or supply of services to the public and Class 10 – non habitable buildings or structures, e.g. swimming pools.

 

Peter Wood gave an overview of the assessment stages for a development application.

 

Peter Wood advised that there are late items for discussion at tonight’s meeting as these development applications were only received last week. 

 

Craig Squires advised that all the development applications received by the Access Committee are before determination.  There is not a great level of detail at the development application stage.  The level of detail is provided at construction certificate stage.  If a construction certificate is issued privately then Council’s role is minimal.

 

The Committee discussed provision of adaptable apartments and difficulty of tracking them as there is no register.

 

Peter Wood advised that it was important for the members of the Access Committee to be aware of the policies as development applications are assessed against the policies. If the Committee thinks that there are other things which should be captured by the policy then it can make recommendations and the policy can be amended.  It is good to have discussions with applicants early so that they can respond and upgrade their development application if necessary.

 

Peter Wood advised that Council’s Development Control Plan (DCP) will be reviewed.  His department will be engaging with all areas of Council as well as the Access Committee during this process.  It would be beneficial if Committee members were familiar with the current policies, to know what is working and what is not working so they can be part of the review process.

 

Discussion was held regarding the accessibility of school grounds, particularly as schools are used more for out of school activities.

 

Councillor Hitchen read out comments from Farah Madon which she advised would be passed onto Peter Wood.

 

·    Council’s DA application form should be updated to include a line that shows requirements for an Access Report for certain types of buildings such as swimming pools, multi-unit housing and commercial and industrial buildings. This will ensure that all applicants are reminded of the requirements for disability access. This is consistent with the requirements of other Council application forms.

 

·    The Access report where required to be provided must be prepared by an Accredited Access Consultant. Accredited access consultants are required to pass an exam that ensures that they have been tested for their knowledge in all access related regulations, they have to maintain continued professional development so that their knowledge is current and they have minimum standards required for preparation of access reports. This is consistent with a number of other Councils that specifically ask for accredited access consultants to provide reports including Penrith Development Control Plan 2014 Clause 2.5.20 Accessibility and Adaptability that calls for use of an Accredited Access Consultant for residential buildings. This will ensure that better quality of access is provided within the buildings in Penrith.

 

The issue of generic Access reports was discussed by the Committee.

  

RECOMMENDED

That the information contained in the report on Referrals to the Access Committee be received.

 

1        Development Applications Referred to the Access Committee           

 

DA19/0219      Alterations and Additions to Castlereagh Hall, 1158-1160 Castlereagh Road, Castlereagh

 

Lucy Goldstein spoke to the development application for the alterations and additions to the community hall at Castlereagh.

 

The application is for upgrades to the existing toilet facilities and the accessible bathroom and provision of a new platform lift to the existing stage on the south side of the building.  Also proposed is construction of a new deck with an access ramp and concrete path to the deck.

 

Comments from Farah Madon:

 

·    The access report is very generic and does not really address the actual development as to the actual assessment of the development.

·    The accessible toilet design does not comply with AS1428.1. The length of the accessible toilet is required to be minimum of 2.3m whereas the room size is shown as 2.2m on the plan and 2.14m on the internal elevation page which are both non-compliant.

·    It appears that a change table is proposed within the accessible toilet. It is my opinion that a change table would be better if provided within the male and female bank of toilets rather than within the accessible toilet so as not to hold up a person with a disability who may require the use of the facility urgently. Note that changing a baby could potentially take up to 15 minutes.

·    I would recommend as a minimum at least one set of double doors (to dining room, to the new deck and to rear outdoor area) to be modified so that one operable door leaf is provided with 850mm clear opening. There are many ways of doing this even if the building is of heritage nature.

·    Steps to the stage area are still required to be compliant with handrails on both sides with handrail extensions and TGSIs regardless of provision of the platform lift as the steps could be used by an ambulant user.

·    It is unclear if access is provided to the building from an accessible parking space. About accessible toilet and baby change table, put change table in the female toilet if possible.

 

Councillor Hitchen thanked Lucy Goldstein for her presentation.

 

DA18/0587      Development Application for Construction and Embellishment of Village Park in Central Precinct Jordan Springs

 

Access Committee members were sent an email with a copy of the Access Report for the Village Park and Community Activation Shelter at Jordan Springs East.  Lucy Goldstein advised that when the application came to the Committee the first time there was no Access Report provided. 

 

Peter Wood advised that a few parks have been presented to the Committee and these had issues regarding the topography.  The Access Committee is to be engaged in recommending a strategy for parks as well as appropriate locations and needs.

 

Peter Wood said it is important that the plans specifically identify the embellishment requirements and advised that agreements are negotiated through the process.  Contribution plans and agreements need to be specific.

 

Councillor Hitchen advised that the information regarding the Village Park was emailed out to Committee members and asked that if there are any comments to forward these to Council.

 

DA19/0220      Alterations and Additions to Existing Community Facility, 4 Lawson Street Emu Plains

 

Jake Bentley spoke to the development application for the alterations and additions to the existing community facility, the old Emu Plains Public School building.  The proposed works are the removal of two trees to provide better access to the western side of the building.  Demolition works to the north-eastern and north-western parts of the building as well as removal of a metal fence, removal of stairs to the western hall and removal of the window to the storage area. Changes to the building include provision of an accessible unisex toilet and removal of the ramp to the north-eastern end of the building.  Provision of a new deck and access ramp is also proposed.  Construction of a new storage room and bathrooms as well as construction of new staircase to the western hall, reconstruction to the roof and increased door widths to improve access are planned.

 

Issues discussed by the Committee included:

 

·    Emergency egress from the north-eastern end of the building – someone with mobility issues could not exit if there was a fire.

·    Suggestion to have ramps at all entrances to the building making them accessible

·    Accessible parking

·    Looking at linkages between the four buildings in the precinct

·    Study being undertaken regarding activation of the precinct to consider how the community can best use the buildings.

 

Jake Bentley left the meeting at 6.30pm.

 

 

DA18/1260      Construction of Hotel with Ground Floor retail premises, 83 Mulgoa Road Penrith

 

DA18/1261      Construction of mixed use development comprising exhibition centre, retail premises and serviced apartments, 83 Mulgoa Road Penrith

 

Peter Wood advised that he would discuss the two development application referrals for 83 Mulgoa Road Penrith together in a combined presentation.  The applications are for stages 2 and 3 of the development – a six-storey hotel and exhibition space with retail and six-storey apartments including carparking plus landscaping works.  There are three stages to the development altogether – the basement carpark is stage 1.

 

Issues discussed by the Committee included:

 

·    The number of accessible parking spaces in the basement carpark

·    Access around the trees

·    Accessible rooms with dual keys

·    Circulation space and layout of accessible rooms

·    Adult change facility being incorporated into the conference space

·    Accessible access to the swimming pools

·    Signage and wayfinding

·    Seating

·    Bus routes

·    Handrails

·    Ground surface changes.

 

Comments from Farah Madon:

 

·    I find the access reports very generic which can be applied to any project and does not really address the actual development at all apart from the address of the site and the page that states the total number of units in the serviced apartment. This again reinforces my previous comment of the need of use of Accredited Access Consultants.

·    Drawings indicate that all the accessible rooms in the development have been provided with left hand transfer toilets. I would recommend that an even mix of left hand and right hand transfer accessible toilets be provided in the accessible rooms to provide a choice to the guests.

·    Some standard rooms have been provided as family rooms i.e. interconnecting doors provided. The same provision can also easily be provided to the accessible rooms so families can stay together.

·    I have not been able to identify nine accessible rooms on the plans (but this could be just due to the scale of the printed drawings).

 

RECOMMENDED

That the information contained in the report on Development Applications Referred to the Access Committee be received.

 


 

GENERAL BUSINESS

 

GB 1           Access Committee Community Member Vacancy

Claire Galvin advised that to fill the casual vacancy for a community member on the Access Committee the eligibility list from the previous recruitment was revisited.  It is recommended that the vacant position be filled by Matthew Rodger who has MS and lives in Glenmore Park.  All community members agreed with the recommendation to appoint Matthew Rodger to fill the community member vacancy on the Access Committee.

 

GB 2           Accessible Parking in Glenmore Park

Claire Galvin advised that Council worked together with residents to increase the accessible parking in the reserve at Glenmore Park.

 

GB 3           Lights at Station and High Streets Penrith  

Anthony Mulholland advised that the timer on the pedestrian lights near Subway on High Street Penrith is no longer working and there is no count down.  Councillor Hitchen advised that Council would look into this issue.

 

GB 4           St Marys Station        

Carole Grayson advised of a rectangular hole next to the Penrith City Council information sign at St Marys Station.  There is a cut-out in the pavement and the hole in the ground has not been filled in causing a trip hazard.

 

GB 5           Re-Imagine Ageing Festival        

Councillor Cook advised that she attended the Re-Imagine Ageing Festival at Thornton and noted the difficulty of people with walkers and other mobility aids getting around on the grassed surface to the stalls.  Also, there was lack of shelter for elderly residents who were watching the performances on the stage. It was suggested that these issues should be looked at for future events.

 

GB 6           Funding for River Master Plan    

Councillor Cook suggested that as funding is to be provided for the River Master Plan that funds be allocated for an adult change facility at Regatta Park.

 

GB 7           Abandoned Trolleys 

Tracy Leahy advised that Council had written to Centro Nepean and Westfield Management about the issue of the abandoned shopping trolleys.  Centro Nepean contacted Council immediately and advised they have a locking device on their trolleys so did not think the abandoned trolleys were from their centre.  The Centro Nepean manager also offered to speak to the Committee if needed.

 

To date a response has not been received from Westfield Shopping Centre.  Tracy Leahy undertook to follow up with Westfield Management regarding Woolworths trolleys and report back to the Committee.

 

GB 8           Harmony Day    

Dianne Brookes advised that Harmony Day this year was a brilliant event and the best she had ever attended.

 

 

 

There being no further business the Chairperson declared the meeting closed the time being 7.05pm.

 

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the recommendations contained in the Report and Recommendations of the Access Committee meeting held on 10 April, 2019 be adopted.

 

 

 


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                    27 May 2019

 

REPORT AND RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE
 Local Traffic Committee MEETING

HELD ON 6 May, 2019

 

 

 

PRESENT

Councillor Tricia Hitchen (Representative for the Member for Penrith), Councillor Robin Cook (Representative for the Member for Londonderry), Councillor Karen McKeown OAM (Council Representative), Adam Wilkinson – Engineering Services Manager (Chair), Brana Ravichelvan – Roads and Maritime Services (RMS), Sergeant Matthew Shirvington – Nepean PAC (Police Area Command).

IN ATTENDANCE

Steve Grady – Busways, David Drozd – Traffic Engineering Coordinator, Graham Green – Senior Traffic Engineer, Daniel Davidson – Senior Traffic Engineer, Anthony Baradhy – Traffic Engineering Officer, Caitlin Bailey – Traffic Officer, Isaac Mann - Trainee Engineer, Bernie Meier – Signs and Lines Marking Supervisor, Darrell Boggs – Ranger.

 

APOLOGIES

Councillor Marcus Cornish, Wayne Mitchell – Director, Development and Regulatory Services, Ruth Byrnes – Senior Traffic Officer, Catherine Waerner – Road Safety Officer.

 

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES - Local Traffic Committee Meeting - 1 April 2019

The minutes of the Local Traffic Committee Meeting of 1 April 2019 were confirmed.

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

Councillor Robin Cook (Representative for the Member for Londonderry) declared an interest in Item 1 “Traffic Facilities, Blackspot and Safer Roads Program 2019-20” and informed the Committee that the interest is non pecuniary, not significant.

 

DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Outcome 3 - We can get around the City

 

1        Traffic Facilities, Blackspot and Safer Roads Program 2019-20             

RECOMMENDED

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Traffic Facilities, Blackspot and Safer Roads Program 2019-20 be received.

2.    Projects listed in Table 2 “Projects Proposed for Construction – Major Traffic Facilities 2019/20” be forwarded to Council’s Design Co-ordinator to finalise design and construction estimates, with a Design Endorsement Report for each project submitted to the Local Traffic Committee as these are finalised.

3.    If the detailed cost estimates for projects are higher than listed in Table 2, the lower ranked projects be deferred to future programs.

 

2        Forbes Street and Nepean Street, Emu Plains - Endorsement of Concept Design Plans relating to Road and Pedestrian Safety Improvements                                                                                                

RECOMMENDED

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Forbes Street and Nepean Street, Emu Plains - Endorsement of Concept Design Plans relating to Road and Pedestrian Safety Improvements be received.

2.    Consultation be undertaken with affected residents.

3.    Subject to no substantial objections, concept Design Plan AF001 (Appendix 1) be endorsed in principle and a construction plan be brought before the Local Traffic Committee at a later date.

4.    A street lighting assessment be conducted in accordance with Council’s Public Domain Lighting Policy (August 2004) to ensure compliance with the relevant lighting category.

5.    The resident who reported the matter be advised of Council’s resolution.

 

3        Sixth Avenue and Second Avenue, Llandilo - Provision of STOP Sign, Holding Line and Double Barrier Line Marking                                         

RECOMMENDED

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Sixth Avenue and Second Avenue, Llandilo - Provision of STOP Sign, Holding Line and Double Barrier Line Marking be received.

2.    STOP sign, holding line, and double barrier line marking treatment be installed in place of the current ‘GIVE WAY’ signs at the intersection of Sixth Avenue and Second Avenue, Llandilo as shown in Appendix 2.

3.    An assessment of the existing vegetation at, and on approach to the intersection, be undertaken and maintenance undertaken as appropriate.

 

4        Chapel Street, St Marys - Proposed Pedestrian Crossing on a Perimeter Treatment                                                                                     

Councillor Robin Cook (Representative for the Member for Londonderry) expressed her appreciation of the proposed pedestrian crossing on Chapel Street, St Marys.

