Council_Mark_POS_RGB

21 August 2019

 

Dear Councillor,

In pursuance of the provisions of the Local Government Act, 1993 and the Regulations thereunder, notice is hereby given that an ORDINARY MEETING of Penrith City Council is to be held in the Council Chambers, Civic Centre, 601 High Street, Penrith on Monday 26 August 2019 at 7:00PM.

Attention is directed to the statement accompanying this notice of the business proposed to be transacted at the meeting.

Yours faithfully

 

Warwick Winn

General Manager

 

BUSINESS

 

1.           LEAVE OF ABSENCE

Leave of absence has been requested by:

Councillor Jim Aitken OAM – 26 August 2019

 

2.           APOLOGIES

 

3.           CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES

Ordinary Meeting - 22 July 2019.

 

4.           DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

Pecuniary Interest (The Act requires Councillors who declare a pecuniary interest in an item to leave the meeting during discussion of that item)

Non-Pecuniary Conflict of Interest – Significant and Less than Significant (The Code of Conduct requires Councillors who declare a significant non-pecuniary conflict of interest in an item to leave the meeting during discussion of that item)

 

5.           ADDRESSING COUNCIL

6.           MAYORAL MINUTES

7.           NOTICES OF MOTION TO RESCIND A RESOLUTION

8.           NOTICES OF MOTION AND QUESTIONS ON NOTICE

9.           ADOPTION OF REPORTS AND RECOMMENDATION OF COMMITTEES

Resilience Committee Meeting - 31 July 2019.

Local Traffic Committee Meeting - 5 August 2019.

Policy Review Committee Meeting - 12 August 2019.

 

10.         DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

11.         REQUESTS FOR REPORTS AND MEMORANDUMS

 

12.         URGENT BUSINESS

 

13.         COMMITTEE OF THE WHOLE


ORDINARY MEETING

 

Monday 26 August 2019

 

table of contents

 

 

 

 

ADVANCE AUSTRALIA FAIR

 

 

STATEMENT OF RECOGNITION OF PENRITH CITY’S ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER CULTURAL HERITAGE

 

 

PRAYER

 

 

COUNCIL CHAMBER seating arrangements

 

 

meeting calendar

 

 

confirmation of minutes

 

 

PROCEDURE FOR ADDRESSING COUNCIL MEETING

 

 

MAYORAL MINUTES

 

 

report and recommendations of committees

 

 

DELIVERY program reports


 

 

 

 

ADVANCE AUSTRALIA FAIR

 

 

Australians all let us rejoice,

For we are young and free;

We’ve golden soil and wealth for toil;

Our home is girt by sea;

Our land abounds in nature’s gifts

Of beauty rich and rare;

In history’s page, let every stage

Advance Australia Fair.

 

In joyful strains then let us sing,

Advance Australia Fair.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



Statement of Recognition of

Penrith City’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cultural Heritage

 

 

Council values the unique status of Aboriginal people as the original owners and custodians of lands and waters, including the land and waters of Penrith City.

 

Council values the unique status of Torres Strait Islander people as the original owners and custodians of the Torres Strait Islands and surrounding waters.

 

We work together for a united Australia and City that respects this land of ours, that values the diversity of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural heritage, and provides justice and equity for all.

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

PRAYER

 

 

 

“Sovereign God, tonight as we gather together as a Council we affirm that you are the giver and sustainer of life.  We come together as representatives of our community to make decisions that will benefit this city and the people within it. 

 

We come not in a spirit of competition, not as adversaries, but as colleagues.  Help us to treat each other with respect, with dignity, with interest and with honesty.  Help us not just to hear the words we say, but also to hear each others hearts.  We seek to be wise in all that we say and do.

 

As we meet, our concern is for this city.  Grant us wisdom, courage and strength.

 

Lord, help us.  We pray this in the name of Jesus Christ our Lord.  Amen.”

 

 

 

 

 


Council Chambers

Seating Arrangements


For members of the public addressing the meeting


 

 

 

Lectern


 

 

     Directors


 

 

 

General Manager
Warwick Winn

His Worship the Mayor Councillor Ross Fowler OAM



Governance Coordinator Adam Beggs






Minute Clerk

MediaClr Marcus Cornish

North Ward

 

Clr Bernard Bratusa

East Ward

 

 

Clr Tricia Hitchen

East Ward

 

 

Clr Brian Cartwright

South Ward

 

 

Clr Mark Davies

South Ward

 

 

Clr Jim Aitken OAM

Public GallerySouth Ward

 

 

Clr Kevin Crameri OAM

North Ward

 

 

Clr John Thain

North Ward

Clr Karen McKeown OAM

South Ward

 

Clr Aaron Duke

North Ward

 

Clr Todd Carney

East Ward

 

Clr Greg Davies

East Ward

 

Clr Robin Cook

East Ward

 

Clr Kath Presdee

ManagersSouth Ward

 

 

Directors


 


Oath of Office

 

I swear that I will undertake the duties of the office of Councillor in the best interests of the people of Penrith and the Penrith City Council and that I will faithfully and impartially carry out the functions, powers, authorities and discretions vested in me under the Local Government Act 1993 or any other Act to the best of my ability and judgment.

 

 

Affirmation of Office

 

I solemnly and sincerely declare and affirm that I will undertake the duties of the office of Councillor in the best interests of the people of Penrith and the Penrith City Council and that I will faithfully and impartially carry out the functions, powers, authorities and discretions vested in me under the Local Government Act 1993 or any other Act to the best of my ability and judgment.

 

 

2016 General Election – taken/made at the Ordinary Meeting of Council on 26 September 2016, Minute Number 272

 

2018 By-Election – taken/made by Councillor Brian Cartwright on 17 May 2018 and Councillor Robin Cook on 21 May 2018 before the Chief Governance Officer, Stephen Britten, an Australian Legal Practitioner

 

 

Local Government Act 1993, Section 233A

 


Council_Mark_POS_RGB2019 MEETING CALENDAR

January 2019 - December 2019

(Adopted by Council - 26 November 2018, Amended 1 May, 28 May and 27 June 2019)

 

 

 

TIME

JAN

FEB

MAR

APRIL

MAY

JUNE

JULY

AUG

SEPT

OCT

NOV

DEC

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

 

Ordinary Council Meeting

7.00pm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

25@

25

29v

27#

24*

22

26@

  23^ü

28

25#+

16

Policy Review Committee

7.00pm

 

11

11

8

 

 

 

12

9

21

11

9

 

 

 v

Meeting at which the draft corporate planning documents (Delivery Program and Operational Plan) are endorsed for exhibition

 *

Meeting at which the draft corporate planning documents (Delivery Program and Operational Plan) are adopted

 #

Meetings at which the Operational Plan quarterly reviews (March and September) are presented

 @

Meetings at which the Delivery Program progress reports (including the Operational Plan quarterly reviews for December and June) are presented

 ^

Election of Mayor/Deputy Mayor

 ü

Meeting at which the 2018-2019 Annual Statements are presented

 

Meeting at which any comments on the 2018-2019 Annual Statements are adopted

 +

Meeting at which the Annual Report is presented

Briefing to consider Budget, draft fees & charges and corporate documents

-            Extraordinary Meetings are held as required;

-            Members of the public are invited to observe meetings of the Council (Ordinary and Policy Review Committee).

Should you wish to address Council, please contact Governance Coordinator, Adam Beggs on 4732 7597.

 



UNCONFIRMED MINUTES

 OF THE ORDINARY MEETING OF PENRITH CITY COUNCIL HELD IN THE

COUNCIL CHAMBERS

ON MONDAY 22 JULY 2019 AT 7:00PM

NATIONAL ANTHEM 

The meeting opened with the National Anthem.

STATEMENT OF RECOGNITION

His Worship the Mayor, Councillor Ross Fowler OAM read a statement of recognition of Penrith City’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cultural Heritage.

PRAYER

The Council Prayer was read by the Rev Neil Checkley.

PRESENT

His Worship the Mayor, Councillor Ross Fowler OAM, and Councillors Jim Aitken OAM, Bernard Bratusa (arrived 7:19pm), Todd Carney, Robin Cook, Marcus Cornish, Kevin Crameri OAM, Mark Davies, Tricia Hitchen, Karen McKeown OAM, Kath Presdee and John Thain.

 

APOLOGIES

124  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor John Thain seconded Councillor Jim Aitken OAM that apologies for Councillors Greg Davies, Brian Cartwright and Aaron Duke be accepted for their non-attendance at the meeting, and for Councillor Bernard Bratusa for his late arrival at the meeting.

 

 

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES - Ordinary Meeting - 24 June 2019

125  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Karen McKeown OAM seconded Councillor Tricia  Hitchen that the minutes of the Ordinary Meeting of 24 June 2019 be confirmed.

 

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

Councillor Jim Aitken OAM declared a Pecuniary Interest in COW Item 6 – Property Matter as Jim Aitken & Partners Emu Plains is the listing agent for the vendor.  Councillor Aitken stated that he would not take part in debate on this item and would leave the meeting during consideration of this item.

 

Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM declared a Non-Pecuniary Conflict of Interest – Significant in an urgent motion proposed to be raised by Councillor John Thain during Urgent Business as it refers to works at St David’s Hall, Llandilo and Councillor Crameri is the Public Officer of the St David’s Hall Committee.

 


 

 

Mayoral Minutes

 

1        Passing of Andrew (Andy) Robertson

Councillor John Thain spoke in support of the Mayoral Minute.                           

126  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Ross Fowler OAM seconded Councillor John Thain that the Mayoral Minute on Passing of Andrew (Andy) Robertson be received.

 

2        Council Annual Report Wins Gold (Again)

Councillor John Thain spoke in support of the Mayoral Minute.

127  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Ross Fowler OAM seconded Councillor John Thain that the Mayoral Minute on Council Annual Report Wins Gold (Again) be received.

 

 

Reports of Committees

 

1        Report and Recommendations of the Access Committee Meeting held on 12 June 2019                                                                                  

128  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Tricia  Hitchen seconded Councillor Karen McKeown OAM that the recommendations contained in the Report and Recommendations of the Access Committee meeting held on 12 June, 2019 be adopted.

 

2        Report and Recommendations of the Local Traffic Committee Meeting held on 1 July 2019                                                                      

129  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Karen McKeown OAM seconded Councillor Marcus Cornish that the recommendations contained in the Report and Recommendations of the Local Traffic Committee meeting held on 1 July, 2019 be adopted.

 

 

DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Outcome 2 - We plan for our future growth

 

1        Heritage Assistance Fund                                                                         

130  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Marcus Cornish seconded Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Heritage Assistance Fund be received.

2.     The Heritage Assistance Fund be allocated as outlined in this report and be available for two financial years.

 

 

3.     Further applications be sought and funded from the unallocated balance of  the 2019-20 Heritage Assistance Fund for the preparation of Conservation Management Plans/Costed Maintenance Plans for individually listed heritage items.

 

2        Boarding Houses

Councillor Bernard Bratusa arrived at the meeting, the time being 7:19pm.              

131  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Tricia  Hitchen seconded Councillor Marcus Cornish

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Boarding Houses be received.

2.    Council continue to advocate with State Government in relation to Boarding Houses and the Affordable Rental Housing SEPP that reflect the concerns of our community.

 

 

Outcome 5 - We care about our environment

 

3        RFT18/19-26 Disposal of Construction Waste                                        

132  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor John Thain seconded Councillor Todd Carney

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on RFT18/19-26 Disposal of Construction Waste be received.

2.    Hi-Quality Recycling Services Pty Ltd be awarded the contract for both disposal and haulage portions of the contract for an initial period of six (6) years, with an option by Council to extend the agreement for a further two (2) x 2 year periods, subject to satisfactory performance and subject to the return of an acceptable financial check.

3.    The Common Seal of the Council of the City of Penrith be placed on all documentation if necessary

 

 

Outcome 6 - We are healthy and share strong community spirit

 

4        RFT18/19-27 Detailed Landscape Design of Regatta Park Precinct     

Councillor Todd Carney left the meeting, the time being 7:23pm.

133  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Marcus Cornish seconded Councillor Bernard Bratusa

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on RFT18/19-27 Detailed Landscape Design of Regatta Park Precinct be received

2.    McGregor Coxall Unit Trust be awarded the Contract subject to the execution of a formal agreement for the Detailed Landscape Design of Regatta Park Precinct for the amount of $442,912 excluding GST, subject to the return of an acceptable financial check.

3.    The Common Seal of the Council of the City of Penrith be placed on all documentation as necessary.

 

Councillor Bernard Bratusa declared a Non-Pecuniary Conflict of Interest - Less Than Significant in Item 5 - Financial implications of State Government funding for Penrith City facilities as he is employed by the office of the Minister for Sport.  Councillor Bratusa then left the meeting during consideration of this item, time being 7:23pm.

 

5        Financial implications of State Government funding for Penrith City facilities

Councillor Todd Carney returned to the meeting, the time being 7:24pm.

134  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Karen McKeown OAM seconded Councillor Kath Presdee that the information contained in the report on Financial implications of State Government funding for Penrith City facilities be received.

 

6        Naming of Playground in Colyton - Hazel Little                                      

135  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Tricia  Hitchen seconded Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Naming of Playground in Colyton - Hazel Little be received.

2.    Council endorse the naming of the playground in Ted Little Park, Colyton after Hazel Eileen Little.

3.    Following endorsement, an official naming ceremony be held at the park.

 

Councillor Bernard Bratusa returned to the meeting, the time being 7:27pm.

 

 

Outcome 7 - We have confidence in our Council

 

7        Investment Policy                                                                                       

136  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Kath Presdee seconded Councillor John Thain

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Investment Policy be received.

2.    Council adopt the proposed changes to the Investment Policy tabled in this report.

 


 

 

8        Borrowing Policy                                                                                        

137  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Kath Presdee seconded Councillor John Thain

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Borrowing Policy be received.

2.    Council adopt the Borrowing Policy.

 

9        Borrowing Program 2018-19                                                                      

138  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Kath Presdee seconded Councillor Tricia  Hitchen

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Borrowing Program 2018-19 be received.

2.    Council be advised that NSW TCorp was the successful lender for the $5,500,000 new monies and ANZ was the successful lender for the renewal loans that comprised the 2018-19 Borrowing Program.

 

11      Audit, Risk and Improvement Committee                                                

139  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Kath Presdee seconded Councillor Tricia  Hitchen that the information contained in the report on Audit, Risk and Improvement Committee be received.

 

12      Summary of Investments & Banking for the Period 1 June 2019 to 30 June 2019                                                                                                     

140  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Kath Presdee seconded Councillor Tricia  Hitchen

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Summary of Investments & Banking for the Period 1 June 2019 to 30 June 2019 be received.

2.    The certificate of the Responsible Accounting Officer and Summary of Investments and Performance for the period 1 June 2019 to 30 June 2019 be noted and accepted.

3.    The graphical investment analysis as at 30 June 2019 be noted.

 


 

 

10      Proposed Amendments to 2019-20 Fees and Charges                          

141  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Jim Aitken OAM seconded Councillor Marcus Cornish

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Proposed Amendments to 2019-20 Fees and Charges be received.

2.    Council adopt the amended Fees and Charges document, excluding the following two fees, and that a review of these fees be the subject of a Councillor Briefing:

·         Request to Review Determination Fee (Tree Removal Applications) $175; and

·         Request to Review Determination Fee (Vegetation Clearing Applications) $350.

 

 

REQUESTS FOR REPORTS AND MEMORANDUMS AND  URGENT BUSINESS

 

UB 1           NSW Corps of Marines Inc 

Councillor Marcus Cornish requested that $1,000 be allocated, in equal amounts, from each Ward’s voted works, to the NSW Corps of Marines Inc to assist in the cost of their uniforms and equipment.

142  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Marcus Cornish seconded Councillor John Thain that the matter be brought forward and dealt with as a matter of urgency.

 

His Worship the Mayor, Councillor Ross Fowler OAM, ruled that the matter was urgent and should be dealt with at the meeting.

 

143  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Marcus Cornish seconded Councillor John Thain that $1,000 be allocated, in equal amounts, from each Ward’s voted works, to the NSW Corps of Marines Inc to assist in the cost of their uniforms and equipment.

 

RR 1           Dangerous Tree - Great Western Highway, Emu Plains

Councillor Marcus Cornish requested a memo reply to all Councillors providing an assessment of any potential danger that is posed by a large gum tree growing near the Great Western Highway at Emu Plains, close to the Emu Plains Before and After School Care premises.

 

RR 2           Blocking Vehicular Access to Reserve in Short Street, Emu Plains       

Councillor Marcus Cornish requested that a gate be provided at the access to the reserve at the bend in Short Street, Emu Plains to prevent vehicular access.

 

RR 3           Parking Signs - East Lane, St Marys   

Councillor Marcus Cornish requested that the missing and damaged ‘No Stopping’ and ‘No Parking’ signs and poles in East Lane, St Marys behind the shops be replaced.

 

 

RR 4           Update on Proposed Waste Transfer Station - Bromley Road,        Emu Heights                  

Councillor Marcus Cornish requested an update on the development application for a proposed waste transfer station at Bromley Road, Emu Heights.

 

RR 5           Update on Proposed Community Centre in Cranebrook       

Councillor Marcus Cornish requested an update on the development application for a community centre in Cranebrook, and requested information as to whether the intended use is a place of public worship.

 

RR 6           Policy on Group Homes     

Councillor Tricia  Hitchen requested a Councillor Briefing or a report to Council on developing a policy for Group Homes, with the policy to cover permissible numbers of group homes in one street to ensure neighbourhood amenity is maintained.

 

RR 7           Private Certification Issues

Councillor Mark Davies requested a memo reply to all Councillors providing information regarding the issue of personal indemnity insurance for certifiers, and Council’s position regarding certification in light of the issues surrounding private certifiers.

 

UB 2           Consideration of Urgent Property Matter in Committee of the        Whole       

Councillor Mark Davies requested that an urgent property matter be considered in Committee of the Whole because the matter refers to information that would, if disclosed, confer a commercial advantage on a person with whom the Council is conducting (or proposes to conduct) business and discussion of the matter in open meeting would be, on balance, contrary to the public interest.

 

144  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Mark Davies seconded Councillor John Thain that the matter be brought forward and dealt with as a matter of urgency.

 

His Worship the Mayor, Councillor Ross Fowler OAM, ruled that the matter was urgent and should be dealt with at the meeting.

 

145  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Mark Davies seconded Councillor John Thain requested that an urgent property matter be considered in Committee of the Whole because the matter refers to information that would, if disclosed, confer a commercial advantage on a person with whom the Council is conducting (or proposes to conduct) business and discussion of the matter in open meeting would be, on balance, contrary to the public interest.

 

RR 8           Drainage Issues - Llandilo 

Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM requested that Council revisit the drainage issues at Xavier College, Llandilo and also in Fourth Avenue, Llandilo where the group homes are located as water in both areas is flowing across the road and into properties.

 


 

 

RR 9           Properties in Ninth Avenue, Llandilo  

Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM requested a memo reply to all Councillors providing an explanation as to why Lendlease has not provided a footpath behind the properties built in Ninth Avenue as part of the Jordan Springs development.

 

RR 10         Displaying Street Numbers on Business Premises in Penrith         CBD

Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM requested a memo reply to all Councillors providing information as to how businesses in the Penrith CBD may be required to display the street number of the business on the premises and if this is a requirement in Penrith’s DCP and LEP.

 

RR 11         Provision of Truck Rest Area on Northern Road  

Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM requested that Council write to local State Members and the Premier requesting them to make representations to the Roads and Maritime Services seeking the reinstatement of a truck rest area on The Northern Road, after it was removed during the road widening works on The Northern Road through the Penrith LGA.

 

RR 12         Repairs to Garbage Bin - Carolyn Chase, Orchard Hills        

Councillor Jim Aitken OAM requested that Council officers follow up an issue regarding broken wheels on a red lidded garbage bin in Carolyn Chase, Orchard Hills. 

 

Having previously declared an interest in an urgent business item concerning voted works, Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM left the meeting, the time being 7:52pm.

 

UB 3           St David's Hall, Llandilo     

Councillor John Thain requested that an amount of $5,400 be allocated from North Ward voted works to St David’s Hall Committee, Llandilo for repairs to the floors of the Hall.

146  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor John Thain seconded Councillor Marcus Cornish that the matter be brought forward and dealt with as a matter of urgency.

 

His Worship the Mayor, Councillor Ross Fowler OAM, ruled that the matter was urgent and should be dealt with at the meeting.

 

147  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor John Thain seconded Councillor Marcus Cornish that an amount of $5,400 be allocated from North Ward voted works to St David’s Hall Committee, Llandilo for repairs to the floors of the Hall.

 

Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM returned to the meeting, the time being 7:53pm.

 

RR 13         Ripples Facility Board        

Councillor Todd Carney requested that the Board of Ripples be congratulated for its decision to consider naming part of the facility after the Late Alan Brown who was a volunteer member of the Board of Ripples since 1994.

 


 

 

RR 14         National Heavy Vehicle Regulator       

Councillor Todd Carney requested a memo reply to all Councillors advising whether the National Heavy Vehicle Regulator has contacted Council with a view to mapping out areas where cranes and other heavy vehicles can travel through the Penrith LGA. 

 

RR 15         Disposal of Recycled Waste       

Councillor Kath Presdee requested that in light of Council’s new recycling contract, an update be sought from VISY (a) seeking an assurance that all recyclable waste collected form kerbside collection under the Penrith City Council contract will be dealt with within Australia; and (b) asking what measures will be taken to prevent the contamination of this waste if the waste is being transported to its ultimate destination.

 

RR 16         Canal through Thornton    

Councillor Marcus Cornish requested that Urban Growth be requested to clean the canal that runs through Thornton as it has become polluted.

 

RR 17         Footpath Paving - Coreen Avenue, Penrith 

Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM requested that a high priority be given to extending the footpath paving along Coreen Avenue from Lemongrove Road to Thornton.

 

 

Committee of the Whole

 

148  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Marcus Cornish seconded Councillor Mark Davies that the meeting adjourn to the Committee of the Whole to deal with the following matters, the time being 7:59pm.

 

1        Presence of the Public

 

CW1 RESOLVED on the motion of Councillor Marcus Cornish seconded Councillor Mark Davies that the press and public be excluded from Committee of the Whole to deal with the following matters:

 

Outcome 7

 

2        Council Property - Lease Agreement - Suite G02/114-116 Henry Street, Penrith (Community Connections Building)                                                                               

 

This item has been referred to Committee of the Whole as the report refers to information that would, if disclosed, confer a commercial advantage on a person with whom the Council is conducting (or proposes to conduct) business and discussion of the matter in open meeting would be, on balance, contrary to the public interest.

 

3        Council Property - Lease Agreement - Suite 1, Ground Floor and Level 1, 225-227 Queen Street, St Marys                                                                                                     

 

This item has been referred to Committee of the Whole as the report refers to information that would, if disclosed, confer a commercial advantage on a person with whom the Council is conducting (or proposes to conduct) business and discussion of the matter in open meeting would be, on balance, contrary to the public interest.

 

Outcome 5

 

4        Acquisition of Easement - 2-16 Leland Street, Penrith (Lot 6 DP1040572)                

 

This item has been referred to Committee of the Whole as the report refers to information that would, if disclosed, confer a commercial advantage on a person with whom the Council is conducting (or proposes to conduct) business and discussion of the matter in open meeting would be, on balance, contrary to the public interest.

 

 

Outcome 7

 

5        Property Matter                                                                                                                  

 

This item has been referred to Committee of the Whole as the report refers to information that would, if disclosed, confer a commercial advantage on a person with whom the Council is conducting (or proposes to conduct) business and discussion of the matter in open meeting would be, on balance, contrary to the public interest.

 

6        Property Matter                                                                                                                  

 

This item has been referred to Committee of the Whole as the report refers to information that would, if disclosed, confer a commercial advantage on a person with whom the Council is conducting (or proposes to conduct) business and discussion of the matter in open meeting would be, on balance, contrary to the public interest.

 

 

The meeting resumed at 8:19pm and the General Manager reported that the Committee of the Whole met at 7:59pm on 22 July 2019, the following being present

 

His Worship the Mayor, Councillor Ross Fowler OAM, and Councillors Jim Aitken OAM, Bernard Bratusa, Todd Carney, Robin Cook, Marcus Cornish, Kevin Crameri OAM, Tricia Hitchen, Karen McKeown OAM, Kath Presdee and John Thain.     

 

and the Committee of the Whole excluded the press and public from the meeting for the reasons set out in CW1 and that the Committee of the Whole submitted the following recommendations to Council.

 

 

CONFIDENTIAL BUSINESS

 

2        Council Property - Lease Agreement - Suite G02/114-116 Henry Street, Penrith (Community Connections Building)                                                                               

RECOMMENDED on the MOTION of Councillor Bernard Bratusa seconded Councillor Robin Cook

CW2 That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Council Property - Lease Agreement - Suite G02/114-116 Henry Street, Penrith (Community Connections Building) be received.

2.    Council approve the proposed new lease agreement as per the terms and conditions listed in this report.

3.    The Common Seal of the Council of the City of Penrith be placed on all necessary documentation.

 

3        Council Property - Lease Agreement - Suite 1, Ground Floor and Level 1, 225-227 Queen Street, St Marys                                                                                                     

RECOMMENDED on the MOTION of Councillor Tricia Hitchen seconded Councillor Jim Aitken OAM

CW3 That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Council Property - Lease Agreement - Suite 1, Ground Floor and Level 1, 225-227 Queen Street, St Marys  be received

2.    Council approve the proposed new lease agreement as per the terms and conditions listed in this report.

3.    The Common Seal of the Council of the City of Penrith be placed on all necessary documentation.

 

4        Acquisition of Easement - 2-16 Leland Street, Penrith (Lot 6 DP1040572)                

RECOMMENDED on the MOTION of Councillor Todd Carney seconded Councillor John Thain

CW4 That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Acquisition of Easement - 2-16 Leland Street, Penrith (Lot 6 DP1040572) be received.