Councillor Karen McKeown OAM (Council Representative) advised the Committee that there is a development occurring opposite this location and traffic and pedestrian flow are likely to increase. Councillor McKeown advised that the proposed pedestrian crossing is expected to be well utilised.

Brana Ravichelvan of RMS advised the Committee to be wary of the potential for pedestrians to cross the proposed pedestrian crossing on Chapel Street and the pedestrian crossing on Queen Street in one staged movement, and the potential for drivers to be unaware of this.

 

 

David Drozd – Traffic Engineering Coordinator advised that there is an existing pedestrian fence in between the two crossing facilities and Council’s Traffic Engineering Officers will monitor the location and pedestrian movements following the installation of the proposed pedestrian crossing on Chapel Street.

RECOMMENDED

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Chapel Street, St Marys - Proposed Pedestrian Crossing on a Perimeter Treatment be received.

2.    The current perimeter threshold treatment to be upgraded to a pedestrian crossing on a perimeter treatment as illustrated in Appendix 3.

3.    Ms Prue Car MP, Member for Londonderry and Councillor Robin Cook be advised of Council’s resolution.

 

5        Batt Street, Jamisontown - Proposed Extension to "No Stopping" Zone                                                                                                                

RECOMMENDED

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Batt Street, Jamisontown - Proposed Extension to "No Stopping" Zone be received.

2.    “No Stopping” signage (R5-400) be extended by approximately 44 metres on the southern side of Batt Street, at the frontage of 130-132 Batt Street, Jamisontown in accordance with the plan prepared by James Clifford Construction Pty Ltd, submitted 16 April 2019 as shown in Appendix 1.

3.    All works associated with the installation of the signposting be undertaken by the applicant and at no cost to Council.

4.    The applicant be advised of Council’s decision and that the works as required in Condition 38(a) has been undertaken by Council separately in 2017.

5.    Council’s Rangers be advised of Council’s decision.

 

 

6        Speeding Prevention Project - Radar Variable Message Sign Trailer - January to March 2019 Locations                                                               

Councillor Karen McKeown OAM (Council Representative) requested that River Road, Emu Plains be listed as a location for the deployment of the Radar Variable Message Sign (VMS) trailer.

Sergeant Matthew Shirvington of Nepean PAC requested that Bromley Road, Emu Heights be listed as a location for the deployment of the Radar VMS trailer. 

RECOMMENDED

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Speeding Prevention Project - Radar Variable Message Sign Trailer - January to March 2019 Locations be received.

 

2.    The January to March 2019 locations be noted and River Road, Emu Plains and Bromley Road, Emu Heights be added to the list of locations for the Radar VMS trailer to be deployed at.

 

7        Caddens Road, Caddens - Traffic Management Plan Supporting Changes to Road Pattern                                                                             

Councillor Karen McKeown OAM (Council Representative), Councillor Robin Cook (Representative for the Member for Londonderry) and Councillor Tricia Hitchen (Representative for the Member for Penrith) advised that they do not support this permanent road closure.

Brana Ravichelvan - Roads and Maritime Services Representative and Sergeant Matthew Shirvington - Nepean PAC Representative had no objections to the closure.

David Drozd – Traffic Engineering Coordinator advised that the planning for the Caddens release area was undertaken several years ago and identified Caddens Roads as a minor Rural road, with Cadda Ridge Drive as the main Collector road through this precinct. The future growth of this road corridor has been planned for in line with planning and traffic engineering instruments and road capacities are adequate to allow for this future growth. This proposed closure is the second and final instalment of the closure of Caddens Road as required by the Masterplan for this residential release area.

RECOMMENDED

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Caddens Road, Caddens - Traffic Management Plan Supporting Changes to Road Pattern be received.

2.    The Traffic Management Plan be endorsed subject to concurrence with relevant authorities including Roads and Maritime Services, Transport for NSW, Busways and Emergency Services.

3.    Council enter negotiations with Legacy Property regarding the facilitation of the permanent partial road closure and decommissioning of existing pavement between Ulm Road and Hermitage Court.

4.    A comprehensive communications package be put forward to the community regarding the proposed changes to the road network.

 

8        Lethbridge Street, Penrith - Proposed Changes to Bus Zone Times     

RECOMMENDED

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Lethbridge Street, Penrith - Proposed Changes to Bus Zone Times be received.

2.    The times of the bus zone on the northern side of Lethbridge Street, Penrith, midblock between Doonmore and Colless Streets, be changed to “Bus Zone 8:00am – 4:00pm School Days” as shown in Appendix 1. 

3.    Council’s Rangers, the Principal of Penrith Selective High School and Busways be advised of the outcome.

 

 


 

9        Kukundi Drive, Glenmore Park - Proposed Installation of Bus Zone     

Steve Grady of Busways commended Catherine Waerner – Traffic Safety Officer for her work in identifying locations such as Kukundi Drive, Glenmore Park where parking near schools can be improved.

RECOMMENDED

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Kukundi Drive, Glenmore Park - Proposed Installation of Bus Zone be received.

2.    A Bus Zone of 23 metres be installed on Kukundi Drive east of Jindalee Place within the existing Bus Stop as shown in Appendix 1.

3.    Affected residents and Busways be informed.

 

 

REQUESTS FOR REPORTS AND MEMORANDUMS

 

GENERAL BUSINESS

 

GB 1           Hewitt Street, Colyton - Proposed Pedestrian Facility & Speed      Humps      

The purpose of this report is to consider the installation of two speed humps and a pedestrian refuge facility in Hewitt Street, Colyton. The report recommends that the proposed speed humps and pedestrian facility are endorsed for installation.

 

Background

At the Local Traffic Committee Meeting held in September 2015, Councils Traffic Engineering Officer presented a report regarding improvements for pedestrians accessing the local shops. The report demonstrated the need for the installation of a pedestrian facility on Hewitt Street, between Jensen Street and Nevada Street. The recommendations from the report were endorsed at the September 2015 Ordinary Meeting as follows;

“That:

1.   The information contained in the report on Hewitt Street, Colyton - Proposed Pedestrian Facility be received.

2.   A project be entered into Council’s Traffic Facilities Prioritisation Program for the design and construction of an appropriate pedestrian facility on Hewitt Street at Huddleston Avenue, Colyton.

3.   When the project receives priority against other listed sites, Council’s Design Co‑ordinator be requested to prepare a design for the facilities, with a further report submitted to the Local Traffic Committee for design plan finalisation and endorsement.

4.   The resident be advised of Council’s resolution.”

Since this recommendation was endorsed, Councillor Cook has also made additional representations on behalf of Colyton Centre Pharmacy, requesting a pedestrian facility and/or pedestrian safety improvements to Hewitt Street. This followed a recent pedestrian related crash involving an elderly lady.

 

 

 

Current Situation 

 

Hewitt Street is a 12.5m wide collector road in Colyton. The full length of the road has a 50km/hr posted speed limit and is delineated with double barrier line marking and parking lane line marking.

 

Based on the results of the Pedestrian-Vehicle survey that was previously undertaken, there were 16 pedestrians that crossed Hewitt Street in the morning peak hours, 19 pedestrians crossed at midday, 38 pedestrians crossed in the afternoon hours, 184 vehicles were counted in the morning hours, 285 vehicles were counted at midday and 340 vehicles were counted in the afternoon hours. The pedestrian numbers are being observed as current, whilst road safety is also a consideration due to a recent pedestrian related crash fronting the shops.

 

As such, the previous investigation determined that whilst a marked pedestrian crossing is not supported, that a pedestrian facility is warranted at this location. These facilities would provide improved sight distance for pedestrians and drivers, as well as providing some level of kerbside protection. A pedestrian refuge was investigated, however, widths were not available when considering swept paths.

 

Subsequently, it is proposed to install kerb blisters to provide additional kerbside protection for pedestrians, as well as watts profile speed humps, as shown in appendices 1-4, to lower the speed of vehicles travelling adjacent to the local suburban shopping area. Due to site restriction, this has been determined to be the best outcome for supporting the pedestrian desire line, whilst also providing a measure of protection for the area’s most vulnerable road users.

 

It is also proposed to provide supporting edge line marking and ‘No Stopping’ restrictions at the intersections of Hewitt Street with Huddleston Street and Jensen Street. This will reinforce the regulatory ‘No Stopping’ area within 10m of the intersection and will support the proposed pedestrian facility.

_________________________________________________________________________

 

RECOMMENDED

          That:

 

1.    The information contained in the report on GB 1. Hewitt Street, Colyton – Proposed Pedestrian Facility and Speed Humps be received.

2.    Consultation be undertaken with affected residents and surrounding businesses regarding the proposed pedestrian facility and speed humps on Hewitt Street, Colyton, as shown in Appendices 1-4.

3.    Subject to no substantial objections, the concept design plan as shown in Appendices 1-4, be endorsed in principle and a construction plan be brought before Local Traffic Committee at a later date, with funding made available in either the current or future Urgent LTC Budget.

4.    Affected residents, businesses and Councillor Cook be notified of Council’s resolution.

 


 

GB 2           Wainwright Lane, Kingswood – Proposed “No Stopping” Zone     and “No Parking – Waste Collection and Removalist Vehicles    Excepted” Zone

Executive Summary

The purpose of this report is to consider the implementation of a “No Parking – Waste Collection and Removalist Vehicles Excepted” zone and “No Stopping” zone in Wainwright Lane, Kingswood that is associated with an approved eight story mixed-use development at 240-246 Great Western Highway, Kingswood. The report recommends that the proposed parking restrictions be implemented.

Background

On 10 April 2014, the Joint Regional Planning Panel granted development consent to DA13/0554 for an 8 storey mixed-use development containing three levels of basement car parking, ten ground floor commercial tenancies and 97 residential apartments at 240-246 Great Western Highway, Kingswood. To allow for driver sight lines at the proposed driveway and to allow for garbage servicing, Conditions 64 and 65 respectively required that:

 

“64. A separate application is to be made to Council’s Local Traffic Committee for the implementation of “No Stopping “restrictions on the northern side of Wainwright Lane, from the kerb ramp immediately to the east of the eastern side boundary, for 25m to the west. This is required to maintain sight distances around the new loading bay and basement entry and exit. This is subject to a separate application to, and approved by Council’s Local Traffic Committee prior to implementation and installed at no cost top Council.”

 

“65. A separate application is to be made to Council’s Local Traffic Committee for the implementation of a loading zone on the northern side of Wainwright Lane. This is subject to a separate application to, and approval by Council’s Local Traffic Committee prior to implementation and installed at no cost to Council.”

 

Current Situation

 

Rather than a “Loading Zone” which also permits parking of any utility vehicle or van, it is appropriate that the zone be restricted by a “No Parking – Waste and Removalist Vehicles Excepted” zone, which will better satisfy the intent of the condition and will be consistent with other similar zones previously endorsed.

 

As a result, to facilitate sight distances around the new loading bay and basement entry and exit and waste removal and removalist vehicles allowing pull-in and pull-out, a 25m long “No Stopping” zone at the driveway and a 16m long “No Parking – Waste and Removalist Vehicles Excepted” zone at the western approach to the driveway is required in Wainwright Lane the rear of 240-246 Great Western Highway, Kingswood, as shown in Appendix 1.  

 

The implementation of the “No Parking – Waste and Removalist Vehicles Excepted” restrictions will allow all drivers to stop in the bay to drop-off or pick-up passengers for a period of 2 minutes and /or leave a vehicle unattended by up to 3 metres (Rule 168, NSW Road Rules 2008). Waste and removalist vehicles will be exempt from the time and distance requirements of this rule.

________________________________________________________________________

 

 

 

 

RECOMMENDED

          That:

 

1.     The information contained in the report on Wainwright Lane, Kingswood – Proposed “No Stopping” Zone and “No Parking – Waste Collection and Removalist Vehicles Excepted” Zone be received.

2.     “No Stopping” zone and “No Parking – Waste Collection and Removalist Vehicles Excepted” zone signage (R5-447 modified) be installed in Wainwright Lane at the rear of 240-246 Great Western Highway, Kingswood as shown in Appendix 1.

3.     All costs associated with the installation of the signage and line marking to be funded by the applicant.

4.     The applicant be advised of Council’s decision.

5.     Council’s Waste Services section and Rangers be advised of Council’s decision. 

 

GB 3           York Road and Preston Street, Jamisontown - Missing Signage   

Sergeant Matthew Shirvington of Nepean PAC advised the Committee of missing ‘No Right Turn’ signage on Preston Street, Jamisontown at its intersection with York Road.

Bernie Meier – Signs and Lines Marking Supervisor advised that he is aware of the missing signage and a request has already been sent to Council’s Signage and Line Marking crew to replace the missing ‘No Right Turn’ signage.

RECOMMENDED

          That Council’s Signage and Lines Marking supervisor advise Sergeant Matthew Shirvington of Nepean PAC once the missing ‘No Right Turn’ signage on Preston Street, Jamisontown at its intersection with York Road has been replaced.

 

 

GB 4           Changes to Roads and Maritime Services   

Brana Ravichelvan of RMS advised the Committee that as of 1 July 2019, Roads and Maritime Services (RMS) will be structured under Transport for NSW (TfNSW).

RECOMMENDED

          That the Committee note the information.

 

GB 5           Changes to Bus Timetables        

Steve Grady of Busways advised the Committee that the Northwest Rail commences on 26 May 2019 and there will be changes to bus timetables.

RECOMMENDED

          That the Committee note the information. 

 


 

GB 6           Greygums Road and Andrews Road, Cranebrook - Status of         Works       

Steve Grady of Busways advised the Committee that works at the intersection of Greygums Road and Andrews Road, Cranebrook are going well and Brendan McLister – Council’s Acting Civil Operations Engineer has been very helpful with liaising with Busways.

RECOMMENDED

          That the Committee note the information.