2.    Council acquire an easement over Lot 6 DP1040572 under the terms outlined within the report.

3.    The Common Seal of the Council of the City of Penrith be placed on all necessary documentation.

 

5        Property Matter                                                                                                                  

RECOMMENDED on the MOTION of Councillor Marcus Cornish seconded Councillor Karen McKeown

CW5 That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Property Matter (Lot 2526 DP 710266, Peachtree Road, Penrith) be received.

2.    Council resolve to adopt the recommendations as listed within the body of the distributed report.

3.    The Common Seal of the Council of the City of Penrith be placed on any necessary documentation.

4.    A further report be presented to Council detailing the outcome of any negotiations in this matter.

5.    If negotiations are successful, the property be proposed to be classified as operational land in a future report.

 

 

Having declared a Pecuniary Interest COW Item 6 – Property Matter, Councillor Jim Aitken OAM left the meeting at 8:10pm and did not return.

 

6        Property Matter

RECOMMENDED on the MOTION of Councillor  Marcus Cornish seconded Councillor John Thain

CW6 That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Property Matter (Lot 2 DP 504935, 92 River Road, Emu Plains) be received.

2.    Council resolve to adopt the recommendations as listed within the body of the distributed report.

3.    The Common Seal of the Council of the City of Penrith be placed on any necessary documentation.

4.     A further report be presented to Council detailing the outcome of any negotiations in this matter.

5.     If negotiations are successful, the property be proposed to be classified as operational land in a future report.

 

ADOPTION OF Committee of the Whole

 

149  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Todd Carney seconded Councillor Mark Davies that the recommendations contained in the Committee of the Whole and shown as CW1, CW2, CW3, CW4, CW5 and CW6 be adopted.

 

 

There being no further business the Chairperson declared the meeting closed the time being 8:20pm.

 


PENRITH CITY COUNCIL

 

Procedure for Addressing Meetings

 

Anyone can request permission to address a meeting, providing that the number of speakers is limited to three in support of any proposal and three against.

 

Any request about an issue or matter on the Agenda for the meeting can be lodged with the General Manager or Public Officer up until 12 noon on the day of the meeting.

 

Prior to the meeting the person who has requested permission to address the meeting will need to provide the Public Officer with a written statement of the points to be covered during the address in sufficient detail so as to inform the Councillors of the substance of the address and a written copy of any questions to be asked of the Council in order that responses to those questions can be provided in due course.

 

In addition, prior to addressing the meeting a person addressing Council or Committee will be informed that they do not enjoy any privilege and that permission to speak may be withdrawn should they make inappropriate comments.

 

It should be noted that persons who wish to address the Council are addressing a formal part of the Council Meeting. All persons addressing the Meeting should give consideration to their dress attire. Smart casual is a minimum that is thought to be appropriate when addressing such a forum.

 

It should be noted that speakers at meetings of the Council or Committee do not have absolute privilege (parliamentary privilege).  A speaker who makes any potentially offensive or defamatory remarks about any other person may render themselves open to legal action.

 

Prior to addressing the meeting the person will be required to sign the following statement:

 

“I (name) understand that the meeting I intend to address on (date) is a public meeting.  I also understand that should I say or present any material that is inappropriate, I may be subject to legal action.  I also acknowledge that I have been informed to obtain my own legal advice about the appropriateness of the material that I intend to present at the above mentioned meeting”.

 

Should a person fail to sign the above statement then permission to address either the Council or Committee will not be granted.

 

The Public Officer or Minute Clerk will speak to those people who have requested permission to address the meeting, prior to the meeting at 6.45pm.

 

It is up to the Council or Committee to decide if the request to address the meeting will be granted.

 

Where permission is to be granted the Council or Committee, at the appropriate time, will suspend only so much of the Standing Orders to allow the address to occur.

 

The Chairperson will then call the person up to the lectern or speaking area.

 

The person addressing the meeting needs to clearly indicate:

 

·       Their name;

 

·       Organisation or group they are representing (if applicable);

 

·       Details of the issue to be addressed and the item number of the report in the Business Paper;

 

·       Whether they are opposing or supporting the issue or matter (if applicable) and the action they would like the meeting to take;

 

·         The interest of the speaker (e.g. affected person, neighbour, applicant,    applicants spokesperson, interested citizen etc).

 

Each person then has five minutes to make their address.  Those addressing Council will be required to speak to the written statement they have submitted.  Permission to address Council is not to be taken as an opportunity to refute or otherwise the points made by previous speakers on the same issue. 

 

The Council or Committee can extend this time if they consider if appropriate, however, everyone needs to work on the basis that the address will be for five minutes only.

 

Councillors may have questions about the address so people are asked to remain at the lectern or in the speaking area until the Chairperson has thanked them.

 

When this occurs, they should then return to their seat.

 

Glenn McCarthy

Public Officer

02 4732 7649                                               

   


Reports of Committees

 

Item                                                                                                                                                Page

 

1        Report and Recommendations of the Resilience Committee Meeting held on 31 July 2019                                                                                                                                              1

 

2        Report and Recommendations of the Local Traffic Committee Meeting held on 5 August 2019                                                                                                                                    8

 

3        Report and Recommendations of the Policy Review Committee Meeting held on 12 August 2019                                                                                                                                  16

 

 

 

 

 



Ordinary Meeting                                                                                               26 August 2019

 

REPORT AND RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE
 Resilience Committee MEETING

HELD ON 31 July, 2019

 

 

 

PRESENT

Councillors Karen McKeown OAM, Kath Presdee and Robin Cook; Michelle Tormey, Nevin Sweeney, Duncan Challen, Andrea Connor.

 

Also in attendance were Warwick Winn – General Manager, Andrew Moore – Director Corporate Services, Jacklin Messih – Business Transformation Manager, Andrew Hewson – Sustainability Coordinator, Krystie Race – Sustainability Research Planner, Tim Gowing – Senior Water Management Officer, Anthony Price – Environmental Health Coordinator, Greg McCarthy – Manager Environmental Health and Compliance, and Aisha Poole – Resource Recovery Coordinator.

 

APOLOGIES

Councillor John Thain, Carina Fernandes, Bradley Forssman, Suzanne Dunford, Helen Ryan.

 

 

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES - Resilience Committee Meeting - 6 March 2019

The minutes of the Resilience Committee Meeting of 6 March 2019 were confirmed, with an amendment to the attendance to reflect that both Councillor Ross Fowler OAM and Councillor Greg Davies were not in attendance at that meeting.

 

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

 

Nevin Sweeney declared that he had a Pecuniary Interest in agenda Item 1 - Heat Summit Update, as he is a guest presenter at the Heat Summit in his capacity as President of Permaculture Sydney West, and stated that he would leave the meeting during debate and voting on this matter.

 

DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Having previously declared a Pecuniary Interest in Item 1, Nevin Sweeney left the meeting, the time being 6.20pm.

 

 

Outcome 5 - We care about our environment

 

1        Heat summit update

Andrew Hewson presented an update and overview of the proposed heat summit. The event will be held in late February, with the aim of engaging developers, builders and planners around improving our urban development in the Penrith region in to the future.

The aim of the event will be to showcase Council’s work and leadership around urban heat, to advocate for better changes, and to engage with builders and developers about doing this. The key themes will be to showcase the challenge and why we need to address it, showcase Council’s work, to look at best practice examples and the latest research, and look at where to from here.

The core event will be a professionally focused event targeted at developers, planners and builders. It will be held in a high profile location such as the Joan Sutherland Performing Arts Centre. The broad program of the event is:

•  Setting the context

–    Heat as an issue

–    Health impacts of heat

–    Stories of social heat impacts

•  Case studies

–    Council’s actions

–    Best practice urban design

–    Best practice building design

•  Where to from here

–    Latest research

–    Cool Suburbs tool

Council is looking to engage Josh Byrne as a keynote speaker for the event. Josh is most well-known for his role as a presenter on ABC’s Gardening Australia program. Josh also leads Josh Byrne and Associates, working on urban design and innovation including consultancy work for a number of councils. His personal home in Perth is accredited as a 10 star energy efficient home, and includes a number of features that make it ‘cool’ including passive design principles, insulation and more. Through his work at Curtin University, the home has analytics to track its real world performance. He has also worked on a series called Density by Design, which explores best practice medium to high density development case studies. He can talk about heat from a household level up to a suburb wide perspective, and will also be a drawcard being a television personality.

Some of the additional elements, to add further value to the main heat summit, include:

·     A morning bus tour with researchers from Western Sydney University and their thermal imaging cameras. This would look at different examples of how choice of materials impacts on surface temperatures.

 

·     An evening talk for local residents on making our homes more adapted to heat and energy efficient. Potential speakers would include Josh Byrne, Mark Davis Design (a Blue Mountains based architect who has Passive House accreditation), and Nevin Sweeney from Permaculture Sydney West who is a resident in St Clair. This would be particularly to engage and inspire residents on things they can do at home.

 

·     Doing video interviews with local residents about the impact that heat has on their lifestyle and health, to be shown as part of the main heat summit. This would ‘give a face’ to the data and create a much more powerful message to attendees.

 

·     A heat sensor project in partnership with Western Sydney University. This would see a number of sensors spread across the LGA, tracking heat over December to January, with the data to be presented at the main heat summit. The sensor project also presents an opportunity to engage residents over the summer as well.

Council is also investigating opportunities to deliver the ‘ice box challenge’. This is a high profile demonstration, where a small ‘house’ (similar in size to a small garden shed) is built to NSW’s BASIX requirements, and another is built to passive house design principles – so high levels of insulation, cool materials etc. Each is then filled with blocks of ice, and their relative performance is tracked against each other. The approach would be to deliver this in a high profile location such as The Mondo. This project will involve working with a number of partners to deliver it effectively, and this is being explored.

Overall the proposed heat summit will target the key players in designing and building our future urban development – developers, builders and planners. The event also provides an opportunity for Council to showcase our leadership and will be used as a high profile advocacy tool. The elements to engage the community will likewise showcase Council’s leadership, and help residents learn about improvements they can make to their own homes.

RECOMMENDED

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Heat summit update be received.

2.    The Resilience Committee endorse the proposed Heat Summit actions.

 

 

Nevin Sweeney returned to the meeting, the time being 6:40pm.

 

2        Stormwater Quality Management – Water Sensitive Urban Design

Tim Gowing presented on Council’s work in delivering activities that deliver Water Sensitive Urban Design outcomes for the city, in line with both the Water Sensitive Urban Design (WSUD) Policy and Cooling the City Strategy.

Recycled Water and Managed Aquifer Recharge

Hickey’s Lane irrigation system provides recycled water from Penrith STP to a number of local sporting fields including the adjacent rugby fields, Nepean Rugby Park, Andrews Road baseball complex and Greygums Oval AFL fields. Further investigations have been undertaken for projects at other sites including recycled water at Jamison Oval, and stormwater harvesting using managed aquifer recharge at Emu Plains, however these were deemed not be viable.

Reduced Potable Water Consumption

Council’s potable water consumption across all assets in 2017-2018 was 283,499kL, an increase of 20% compared with the previous year (236,585). The overall increase in water use is primarily due to a 41% reduction in rainfall from the previous year, with only 374mm of rainfall recorded, compared with a long-term annual average of 719mm. The dry weather led to an increased need to irrigate Council’s parks and playing fields, with irrigation a major component of Council’s overall water consumption.

Recycled water consumption has also increased significantly with usage of 36,626kL in 2017-2018 compared to 21,803kL in the previous year, an increase of 68%. Council purchases metered recycled water for irrigation for four sites, including Greygums Oval, Nepean Rugby Park, Hickeys Reserve and Andrews Road Baseball Complex at Cranebrook. Additionally, Council also has almost 40 rainwater tanks in locations across the region, further reducing how much tap water we use.

Water Sensitive Urban Design Policy

In response to increasing urban development and a need to protect waterway health, Council developed and adopted a Water Sensitive Urban Design (WSUD) Policy in 2013. This policy introduced a framework for developments to improve stormwater quality and reduce potable water consumption to help restore the natural water cycle. WSUD Technical Guidelines and factsheets have been developed to support developers in implementing the measures. A Deemed to Comply Toolkit has also been prepared to assist in the design of stormwater treatment systems for smaller types of typical developments. This toolkit seeks to simplify the process for smaller types of developments. Engineering specifications and drawings for bioretention systems are also being prepared with the aim of improving the design, construction and maintainability of vegetated assets.

Stormwater Quality Improvement Program

In recent years Council has also completed several water sensitive projects. These include:

·     Andrew’s Road Bioretention System. A 2,400m2 system that treats stormwater from a 60 hectare catchment and improves it before it flows in to the Waterside development, Penrith Lakes and ultimately the Nepean River. In addition to reducing litter and improving water quality, this project has bolstered native vegetation and reduced weeds.