 

GB 7           4 Weeks’ Notice to TfNSW of Bus Route Changes as a Result of   Works       

Steve Grady of Busways advised the Committee that Transport for NSW (TfNSW) has indicated that bus companies must now give 4 weeks’ notice of any changes to bus routes as a result of works. Steve Grady also advised that once the works on a street have been completed and the street is open to traffic (e.g. O’Connell Street), buses cannot operate on the street for 2 weeks until TfNSW has received data from the bus company.

RECOMMENDED

          That the Committee note the information.

 

GB 8           Bringelly Road and the Great Western Highway, Kingswood -       Turning Movements at the Intersection   

Councillor Tricia  Hitchen advised the Committee about vehicles in the left lane on Bringelly Road, Kingswood are illegally turning right at its intersection with the Great Western Highway.

RECOMMENDED

That:

1.   Council’s Traffic Engineering Officers request the Roads and Maritime Services (RMS) to review the left and right lanes and associated arrow pavement markings on Bringelly Road, at its intersection with the Great Western Highway.

 

2.   Councillor Tricia Hitchen (Representative for the Member for Penrith) and Council’s Traffic Engineering Officers be advised of the outcome.

 

 

There being no further business the Chairperson declared the meeting closed and the time being 10:10am.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the recommendations contained in the Report and Recommendations of the Local Traffic Committee meeting held on 6 May, 2019 be adopted.

 

 

  



DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Item                                                                                                                                                Page

 

 

Outcome 2 - We plan for our future growth

 

1        Penrith Local Planning Panel and Sydney Western City Planning Panel                         1

 

 

Outcome 4 - We have safe, vibrant places

 

2        Neighbourhood Renewal Program - Progress and Future Delivery                                  9

 

3        Tender Reference 18/19-08, Public Toilet Cleaning Services                                        17

 

4        RFT18/19-25 Refurbishment of Council Heritage Buildings, Castlereagh Hall and Emu Plains Old School Building                                                                                               25

 

 

Outcome 6 - We are healthy and share strong community spirit

 

5        Responding to the Changing Needs of Older People in the City                                    33

 

 

Outcome 7 - We have confidence in our Council

 

6        Organisational Performance and Financial Review March 2019                                    45

 

7        Proposed Amendments to 2019-20 Draft Fees and Charges                                         50

 

8        Local Government Remuneration Tribunal Determination for Mayor and Councillors for 2019-2020                                                                                                                        53

 

9        Summary of Investments & Banking for the Period 1 April 2019 to 30 April 2019         56

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


 

 

Outcome 1 - We can work close to home

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


Outcome 2 - We plan for our future growth

 

Item                                                                                                                                                Page

 

1        Penrith Local Planning Panel and Sydney Western City Planning Panel                         1

 

 

 



Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                    27 May 2019

 

 

 

1

Penrith Local Planning Panel and Sydney Western City Planning Panel   

 

Compiled by:               Peter Wood, Development Services Manager

Authorised by:            Wayne Mitchell, Director - Development and Regulatory Services 

Requested By:            Councillor Karen McKeown OAM

 

Outcome

We plan for our future growth

Strategy

Facilitate quality development in the City that considers the current and future needs of our community

Service Activity

Assess development proposals efficiently and make decisions that are open and fair

      

 

Executive Summary

Penrith City Council’s Local Planning Panel (LPP) has been operating now for just over 12 months in addition to the Sydney Western City Planning Panel which has operated as the regional panel for many years. A request by Councillor McKeown on the operation of these panels is therefore timely to consider the impact of this change. The operation of the Local Planning Panel warranted significant upfront investment in meeting and administration resourcing. Whilst operating costs are less than originally projected, a specific project budget is maintained for the operation of the panel. The Development Services Department continues to facilitate and administer Penrith City Council’s Local Planning Panel efficiently and effectively.

Background

The Sydney Western City Planning Panel (SWCPP) has been operating for many years as Penrith City Council’s regional planning panel under the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act, 1979 (the Act). Penrith City Council’s Local Planning Panel (LPP) has been operating from March 2018 with the compulsory introduction brought by amendments to the Act which also removed decision making powers on Development Applications. 

At Council’s Ordinary meeting of 25 March 2019, Councillor Karen McKeown OAM requested that, after 12 months of the local IHAPs being in operation, Councillors be provided with a report including a table of the decisions made by local IHAPs, including the Sydney Western City Planning Panel, as well as the amount of time the Panels have sat and the total dollar amount of payment for each meeting, and that this information be declared each quarter into the future. Given the LPP has been in operation for just over 12 months Councillor McKeown’s request is timely as we are able to provide details on meeting frequency, costs and outcomes and compare between both the regional and local panel.

 

Sydney Western City Planning Panel (SWCPP)

 

The Sydney Western City Planning Panel is a regional panel with three State appointed and two Council appointed members. The SWCPP is responsible for determining applications for the following forms of regionally significant development:

 

·    Capital Investment Value (CIV) over $30 Million

·    Council Development over $5 Million

·    Crown Development over $5 Million

·    Private infrastructure and community facilities over $5 million

·    Eco-tourist facilities over $5 million

·    Particular designated development

·    Development subject to delays in determination

·    Development in council areas where development assessment unsatisfactory

 

The following table summarises the outcome of determination meetings for the previous and current financial years.

 

 

July 2018 – March 2019

July 2017 – June 2018

No. of Panel meetings

5

11

No. of applications

8

15

Electronic Determinations

2 approvals

3 approvals

Approvals

4

10

Refusals

1

1

Deferred to another meeting (additional information required)

1

1

Panel members time

26 hours

33 hours

 

 

From this table it is evident that the number of SWCPP panel meetings appears to be declining slightly from the previous year. The frequency of meetings is now roughly one every two months where previously it was one per month however it must be remembered that some determinations can occur electronically. Whilst the threshold for regional panel matters increased from $20 Million CIV to $30 Million CIV, this has not significantly impacted on the number of applications being determined. The categories of applications to be reported to the LPP has not had any real reduction in the number of matters being reported to the SWCPP.

 

Unlike the LPP, the state appointed members are remunerated for their SWCPP commitments by the state government such that the cost to Council is effectively absorbed by salary time for Council appointed members and staff. There is also a state appointed panel secretariat who schedules meetings and advertising although the administrative burden on Council staff remains substantial.

 

Penrith Local Planning Panel

 

Section 4.8(2) of the Act prescribed that:

 

The functions of a council as a consent authority in respect of any such area are not exercisable by the councillors. They are exercisable on behalf of the council by:

(a) the local planning panel, or

(b) an officer or employee of the council to whom the council delegates those functions.

 

The Penrith LPP is a local panel constituted in March 2018 comprised of state appointed Chair(s), two Council appointed experts (from a Minister endorsed list) and community representative(s) appointed by Council’s General Manager through an expression of interest process open to the community. The Minister has directed that the following applications types are to be determined by the LPP:

 

·    Potential Conflict of Interest where Council, Councillor or staff with functions under the Act, Member of Parliament or relative with some minor building exemptions

·    Contentious Development subject of 10 or more unique submissions

·    >10% variation to Development Standard

·    Sensitive Development being designated, apartment building, new licensed premises, heritage item demolition, sex services/restricted premises or VPA offered.

 

The following table summarises LPP Determination Meetings to date with the full description of all items in the table provided separately for the information of Councillors (Enclosure 2).

 

No. of Panel meetings

15  (includes 1 internal briefing)

No. of applications

28 DA’s

2 Planning Proposals

Electronic Determinations

(after additional information received)

3 approval

1 refused

Approvals

15

Refusals

5

Deferred to another meeting (additional information required)

5

Referred back to council staff for determination

3

Panel members total time

31 hours

 

Conclusion

 

All decisions of both the SWCPP and the LPP have been in accordance with the recommendation except for one for each panel. LPP costs include members fees, advertising and catering. The total expenditure on the panel for the first year from March 2018 to March 2019 was $80,000. The LPP was successfully constituted on time and has been operating well within budget in addition to the SWCPP. The panels provide for transparent decision making with community engagement. 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the information contained in the report on Penrith Local Planning Panel and Sydney Western City Planning Panel be received.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.  


 

 

Outcome 3 - We can get around the City

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


Outcome 4 - We have safe, vibrant places

 

Item                                                                                                                                                Page

 

2        Neighbourhood Renewal Program - Progress and Future Delivery                                  9

 

3        Tender Reference 18/19-08, Public Toilet Cleaning Services                                        17

 

4        RFT18/19-25 Refurbishment of Council Heritage Buildings, Castlereagh Hall and Emu Plains Old School Building                                                                                               25

 

 

 

 

 



Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                    27 May 2019

 

 

 

2

Neighbourhood Renewal Program - Progress and Future Delivery   

 

Compiled by:               Lila Kennelly, Neighbourhood Renewal Coordinator

Authorised by:            Jeni Pollard, Place Manager  

 

Outcome

We have safe, vibrant places

Strategy

Work with our communities to improve wellbeing and infrastructure in their neighbourhoods

Service Activity

Work with local communities to identify priority issues in their area

      

 

Executive Summary

This report provides Council with an overview of the Neighbourhood Renewal Program and outlines recent progress in Colyton, North St Marys, Oxley Park and Kingswood. This work has tested how best to engage with residents and stakeholders to drive positive change in these neighbourhoods.

 

In the context of a rapidly changing region, many of the City’s older established neighbourhoods continue to experience relatively high levels of disadvantage.

 

Neighbourhood Renewal plays an important role in generating positive outcomes in these areas, supporting communities to work together and take action on local priorities.

Recent programming has demonstrated that each place and community is unique requiring an approach tailored to local context to drive the greatest impact for and with residents impacted by disadvantage.

 

The report recommends the information be received and Council endorse the delivery of the Neighbourhood Renewal program in Kingwood Park, Llandilo, Cranebrook and St Marys.

 

Background

Council’s Neighbourhood Renewal Program supports positive change across the City’s older established communities. The program provides an integrated model of community and cultural engagement and economic participation that enhances the social wellbeing and infrastructure of neighbourhoods impacted by disadvantage.

 

Sitting within Council’s Place Management Department, Neighbourhood Renewal responds to Council’s long-standing commitment to resourcing older established neighbourhoods and providing opportunities for resident participation. The program enables Council to build relationships and trust within disadvantaged communities, ensuring social harmony is maintained across the City in the context of increasing growth and change.

 

The Neighbourhood Renewal Program has been active since 2006 when funding was first made available through the Asset Renewal and Established Areas Strategy. Since its inception, the program has reached over 30,000 residents and delivered a range of award winning projects that have responded to the needs and aspirations of local communities. Many of these projects have been delivered by leveraging the existing resources of Council and local services or through external grant funding.

 

In 2015, Council endorsed the pilot of a new approach to Neighbourhood Renewal in Colyton (2015-16), North St Marys (2016-17) and Kingswood in (2017-18). This pilot set out a 3-year model of working more closely with residents to develop “Local Teams” and Community Action Plans. The model sought to increase resident participation in local decision making and empower both residents and services to work together to drive change. Work was also undertaken in Oxley Park (2017-18) to develop the Oxley Park Place Plan.

Based on this recent work, this report suggests a continuation and evolution of the place by place approach for the future delivery of the Neighbourhood Renewal Program.

 

Progress in Colyton, North St Marys, Kingswood and Oxley Park

Colyton

In 2015, Neighbourhood Renewal piloted a new “Local Team” model by establishing Team Colyton. This group brought local residents together with Council, local services, businesses, schools, and faith organisations to develop a Community Action Plan and collaborate on its delivery.

 

Council endorsed the Colyton Community Action Plan 2015-18 at a Policy and Review Committee Meeting on 14 March 2016. To date, over 80 Team Colyton meetings have been held and significant progress has since been made on the delivery of this plan. Residents, Council, and other stakeholders have delivered 88% of all actions, with notable achievements including:

 

·    Establishment of the annual, community led, Colyton Carols event

·    Installation of new fitness equipment in Kevin Maley Park supported by a fitness training program

·    Establishment of the Colyton Walking Group and the Colyton Book Club

·    An upgrade to the public amenity at Day St shopping strip

·    Installation of public wall art on Bennett Rd

·    Delivery of 6 local community events, such as Colyton’s Birthday celebration




Team Colyton residents and Clr Thain celebrate the opening of new fitness equipment in Kevin Maley Reserve.

Residents involved in Team Colyton demonstrated enormous passion, pride and determination, volunteering much of their own time to be part of the group and run local events and projects. After a handover period, the residents involved in Team Colyton decided to continue meeting independently of Council, with support of local community service Community Junction.

 

North St Marys
Following the trial of Team Colyton, Neighbourhood Renewal established #NorthStMarysMatters in 2016. The resident group attracted many local parents who were actively involved in the development of the North St Marys Community Action Plan 2017-19, which was endorsed by Council at an Ordinary meeting on 14 August 2017. Significant progress has been made on the plan’s delivery, with 94% of actions complete including a number of highlights:

 

·    Development and delivery of the Village Café project

·    Co-design of Robin Wiles Reserve (construction of phase 1 is currently underway)

·    Development and delivery of the Parklawn Place-Makers project funded by NSW Justice (construction of public amenity upgrades currently underway)

·    Delivery of resident led Community Safety Audits

·    Delivery of numerous resident led community events to celebrate activities such as youth week

·    Facilitation of 2 Community Action Training workshops

 

Residents involved in #NorthStMarysMatters receive recognition at Council’s 2018 Australia Day Awards.

 

Residents involved in #NorthStMarysMatters demonstrated enormous passion for making a difference in their neighbourhood and report feeling immensely proud of their efforts. Following a 3-year period the group have recently identified they do not have the capacity to continue independently of Council. Given the needs identified by the community, Neighbourhood Renewal will continue providing support to North St Marys.

 

Kingswood
With a growing population of residents from diverse cultural and socio-economic backgrounds, Kingswood differs greatly from Colyton and North St Marys both socially and physically. Extensive engagement was undertaken with a range of residents to identify local priorities and develop the Kingswood Place Plan 2018-22, which was endorsed at Policy Review Committee meeting on 12 November 2018. Delivery of this plan is currently underway, with recent achievements including:

 

·    Delivery of 14 Village Café sessions in Wainwright Park

·    A pedestrian lighting audit was undertaken in response to local community safety concerns

·    Council’s Community Safety team received $400,000 for the installation of 20 pedestrian lights, funded by a grant from the Commonwealth Department of Industry, Innovation and Science

·    Delivery of Community Action Training

 

Building on the success of Community Action Training in Colyton, residents interested in making a difference in Kingswood were invited to attend the 8-week program. This opportunity attracted over 18 passionate locals who actively participated in a range of discussions about their community. The training was highly successful in bringing a diverse group together to identify common values and goals for Kingswood and building their capacity to take action.

 


Kingswood residents who undertook an 8 week Community Action Training program.

Following this training, the residents decided to continue meeting as Kingswood Together with an aim to host events and projects in the neighbourhood with minimal support from Council.

 

Oxley Park
Oxley Park’s population is 3,289 and the suburb has recently experienced rapid change. The development of many new medium density dwellings has attracted families to the area resulting in an increased number of children as well as adults aged 18-34 in Oxley Park.

 

In early 2017 Council received numerous concerns from Oxley Park residents in relation to parking, traffic and waste issues. In response to these emerging issues, Neighbourhood Renewal was able to reach out to local residents and develop the Oxley Park Place Plan 2017-19. This plan was endorsed by Council at a Policy and Review Committee Meeting on 11 September 2017 and the majority of actions are now either complete or have resulted in an ongoing change to practice. This Place Plan approach was able to deliver a significant number of outcomes for Oxley Park in a relatively short period of time.

 

Place Plans offer a place management response to an area experiencing complex or overlapping issues. This approach was able to effectively engage with residents and coordinate Council’s resources in response to emerging issues. This offers another model of working with community to address local challenges.


Oxley Park residents volunteer to run the BBQ at a community event hosted by Neighbourhood Renewal in October 2018.

Overall, this recent work has driven significant outcomes and made a positive impact in each neighbourhood. Conditions for success have depended on the context of each neighbourhood and highlighted the need for an agile approach that responds to the unique capacity and strengths of each community. Later this year a report will be prepared for Council that reviews of all plans developed to date and outlining any outstanding actions for resolution. 

 

Priority neighbourhoods

Since 2006, the Neighbourhood Renewal Program has been active in the City’s most disadvantaged neighbourhoods, as identified by the Socio-Economic Index for Areas (SEIFA). This index uses a range of indicators to identify neighbourhoods that experience comparatively higher levels of disadvantage than others within the City. These indicators include, but are not limited to educational attainment, income, employment, occupation and access to services.

 

In Penrith City, areas with lower SEIFA scores (higher levels of disadvantage) also tend to be located within the City’s older established areas that have historically seen lower levels of new development. Based on the 2006, 2011, and confirmed by the 2016 Census, the Neighbourhood Renewal Program has focused on the following suburbs or localities:

 

·    Londonderry

·    Cranebrook

·    Llandilo

·    Cambridge Park

·    Kingswood

·    Colyton

·    Oxley Park

·    Penrith

·    Werrington

·    St Marys

·    Kingswood Park

·    North St Marys

 

The majority of Neighbourhood Renewal suburbs fall below the NSW average for disadvantage. The demographic characteristics making up SEIFA are complex and it is important to note that the scores are relative, that is, they are comparisons between areas of certain identified characteristics. It is also important to note that pockets of significant disadvantage may also exist within suburbs, for example in Werrington, Kingswood Park, Cranebrook and Kingswood. In addition, trends suggest that areas such as North St Marys have continued to experience a high level of disadvantage over time.

 

Other factors, such as geographical and social isolation, access to community services, housing stress, level of community engagement, and local infrastructure are also considered in identifying sites for Neighbourhood Renewal. While Llandilo and Londonderry rank above the NSW average for disadvantage, many residents experience different types of disadvantage (e.g. access to fewer services and isolation) due to the rural nature of these communities.

 

Importantly, what the data is unable to capture is the unique strengths of these neighbourhoods where residents often demonstrate great resilience, determination, passion and pride despite sometimes challenging personal circumstances.

 

Neighbourhood Renewal’s approach

The Neighbourhood Renewal Program continues to lead the way in terms of local government addressing place-based disadvantage. The program seeks to find the most innovative and impactful ways of driving outcomes both for and with residents in the City’s most disadvantaged places. As demonstrated by recent programming, each suburb for Neighbourhood Renewal is unique with different levels of infrastructure, social wellbeing and resident capacity. This means no single approach is most effective and a place by place approach that is adaptive to the capacity of each neighbourhood, identifying local priorities and tailoring a response according to the capacity and aspirations of that community is warranted.

 

Extensive community engagement will continue to determine the most effective model for driving impact in each area, whether that be through a Local Team, Community Action Training, a Village Café style project, or the development of a Community Action Plan or Place Plan. This approach enables residents to co-design how they participate in and contribute to their neighbourhood, ensuring the most effective outcomes. Co-design is a growing practice utilised by Government and services to involve stakeholders in the design of new and innovative solutions to existing issues.


A North St Marys resident participates in a co-design process, contributing ideas for a new Masterplan for Robin Wiles Reserve.

Proposed sites 2019-22

Following an analysis of the 12 Neighbourhood Renewal priority suburbs as well as feedback from partner agencies and Councillors, 4 sites have been identified for the delivery of activity over the next 4 years:

 

·    2019-20 Kingswood Park

·    2020-21 Llandilo

·    2021-22 Cranebrook

·    2022-23 St Marys

 

These neighbourhoods are proposed according to a matrix of indicators including measurement of disadvantage, access to services and engagement undertaken. It is also worth noting when the Neighbourhood Renewal Program was last delivered in each suburb.

Neighbourhood Renewal was last active in Kingswood Park in 2008. Recent feedback from local services has identified that the area continues to experience high levels of disadvantage manifesting in a decline of social cohesion. Data also suggests that pockets of Kingswood Park experience some of the highest levels of disadvantage in Penrith City. It is proposed Neighbourhood Renewal will engage with residents to better understand local issues and develop a response based on community needs and capacity.

 

In Llandilo, Neighbourhood Renewal was last active in 2011. Neighbourhood Renewal staff recently supported engagement in Llandilo as part of the development of Council’s Community Safety Plan. Feedback from some residents highlighted a number of challenges, including limited access to services, and concerns for increasing social isolation amongst older residents. Data shows that Llandilo has a higher proportion of 60-84 years compared to Penrith City, along with a higher percentage of people from non-English speaking backgrounds.

 

Neighbourhood Renewal was last active in Cranebrook in 2014. Pockets of the suburb continue to experience the highest levels of disadvantage in the City despite significant efforts from local community services. Neighbourhood Renewal activity will benefit the community by supporting residents to co-design initiatives that reflect local aspirations and enhance social cohesion.

 

While St Marys has experienced significant change since Neighbourhood Renewal engaged with residents in 2010, it continues to rank as one of the City’s most disadvantaged suburbs. Almost 50% of residents do not hold any qualifications and 20.3% of all households are on low incomes. It is proposed that Neighbourhood Renewal could support residents in St Marys to build a shared vision with aspirations whilst their community undergoes significant change and development.

 

Other Neighbourhood Renewal activities

In addition to delivering the proposed place by place model, Neighbourhood Renewal will continue to offer programming across the 12 priority suburbs, including:

Magnetic Places
The annual Magnetic Places funding program will continue to be offered across Neighbourhood Renewal areas in order to connect local residents with arts and cultural engagement opportunities.

 

Penrith Mayoral Challenge
The Penrith Mayoral Challenge will be delivered in Oxley Park in 2019-20 to renew Brian King Reserve as a key outcome of the Oxley Park Place Plan 2017-19. A further report will be presented to Council outlining future sites for the delivery of this impactful project, aligning with Council’s strategic open space vision.

 


Mayor of Penrith City, Clr Fowler OAM celebrates the completion of works in Lincoln Park delivered as part of the 2017 Penrith Mayoral Challenge.

Village Café
In addition, the Village Café will continue to be delivered in North St Marys offering a valuable space for resident connection in an area where many experience social and financial hardship. In Kingswood the project will move to a monthly offering in order to be delivered in Llandilo in 2020-21. The Village Café has proven to be highly successful in increasing social connection for residents and improving access to information and local services, leveraging resources from a range key partner organisations.

 

Conclusion 

This report has provided Council with a brief overview of Neighbourhood Renewal’s recent work in Colyton, North St Marys, Oxley Park and Kingswood.

 

Going forward Neighbourhood Renewal seeks to deliver a place by place approach in Kingswood Park, Llandilo, St Marys and Cranebrook that will respond to the needs of these unique communities. This approach will ensure residents are engaged to share their community’s aspirations and co-design effective and innovative responses that address local priorities.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Neighbourhood Renewal Program - Progress and Future Delivery be received

2.    Council endorse the proposed approach as outlined for delivery in Kingswood Park, Llandilo, Cranebrook and St Marys.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                    27 May 2019

 

 

 

3

Tender Reference 18/19-08, Public Toilet Cleaning Services   

 

Compiled by:               Murray  Halls, Acting City Presentation Manager - Public Spaces Maintenance

Authorised by:            Brian Steffen, Director - City Services  

 

Outcome

We have safe, vibrant places

Strategy

Make our public places safe and attractive

Service Activity

Maintain Council's public spaces

      

 

Executive Summary

The purpose of this report is to advise Council of the outcome of the Tender for the provision of Public Toilet Cleaning Services. This service includes the daily opening and cleaning of 28 public toilet facilities, including weekends and public holidays.

 

A total of 21 tender responses were received.  Following a review of the tenders by the Tender Evaluation Panel a determination was made to short-list five (5) tenderers that represented the best value to Council.  The companies shortlisted were Advanced National Services Pty Ltd., SKG Cleaning Services Pty Ltd., Solo Services Group, TST Property Services Pty Ltd., and VDG Services.

 

An independent referee check indicated that the preferred short-listed company had satisfactory to very good performance and customer satisfaction ratings.  The independent financial analysis check on the preferred short-listed company showed no adverse findings and demonstrated a satisfactory capacity to undertake the works required by the tender.

 

Based on detailed evaluation interviews, independent risk analysis and best overall value, the Tender Evaluation Panel is recommending that the contract for the provision of Public Toilet Cleaning Services be awarded to TST Property Services Pty Ltd, for an initial period of three (3) years, with an option to extend for a further two (2) x one (1) year periods (with provision for rise and fall) subject to satisfactory performance.

 

Background

A new tender for the provision of Public Toilet Cleaning Services for an initial three (3) year period with an option to extend for a further two (2) x one (1) year periods allowing for rise and fall provisions, was advertised in the Western Weekender on 14 February 2019 and the Sydney Morning Herald on 19 February 2019.

 

The scope of the works required in this tender included the following requirements:

 

·    Scheduled Cleaning. Involving the opening and cleaning of public toilets across the City.  Unlocks and cleans to be completed no later than the times outlined in the Tender specification.

·    Periodic Cleaning Activities.  Involving cleaning tasks that are performed on a weekly and monthly frequency.  The initial periodic cleaning activities are to be undertaken within one month of the awarding of the contract.

·    Call Back Cleans.  Involves any additional cleaning outside of the scheduled times, at the request of Council’s representative.

 

Tenderers were required to submit their tender on a standard pro-forma sheet, which clearly identified the required response against each of the evaluation criteria.

 

Tender Evaluation Panel

The Tender Evaluation Panel consisted of Allyce Langton (Procurement Business Partner),  Murray Halls (Acting City Presentation Manager – Public Spaces Maintenance), Daniel Browne (Operations Coordinator – Cross City Services), and Tamryn Elks (City Presentation – Business Support Officer).