 

·     Cranebrook Wetland Project. Council received $1,835,000 in funding from the Australian Government to undertake this four year restoration project. This has won the Stormwater NSW Awards for Excellence in the Integrated Stormwater Design Category in 2018 as well as the Keep Australia Beautiful NSW 2018 Sustainable Cities Awards in the Coastal and Waterways Protection Category. This project involved improving the condition of a regionally significant wetland, improving Cumberland Plain Woodland, and increasing access and amenity for the local community including a viewing platform, a bird hide, walking paths, interpretive signage, way-markers and public artworks. Again this project helps to improve water quality flowing in to Penrith Lakes.

Stormwater Treatment, Harvesting Investigation Project

Council has investigated stormwater harvesting and reuse projects across the city, with 20 parks across the city considered to determine the most suitable sites. Concept designs were then prepared for 6 preferred sites. The key opportunity identified was Cook Park in St Marys, with potential benefits including sustainable water management, improved amenity, restoration of degraded open space, community awareness and mitigation of localised flooding risks. Detailed designs and specifications are currently being finalised, with construction subject to funding and regulatory approvals.

Water Sensitive Urban Design (WSUD) Capacity Building

Building capacity in WSUD is also an important component of implementing of water sensitive urban design. Examples of capacity building initiatives include the development of resources such as engineering specifications and drawings for vegetated stormwater assets as well as maintenance manuals and checklists. These tools are developed to better guide developers and Council’s Officers on the design considerations and maintenance requirements associated with vegetated stormwater treatment measures. In addition to these resources, a number staff across relevant Council departments have attended training on Water Sensitive Urban Design (WSUD). The training seeks to build the capacity of Council staff in design, construction, operation and maintenance of WSUD assets.

Community Education and Engagement

An active program is delivered to engage the local community around water sensitive urban design principles and the actions they can take to help create positive outcomes. This includes promoting raingardens that capture run off, a portable 3D model of a vegetable raingarden (which has been featured at events including the Real Festival and World Environment Day), and fact sheets and information on Council’s website. Other activities include catchment tours with local schools, interpretive walking maps developed as part of the Bushtrackers project, and an interpretive educational walking trail at Werrington Lake and park.

Council continues to look for new opportunities to improve our local environment in line with the principles of water sensitive urban design.

 

RECOMMENDED

That:

1.   The information contained in the report on Stormwater Quality Management – Water Sensitive Urban Design be received.

 

2.   The Council Officers be commended for compiling an excellent report.

 

3        Waste Avoidance and Resource Recovery Update

Aisha Poole presented an update on Council’s waste avoidance and resource recovery activities, and some of the factors that influence our work in this space.

Council works within a number of frameworks, in delivering waste programs for our city. This includes the State Government Waste Avoidance and Resource Recovery (WARR) Strategy, Western Region WARR Strategy, Alliance WARR Strategy, and then our own WARR Strategy.

Council’s new waste collection contract now bundles together all Council managed waste collections, creating better flexibility and customer service. The contract includes residential waste including bins and bulky waste collections and expansion of food and organics bins to rural and small multi-unit properties, civic waste, public space, and commercial services.

As part of this new contract, there are a number of technology and customer service improvements. These include trucks fitted with GPS, in truck cameras, Council managing customer relations management, and a customer portal for reporting missed services, bin repair and replacement, and booking clean ups. A range of service options are offered to suit different house and family types. The waste collected is processed at a range of facilities.

Moving in to the future, key areas of work will include continued work on customer service via the customer service portal and integration between Council and Suez, education on how to reduce waste and sort it correctly, integration of services to improve efficiency, and advocate for a local circular economy including reuse and recycling opportunities.

 

RECOMMENDED

Tthat the information contained in the report on Waste Avoidance and Resource Recovery Update be received.

 


 

 

Outcome 7 - We have confidence in our Council

 

4        Sustainability Revolving Fund update

Krystie Race presented on the Sustainability Revolving Fund, which was established in 2003.

Since its inception the Fund has provided just over $1.5 million towards capital works to improve the sustainability of our assets through 48 projects. Combined, these initiatives are now calculated to provide total savings of $603,840 per year in energy costs, reduce our electricity consumption by 3,153 MWh, and our greenhouse emissions by 3,190 tonnes per year.

The Revolving Fund allows the savings made as a result of sustainability initiatives to be diverted into a designated fund to provide financial support for future sustainability projects.

The Fund is managed by the SRF Working Group and is supported by Guidelines that outline the administration of the Fund, its purpose, and how it is to be managed. The Working Group comprises key staff from Financial Services, Sustainability, City Assets, Engineering Services, and Design and Projects.

Successful projects are required to repay the initial project cost. In addition, projects must also return the identified savings from the project back into the Fund for a minimum of 3 years. This allows the Fund to continue to support more projects into the future.

In the 2018-19 financial year a total of $33,222 was invested in projects including the Penrith Social Profile, Civic Centre solar assessment, Queen Street lighting upgrade, and the electric vehicle charging station.

Council has recently endorsed a project which will see 6,530 street lights upgraded with more energy efficient globes. The total project cost is $2,285,500. $1,847,990 of this will be financed by Council from the Sustainability Revolving Fund, with the remaining project costs of $437,510 being met thanks to funding from the NSW Office of Environment and Heritage. The project is estimated to provide council with annual energy usage savings and reduced annual maintenance charges of $459,002. This would result in a 4-year payback period in relation to Council’s funding. The project will also reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 2,044 tonnes per annum.

         

RECOMMENDED

That the information contained in the report on Sustainability Revolving Fund update be received.

 

 

GENERAL BUSINESS

 

The Chairperson outlined that any general business items be carried over to the next meeting.

 

There being no further business the Chairperson declared the meeting closed the time being 8:00pm.


 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the recommendations contained in the Report and Recommendations of the Resilience Committee meeting held on 31 July, 2019 be adopted.

 

 

 


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                               26 August 2019

 

REPORT AND RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE
 Local Traffic Committee MEETING

HELD ON 5 August, 2019

 

 

 

PRESENT

Councillor Robin Cook (Representative for the Member for Londonderry), Councillor Tricia Hitchen (Representative for the Member for Penrith), Councillor Karen McKeown OAM (Council Representative), Wayne Mitchell – Director Development and Regulatory Services (Chair), Brana Ravichelvan – Roads and Maritime Services (RMS).  

IN ATTENDANCE

Councillor Marcus Cornish, Steve Grady – Busways, Adam Wilkinson – Engineering Services Manager, David Drozd – Traffic Engineering Coordinator, Graham Green – Senior Traffic Engineer, Daniel Davidson – Senior Traffic Engineer, Catherine Waerner – Road Safety Officer, Anthony Baradhy – Traffic Engineering Officer, Timothy Le – Traffic Officer, Isaac Mann - Trainee Engineer, Bernie Meier – Signs and Lines Marking Supervisor, Paul Maynard – Senior Ranger.

 

APOLOGIES

Senior Constable Stephen Page, Nepean (Police Area Command).

 

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES - Local Traffic Committee Meeting - 1 July 2019

The minutes of the Local Traffic Committee Meeting of 1 July 2019 were confirmed.

 

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

NIL. 

 

DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Outcome 3 - We can get around the City

 

1        Snowden Street, Jamisontown - Proposed Installation of 'No Stopping' Sign and Double Barrier Line Marking                                     

RECOMMENDED

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Snowden Street, Jamisontown - Proposed Installation of 'No Stopping' Sign and Double Barrier Line Marking be received.

2.    Consultation be undertaken with affected residents in regards to the proposed ‘No Stopping’ signs and double barrier line marking at the bend of Snowden Street, Jamisontown.

3.    Subject to no substantial objections being received, the ‘No Stopping’ signs and double barrier line marking be installed for a length of 25m at the 90-degree bend of Snowden Street, Jamisontown as shown in Appendix 1.

4.    The resident that reported the matter be advised of Council’s resolution.

 

 

2        Jordan Springs, Stage 1 Residential - Endorsement of Signage and Line Marking Plan                                                                                         

RECOMMENDED

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Jordan Springs, Stage 1 Residential - Endorsement of Signage and Line Marking Plan be received.

2.    The signage and line marking plan prepared by J. WYNDHAM PRINCE Consulting associated with the approved Stage 1 - Residential development in Jordan Springs (Plan No.11048701/CC36, Revision E, Dated 04 July 2019) be endorsed for construction, as shown in Appendix 1.

3.    All works associated with the implementation of the signposting and/or line marking shall be undertaken by the applicant in accordance with Section 8 of Council’s Engineering Construction Specification for Civil Works and Council standard drawings SD1006/1 and SD1006/2 and be at no cost to Council.

4.    The applicant be advised of Council’s resolution.

 

3        Bennett Road, Colyton - Provision of Peak Time 'No Parking' Restrictions                                                                                                   

 RECOMMENDED

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Bennett Road, Colyton - Provision of Peak Time 'No Parking' Restrictions be received.

2.    45 metres of peak time parking restrictions be installed along Bennett Road as shown in Appendix 1. These restrictions will prevent parking between 6am-10am and 3pm-7pm weekdays only.

3.    The resident that raised the original concerns and the objector be informed of Council’s resolution.

4.    Council Rangers be notified of Council’s resolution.

 

4        Trinity Drive, Cambridge Gardens - Proposed Changes to Parking Signage                                                                                                          

RECOMMENDED

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Trinity Drive, Cambridge Gardens - Proposed Changes to Parking Signage be received.

2.    The existing Bus Zone (school times) be replaced with a ‘No Parking 8:00 – 9:30am 2:30 – 4:00pm school days’ zone, to reduce the ‘No Stopping’ zone on the northbound departure from the pedestrian crossing to 7 metres and the existing ‘No Parking’ zone (school times) be replaced with a permanent Bus Zone, subject to consultation with the school and the affected resident, as shown in Appendices 1 and 2.

3.    The existing ‘No Stopping’ zone on the northbound approach to the pedestrian crossing be reduced from 26 to 15 metres, and that this space be incorporated into the newly proposed ‘No Parking’ (school times) zone, to a combined total of 56 metres length, subject to consultation with the school, as shown in Appendices 1 and 2.

4.    The Hon Stuart Ayres MP, Member for Penrith, The Mayor, Councillor Ross Fowler OAM, all Councillors, the parent who contacted Council, the affected residents, Busways and Cambridge Garden Public School be advised of Council’s resolution.

 

5        Doonmore Street and Lethbridge Street, Penrith - Endorsement of Design Plan AD133                                                                                       

RECOMMENDED

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Doonmore Street and Lethbridge Street, Penrith - Endorsement of Design Plan AD133 be received.

2.    Consultation be undertaken with affected residents regarding Design Plan AD133 dated July 2019 for the proposed installation of speed cushions, raised threshold and zebra crossing with their associated advisory signs and line marking at the intersection of Doonmore Street and Lethbridge Street, Penrith.

3.    Subject to no substantial objections being received, Design Plan AD133 dated 16 July 2019 be endorsed for construction, with funding provided from the 2019/20 – Active Transport and High Pedestrian Area Program.

4.    A street lighting assessment be conducted in accordance with Council’s Public Domain Lighting Policy (August 2004) to ensure compliance with the relevant lighting category.

 

6        Evan Street and Higgins Street, Penrith - Endorsement of Design Plan AE84                                                                                                               

RECOMMENDED

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Evan Street and Higgins Street, Penrith - Endorsement of Design Plan AE84 be received.

2.    Consultation be undertaken with affected residents regarding Design Plan AE84 dated July 2019 for the proposed installation of a raised threshold their associated advisory signs and line marking at the intersection of Evan Street and Higgins Street, Penrith.

3.    Subject to no substantial objections being received, Design Plan AE84 dated July 2019 be endorsed for construction, with funding provided from the High Pedestrian Area Program.

4.    A street lighting assessment be conducted in accordance with Council’s Public Domain Lighting Policy (August 2004) to ensure compliance with the relevant lighting category.

 

 


 

7        Hewitt Street, between Nevada Avenue and Franklin Place, Colyton - Endorsement of Design Plan AH135                                                          

Councillor Marcus Cornish enquired if there were parking lane line markings on Hewitt Street, Colyton.

David Drozd – Traffic Engineering Coordinator confirmed there are parking lane line markings on Hewitt Street, Colyton.

Steve Grady of Busways enquired about the distance the proposed speed hump will be installed from the existing Bus Stop located on Hewitt Street, just north of Nevada Avenue, Colyton.

David Drozd – Traffic Engineering Coordinator advised that the proposed speed hump will be installed at least a bus length away from the existing Bus Stop.

Councillor Robin Cook (Representative for the Member for Londonderry) expressed her thanks to the Committee for fast tracking this matter.

RECOMMENDED

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Hewitt Street, between Nevada Avenue and Franklin Place, Colyton - Endorsement of Design Plan AH135 be received.

2.    Consultation be undertaken with affected residents and surrounding businesses regarding the proposed pedestrian facility and speed humps on Hewitt Street, Colyton.

3.    Subject to no substantial objections, Design Plan AH135 dated June 2019 be endorsed for construction, with funding provided from the 2019/20 – Active Transport and Bicycle Facilities Program.