 

Evaluation process

The process for the evaluation of tenders was as follows:

 

1.   Initial review of tenders to determine compliance with the evaluation criteria including the ability to provide the full range of services specified;

2.   Assessment of costs based on the unit rates tendered and the allocated staff to perform the services;

3.   Determination of a short-list based on the best rankings from 1 and 2 above;

4.   Further evaluation of the short-listed companies through:

-     Formal Interviews

-     Independent Financial Risk Analysis

-     Independent Referee Checks

 

Tender Evaluation Criteria

The tenders submitted were initially assessed in accordance with the evaluation specified in the tender documents.  The selection criteria advertised and used in selecting the successful tenderers were as follows:

 

Company Information

·    Company Profile

 

Commercial Requirements

·    Critical Assumptions

·    Conforming Requirements

·    Conflict of Interest Declaration

·    Insurances

·    Instrument of Agreement

·    Required Declarations

·    Compliance Statement

·    Business References

 

Scope of Requirements

·    Demonstrated Ability

·    Compliance to Specified Requirements

·    Establishment and Response Times

·    Conformance to Relevant Standards

 

Cost/Price Category

·    Unit Rates

·    Rise and Fall Provisions

·    Financial Viability

 

 

Management and Administration

·    Resources and Personnel

·    Quality Assurance

·    Environmental Management

·    Industrial Relations

·    Work Health & Safety

 

Summary of Tenders Received

A total of 21 companies lodged submissions in response to the advertised tender.  The list of tenders received is shown below in alphabetical order in the following table:

 

Company Name

Address

Directors/ Owners

Academy Services Pty Ltd

Unit 7, 20 Barcoo Street Roseville NSW 2069

Glen Browne, John Hoffman, Mauro Viola, Robert Sweetlove

Advanced National Services Pty Ltd

PO Box 699 Beenleigh QLD 4207

Edward Klimowicz

AFMR Pty Ltd t/a Solo Services Group

Level 2, 133 Alexander Street Crows Nest NSW 2065

Matt Salihi

Allied Security Management

8/3 Kelso Crescent, Moorebank NSW 2170

Amer Awad

Anytime Commercial Cleaning Services Pty Ltd

24 Pinehurst Avenue Glenmore Park NSW 2745

Kilbert Amalathas, Neville Emerson, Deborah Benjamin

Ashcroft Cleaning Services NSW Pty Ltd

48 Masterfield Street Rossmore NSW 2557

Rosa Montes De Oca

Assure Protection Services

7/575 Woodville Road Guildford NSW 2161

Gopali Dahl

Aus2co Pty Ltd

16/2-4 Sturt Place St Ives NSW 2075

Jay Jung

Cleanlink Pty Ltd

PO Box 6 Westpoint Blacktown NSW 2148

Felix Syamando

Gavs Group

Suite 3.04, 1753-1765 Botany Road Banksmeadow NSW 2019

Antonio Cerqueira, Victor Lopes, Alan Serebro

GJK Indigenous Solutions

3/629 Gardeners Road Mascot NSW 2020

Jasmine Groves, George Stamas, Steve Taylor, Max Newman

Maas Group Facility Services

15 Michigan Road Seven Hills 2147

Athavan Muthulingam

RD Cleaning Professionals Pty Ltd

Shop 15/58-62 Fitzwilliam Road, Old Toongabbie NSW 2146

Alpesh Prajapati

S Michael Cleaning Services Pty Ltd

4B, 8 Pioneer Avenue Tuggerah NSW 2259

Simon Nakhla

SKG Cleaning Services Pty Ltd

PO Box 2446 Taren Point NSW 2229

Steve Manoussakis, George Manoussakis

Star Property Maintenance NSW Pty Ltd

PO Box 63 West Hoxton NSW 2171

Steven Khalil

Storm International Pty Ltd

PO Box 648 Fairfield NSW 1860

Wilson Younan, Ismar Younan, Maria Younan

Summit Open Space Services

1 Smith Street Emu Plains NSW 2750

Gregory Fitzgerald, Scott Bryan, Matthew Bryan, Brian Bauer

TST Property Services Pty Ltd

PO Box 3336 Wetherill Park NSW 2164

Najeeb Shamoon

VDG Services

PO Box 1051 Menai Central NSW 2234

Dean Graoroski

Versatile Property Services Pty Ltd

Level 26, 44 Market Street Sydney NSW 2000

Joe Merkbawi

 

An initial review of all tenders received identified that eleven (11) were found to be non-compliant.  Due to the lack of information and the misunderstanding of the scope of service required, it was not possible to properly assess the tenders from:

 

·    Academy Services Pty Ltd

·    Allied Security Management

·    Assure Protection Services

·    RD Cleaning Professional Pty Ltd

·    S Michael Cleaning Services Pty Ltd

·    Star Property Maintenance NSW Pty Ltd

·    Storm International Pty Ltd

·    Summit Open Space Services

·    Versatile Property Services Pty Ltd.

 

The tender from Ashcroft Cleaning Services NSW Pty Ltd did not include any pricing information so could not be considered.

 

The remaining nine (9) tenderers were included for further evaluation.

 

 

 

 

Initial Evaluation of Tenders

Compliance

 

All remaining tenders were assessed against the evaluation criteria and based on their written submissions they all met the specified requirements.

 

Prices

 

Tenderers were requested to provide a price for the cleaning of all 28 listed public toilets. The table below indicates that total annualised cost (lowest to highest) to perform the requested services.

 

Tenderer

Total annualised cost

($)

Advanced National Services Pty Ltd

$115,897.02

VDG Services

$166,508.48

TST Property Services Pty Ltd

$197,698.80

SKG Cleaning Services Pty Ltd

$265,424.25

AFMR Pty Ltd  t/a Solo Services Group

$465,667.28

Gavs Group

$523,487.12

Cleanlink Pty Ltd

$698,110.40

Anytime Commercial Cleaning Services Pty Ltd

$807,040.00

Maas Group Facility Services

$2,152,600.00

 

 

Comments

 

After the initial evaluation it was determined by the Tender Evaluation Panel that there was no benefit to Council in further considering the higher priced tenders from the following companies:

 

Gavs Group

$523,487.12

Cleanlink Pty Ltd

$698,110.40

Anytime Commercial Cleaning Services Pty Ltd

$807,040.00

Maas Group Facility Services

$2,152,600.00

 

The proposed service methodology, including staffing arrangements, submitted by all remaining five (5) tenderers were reviewed in detail.

 

Comments

 

Advanced National Services Pty Ltd ($115,897.02)

 

Advanced National Services Pty Ltd are based in Queensland.  They currently provide general cleaning services to a range of public and private facilities across Australia.

 

They currently have a number of cleaning contracts with councils across Queensland and South Australia. In 2018 they commenced a contract with North Sydney Council which includes the cleaning of outdoor space areas including public toilets.

 

They provided limited information in regards to the methodology and approach they would use in ensuring satisfactory performance of the specified service. Additionally, the overall contract price submitted did not match the total daily man hours detailed for the delivery of the service and use of National Cleaning award pay scales.

They received the fourth (4th) highest “non price” rank as part of the tender review process.

 

VDG Services ($166,508.48)

 

VDG Services Australia are based in Sydney.  They provide general cleaning to a number of government and commercial businesses.

 

They currently provide cleaning services to a variety of premises within the Fairfield City Council area including 5 libraries, 13 childcare centres, 4 leisure centres and 4 baby health centres. They also provide cleaning services to a variety of facilities within the Central Coast Council area.

 

They received the second (2nd) highest “non-price” rank of 90.01% as part of the tender review process.

 

 

TST Property Services Pty Ltd ($197,698.80)

 

TST property Services Pty Ltd are based in Wetherill Park, Sydney.  They currently have cleaning contracts with Penrith City Council, and 7 other local councils in Sydney.

 

They have been providing cleaning services to Penrith City Council since January 2015.  They currently have two contracts with council, cleaning of all public toilets and cleaning of various community centres and halls.

 

The option to extend the existing public toilet cleaning contract for an additional 1-year period was taken up on two occasions due to satisfactory performance standards being met.

 

They received the highest (1st) “non-price” rank of 99.26% as part of the tender review process.

 

SKG Cleaning Services Pty Ltd ($265,424.25)

 

SKG Cleaning Services Pty Ltd commenced a contract with Woollahra Council in 2015, involving the cleaning of public toilets and associated changeroom facilities.

 

They also have a current contract with Wollongong City Council involving the cleaning of a range of council facilities including the administration building, childcare centres and the public amenities of the tourist location Gateway Centre.

 

The received the third (3rd) highest “non-price” rank of 80.09% as part of the tender review process.

 

AFMR Pty Ltd  t/a Solo Services Group ($465,667.28)

 

AFMR Pty Ltd trading as Solo Services Group are based in Sydney.  They currently provide general cleaning services to a number of local councils.

 

They currently have contracts, which includes the cleaning of public toilets, with Mosman Council, Liverpool Council and Northern Beaches Council.

 

The received the fifth (5th) highest “non-price” rank of 73.63% as part of the tender review process.

 

 

 

Short Listed Tenders

Following the detailed evaluation of each company’s ability to undertake the work, and the high level of satisfaction with the current contractor, it was decided to conduct interviews with representatives from VDG Services and TST Property Services Pty Ltd.

 

The interview conducted with VDG Services confirmed that they had not allocated sufficient man hours to complete the cleaning of multiple sites across the city within stated timeframes.  Given the adjustment required in man hours to meet servicing requirements, we would see the overall price increase to an amount close to that provided by TST Property Services Pty Ltd, who scored a higher “non-price” rank.

 

Financial Services Manager’s Comment

 

Included in the assessment of tenders was the commissioning of independent reference checks, financial analysis, and performance analysis on TST Property Services Pty Ltd.  These checks were completed by Corporate Scorecard Pty Ltd.  These checks were reviewed the financial information provided by the tenderer and have not identified any reason why the contract should not be awarded.  The report recommends acceptance of the tender by TST Property Services Pty Ltd.  The cost of the proposed contract will be managed from within existing divisional budgets.

 

Tender Advisory Group Comments

The objective of the Tender Advisory Group (TAG) is to support the Council to achieve fair and equitable tender processes. The TAG, consisting of John Gordon – Acting Director – City Services, Adam Beggs - Governance Coordinator and Neil Farquharson – Financial Services Manager were briefed by the City Presentation team about the background and the process followed. The TAG considered the recommendations in relation to the tender for Public Toilet Cleaning Services noting that, while the recommended tender was not the lowest price, the company has demonstrated their ability to meet Council’s requirements and their proposal was considered to be the most advantageous to Council. The TAG reviewed the evaluation process outlined within the report and is satisfied that the selection criteria have been correctly applied in making the recommendations.

 

Conclusion

The Tender Evaluation Committee is of the opinion that TST Property Services Pty Ltd provided the most advantageous tender and it is recommended that the company be awarded the contract for a sum of $197,698.80 excluding GST.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Tender Reference 18/19-08, Public Toilet Cleaning Services be received

2.    The contract for the provision of Public Toilet Cleaning Services be awarded to TST Property Services Pty Ltd for an initial period of three (3) years, with an option to extend for a further two (2) x one (1) year periods, with provision for rise and fall subject to satisfactory performance.

 

 

3.    The Common Seal of the Council of Penrith be affixed to any necessary documentation.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                    27 May 2019

 

 

 

4

RFT18/19-25 Refurbishment of Council Heritage Buildings, Castlereagh Hall and Emu Plains Old School Building   

 

Compiled by:               Greg Bretherton, Project Supervisor

Authorised by:            Michael Jackson, Design and Projects Manager  

 

Outcome

We have safe, vibrant places

Strategy

Work with our communities to improve wellbeing and infrastructure in their neighbourhoods

Service Activity

Implement the Neighbourhood Facilities Improvement Program

      

 

Executive Summary

A Tender for the refurbishment of two council heritage community facility buildings, Castlereagh Hall and Emu Plains Old School Building, was advertised in the Western Weekender on 28 March 2019 and the Sydney Morning Herald on 2 April 2019. The tender closed on 3 May 2019.

 

This report advises Council of the outcome of the tender process and recommends that the tender from Phillip McNamara T/A Cranebrook Constructions (Cranebrook Constructions) for the full scope of works outlined in RFT18/19-25 Refurbishment of Council Heritage Buildings Castlereagh Hall and Emu Plains Old School Building is accepted in the amount of $845 363 (excluding GST).

Background

Penrith City Council has allocated funding for the refurbishment of a number of Community Facility Buildings in its 18/19 Assert Renewal Program (ARP).  Refurbishment works at Castlereagh Hall and the Emu Plains Old School Building are included in this program and these two sites were grouped together in a single tender due to their heritage features and significance.

Work at both sites features the following

·    Access improvements - ramps and decks as well as improving main paths of travel within the buildings.

·    Bathroom refurbishments including full accessibility

·    Upgrades to existing Air Conditioning

·    Improvements to lighting and power (including bringing existing services up to current codes)

·    General ‘cosmetic’ work including internal and external painting, roof and gutter repairs, repairs to existing joinery, new doors and security screens.

·    Minor landscape works, new paving and fencing

 

A feature of Castlereagh Hall will be a new open deck on the south side of the building taking in views over the lakes and mountains which add to the already significant appeal of this building for future functions and community use. Emu Plains Old School Building will benefit from improvements to facilities for current and potential user groups in the form of new and improved office, kitchenette and meeting spaces.

Responding parties were required to submit their tender on a standard pro forma sheet which clearly defined the response required against each of the evaluation criteria.

Tender Evaluation Process

The Tender Evaluation Committee consisted of Rosemarie Canales, Architectural Supervisor, Greg Bretherton, Project Supervisor and was chaired by Michael Jackson, Design and Projects Manager.  Allyce Langton from Council’s Procurement team performed the role of tender administration and probity officer for this tender.

 

The evaluation criteria advertised and used in assessing the tenders received included the following:

·    Business References

·    Demonstrated Ability

·    Works Method and Program

·    Financials

·    Employment Policies and details (Direct labour and Sub Contractors)

·    Support of Local Businesses within the Penrith LGA - Suppliers and Contractors

·    Quality Assurance Systems

·    Environmental Management Systems

·    Work Health & Safety

 

Initial Tender Review

A full listing of the tenders received is detailed below in price order (ex GST).

 

Company

Tendered Price

Company Location

Directors

Phillip McNamara T/A Cranebrook Constructions

$845,563.00

Cranebrook NSW

Phillip McNamara

Auscare Constructions Pty Ltd

$1,029,791.52

Leichardt NSW

Mark, Ben & Athol Simpson

SOFC Pty Ltd

$1,085,557.53

Sydney City NSW

Keith Sheppard

Aurify Constructions Pty Ltd

$1,242,700.00

Lane Cove NSW

Robert Stapleton, Leo Sprague and Colin Baggot

The Trustee for the Adaptive Trust T/A Dezign

$1,254,910.32

Lawson NSW

Tim Pridham

MMS Group Pty Ltd

$2,104,935.10

Molendinar QLD

Wayne Hemi

 

The three (3) lowest priced tenders were considered for initial assessment and were evaluated using Apet360 software to provide a ranking for conformance with the evaluation criteria.  Tenders evaluated were the submissions by Cranebrook Constructions, Auscare Constructions Pty Ltd and SOFC Pty Ltd

 

The remaining tenders were not considered for the evaluation as their tender price was higher than the expected price range.

Evaluation of the Preferred Tender

Following a detailed assessment, the tender from Cranebrook Constructions was considered by the Tender Evaluation Committee to provide the highest value for money compared to the next on the ranking list in terms of effectiveness and price.  This was also the lowest priced Tender.