4.    A street lighting assessment be conducted in accordance with Council’s Public Domain Lighting Policy (August 2004) to ensure compliance with the relevant lighting category.

5.    Affected residents, businesses and Councillor Cook be notified of Council’s resolution.

 

8        Henry Street, Penrith - Proposed 'No Parking 3PM - 7PM Monday to Friday' Restrictions                                                                                       

RECOMMENDED

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Henry Street, Penrith - Proposed 'No Parking 3PM - 7PM Monday to Friday' Restrictions be received.

2.    Consultation be undertaken with RMS and adjoining businesses regarding the proposed parking changes from unrestricted parking spaces to ‘No Parking 3pm -7pm Monday to Friday’ in Henry Street, east of Evan Street, Penrith.

3.    Subject to no substantial objection being received, 40 metres of ‘No Parking 3pm – 7pm Monday – Friday’ restrictions be installed in Henry Street, Penrith, as shown in Appendices 1 and 2.

 

4.    Council’s Rangers Department and the constituent(s) that raised the matter be advised of Council’s resolution.

 

 

GENERAL BUSINESS

 

GB 1           Tadmore Road & Smeeton Road, Cranebrook - Endorsement of    Design Plan AT93         

Executive Summary

 

The purpose of this report is to seek endorsement for an upgrade to the bend of Tadmore Road and Smeeton Road, Cranebrook. The report recommends that Design Plan AT93 dated July 2019 be endorsed for construction.

 

Background

 

The bend of Tadmore Road and Smeeton Road, Cranebrook was one of several projects nominated under the 2019/20 NSW Safer Roads Program. The nomination for the project proved to be successful, with a funding offer of $175,600 for rural road safety improvements at the bend.

 

Current Situation

 

Council’s Design Section have now completed a design plan for the bend treatment of

Smeeton Road and Tadmore Road, Cranebrook. In summary, the plan proposes a concrete median island, road widening, guard rails, and chevron alignment markers to span the bend.

 

This treatment serves to increase motorists’ awareness, reduce travels speeds, and

segregate opposing traffic.

 

The project is funded as a Black Spot under the 2019/20 NSW Safer Roads Program, with

construction required to be completed by June 2020.

 

 

Council’s Design Section advises that the proposal has been designed to best practice when considering the Roads and Maritime Services supplement, Austroads and Australian

Standards requirements.

 

As with all designs involving traffic and pedestrian facilities, a lighting assessment will be

undertaken to ensure compliance with the relevant lighting category.

________________________________________________________________________

 

Councillor Marcus Cornish requested for traverse line marking to be installed at the bend of Tadmore Road and Smeeton Road, Cranebrook.

 

David Drozd – Traffic Engineering Coordinator advised that traverse line marking is appropriate at the subject bend and Council’s Design Plan will be amended to reflect the placement of traverse line marking.

 

 

 

 

 

RECOMMENDED

 

          That:

 

1.    The information contained in the report on Tadmore Road and Smeeton Road, Cranebrook – Endorsement of Design Plan AT93.

2.    Design Plan AT93 (dated July 2019), as shown in Appendix 1, for rural road safety improvements, including the installation of traverse line marking at both approaches at the bend of Tadmore Road and Smeeton Road, Cranebrook be endorsed for construction, with funding provided through the 2019/20 NSW Safer Roads Program.

3.    A street lighting assessment be conducted in accordance with Council’s Public Domain Lighting Policy (August 2004) to ensure compliance with the relevant lighting category.

 

GB 2           Evan Street at Henry Street, Penrith - Concerns about Right          Turn                    Movements at the Intersection   

Councillor Tricia  Hitchen (Representative for the Member for Penrith) advised the Committee about concerns regarding vehicles at the intersection of Evan Street turning right (eastbound) onto Henry Street, Penrith. Councillor Tricia Hitchen requested for a traffic volume count to be conducted with a view of implementing a ‘No Right Turn’ restriction at this intersection to restrict vehicles from turning right from Evan Street onto Henry Street, Penrith.

RECOMMENDED

          That:

1.   Council’s Traffic Engineering Officers conduct a traffic volume count at the intersection at the intersection of Evan Street and Henry Street, Penrith.

 

2.   Council’s Traffic Engineering Officers review the potential of implementing a ‘No Right Turn’ restriction at this intersection to restrict vehicles from turning right (eastbound) from Evan Street onto Henry Street, Penrith.

 

3.   Councillor Tricia Hitchen (Representative for the Member for Penrith) be advised of the outcome.

 

GB 3           Ladbury Avenue at the Great Western Highway, Penrith - Right     Turn Movements       

Councillor Robin Cook (Representative for the Member for Londonderry) advised the Committee about motorists experiencing difficulties turning right from Ladbury Avenue (eastbound) onto the Great Western Highway, Penrith due to limited breaks in through traffic flow. 

David Drozd – Traffic Engineering Coordinator advised that the Roads and Maritime Services (RMS) are currently upgrading the intersection of the Great Western Highway and Mulgoa Road, Penrith. David Drozd advised that Council will request the RMS to repaint the line marking on the Great Western Highway and at the intersection with Ladbury Avenue, Penrith.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDED

          That:

1.   Council’s Traffic Engineering Officers write to the Roads and Maritime Services (RMS) requesting them to advise Council if there are any planned improvements works to be undertaken at the intersection of Ladbury Avenue and the Great Western Highway, Penrith as part of the Mulgoa Road Upgrade. 

 

2.   Should no RMS improvement works be planned for the intersection of Ladbury Avenue and the Great Western Highway, Penrith, Council’s Traffic Engineering Officers write to the RMS requesting that they re-linemark the Great Western Highway between Victoria Bridge and Mulgoa Road, Penrith and investigate improvements to be made at the intersection of Ladbury Avenue and the Great Western Highway, Penrith as part of the Mulgoa Road Upgrade works.

 

3.   Councillor Robin Cook (Representative for the Member for Londonderry) be advised of the outcome.

 

 

GB 4           Bruce Neal Drive at the Great Western Highway, Penrith - Right    Turn Movements       

Councillor Karen McKeown OAM (Council Representative) advised the Committee of concerns about motorists experiencing difficulty with turning right out of Bruce Neal Drive (westbound) onto the Great Western Highway, Penrith due to limited breaks in through traffic flow.

RECOMMENDED

          That:

1.   Council’s Traffic Engineering Officers write to the Roads and Maritime Services (RMS) requesting them to advise Council if there are any planned improvements works to be undertaken at the intersection of Bruce Neal Drive and the Great Western Highway, Penrith as part of the Mulgoa Road Upgrade. 

 

2.   Should no RMS improvement works be planned for the intersection of Bruce Neal Drive and the Great Western Highway, Penrith, Council’s Traffic Engineering Officers write to the RMS requesting that they investigate improvements to be made at the intersection of Bruce Neale Drive in conjunction with Ladbury Avenue and the Great Western Highway, Penrith as part of the Mulgoa Road Upgrade works.

 

3.   Councillor Karen McKeown OAM (Council Representative) be advised of the outcome.

 


 

 

There being no further business the Chairperson declared the meeting closed and the time being 9:40am.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the recommendations contained in the Report and Recommendations of the Local Traffic Committee meeting held on 5 August, 2019 be adopted.

 

 


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                               26 August 2019

 

REPORT AND RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE
 Policy Review Committee MEETING

HELD ON 12 August, 2019

 

 

 

PRESENT

His Worship the Mayor, Councillor Ross Fowler OAM, Deputy Mayor, Councillor Greg Davies, and Councillors Jim Aitken OAM, Bernard Bratusa, Todd Carney, Brian Cartwright, Robin Cook, Marcus Cornish, Kevin Crameri OAM, Mark Davies, Tricia Hitchen, Karen McKeown OAM and Kath Presdee.

 

APOLOGIES

The apologies from Councillors John Thain and Aaron Duke were accepted.

 

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES - Policy Review Committee Meeting - 8 April 2019

The minutes of the Policy Review Committee Meeting of 8 April 2019 were confirmed.

 

 

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

 

Councillor Ross Fowler OAM declared a Pecuniary Conflict of Interest in Item 3 – Penrith CBD Corporation Annual Report 2018-2019 and Business Plan 2019-2020, as he is the Auditor of the Penrith CBD Corporation. Councillor Fowler OAM indicated he would leave the meeting during consideration of this Item.

 

Councillor Karen McKeown OAM declared a Pecuniary Conflict of Interest in Item 4 – Local Government NSW Annual Conference 2019, as she is on the Board of Local Government NSW and also sits on the Motion Review Committee for the LGNSW Conference. Councillor McKeown OAM indicated that she would leave the meeting during consideration of this Item.

 

 

Ms Sylvana De Filippis

 

Item 1 – Planning Proposal for the Australian Arms Hotel – 351 and 359 High Street, Penrith

 

Ms De Filippis spoke against the recommendation and expressed her concerns regarding the proposed height and floor space ratio and the potential negative impact on the heritage value of Penrith, the value of existing properties, obstruction to the view of the Blue Mountains and the impact on roads, infrastructure and noise pollution.

 

 

DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Having previously declared an interest in Item 3, His Worship the Mayor, Councillor Ross Fowler OAM left the meeting, the time being 7:12pm.

 

The Deputy Mayor, Councillor Greg Davies then took the Chair for consideration of Item 3.


 

 

Outcome 4 - We have safe, vibrant places

 

3        Penrith CBD Corporation Annual Report 2018-2019 and Business Plan 2019-2020                                                                                              

RECOMMENDED

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Penrith CBD Corporation Annual Report 2018-2019 and Business Plan 2019-2020 be received

2.    Council receive information on the Annual Report and Audited Financial Statement for 2018-2019 of the Penrith CBD Corporation.

3.    Council endorse the Penrith CBD Corporation’s Annual Business Plan 2019-2020.

 

 

His Worship the Mayor, Councillor Ross Fowler OAM returned to the meeting and retook the Chair, the time being 7:30pm.

 

Outcome 2 - We plan for our future growth

 

1        Planning Proposal for the Australian Arms Hotel - 351 and 359 High Street, Penrith                                                                                                

RECOMMENDED

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Planning Proposal for the Australian Arms Hotel - 351 and 359 High Street, Penrith be received

2.     Council endorse the Planning Proposal for the Australian Arms Hotel - 351 and 359 High Street, Penrith provided in the separate enclosure to this report.

3.     Council officers forward the Planning Proposal to Parliamentary Counsel for an opinion in accordance with the plan making process.

4.     Council make the required amendment to Penrith Local Environmental Plan 2010.

5.     Council authorise the General Manager to execute all necessary documents, and do all necessary things to give effect to the Council’s decision to make the amendment to the Penrith Local Environmental Plan.

6.     The Department of Planning, Industry and Environment be provided with a copy of the amended plan for notification

 

In accordance with Section 375A of the Local Government Act 1993, a DIVISION was then called with the following result:

For

Against

 

Councillor Kath Presdee

Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM

Councillor Greg Davies

Councillor Karen McKeown OAM

Councillor Todd Carney

Councillor Robin Cook

Councillor Jim Aitken OAM

 

Councillor Mark Davies

 

Councillor Brian Cartwright

 

Councillor Bernard Bratusa   

 

Councillor Ross Fowler OAM

                           

Councillor Marcus Cornish

 

Councillor Tricia Hitchen

 

 

Councillor Mark Davies left the meeting, the time being 7:40pm.

 

Councillor Marcus Cornish left the meeting, the time being 7:42pm.

 

Outcome 4 - We have safe, vibrant places

 

2        Draft Hoardings Policy

Councillor Mark Davies returned to the meeting, the time being 7:44pm.

Councillor Marcus Cornish returned to the meeting, the time being 7:47pm.         

RECOMMENDED

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Draft Hoardings Policy be received

2.    The Draft Hoardings Policy be adopted.

 

 

Councillor Karen McKeown OAM left the meeting, the time being 7:58pm.

 

 

Outcome 7 - We have confidence in our Council

 

4        Local Government NSW Annual Conference 2019                                   

RECOMMENDED

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Local Government NSW Annual Conference 2019 be received

2.    The Motions detailed in the report be submitted for inclusion in the 2019 Local Government NSW Annual Conference Business Paper.

3.    Council write to neighbouring metropolitan councils, as well as local Members of Parliament advising of the Bill Posters motion and seeking support when the matter is considered at the LGNSW Conference in October.

 

  


 

 

There being no further business the Chairperson declared the meeting closed the time being 8:03pm.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the recommendations contained in the Report and Recommendations of the Policy Review Committee meeting held on 12 August, 2019 be adopted.

 

 

  



DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Item                                                                                                                                                Page

 

Outcome 1 - We can work close to home

 

1        Update on the Quarter, Penrith's health and education precinct Action Plan 2017          1

 

Outcome 2 - We plan for our future growth

 

2        Fire Safety Update                                                                                                             7

 

Outcome 3 - We can get around the City

 

3        NSW Government "Active Transport Program" - Funding Acceptance 2019-20            13

 

4        Council's submission to Parliamentary Inquiry into proposal to raise Warragamba Dam Wall                                                                                                                                           15

 

Outcome 4 - We have safe, vibrant places

 

5        Magnetic Places Grants Program 2019-20                                                                     25

 

6        RFT18/19-20 Asbestos Consulting Services                                                                   33

 

Outcome 5 - We care about our environment

 

7        Hawkesbury River County Council (HRCC) Additional Maintenance Funding               45

 

Outcome 6 - We are healthy and share strong community spirit

 

8        Community Assistance Program Planned Component 2019-20                                     49

 

9        Feasibility of Preparing Plans for Small Sporting Clubs                                                  59

 

Outcome 7 - We have confidence in our Council

 

10      Dedication of Council Land for Road Widening Purposes - Erskine Park Road Upgrade                                                                                                                                             71

 

11      Results of the 2019 Community Satisfaction Survey                                                      74

 

12      Local Government Rating Review - IPART Final Report                                                78

 

13      Organisational Performance and Financial Review - June 2019                                    88

 

14      Regional Strategic Alliance                                                                                              94

 

15      Summary of Investments & Banking for the Period 1 July 2019 to 31 July 2019           98

 

 


Outcome 1 - We can work close to home

 

Item                                                                                                                                                Page

 

1        Update on the Quarter, Penrith's health and education precinct Action Plan 2017          1

 

 

 



Ordinary Meeting                                                                                               26 August 2019

 

 

 

1

Update on the Quarter, Penrith's health and education precinct Action Plan 2017   

 

Compiled by:               Wendy  Read, City Precinct Facilitator

Authorised by:            Nathan Burbridge, Economic Initiatives Manager  

 

Outcome

We can work close to home

Strategy

Attract investment to grow the economy and increase the range of businesses operating in the region

Service Activity

Deliver actions identified in the Economic Development Strategy and Penrith Progression

      

 

Executive Summary

The purpose of this report is to provide an update on the status of the implementation of the Quarter Action Plan 2017-2021; and to advise Council of projects being delivered within the 2019-20 financial year. At this stage, 69% of action have been completed or are in progress.

 

Background

The Quarter precinct brings together the health sector, universities, TAFE, private enterprise and Council to grow and develop in collaboration.  Each of the organisations that make up the Quarter Leadership committee have an interest in the success of the precinct because of   geographic location, the functions they perform and how collectively, they can generate significant investment opportunities for Penrith and its community.

 

In 2011, the NSW Government listed the Penrith Health and Education Precinct (PHEP) – now called “The Quarter” as a ‘potential specialised economic centre’ in the then Metropolitan Plan for Sydney. This led to the NSW Department of Premier and Cabinet directly funding the development of a Strategic Vision prepared by the Penrith Business Alliance.

 

This strategy overtime was refined into an action plan. The Quarter Strategic Action Plan (the Plan) and subject of this report was adopted by the Quarter Leadership Committee group in 2017. The Plan lays the foundation for the partnerships to attract investment to The Quarter. The Plan is due for a mid-term review to report against its progress over the first three years of implementation (2017-2019).

 

The vision is: “To become an international destination for investment in health services, education, research and related industry.”

 

The Plan contains 18 focus areas with 56 sub-actions for the Quarter Leadership Committee and its three sub-committees to deliver (refer to attachment 2).

 

Current Situation

In 2018, the Quarter was identified as a strategic centre and collaboration area in the Greater Sydney Commission’s Western District Plan. The significance of health and education precincts to a growing region cannot be understated. In addition to delivering critical health services, providing educational opportunities, improving social cohesion and a generating a hub for collaboration; these precincts bring the capacity to be a driver of investment, jobs growth, and urban revitalisation.

Council’s Economic Development Strategy draws from this by identifying the health and education sector as a significant generator of jobs. The strategy seeks to target a net job increase of +12,000 for these sectors by 2036. As such, the Quarter is the means for achieving the health and education objectives of the Economic Development Strategy.

 

According to the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS, 2016) Census of Population and Housing Place of Work dataset indicates current jobs in Health Care and Social Assistance make up 51% of total jobs (3,786) followed by Education and Training at 24.9% (1,844) within the Quarter Precinct.

 

There is potential to further grow the Precinct’s employment by an additional 6,000+ jobs in the coming decade by leveraging:

 

·    Western Sydney Airport Growth Area

·    Greater Penrith Collaboration Area

·    Greater Penrith to Eastern Creek Growth Area

·    Western Economic Corridor

 

The Western Sydney City Deal will also enable stakeholders to participate in the Western Sydney Health Alliance. This initiative will allow us to work more collaboratively with those health and education precincts within the Parkland City.

Status of actions

In consultation with the Quarter Leadership Committee and sub-committees, the Member organisations provided input to update the 18 focus areas and 56 sub-actions (a total of 80 actions).

 

Since 2017 there has been:

·    27% (21 actions) achieved and moved into a ‘business as usual’ classification.

·    42% (34 actions) are in progress.

·    31% (25 actions) have not commenced during the reporting period. 

 

The key achievements reported to the Quarter Leadership Committee include:

·    Leadership Committee and Sub-Committee governance is operating with a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) now in place

·    The Quarter was recognised as a strategic centre and collaboration area in the Greater Sydney Commission’s Western District Plan

·    The Quarter brand was launched with website and Marketing Plan endorsed;

·    Won the planning for jobs and skills category at the 2018 Greater Sydney Commission Planning Awards

·    Hosted a Quarter Executive Breakfast during the Nepean Blue Mountains Local Health District ‘Together Achieving Better Health’ conference

·    Economic and land use research is underway to leverage current opportunities to the Precinct by way of North-South Rail and other City Shaping development proposals;

·    Commenced the delivery of actions that are part of the Greater Penrith Collaboration Area Place Strategy.

 

Projects to be delivered in 2019-20 financial year

The Quarter Sub-Committees are progressing the following projects during the 2019-20 financial year:

 

 

Land Use, Infrastructure and Economics Subcommittee:

 

·    Undertake a market demand analysis to define and identify the specific market sectors and benchmark Penrith’s health and education precinct with others in Metropolitan Sydney; 

·    Update the Precinct Snapshot data to compare with 2016 precinct statistics;

·    Ecosystem mapping to identify potential supply-chain of services and relationships within the precinct;

·    Structure Plan that considers the ecosystem mapping and transport inputs and preparation of an artist impression of the precinct indicating the development pipeline;

·    Travel plan and transport planning will follow the delivery of the draft Structure Plan to deliver place-based initiatives specific to each organisation;

·    Actions from the Greater Penrith Collaboration Area Place Strategy for implementation in partnership with cross-government and Quarter stakeholders.

 

Marketing and Branding Sub-Committee:

 

·    Develop marketing collateral that responds to Leadership Committee views on the following:

-     Attract and retain hospital and health care sector workers including nurses and clinicians

-     Provide messaging to students relating to local career pathways and opportunities

-     Enhance the experience for students

-     Precinct signage and wayfinding

-     Members to receive organisational messaging that promotes the Quarter so that this can be promoted to staff (such as newsletters etc.)

 

Governance and Advocacy Sub-committee:

 

·    Explore funding opportunities with other stakeholders

·    Secure funding for the combined Secretariat and City Precinct Facilitator role

·    Support ongoing development that creates employment, research and student opportunities within the Precinct.

 

Resourcing

 

Implementing the Quarter Action Plan is through in-kind contributions with council continuing to dedicate a staff resource to coordinate the Quarter stakeholder group. It should be recognised that moving forward; it will be necessary for the Quarter Leadership Committee to consider how projects that require it, will be funded.

 

Conclusion

 

The Quarter continues to provide vital tertiary level health services, education and research to a population catchment of over 500,000 residents with approximately 6,000 jobs primarily in health and education - figures which are set to double by 2036.

 

As this report demonstrates; stakeholders have made since 2017 significant step towards implementing this Action Plan. The Quarter will continue to collaborate to achieve improved health facilities, advances in research and more educational opportunities to equip local workers with the skills they need to secure the jobs of the future.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the information contained in the report on Update on the Quarter, Penrith's health and education precinct Action Plan 2017 be received.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

Quarter Action Plan 2019 Update - Action Plan Audit

11 Pages

Attachments Included

2.

The Quarter Action Plan prepared by Deloitte Access Economics

50 Pages

Attachments Included

   


Outcome 2 - We plan for our future growth

 

Item                                                                                                                                                Page

 

2        Fire Safety Update                                                                                                             7

 

 

 



Ordinary Meeting                                                                                               26 August 2019

 

 

 

2

Fire Safety Update   

 

Compiled by:               Craig Squires, Building Certification Co-ordinator

Authorised by:            Peter Wood, Development Services Manager  

 

Outcome

We plan for our future growth

Strategy

Facilitate development in the City that considers the current and future needs  of our community

Service Activity

Assess development proposals efficiently and make decisions that are open and fair

      

 

Executive Summary

Council is in receipt of reports from Fire and Rescue NSW concerning fire safety issues at properties in the Penrith Local Government Area.  Fire and Rescue NSW inspect sites as part of their duties either routinely or on request. The premises highlighted in this report were inspected following a complaint received.  Details of the complainants were not provided.

 

Schedule 5, Part 8, Clause 17 (previously Section 121ZD) of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act requires the matters resulting from an inspection by Fire and Rescue NSW to be reported to Council.

 

Most of the issues raised by Fire and Rescue NSW were of a minor nature and some had already been addressed prior to Council Officers inspecting the premises.  Other issues may take longer to resolve, and this could result in the issue of Fire Safety Orders.

 

This report recommends Council continue to monitor these premises as part of its’ Fire Safety Audit Program and essential fire safety measures are maintained in the buildings through Fire Safety Orders if required. It is also recommended that Council advise Fire and Rescue NSW of its’ decision.

Fire and Rescue Reporting

The fire safety upgrading provisions are contained in fire safety orders 1, 2 and 3 of Schedule 5, Part 2 (previously Section 121B) of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 (the Act).  This report relates to such a circumstance where Fire and Rescue NSW has advised Council of fire safety issues and requested Council to determine the matter.

 

Under Section 9.32 of the Act, Fire and Rescue NSW can inspect any premises of shared accommodation or any other premises when requested by the Council, a person who is the owner, lessee or occupier of the building or when they receive a complaint in writing.  In most instances, the inspection is initiated by a complaint and in these circumstances the complainant is rarely disclosed to Council.

 

When a Council receives advice from Fire and Rescue NSW that they have inspected a premises under Schedule 5, Part 8, Clause 17 of the Act, a report must be tabled to a meeting of the Council to determine whether or not it will exercise its powers under the Act to issue an Order to rectify the situation.  Council must also give notice of its’ determination to the Commissioner of Fire and Rescue NSW.


 

The details of Fire and Rescue NSW and outcomes of Council inspections are summarised in the following table:

 

Premises

Fire and Rescue NSW Comments

Action Taken

Shopping Centre,

80 Borrowdale Road, Cranebrook

Inspection undertaken by FRNSW after a fire in one of the tenancies. Faults were found on fire indicator panel and unsafe cooking practices were noted in the subject tenancy.

Inspection undertaken. No faults on panel. Confirmed with staff in the subject tenancy that cooking processes have changed. No further action required.

 

Residential Flat Building,

1-39 Lord Sheffield Circuit,

Thornton

 

Inspection undertaken by FRNSW determined that the Sound Systems and Intercom Systems for Emergency Purposes (SSISEP) was in fault, the hydrant/sprinkler booster pump had not been correctly commissioned and the AFDAS did not have any logbooks available for inspection at the Fire Indicator Panel.

Inspection substantiated all of the concerns raised by FRNSW. Notice of Intention sent to owners to rectify issues along with a show cause letter for failure to maintain fire safety measure. All issues rectified.

 

Industrial development, 8 Kommer Place,

St Marys

 

FRNSW received a request from the NSW EPA to inspect the site given that it was a waste facility used for the processing of highly flammable materials. They identified a number of issues with relation to the fire hydrant system, hose reel system, portable fire extinguishers and egress.

Inspection revealed deficiencies with some valves and clearances associated with the hydrant system. A Fire Safety Order has been served to rectify works.

 

Factory Unit,

40-66 Lockwood Road, Erskine Park

 

FRNSW received a complaint from the local fire station. The complaint related to the sprinkler system being hidden by pallets and blocked egress. An inspection by FRNSW identified issues with egress being blocked, an insufficient bore suction connection to the sprinkler system and obstruction of the fire hydrant system.

 

Inspection undertaken. All issues raised by FRNSW have been resolved with the exception of the issue relating to concerns with the sprinkler system. FRNSW make reference to the intent of a Fire Hydrant standard when raising issues with the sprinkler system. No specific rectification requirements are put forward in their correspondence and no non-compliances exist with the sprinkler standard (AS2118.1-1999). FRNSW to be advised of Council's determination and further information to be sought from FRNSW to inform any further decision on this matter.

Factory Unit,

38 Links Road, St Marys

 

FRNSW inspection revealed minor concerns regarding fire hose reels and portable fire extinguishers.