 

The recommended company, Cranebrook Constructions was selected based on their:

 

1)      Compliance with the tender evaluation criteria,

2)      Demonstrated ability to meet Council’s requirements; and

3)      Competitive price for the services offered.

 

The Tender Evaluation Committee thoroughly reviewed the information provided pertaining to past experience of the proposed tenderer and conducted reference checks. 

Recommended Tenderer

Cranebrook Constructions was founded in 1992. The company has undertaken a diverse range of building works in the commercial sector encompassing a broad area of the industry from public and leisure facilities, healthcare, educational, industrial and commercial buildings. They have completed a number of public facility projects for Blue Mountains and Bankstown Councils, along with heritage related projects for National Parks NSW.

Financial Services Manager’s Comment

Included in the assessment of tenders was the commissioning of independent reference checks, financial analysis, and performance analysis on Phillip McNamara T/A Cranebrook Constructions. These checks were completed by Equifax Australasia Credit Ratings Pty Ltd who found that Cranebrook Constructions is trading in a profitable manner however the size of its annual revenue appeared to indicate that the contract would be outside appropriate capacity.  Financial Services have reviewed further financial information provided by the tenderer and assessed by Equifax and have requested additional securities be provided to now obtain adequate comfort in the tenderer’s financial capacity. A termination clause should be included within the contract in the event that appropriate additional security cannot be provided by Cranebrook Constructions.

 

Funding for the refurbishment of Castlereagh Hall and Emu Plains Old School Building has been identified under the 2018/19 Building Asset Renewal Program. Minor reprioritisation of the program schedule to fund the works into the next financial year will be required.

 

Tender Advisory Group (TAG) Comment

The objective of the Tender Advisory Group (TAG) is to support the Council to achieve fair and equitable tender processes. The TAG, consisting of Murray Halls – Acting City Presentation Manager, Public Spaces Maintenance, Adam Beggs - Governance Coordinator and Neil Farquharson – Financial Services Manager were briefed by the Design & Projects team about the background and the process followed. The TAG considered the recommendations in relation to the tender for works on 2 heritage community buildings noting that the recommended tender is the lowest price, the company has demonstrated their ability to meet Council’s requirements and their proposal was considered to be the most advantageous to Council. The TAG reviewed the evaluation process outlined within the report and is satisfied that the selection criteria have been correctly applied in making the recommendations.

Conclusion

The Tender Evaluation Committee is of the opinion that Phillip McNamara T/A Cranebrook Constructions provided the most advantageous tender and it is recommended that the Company be awarded the contract for a sum of $845,563 excluding GST.

 


 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on RFT18/19-25 Refurbishment of Council Heritage Buildings, Castlereagh Hall and Emu Plains Old School Building be received

2.    Phillip McNamara T/A Cranebrook Constructions be awarded the Contract subject to the execution of a formal agreement for the refurbishment works to Castlereagh Hall and Emu plains Old School Buildings for the amount of  $845,563.00 excluding GST.

3.    The Common Seal of the Council of the City of Penrith be placed on all documentation as necessary.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.  


 

 

Outcome 5 - We care about our environment

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


Outcome 6 - We are healthy and share strong community spirit

 

Item                                                                                                                                                Page

 

5        Responding to the Changing Needs of Older People in the City                                    33

 

 

 



Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                    27 May 2019

 

 

 

5

Responding to the Changing Needs of Older People in the City   

 

Compiled by:               Melissa McSeveny, Social Planning Coordinator

Authorised by:            Tracy Leahy, Acting Community and Cultural Development Manager  

 

Outcome

We are healthy and share strong community spirit

Strategy

Help build resilient, inclusive communities

Service Activity

Support community service organisations working in our City

      

 

Executive Summary

This report provides an overview of the work Council is undertaking in response to what older people have told us about their experiences and future needs in Penrith City.

 

Consultations in 2018 highlighted that older people have a positive connection with their local communities, they value the proximity and quality of health services available as well as the City’s parks and green spaces as important locations for social connection and physical activity.  The consultations also identified the importance of volunteering for older people and connecting potential volunteers with community organisations, further developing support networks for isolated older people and providing better access to information about social services and community events.

 

A range of Council services support outcomes for older people as part of our overall population through such things as providing better mobility for older people with footpath construction, and planning for a diverse range of housing options, including options for the ageing population.  The Community and Cultural Development service is leading Council’s response to the particular needs of older people identified in the 2018 consultation.

 

This report recommends that the information in the report on the work Council is doing to meet the current and future needs of older people in the city be received. 

Background

Older people are a diverse group and their lives and experiences vary in many ways. People’s experience of ageing will vary according to a range of factors such as health status, workforce participation, whether they live in urban or rural areas, and their personal interests.  In the recent consultations undertaken, to understand the current and future needs of older people, we spoke to groups of people over the age of 50.

 

Penrith City’s first ageing strategy, Planning for An Ageing Community Strategy 2010+, contained 5 priority themes including encouraging participation in social leisure and cultural activities, supporting healthy lifestyles and access to health care, supporting ‘ageing in place’, and participation and contribution to community life.  Since 2010, there have been significant achievements driven by the Strategy, which are outlined in Appendix 1.

 

Since the launch of the Ageing Strategy in 2010, the City has grown. The fastest growing age group in Penrith City from 2006 to 2016 was 65-74 year olds (+46%, +6664 people) followed by those 85 years and over (+38%, +884 people), and 75-84 year olds (+22%, 1327 people). 

 

The proportion of older Aboriginal people in our City increased even more significantly than the population as a whole, with Aboriginal people aged 65 years and over increasing by 244.6% (+181 people) since 2006 and 45-64 year olds increasing by 144.5% (+672 people).

 

In 2006 the City’s population of people over the age of 65 who spoke a language other than English at home was 12,754.  In 2016 that population had grown to 23,396, which is an increase of 183% (10,642) over 10 years.

 

The population ageing and increase in cultural diversity in the Penrith area reflects a broader population trend occurring across Australia and in other developed countries.  Population ageing is something that governments of all levels plan for, to meet specific support needs and take full advantage of the benefits older people bring to communities, local economies and workplaces.

 

The work that local governments across NSW and Australia can do to support their ageing populations is also changing, as is outlined in the section below on ‘The Changing Policy Environment’.

 

What Older People Told Us

To build on and contemporise Council’s work in delivering its Ageing Strategy, Council commissioned Insight Consulting Australia (Insight) to consult with people aged 50 years and older about their experiences, plans, hopes and concerns about growing

older in their local area.

 

Insight conducted seven focus groups with community groups and organisations for older people across the Local Government area. Overall more than one hundred older people participated in the focus groups conducted in Cranebrook, central Penrith, Leonay, St Clair and North St Marys.

 

Focus group questions and facilitators guided participants to think about issues that impacted their own lives and experiences, and also issues that are impacting on Penrith as a city. Participants were asked to reflect on the present and the future.

 

Through the focus groups, Insight identified that Penrith’s older residents have a positive connection with their local area. They are generally content with their local shops and services and especially value their access to high quality health services.

 

Older people’s vision for Penrith into the future is a network of vibrant local neighbourhoods connected by well-planned roads and diverse transport options, in which residents can access high-quality services and amenities.

 

After completing the consultations, Insight provided a report with 14 priorities to build on the foundations established by Council’s 2010 Ageing Strategy, and to align Council’s planning for an ageing population with its Delivery Program 2017-2021 for the City and with the NSW Government Ageing Strategy 2016-2020. 

 

A number of the priorities are already being carried out by a range of teams across Council, as they align with existing Council priorities such as supporting residents to work closer to home, increasing public transport options, and planning for services and accessible public spaces in new and established neighbourhoods.

 

Priorities for 2019 - 2021

Council’s Community and Cultural Development service will focus on the following priorities over the next two years:

 

·    Supporting volunteer efforts by facilitating older people’s connections with volunteer opportunities. In May 2019 Council will host an event to showcase the contributions of volunteers to the community and the work of organisations using volunteers.  It will also provide an opportunity for volunteer organisations to network and exchange ideas on attracting volunteers to their service.

·    Address the growing prevalence of social isolation, Council officers will work with local partners to increase formal and informal support networks for older people, particularly less mobile older people.

·    Respond to the needs of older Aboriginal people and older people from diverse cultural backgrounds by supporting individual services, such as Meals on Wheels and transport services, and providing culturally inclusive practice training to local services through Penrith Community Care Forum.

·    Continue to deliver health initiatives for older people in key public spaces that build social connection, such as by collaborating with Neighbourhood Renewal and other project partners at Village Café locations, and delivering FoodRedi – an educational cooking program focused on chronic disease prevention and reducing the prevalence of food insecurity.

·    Enhance older people’s access to information about available supports and services, in collaboration with other levels of government and community partners, through community events like Reimagine Ageing and Grandparents Day and providing crucial input to the Australian Government funded Aged Care Navigator Hubs, soon to be established by COTA Australia (formerly known as Council on the Ageing) in Penrith.

 

Changing Policy Environment

 

Up until 30 June 2018, Ageing Disability and Home Care (ADHC), a directorate of the NSW Department of Family and Community Services (FACS), provided funding for the aged and disability sector, to provide community development services and support for older people, people with disability, their families and carers.  In line with the broader Australian and State Government reforms toward individualised package funding, such as the roll out of My Aged Care and the NDIS, all program funding through ADHC ceased. 

Local Governments in NSW play an important role in building capacity for the local service sector and providing opportunities that enable older people to remain living in their own homes and staying active in their communities. 

Australian and state aged care policy reforms are increasingly focusing on individual capacity building, rather than broader social inclusion.  This provides an opportunity for Penrith City Council to take a lead role in creating stronger communities and reducing social isolation.  Penrith City can be better aligned to local needs and Council’s broader strategic priorities, such as planning for future growth, and ensuring we have a healthy, strong community.

Because of changing policies, the local community has reported experiencing some challenges in accessing information about community aged care services.  Older residents are likely to continue to contact their local Councils to source information about locally available services.  This provides an avenue for Council to identify potential service gaps and opportunities and facilitate the process to realign services and/or policies to align with local needs.

Penrith’s Community Care Forum (PCCF), coordinated by Council, plays a vital role in supporting the sector through this changing policy environment. PCCF provides information, training and networking opportunities for the local non-government sector as well as local services provided by other levels of government.  Over the last year, the PCCF Forum has provided information and training for the local aged and disability services sector in relation to health issues for older people, accessing My Aged Care services and Home and Community Care (HACC) services, use of My Health Record, responding to elder abuse and mental health issues, including suicide prevention.  The Elder Abuse training provided by PCCF in 2018 was planned and delivered in response to this growing issue experienced by older people across Australia, including in Penrith City.

In 2016 the NSW Government released its NSW Ageing Strategy 2016-2020, which guides state-wide strategies to address the needs of older people with programs such as:

 

·    ‘Grandparents Day’, which has contributed funding to Council’s celebrations of Grandparents Day in 2017 and 2018, and

·    ‘Liveable Communities’, which contributed funding to the piloting of the North St Marys Village Café.

 

Also, Council has received funding from NSW FACS for the Reimagine Ageing event for Seniors Festival, providing an opportunity for older residents and their families to connect with other community members, as well as with community support and health services through information stalls and promotion.

Further detail on the changes in Government policy are detailed in Appendix 2.

 

Conclusion

 

This report has outlined the work Council is doing to support older people across Penrith City through collaboration with other levels of Government and the community service sector, after listening to the needs of older people through consultations and in light of the broader funding and policy reforms.  This current work contemporises and builds on the outcomes achieved through Penrith City’s first ageing Strategy, “Planning for An Ageing Community 2010+”.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the information in the report on Responding to the Changing Needs of Older People in the City be received.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

Ageing Strategy 2010 Achievements

2 Pages

Appendix

2.

Aged Care Reforms

3 Pages

Appendix

  


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                                  27 May 2019

Appendix 1 - Ageing Strategy 2010 Achievements

 

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Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                                  27 May 2019

Appendix 2 - Aged Care Reforms

 

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Outcome 7 - We have confidence in our Council

 

Item                                                                                                                                                Page

 

6        Organisational Performance and Financial Review March 2019                                    45

 

7        Proposed Amendments to 2019-20 Draft Fees and Charges                                         50

 

8        Local Government Remuneration Tribunal Determination for Mayor and Councillors for 2019-2020                                                                                                                        53

 

9        Summary of Investments & Banking for the Period 1 April 2019 to 30 April 2019         56

 

 

 

 

 

 



Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                    27 May 2019

 

 

 

6

Organisational Performance and Financial Review March 2019   

 

Compiled by:               Geraldine Brown, Strategic Finance Coordinator

Craig Shepherd, Corporate Reporting Coordinator

Neil Farquharson, Financial Services Manager

Authorised by:            Andrew Moore, Director - Corporate Services  

 

Outcome

We have confidence in our Council

Strategy

Manage our money and our assets to be sustainable now and into the future

Service Activity

Support financial sustainability through financial planning and budget management

      

 

Executive Summary

This report outlines Council’s progress towards implementing its four-year Delivery Program 2017-21 and Operational Plan 2018-19, focusing on the period of 1 January to 31 March 2019. The report should be read in conjunction with the Organisational Performance Report – March 2019 (see attached), which records significant Variations, Reserve movements, proposed Revotes, Contracts and Consultancies, Cash and Investments position, Income and Expenses by Program and our progress in completing the organisation’s Operating and Capital projects for 2018-19.

 

At 31 March 2019, 253 (96.6%) of Council’s 262 reportable projects, and 26 (81%) of Council’s 32 reportable actions were ‘On Track’ or ‘Completed’.

 

Council projected a Balanced Budget in the adoption of the Original 2018-19 Operational Plan. The March 2019 Quarter Review has resulted in a small surplus of $12,189 being predicted for the Quarter, and a surplus of $179,328 for the full year.

 

This report recommends that the Organisational Report – March 2019 be received and that the revised Budget estimates identified in the report and detailed in the Organisational Report – March 2019 be adopted.  