FRNSW have advised that matters have been resolved to their satisfaction

 

Hotel Motel,

297-305 High Street, Penrith

 

FRNSW received a callout to the building for an automatic fire alarm. The local brigade raised concerns regarding the building occupant warning system.

Full fire safety audit of the building undertaken. A number of issues were identified, and a Fire Safety Order has been sent to the owner.

 

Conclusion

All fire safety issues identified by Fire and Rescue NSW have been responded to by Council officers to ensure that they are addressed by the owners of the premises. In this regard, it is recommended that Council continue to monitor these properties as part of its Fire Safety Audit Program.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

  That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Fire Safety Update be received

2.    Council continue to monitor properties as part of its Fire Safety Audit Program and take any further action as necessary.

3.    Fire and Rescue NSW be advised of Council’s decision.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.  


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


Outcome 3 - We can get around the City

 

Item                                                                                                                                                Page

 

3        NSW Government "Active Transport Program" - Funding Acceptance 2019-20            13

 

4        Council's submission to Parliamentary Inquiry into proposal to raise Warragamba Dam Wall                                                                                                                                           15

 

 

 

 



Ordinary Meeting                                                                                               26 August 2019

 

 

 

3

NSW Government "Active Transport Program" - Funding Acceptance 2019-20   

 

Compiled by:               David Drozd, Traffic Engineering Coordinator

Authorised by:            Adam Wilkinson, Engineering Services Manager  

 

Outcome

We can get around our City

Strategy

Provide a safe and efficient road and pathway network

Service Activity

Manage programs and initiatives that improve road safety and efficiency

      

 

Executive Summary

The purpose of this report is to advise Council of the funding offer obtained under the NSW Government’s “Active Transport Program” 2019-20.  The report recommends that Council accepts the funding offered under this Program.

Background

Council nominated three Active Transport projects in December 2018 being for a Pedestrian Access and Management Plan (PAMP), The Cranebrook to Thornton shared user path continuation (year 3) and a pedestrian crossing on Lethbridge Street at Doonmore Street, Penrith to service Penrith Primary and High School.

 

By correspondence dated 25 July 2019, Roads and Maritime Services has confirmed that two projects have been approved in the “Priority Cycleways” and “Walking Communities” components of the 2019/20 Active Transport Program to the value of $1,050,000 as shown in Table 1 below.

 

TABLE 1.

Projects Approved under the 2019/20 Active Transport Program

RMS reference

Project Description

Allocation

P.0032575

Priority Cycleways

Cranebrook to Thornton via Coombes Drive – construction of 3rd stage of the shared-use path along Andrews Road Southern side

$1,000,000

100%

P.00434443

Walking Communities

Lethbridge Street, Penrith, near Doonmore Street – Construction of a raised marked pedestrian crossing

$50,000

50%

 

TOTAL:

$1,050,000

 

A condition of acceptance is that all projects must be completed prior to 30 June 2020 which can be achieved as preliminary design and assessment for both projects are underway. The funding allocation for the third stage of the shared-use path project is 100% of the total project cost and hence there is no financial contribution required by Council for the 2019/20 financial year.

 

The funding allocation for the raised pedestrian crossing in Lethbridge Street, Penrith is 50% of the total project cost and Council’s contribution of $50,000 is within 2019-20 Budget provisions via Council’s annual funding allocation for the Active Transport projects in 2019/20. It should be noted this work will be integrated with designs currently being prepared for the High Pedestrian Area Scheme extension.

Financial Services Manager’s Comment

The funding allocation for the third stage of the shared-use path project is 100% of the total project cost and hence there is no financial contribution required by Council for the 2019/20 financial year.

 

The funding allocation for the raised pedestrian crossing is 50% of the total project cost however the High Pedestrian Area (40km/h Scheme) for Penrith is funding the remaining 50% hence there is no contribution by Council.

Conclusion

Council’s work in developing the shared-use path network is welcomed and supported by the community.  In addition, the provision of a marked pedestrian crossing will markedly improve pedestrian safety in Lethbridge Street, particularly for the nearby High and Primary School students that cross at this location. The continued State funding for these projects under the “Active Transport Program” should be recognised as a noteworthy achievement for Council. 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on NSW Government "Active Transport Program" - Funding Acceptance 2019-20 be received.

2.    Council accept the grant funding of $1,050,000 offered for two Active Transport projects as shown in Table 1 for the 2019/20 financial year.

3.    Council write to relevant State and Federal Members thanking them for their continued support for the provision of infrastructure for pedestrians and bike riders.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                               26 August 2019

 

 

 

4

Council's submission to Parliamentary Inquiry into proposal to raise Warragamba Dam Wall   

 

Compiled by:               Rachel Pagitz, Advocacy and Government Relations Officer

Authorised by:            Nathan Burbridge, Economic Initiatives Manager  

 

Outcome

We can get around our City

Strategy

Improve passenger and freight transport connections in the region

Service Activity

Work with government to deliver regional transport infrastructure that meets the needs of our community

      

 

Executive Summary

On 20 June 2019 the Legislative Council moved that a select committee be established to inquire into and report on the NSW Government’s proposal to raise the Warragamba Dam wall. This follows a previous inquiry in 2018 by the Standing Committee on State Development on the Water NSW Amendment (Warragamba Dam) Bill 2018. Submissions to the Inquiry close on September 10 2019.

 

Council has chosen to make a submission in response to two (2) points under the Inquiry’s Terms of Reference in relation to flood evacuation and the potential for infrastructure investment, namely the Castlereagh Connection.

 

As the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) into the Dam Wall raising is still outstanding, Council’s submission does not provide commentary on the potential environmental or other impacts of the dam wall raising as this would be premature ahead of the public release of the EIS. Council’s submission neither supports or opposes the raising of the dam wall.

Background

The Hawkesbury-Nepean Valley is widely acknowledged as one of the highest risk areas for flood risk in NSW, if not Australia. The Valley covers 425 square kilometres and falls within the Penrith, Hawkesbury, Hills Shire and Blacktown Local Government Areas (LGAs).

 

Council has a significant interest in the management of the floodplain, the decisions and provisioning of new and upgraded infrastructure and understanding of, and decisions made, relating to evacuation capacity for current and future residents. Council has chosen to make a submission in response to two points under the Inquiry’s Terms of Reference in relation to flood evacuation and the potential for infrastructure investment, namely the Castlereagh Connection, a strategic connection that has been proposed since 1951.

 

A draft submission (Appendix 2) has been compiled that responds to the Select Committee’s Terms of Reference (Appendix 1) 1e and 1f.

 

Summary of submission:

 

·    That consideration be given to the role of the Castlereagh Connection in any flood evacuation planning

·    That the wider benefits of the Castlereagh Connection are significant in terms of easing congestion and increasing connectivity to existing and planned infrastructure

·    The submission does not consider or provide any position on the raising of the dam wall as it is premature to do so ahead of the release of the Environmental Impact Statement

 

Conclusion

 

The Submission outlines the importance of increasing evacuation capacity in the Hawkesbury-Nepean Valley and calls for further investigation into the benefits of building the Castlereagh Connection as a regional evacuation route, in parallel with the ongoing investigations for the Warragamba Dam Wall raising.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Council's submission to Parliamentary Inquiry into proposal to raise Warragamba Dam Wall be received

2.    Council endorse the Draft Submission (Appendix 2) for submission to the Select Committee prior to the closing date of 10 September 2019.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

Terms of Reference - Select Committee on the Proposal to Raise the Warragamba Dam Wall

2 Pages

Appendix

2.

Council's submission to the Parliamentary Inquiry into proposal to raise Warragamba Dam Wall

4 Pages

Appendix

  


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                            26 August 2019

Appendix 1 - Terms of Reference - Select Committee on the Proposal to Raise the Warragamba Dam Wall

 

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Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                            26 August 2019

Appendix 2 - Council's submission to the Parliamentary Inquiry into proposal to raise Warragamba Dam Wall

 

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Outcome 4 - We have safe, vibrant places

 

Item                                                                                                                                                Page

 

5        Magnetic Places Grants Program 2019-20                                                                     25

 

6        RFT18/19-20 Asbestos Consulting Services                                                                   33

 

 

 

 



Ordinary Meeting                                                                                               26 August 2019

 

 

 

5

Magnetic Places Grants Program 2019-20   

 

Compiled by:               Donita Hulme, Cultural Engagement Officer

Authorised by:            Jeni Pollard, Place Manager  

 

Outcome

We have safe, vibrant places

Strategy

Work with our communities to improve wellbeing and infrastructure in their neighbourhoods

Service Activity

Deliver projects that address local issues and improve the wellbeing of local communities

      

 

Executive Summary

This report informs Council of the successful outcomes of the 2018-19 Magnetic Places Grants Program and recommends 6 new placemaking projects for funding in 2019-20.

 

Magnetic Places is a celebrated grants program that positions Penrith City as an innovator in community-driven placemaking. The grants are an integral component of the Neighbourhood Renewal Program and capitalise on valuable support from a range of departments across Council.

 

The program celebrates diversity, innovation and culture in 12 of Penrith's established neighbourhoods and has produced over 70 successful placemaking projects, positively impacting the lives of more than 14,000 residents since 2007. These impacts have included greater community cohesion, improved wellbeing and increased civic participation along with the development of safer and more attractive public spaces in our neighbourhoods.

 

Magnetic Places supports projects that transform neighbourhood places into creative spaces and have an artistic focus involving active collaboration between artists and residents.
This report recommends 6 projects to be funded by the Magnetic Places Grants Program 2019-20 for a total funding spend of $50,000.

 

Background

The Magnetic Places Grants Program was initiated in 2007-08 as a pilot with the objective of enabling residents, community groups, artists and organisations to activate local places. The program complements Council’s investment in identified priority communities through programs such as Neighbourhood Renewal.

 

Magnetic Places continues to grow and evolve as the City's communities collaborate with artists, organisations and each other to celebrate local identity and amplify the vibrancy of Penrith.

 

Since inception, the program has funded 76 successful projects from 137 applications. Project evaluations demonstrate that through the ‘making’ part of placemaking the program is contributing to the wellbeing of Penrith residents with participants reporting that they have made new friends, gained confidence and developed new skills amongst many other valuable outcomes. These evaluations also reinforce that relatively modest amounts of funds can seed and deliver significant outcomes that assist people to feel connected in their community.

The projects have also resulted in the installation of permanent and temporary artworks across the city’s Neighbourhood Renewal areas. The total annual available budget for Magnetic Places is $50,000.

 

2018-19 Magnetic Places projects

In 2018 Council endorsed funding for 5 placemaking projects totalling $48,536. These projects delivered rich community engagement and positive impact through 53 activation workshops with 905 local participants in 11 different types of locations.

 

These projects were supported by 9 paid artists who worked with residents to create 23 new artistic works in 4 neighbourhoods. With the addition of celebration events, enjoyed by 160 attendees, a total of 1065 residents had the opportunity to participate in artistic, community-building activities in their own neighbourhoods.

 

Project highlights include:

 

CRANEBROOK SKATE PARK

By Nepean Community & Neighbourhood Services

+ 13 workshops with a total of 135 participants

 

A series of design workshops with residents, particularly young residents, lead into 8 weeks of painting workshops that reinvigorated the local skate ramps.

 

“We spent many afternoons collaborating with local community in the park to brainstorm ideas and work together to achieve this goal”.

 

"we have had many community members comment on what an uplifting place the skate park is now that it has been painted"

 

 

CONNECTIONS TOTEMS

By artist Kerrie Keefe / auspiced by St Marys Area Community Development Project Inc

+ 12 workshops with a total of 105 participants

 

Free workshops in Kingswood, North St Marys and St Marys made it possible for residents to create and decorate individual ceramic pieces which were then assembled into amazing sculptural totems. People were shown decorative techniques and encouraged to express their creativity. The assembled totems form a decorative, colourful and intriguing representation of the individuals and their community.

 

"[Magnetic Places is] a fabulous program which links artists with the community and local environment. I found those involved to be extremely supportive. Positive benefits from engaging with community members flow back to the artist ten-fold.”

 

2019-20 Program activity

The 2019-20 Magnetic Places Grants Program promotional campaign began in March 2019, running until July 22. The program was promoted to local resident groups, services, artists and organisations with an interest in driving creative projects in Neighbourhood Renewal suburbs. Information about the grant was distributed via email, hard copy flyers, radio advertising and via a social media campaign. Magnetic Places also has a permanent home on the Grants page of the Council website where interested applicants could view the grant guidelines and access the SmartyGrants online grants portal.

 

In May, Neighbourhood Renewal and Community and Cultural Development officers worked together to host two events for interested applicants. On 10 May the Penrith City Council Grants Info Session provided over 40 interested people with information about various funding opportunities including Council’s Community Assistance Program, Heritage grants, Hall Hire Waiver and Magnetic Places. Following a week later on 17 May, a Grant Writing Workshop was held for nearly 30 participants. As both of these events were well attended and received, the intention is to host both again in the New Year well before Club Grants closing date

 

2019-20 Magnetic Places grant applications and assessment

A total of 8 applications were received for the 2019-20 Magnetic Places grants program. The applications received were of a high quality and all together totalled $68,800 in requested funds.