 

Organisational Performance Summary

The Organisational Report – March 2019 provides information on Council’s progress against its 2018-19 Operational Plan and Projects for the three-month period between 1 January 2019 to 31 March 2019. At 31 March 2019:

 

Table 1 provides a performance summary, which overall demonstrates that Council is successfully delivering its services and programs.

 

 

Completed

On Track

Attention Required

Total

 

No.

%

No.

%

No.

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Actions

5

15%

21

66%

6

19%

32

Capital Projects

49

37%

79

60%

3

3%

131

Operating Projects

29

22%

96

73%

6

5%

131

Table 1

 

Further detailed information can be found in the Organisational Report – March 2019.

Organisational Highlights

Council’s programs and services delivered a number of significant achievements during the past three months. These include:

 

·    Hosting and supporting several successful events which injected $13.5 million into the local economy

·    Resealing 39,750m2 of road pavement

·    Finishing Penrith Library upgrade

·    Being one of the first councils in Sydney to have a fully electric vehicle as part of its fleet.

Financial Position Summary

This report covers the third quarter of the 2018-19 financial year. Details of significant Variations, Reserve movements, and the status of Council’s Operating and Capital Projects compared to Budget are included in this document. 

 

Council projected a Balanced Budget in the adoption of the Original 2018-19 Operational Plan.   The September and December Quarterly Reviews reported some variations to the predicted annual budget, including a number of proposed allocations, that when combined with other adopted variations provided for a revised projected surplus of $167,139 for 2018-19. The favourable budget position at those stages also presented the opportunity to transfer $1.2m to Reserve to provide capacity to respond to current and emerging priorities.

 

The March 2019 Review again presents a positive result with a revised projected net surplus of $179,328 for 2018-19. This result comprises mainly positive variations to the adopted Budget, with the most notable for the March Quarter being additional Rates income ($218,143) and S7.11 Lambridge Estate ($697,491). Once again a net positive result for the Quarter has enabled the allocation of funds to Reserve ($400,000), with these funds proposed to be directed towards the Information Management Project under the Digital Transformation Program.

 

Net organisational salary savings of $233,062 have also been identified in this quarter, largely from staff vacancies. In keeping with Council’s adopted practice, these salary savings will be retained within the Employee Cost budget at this stage and not be reallocated until the end of the year to manage any budgetary risks for the remainder of the year. Council’s LTFP has foreshadowed that increases to the annual Employee Leave Entitlement (ELE) provision will be required and a strategy to increase this provision has been implemented. Council is committed to ensuring that sufficient provision is made for ELE and therefore it is proposed that any remaining salary savings will be transferred to the ELE Reserve as part of the June 2019 Review, once provision for current year payments are made. 

 

Additionally, a total of $1.8m of Capital and Operating Project revotes are proposed as a result of the March 2019 Quarter Review, as the works will not be completed in this financial year. Further details on proposed major variations and revotes are provided later in this report with more detail in the Organisational Report – March 2019.

This report recommends that the revised Budget estimates, including Revotes, identified in this report and detailed in the attached Organisational Report – March 2019 be adopted.

Financial Position for the March 2019 Quarter

The financial position of Council for the Quarter is expressed by providing information in compliance with Quarterly Budget Review Statement (QBRS) requirements on:

·    Budget position (whether balanced/surplus/deficit)

·    Significant Variations

·    Identified Revotes

·    Funding summary

·    Reserve movements for the Quarter

·    Capital and Operating Budget Projects list for the quarter

·    Key Performance Indicators

·    Income and Expenses

·    Income and Expenses by Program

·    Capital Budget

·    Cash and Investments

·    Contracts and Other Expenses

·    Consultancy and Legal expenses.

 

Budget Position

 

$’000s

Original Budget Position

0

September 2018 Quarter Variations Adopted by Council

58

December 2018 Quarter Variations  Adopted by Council

109

March 2019 Quarter Variations Adopted by Council

0

March 2019 Quarter Review Proposed Variations

12

Revised Budget Position Surplus/(Deficit) projected to June 2019

179

 

The predicted cumulative result for the year as at March 2019 is a surplus of $179,328 after the recommended variations for the quarter. Commentary is provided below on some of the more significant issues in the review (F= Favourable, U= Unfavourable, A= Allocation). Further details together with all proposed variations, variations with no impact on available funds, revotes, and reserve movements are detailed in the Organisational Report – March 2019.

 

Net Employee Costs

During the third quarter of 2018-19 salary savings have been realised primarily due to vacancies across a number of Departments. The majority of these vacant positions are in the process of being filled. It is recommended that some of the identified salary savings are retained in the individual Departments to enable alternative temporary staff resources to ensure the delivery of key Operational Plan tasks and projects.  The net salary savings of those being retained by Departments total $233,062.

 

It is proposed that as part of the March Quarterly Review that the identified salary savings of $233,062 are retained within the employee costs area to assist with year-end employee cost balancing and to supplement the Budget for any resignations. Any remaining savings at year end could then be transferred to the Employee Leave Entitlement (ELE) Reserve.

 

S7.11 Lambridge Estate (Loan) $697,491 F (24%)

As reported to the Council on 26 March 2018 the 2017-18 Borrowing Program included $2.9m to offset the S7.11 Lambridge Estate Plan that is currently in deficit, as agreed as part of the Financial Capacity Review.  Funding for the debt servicing costs for this loan was included in the 2016-17 SRV. During the 3rd Quarter of 2018-19 Council has received development contributions for the Lambridge Estate S7.11 plan. These funds have reduced the total Plan deficit which in turn has reduced the funds required to be held in Reserve to reduce the possible impact to Council in the future.

 

Rates Income $218,143F (0.1%)

Rates income is forecast to be greater than previous budget estimates. This additional income can be attributed to the commencement of works at the Sydney Science Park and the subsequent change of rate category from Farmland to Business for the portion of land developed. The income was predicted to be received in future years of Council’s LTFP and as such does not substantially increase Council’s financial capacity in future years.

 

Development Application Income $300,000 U (11.6%)

The second quarter to the end of December saw a spike in major DA income which resulted in a $200,000 increase in expected income for the full financial year. The third quarter has however seen a significant reduction in major DA income. Whilst April is showing some signs of returning to an expected monthly income level, May and June income will be crucial in determining if the original estimates remain accurate as we are experiencing unprecedented uncertainty in this area. Minor DA income has also been sporadic however the general negative trend for the year has resulted in a downward budget variation. The overall variation for the March Quarter is therefore $300,000 reduction.

 

Depot ICT Infrastructure $119,000 U

Council has performed an ICT site review of Council’s Kingswood Depot. This review has considered an audit of existing infrastructure as well as to plan for implementing more connectivity as part of the field services mobility (FSM) project. Required works have included; upgrading the internet link for faster connectivity, creating a centralised infrastructure location to counteract dropouts as well as replacing outdated hardware to create a network environment that is contemporary and has planned to cater for future needs.

 

Transfer to ICT Reserve - $400,000 A

The Digital Transformation Program includes the Information Management (Record Keeping) Project. Phase 1 went live in October 2018 and Phase 2 is now estimated to be completed by June 2019.  Prior to this date a program of staff training will be undertaken with these funds are proposed to be allocated to training, data migration and further development costs that are required to complete this project.

 

Other variations with no impact on Available Funds and Proposed Revotes

A number of other variations, proposed as part of this review, do not have an impact on the available funds. Details of these adjustments are provided in FSM report included in the Organisational Report – March 2019.

 

In addition to the aforementioned variations, a total of $1.8m of planned Capital and Operating Projects are proposed for revote this Quarter. The total value of Revotes for the year to date is $11.2m, inclusive of the previous quarter Revote of $9.4m for Western Sydney Infrastructure Plan Local Roads Package (WSIP). This compares to $21.3m (inclusive of $14.3m for WSIP and $2.5m for the Better Boating Program) for the same period in 2017-18. A full list of Revotes is included in the attachment Organisational Report – March 2019.

Conclusion

This report, and the more detailed Organisational Report – March 2019 indicates that the performance of Council’s Capital and Operating Projects are on track to meet Council’s challenging annual program. Strong financial management combined with the fine tuning and confirmation of Budget assumptions have contributed to a surplus being projected to June 2019.

 

The Organisational Performance Report – March 2019 will be placed on Council’s website, and will be available in hard copy on request.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Organisational Performance and Financial Review March 2019 be received

2.    The Organisational Performance and Financial Review March 2019 as at 31 March 2019, including the revised estimates outlined in this report and detailed in the Organisational Report – March 2019 be adopted.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

Organisational Performance Report March 2019

56 Pages

Attachments Included

 

  


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                    27 May 2019

 

 

 

7

Proposed Amendments to 2019-20 Draft Fees and Charges   

 

Compiled by:               Cheryl Freeburn, Operational Project Accountant

Authorised by:            Neil Farquharson, Financial Services Manager

Greg McCarthy, Environmental Health and Compliance Manager

Peter Wood, Development Services Manager  

 

Outcome

We have confidence in our Council

Strategy

Manage our money and our assets to be sustainable now and into the future

Service Activity

Support financial sustainability through financial planning and budget management

      

 

Executive Summary

The purpose of this report is to inform Council of proposed changes to the 2019-20 Draft Fees and Charges. The changes include new fees developed by Environmental Health that were omitted in error from the draft Fees & Charges presented to the Ordinary Council meeting on the 29 April 2019. The proposed amendments include a fee for services required under legislation and two fees that will strengthen procedural fairness for Tree and Vegetation Management determinations by providing applicants with an option to have determinations reviewed.

 

There have also been two Annual Fire Safety fees that were discontinued in the 2019-20 Draft Fees & Charges, which have since been proposed to be reinstated as a single fee.

 

These fees will require 28 days public exhibition and will be presented back to Council for the July Ordinary Meeting, as the June Ordinary Meeting will fall before the required exhibition period is completed for these fees.

Background

The following details the proposed new fees in the Draft 2019-20 Fees & Charges.

 

Environmental Health

 

Public Health Surveillance Program – Places of shared accommodation

 

·    Boarding House Initial Compliance Inspection $350

Pricing Structure – Direct Cost Recovery

Fee Condition – Section 16 Boarding House Act, 2012 – Requirement to inspect certain registered boarding houses within 12 months of registration.

 

Comment - Over recent years, Council has seen the number of Boarding House applications increase dramatically. There is a statutory requirement under Section 16 of the Boarding Houses Act, 2012 for Council to arrange for an initial compliance investigation to be conducted for each registered Boarding House located in its area. This proposed fee is needed as a number of these applications have been approved and construction has either started, near completion or completed and there will be an onus on Council to conduct inspections. This proposed fee will also be applied to existing Boarding Houses that re-register or change proprietor where the previous inspection was completed more than 12 months prior. It is unknown at this stage how many notifications Council will receive and will depend on the number of development applications approved and the number of Boarding Houses that change proprietor. The proposed fee is to recover the cost of providing this inspection service.

 

Tree and Vegetation Management

 

·    Request to Review Determination Fee (Tree Removal Applications) $175

Pricing Structure – Subsidised

 

Comment - Currently the only determination review option under the Vegetation SEPP is for applicants to appeal against a refusal to the Land and Environment Court. This appeal process is likely to be both lengthy and expensive for all parties. To provide applicants with an alternative review option and to strengthen procedural fairness, applicants will be offered a determination review option through Council. This is not dissimilar to the review process available to applicants for development applications. This proposed fee of $175 (professional hourly fee) is to recover (in part) the time taken to consider and respond to an applicant’s request to review the determination of a tree removal/pruning application. The time taken for a determination review is estimated to be double what could be covered by the proposed fee of $175. However, we would prefer to allow applicants an opportunity to first seek a review through Council. This is also consistent with customer expectations that they should be able to seek a review through Council. The proposed fee is also needed to ensure requests to review determinations are legitimate and not just because an applicant is simply dissatisfied with the original determination.

 

·    Request to Review Determination Fee (Vegetation Clearing Applications) $350

Pricing Structure – Subsidised

 

Comment - Currently the only determination review option under the Vegetation SEPP is for applicants to appeal against a refusal to the Land and Environment Court. This appeal process is likely to be both lengthy and expensive for all parties. To provide applicants with an alternative review option and to strengthen procedural fairness, applicants will be offered a determination review process through Council. This is not dissimilar to the review process available to applicants for development applications. This proposed fee of $350 (professional hourly fee x2) is to recover (in part) the time taken to consider and respond to an applicant’s requests to review the determination of a vegetation clearing application. The time taken for a determination review is estimated to be double what could be covered by the proposed fee of $350. However, we would prefer to allow applicants an opportunity to first seek a review through Council. This is also consistent with customer expectations that they should be able to seek a review through Council. This proposed fee is set higher than the proposed tree removal/pruning determination review (see above) as applications involve more complex assessment and documentation such as biodiversity assessments and flora and fauna reports. Applications also involve vegetation clearing as opposed to removal of individual trees. The proposed fee is also needed to ensure requests to review determinations are legitimate and not just because an applicant is simply dissatisfied with the original determination.

 

Development Applications

Miscellaneous – Professional & Administration Fees

 

·    Council staff – Fire Safety Consultancy Services

Pricing Structure – Full Cost Recovery

Fee Condition – Fee by quote + GST

 

Comment- Two fees were mistakenly removed from the fees and charges list for 2019-20 and not replaced: Fire Safety Inspection Service (for existing and new buildings) Initial Inspection $369 first hour then $150 per hour or part thereof and Fire Safety Inspection Service (for existing and new buildings) Follow-up Inspection $184 per hour.

 

These fees are charged to building owners to undertake inspections of their buildings and prepare compliance reports with respect to fire safety. This is a consultancy type service that is also provided by privately accredited building consultants, meaning that it is therefore a contestable service.

 

The fee has previously been listed in Council’s fees and charges as an hourly rate for a significant number of years and has been renamed for 2019-20 to better reflect the service provided. We have also requested that the fee be charged by quote only. This will allow Council to be more flexible and with what we charge as the complexities of the work involved can vary widely across different building sizes and types.

 

The fees charged for this service will be increased by the rate of inflation each year. Consequently, there will be no impact on the budget. It is hoped however that our ability to be more flexible with the fees we charge will enable us to remain competitive with the private sector and possibly increase our market share for this service.

 

Financial Services Manager’s Comments

 

The Local Government Act 1993 Section 610F allows Councils to propose new fees or amend fees if a new service is provided, or the nature or extent of an existing service is changed. Section 610F also sets out that Council must give public notice (in accordance with section 705) for at least 28 days of the fee proposed for the new or changed service.

 

It is proposed the Public Exhibition period will commence on Wednesday 29 May 2019 and close on Wednesday 26 June 2019 (inclusive).

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Proposed Amendments to 2019-20 Draft Fees and Charges be received.

2.    The proposed fees and charges be endorsed for public exhibition.

3.    A further report be presented to Council after the public exhibition period, presenting any public submissions received prior to the adoption of the proposed fees and charges.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                    27 May 2019

 

 

 

8

Local Government Remuneration Tribunal Determination for Mayor and Councillors for 2019-2020   

 

Compiled by:               Sasha Sultana, Governance Support Officer

Adam Beggs, Governance Coordinator

Authorised by:            Glenn McCarthy, Governance Manager  

 

Outcome

We have confidence in our Council

Strategy

Be open and fair in our decisions and our dealings with people

Service Activity

Support the Councillors in meeting their obligations and roles as community representatives

      

 

Executive Summary

The NSW Local Government Remuneration Tribunal (the Tribunal) is responsible for making annual determinations of maximum and minimum fees payable to Mayors and Councillors in NSW. Section 239 of the Local Government Act 1993 requires the Tribunal to determine the categories of Councils and Mayoral Offices once every three years.

 

Section 241 of the LG Act provides for the Tribunal to determine not later than 1 May in each year, the maximum and minimum amount of fees to be paid to Mayors and Councillors of councils. 

 

In determining these fees, the Tribunal is required to give effect to the same policies on increases in remuneration as those of the Industrial Relations Commission (s242A(1) of the Local Government Act 1993). The public sector policy on wages is such, that Mayors and Councillors will be restricted to no more than 2.5% per annum.

 

This year the Tribunal considered requests where individual submissions were made, however did not undertake a broad review of the categorisation of Councils. In 2020, The Tribunal will consider the model, the criteria applicable for each category and the allocation of various Councils.

 

Taking into consideration the Government’s policies on wages, The Tribunal has determined that the minimum and maximum fees applicable to each category will be increased by 2.5%.

 

Background

The Tribunal is constituted in accordance with the Local Government Act 1993. The Tribunal is responsible for categorising each Council for the purpose of determining the minimum and maximum fees payable to Mayors and Councillors in each Category.

 

The Tribunal is required to make an annual determination by no later than 1 May each year, which takes effect from 1 July in that year. Section 239 of the Local Government Act 1993 also requires that the Tribunal must determine Categories of Councils and Mayoral offices at least once every 3 years.

 

In 2009, the Tribunal undertook a review of categories and found that there was no strong case to significantly alter the current categories of Mayoral offices and Councillor. The Tribunal did however decide to apply descriptive titles to each of the categories rather than continuing with the numbering of Categories. The descriptive title given to Penrith City Council (and Blacktown City Council) was “Metropolitan Major” which indicates “a Council that has a residential population greater than 250,000 or has another special feature of section 240 [of the Act] which the Tribunal considers distinguishes it from other Metropolitan Councils”. Council has maintained this category since 2009.

 

On 22 June 2011 the NSW State Government passed the Parliamentary, Local Council and Public Sector Executives Remuneration Legislation Amendment Act 2011. The effect of the amendment is that future remuneration increases from 1 July 2012 for Mayors and Councillors will be restricted to no more than 2.5% per annum (similar to the remuneration for members of Parliament, public sector executives etc).

 

Current 2019 Review

 

On 12 December 2018, the Tribunal wrote to the Mayor and General Manager advising that the 2019 annual determination review process has commenced and would consider councils making submissions with respect to categorisation structure and fees.

 

Local Government Remuneration Tribunal Determination for 2019-2020

 

On 15 April 2019, the Tribunal released its Report and determination on the maximum amounts of fees to be paid to Mayors and Councillors for the period 1 July 2019 to 30 June 2020. A full copy of the Tribunal’s annual report is attached to this report.

 

In regard to limitations imposed by Government policies on wages, The Tribunal determined that the 2.5 per cent increase in the minimum and maximum fees applicable to each category was appropriate.

 

Council’s Submission

 

Council Officers prepared a strong submission to the Remuneration Tribunal earlier this year in relation to the setting of fees and the categorisation of Penrith City Council. Council’s submission reiterated our position that a new category called Metropolitan Large – Growth Centre, due to Council’s exponential population growth, involvement in significant city-shaping projects and initiatives such as the Regional Strategic Alliance (RSA) and Western Sydney Airport (WSA) and also Council’s recognised strategic position within the region. The submission also suggested that Council’s claim to a new Metropolitan Large – Growth Centre category would be enhanced due to the awarding of the Western Sydney City Deal by the Federal and State to our region, which further demonstrates the exponential growth that is expected to occur in the Penrith local government area.

 

As submitted in previous years, Council put forward the notion that Mayors and Councillors should be remunerated as a percentage of a MP’s remuneration. Council also once again suggested that the provision for a Deputy Mayoral fee within legislation be advocated for.

 

It is pleasing again that the Council has maintained its categorisation in line with previous determinations and that the Tribunal has recognised the increasing complexities and responsibilities that are borne by councillors in passing on the full 2.5% increase permissible under government policy. However it is noted in the findings that while the tribunal has acknowledged our representations concerning the Deputy Mayoral Fee and that the 2.5% cap should be reviewed, that the Tribunal has no discretion to action either item due to legislation and government policy. The Tribunal made reference to Council’s suggestion of a new category and encouraged council to put forward this position again next year when categories will be reviewed.

 

 

Mayor and Councillor Fees for 2019-2020

 

The Council’s Policy on the Payment of Expenses and Provision of Facilities to the Mayor, Deputy Mayor and Councillors (Section 252 Policy) states that “Council will determine annually the fee to be paid to the Mayor in accordance with section 249 of the Local Government Act 1993. This fee, which is in addition to the Councillor’s fee, will be paid to the Mayor monthly in arrears”.

 

In respect of the Deputy Mayor the Council’s Policy states “Council will determine annually the fee paid to the Deputy Mayor in accordance with section 249 (5) of the Local Government Act 1993. This fee, which is to be deducted from the Mayor’s fee, is in addition to the Councillor’s fee”.

 

The Tribunal does not set a fee for a Deputy Mayor, despite our submissions to do so; however, it has been the Council’s practice to remunerate the Deputy Mayor by allocating 20% of the Mayor’s fee to the Deputy Mayor, in addition to the fee paid to the Deputy Mayor as a Councillor.

 

It has also been the Council’s practice to remunerate Councillors at the maximum fee level, and the Budget for Councillor fees for the Operational Plan for 2019-20 are based on this practice continuing.

 

The Tribunal has determined the following range of fees for the Category of “Metropolitan Large” Councils (Blacktown, Canterbury-Bankstown, Cumberland, Fairfield, Liverpool, Northern Beaches, Penrith and Sutherland):

 

Councillor Annual Fee – Minimum $18,430 & Maximum $30,410

Mayor Additional Fee – Minimum $39,160 & Maximum $88,600

 

*This fee must be paid in addition to the Mayor as a Councillor (s249(2)).

 

Conclusion

In light of the determination by the Tribunal and Council’s practice to remunerate Councillors at the maximum fee level, it is recommended that the fees payable to the Mayor and Councillors for 2019-20 be set at the maximum level determined by the Tribunal.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Local Government Remuneration Tribunal Determination for Mayor and Councillors for 2019-2020 be received

2.    The fees payable to the Mayor and Councillors for 2019-20 be set at the maximum level permitted.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

Local Government Remuneration Tribunal Determination 2019-2020

20 Pages

Attachments Included

  


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                    27 May 2019

 

 

 

9

Summary of Investments & Banking for the Period 1 April 2019 to 30 April 2019   

 

Compiled by:               Cheryl Freeburn, Operational Project Accountant

Authorised by:            Andrew Moore, Director - Corporate Services  

 

Outcome

We have confidence in our Council

Strategy

Manage our money and our assets to be sustainable now and into the future

Service Activity

Provide accurate information to Council and the community on Council's financial activities

      

 

Executive Summary

This report on the Summary of Investments & Banking for April 2019 is submitted for the purpose of financial accountability and to satisfy the investment reporting requirements of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005 (clause 212), the Local Government Act 1993 (Section 625) and the Council’s Investment Policy.

 

The report certifies that the Council investments comply with the forms of investment made by order of the Minister under section 625(2) of the Local Government Act 1993. The current Ministerial Order was issued under Council Circular 11-01 on 17 February 2011.

 

The report provides a summary of investments for the period 1 April 2019 to 30 April 2019 and a reconciliation of invested funds as at 30 April 2019.

 

The investment returns versus the benchmark as a percentage for April 2019 are:

 

·    Council portfolio current yield (including FRNs)       2.66%

·    90 day Bank Bill Swap rate (Benchmark)                 1.69%

 

 

The report recommends that the information contained in the report be received.

 

Background

Attached to this report is a Summary of Investments including Economic Commentary for April 2019, Historical Investment Performance analysis tables and charts, a reconciliation of Invested Funds for April 2019 and various Investment Summary and Investment Portfolio analysis tables and charts.

CERTIFICATE OF RESPONSIBLE ACCOUNTING OFFICER

I hereby certify the following:

 

1.   All investments have been made in accordance with Section 625 of the Local Government Act 1993, relevant regulations and Council’s Investment Policy.

 

2.   Council’s Cash Book and Bank Statements have been reconciled as at 30 April 2019.

 

                                             

Andrew Moore

Responsible Accounting Officer

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Summary of Investments & Banking for the Period 1 April 2019 to 30 April 2019 be received.

2.    The certificate of the Responsible Accounting Officer and Summary of Investments and Performance for the period 1 April 2019 to 30 April 2019 be noted and accepted.

3.    The graphical investment analysis as at 30 April 2019 be noted.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

Summary of Investments and Banking for April 2019

6 Pages

Appendix

  


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                                  27 May 2019

Appendix 1 - Summary of Investments and Banking for April 2019

 

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Committee of the Whole

 

DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

CONTENTS

 

Pecuniary Interests

 

Other Interests

 

Monday May 27 2019

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

1        Presence of the Public                                                                                                       1

 

2        Council Property - Lease Agreement - Shop 1/140-142 Henry Street Penrith (Allen Arcade)                                                                                                                                              2

 

 

 


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                    27 May 2019

A Leading City

 

 

1        Presence of the Public

 

Everyone is entitled to attend a meeting of the Council and those of its Committees of which all members are Councillors, except as provided by Section 10 of the Local Government Act, 1993.

A Council, or a Committee of the Council of which all the members are Councillors, may close to the public so much of its meeting as comprises:

 

(a)          the discussion of any of the matters listed below; or

(b)          the receipt or discussion of any of the information so listed.

The matters and information are the following:

 

(a)          personnel matters concerning particular individuals;

(b)          the personal hardship of any resident or ratepayers;

(c)           information that would, if disclosed, confer a commercial advantage on a person with whom the council is conducting (or proposes to conduct) business;

(d)          commercial information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed:

·         prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied it; or

 

·         confer a commercial advantage on a competitor of the Council; or

 

·         reveal a trade secret.

 

(e)          information that would, if disclosed, prejudice the maintenance of the law;

(f)            matters affecting the security of the Council, Councillors, Council staff or Council property;

(g)        advice concerning litigation, or advice that would otherwise be privileged from production in legal proceedings on the ground of legal professional privilege.

The grounds on which part of a meeting is closed must be stated in the decision to close that part of the meeting and must be recorded in the minutes of the meeting.

The grounds must specify the following:

(a)          the relevant provision of section 10A(2);

(b)          the matter that is to be discussed during the closed part of the meeting;

(c)           the reasons why the part of the meeting is being closed, including (if the matter concerned is a matter other than a personnel matter concerning particular individuals, the personal hardship of a resident or ratepayer or a trade secret) an explanation of the way in which discussion of the matter in open meeting would be, on balance, contrary to the public interest.

Members of the public may make representations at a Council or Committee Meeting as to whether a part of a meeting should be closed to the public

The process which should be followed is:

 

·         a motion, based on the recommendation below, is moved and seconded

·         the Chairperson then asks if any member/s of the public would like to make representations as to whether a part of the meeting is closed to the public

·         if a member/s of the public wish to make representations, the Chairperson invites them to speak before the Committee makes its decision on whether to close the part of the meeting or not to the public.

·         if no member/s of the public wish to make representations the Chairperson can then put the motion to close the meeting to the public.

The first action is for a motion to be moved and seconded based on the recommendation below.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That:

 

Outcome 1

 

2        Council Property - Lease Agreement - Shop 1/140-142 Henry Street Penrith (Allen Arcade) 

This item has been referred to Committee of the Whole as the report refers to information that would, if disclosed, confer a commercial advantage on a person with whom the Council is conducting (or proposes to conduct) business and discussion of the matter in open meeting would be, on balance, contrary to the public interest.

 

 

 

 

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THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


 

ATTACHMENT       

 

 

 


Date of Meeting:     27 May 2019

 

Delivery Program:   Outcome 7

 

Service:                   Financial Services

 

Report Title:             2018-2019 Voted Works