 

Applications were assessed against their ability to meet the following criteria:

1.   Creatively activate one or more public spaces for the whole community

2.   Undertake quality creative engagement activities with residents

3.   Attract many residents from a range of backgrounds to participate

4.   Work with a sound budget and implementation plan

5.   Be covered by a current certificate or have a quote for public liability insurance.

 

Applications were submitted online and assessed by a three-person panel including an external panel member with arts and cultural development expertise.

 

This panel reviewed all applications against the selection criteria and decided on recommendations to Council for funding. Appendix 1 lists all applications not recommend for funding. Council officers will provide individual feedback to unsuccessful applicants as well as suggestions for alternative funding options where appropriate, to assist efforts with any future applications.

 

When ranked against selection criteria and available funding, the competitive assessment process resulted in 6 projects being shortlisted and represent a total request of $50,000. These projects are shown over the page in Table 1.

 

 

Project

Applicant

Neighbourhood

Request

Recommended

Faces of St Marys

Fusion Western Sydney

St Marys

$10,000

$9,000

Woven Voices

Rhonda Dee

Kingswood

$10,000

$8,600

Londonderry Magnetic Places

Chistine Huynh

Londonderry

$10,000

$7,400

Welcome to Colyton

Team Colyton

Colyton

$10,000

$8,500

Nganaga- Ask Anything

Chifley College Dunheved Campus P&C Association

North St Marys

$10,000

$8,500

Modified Artist Workshop

Australian Foundation for Disability

Llandilo

$10,000

$8,000

TOTAL

$60,000

 

$50,000

 

Conclusion

Through the 2018-19 Magnetic Places Grants Program over 900 residents collaborated with artists and community service providers to amplify their own creativity and enhance the vitality of 11 local locations. These placemaking projects also positively affected 160 event attendees and created 23 new artistic works.

 

If endorsed by Council, the 6 projects (totalling $50,000) recommended for funding in 2019-20 will provide Penrith residents with new opportunities for transforming local public spaces and the ways in which to connect as a community. This creative empowerment will continue to position Penrith City as an Australian leader in community-driven placemaking and creative neighbourhood renewal.


 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Magnetic Places Grants Program 2019-20 be received

2.    The 6 projects listed in Table 1 be funded as part of the Magnetic Places Grants Program 2019-20.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

Applications not recommended for funding

1 Page

Appendix

2.

Applications recommended for funding

2 Pages

Appendix

  


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                            26 August 2019

Appendix 1 - Applications not recommended for funding

 

 

MAGNETIC PLACES 2020 Applications not recommended for funding

 

 

Project

Applicant

Location

Rationale

Requested

funding

1. Stories in the Garden

Prosper (Project Australia)

North St Marys, Werrington

·         Not a place-specific project (existing program delivered in various locations)

·         Venues offers limited opportunities for broad public participation

·         Panel did not rank this project as highly as the other application submitted for North St Marys

$6,800

2. Community Street Library

Faithe Skinner

Kingswood

·         Application contained limited detail about how this project would reach and engage with a diverse range of residents

·         Project duplication (street libraries are being installed at Wainwright Park, Kingswood as part of a 2019 Magnetic Places project).

·         Panel did not rank this project as highly as the other application submitted for Kingswood

$2,000

TOTAL REQUESTED          $8,800

 


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                            26 August 2019

Appendix 2 - Applications recommended for funding

 

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Ordinary Meeting                                                                                               26 August 2019

 

 

 

6

RFT18/19-20 Asbestos Consulting Services   

 

Compiled by:               Adrian Estreich, Divisional Assurance Coordinator

Murray  Halls, Acting City Presentation Manager

Authorised by:            John Gordon, Acting Director - City Services  

 

Outcome

We have safe, vibrant places

Strategy

Make our public places safe and attractive

Service Activity

Maintain Council’s public spaces

      

 

Executive Summary

A tender for asbestos consulting services was advertised on 4 April 2019 in the Western Weekender and 9 April 2019 in the Sydney Morning Herald and closed on Tuesday 7 May 2019.

 

This report advises Council of the outcome of the tender process, and recommends that a panel of experts for asbestos consulting services be established including Trinitas Group Pty Ltd, Greencap Pty Ltd, Alliance Geotechnical Pty Ltd and Getex Pty Ltd.

 

Background

 

Penrith City Council has a responsibility to manage asbestos on Council owned assets (inclusive of land and buildings). This responsibility extends to the following:

 

·    Compliance with SafeWork NSW requirements in relation to Asbestos Registers and Asbestos Management Plans

·    Responding to asbestos related incidents

·    Remediating asbestos contaminated sites

 

To ensure Council complies with its legislative requirements and that the above situations are managed in a manner which protects the health and safety of our community and workers, Council is obligated to engage suitably qualified asbestos consultants to undertake a range of services. These include:

 

·    Undertake asbestos sampling

·    Undertake air and dust monitoring associated with asbestos work

·    Complete clearance inspections and certificates in line with SafeWork NSW requirements

·    Complete asbestos risk assessments

·    Prepare asbestos registers and asbestos management plans in line with SafeWork NSW requirements

·    Provide technical advice

 

Council relies on the services of asbestos consultants to keep workers and the community safe. As such the quality of their work and methodologies they employ are critical to outcomes achieved when managing asbestos. In addition, it is vital that the consultants have the relevant licenses (including Asbestos Assessor Licenses from SafeWork NSW), qualifications and experience in the types of asbestos matters experienced by Council.

 

This tender was prepared to establish a panel of asbestos consultants that can provide the abovementioned services.

Tender Evaluation Panel

The Tender Evaluation Panel consisted of Adrian Estreich – Divisional Assurance Coordinator, Jonathan Page - Asbestos Project Officer and was chaired by Murray Halls – Acting City Presentation Manager.  Laura Stott from Council’s Procurement team performed the role of tender administration and probity officer for this tender.

Tender Evaluation Criteria

The selection criteria advertised and used in selecting the successful tenderer were:

1.   Demonstrated Ability

2.   Financial

3.   Employment Policies

4.   Quality Assurance Systems

5.   Environmental Management

6.   Work Health & Safety

Summary of Tenders Received

A total of thirty (30) tenders were received by the closing date of the advertised tender. These were:

 

Company

Company Location

Director/Company Owner

4Pillars Environment Consulting Pty Ltd

Suite 16, 9 George Street

North Strathfield NSW 2137

James Hammond

ADE Consulting Group Pty Ltd

Unit 6/7 Millennium Court

Silverwater NSW 2128

Ross Nefodov

Akai Renga Ltd

32 Falcon Street

Crows Nest NSW 2065

Gordon Xue

Alliance Geotechnical Pty Ltd

10 Welder Road

Seven Hills NSW 2147

Simon Thomas

John McQuaid

Asset Geotechnical Engineering Pty Ltd

Suite 2.05 / 56 Delhi Road

North Ryde NSW 2113

Mark Bartel

Belinda Bartel

Aurecon Australasia Pty Ltd

Level 5, 116 Military Road

Neutral Bay NSW 2089

William Cox

Louise Adams

Andrew Muller

Aneetha de Silva

Australasia Safety Services Pty Ltd

13 Yeo Street

Victoria Point QLD 4165

Michael Ian Dean

ClearSafe Environmental Solutions Pty Ltd

1/185 Berkeley Rd

Unanderra NSW 2526

Ryan Heckenberg

 

 

Company

Company Location

Director/Company Owner

Coffey Services Australia Pty Ltd

Level 19, Tower B, 799 Pacific Highway

Chatswood NSW 2067

NASDAQ listed company

Douglas Partners Pty Ltd

96 Hermitage Road

West Ryde NSW 2114

Chris Kline

Fiona MacGregor

Geoff McIntosh

Andrew Middleton

Peter Oitmaa

Bruce Stewart

Will Wright

EDP Consultants Pty Ltd

Suite 101, 52 Atchison Street

St Leonards NSW 2065

John Batty

Mark Haydock

EHO Consulting Pty Ltd

16/380 Pennant Hills Rd

Pennant Hills NSW 2120

Farzad Jalali

Alex Thompson

Envirotech Pty Ltd

Level 1, Unit 1/23 Rowood Road

Prospect NSW 2148

Daniel Mathew

EP Risk Management Pty Ltd

109/283 Alfred St

North Sydney NSW 2060

Kris Thomas

Noel Storan

Phillip Hitchcock

Paul Simpson

Getex Pty Ltd

Suite 2.02, Building 2, 35-41 Waterloo Road

Macquarie Park NSW 2113

Wade Wyatt

Greencap Pty Ltd

Level 2, 11 Khartoum Rd

North Ryde NSW, 2113

Dean Comrie

David Baxby

Rachael McVitty

Greenplus Worldwide Pty Ltd

82-84 Dickson Avenue

Artarmon NSW 2064

Philip James Mulvey

Hibbs and Associates Pty Ltd

Unit 48, 378 Parramatta Road

Homebush West NSW 2140

Mr. Philip Hibbs

Integrated Environmental Pty Ltd

351-357 Londonderry Road

Londonderry NSW 2753

Paul Shane Paciullo

JMB Environmental Consulting Pty Ltd

15/77-79 Bourke Road

Alexandria NSW 2015

James Breslin

Rob Whitehouse

Company

Company Location

Director/Company Owner

JTA Health and Safety and Noise Specialists Pty Ltd

139 Ormond Road

Elwood   Vic 3184

Jeremy Leo Trotman

Rhonda Carol Trotman

Newcastle Asbestos Consulting Pty Ltd

49 Fravent St

Toukley NSW 2263

Murray Lynch

Ewen Skipworth

Prensa Pty Ltd

Level 1, 71 Longueville Road

Lane Cove NSW 2068

Cameron Hunter

William Meszaros

Regional Enviroscience Pty Ltd

Unit 2, 7 Energy Place

Dubbo, NSW, 2830

Juliet Duffy

Riskology Pty Ltd

62 Butchers Lane

Morpeth NSW 2321

Sarah-Jane Dunford

Site Environmental and Remediation Services (WA) Pty Ltd

Unit 5 / 2 Edwin Street

Mortlake NSW 2137

Matthew Campbell

SLR Consulting Australian Pty Ltd

2 Lincoln Street

Lane Cove NSW 2066

Neil Penhall

Peter MacKellar

Paul Gardiner

Peter Georgiou

Glenn Thomas

John Giddings

The Trustee of ELS Trust

Building A, G05, 64 Talavera Road

Macquarie Park NSW 2113

Zara Mason

Trinitas Group Pty Ltd

Suite 101, 24 Hunter Street

Parramatta NSW 2150

Denny Bolatti

Rani Haddad

WSP Australian Pty Ltd

Level 27, 680 George Street

Sydney NSW 2000

Guy Templeton

George McMillan

Geoff Shepherd

David Stuart-Watt

Kate Gilchrist

Charlie Jewkes

Brenda Kingston

Simon Clarke

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Tender Review Process

 

Each tender was reviewed using a systematic approach which included:

 

First round review

 

Removed any companies who did not provide all information required of the tender. This resulted in 2 companies being culled.

 

·    Envirotech Pty Ltd

·    4Pillars Environment Consulting Pty Ltd

 

Second round review

 

To assess the remaining 28 companies, a scoring system was established based on the following:

 

Quality and methodology of work

Council relies on the services of asbestos consultants to keep workers and the community safe. As such the quality of their work and methodologies they employ are critical to the outcomes achieved when managing asbestos.

Experience in managing similar services

Asbestos related work can vary between industries, as such the panel reviewed and assessed the tenderer’s experience in dealing with similar asbestos related matters faced by Penrith City Council.

Asbestos registers and management plans

Each asbestos register and management plan were reviewed and assessed on its compliance with SafeWork NSW requirements. In addition, the documents were assessed on structure, ‘usability,’ and if they could integrate with Penrith City Council’s Asbestos Management Framework.

The number of staff available to complete the required service

Asbestos matters generally require urgent responses and as such it was assessed if the tenderer provided details that they had sufficient staff available to respond to Council’s requests in the timeframe provided.

 

In turn, some tenders outlined specific project teams and staff that would be applied to the service. Others did not.

Qualifications, skills and knowledge of staff involved with the service

In addition to the number of staff, it is critical to the service to ensure that the staff involved meet all the requirements of SafeWork NSW and Environment Protection Authority.

 

A key component of this was that tenders were assessed for Licensed Asbestos Assessors. In turn, non-license holders were assessed against SafeWork NSW requirements.

How long the company had been performing the required service

This criteria was assessed to provide the panel confidence that the company had long term experience in managing these types of matters.

Quality assurance systems relating to sampling and testing

Sampling and testing form an integral part of Council’s asbestos Management Framework. Decisions on worker safety and community exposure are determined on the results from sampling and testing. As such it is vital that the quality of sampling and testing meets legislative requirements and Australian Standards.

Use of sub-contractors

The use of sub-contractors was also considered. The use of sub-contractors can be managed; however, it is likely to involve greater project management from Council during each incident and as such, it was viewed more favourably if tenderers did not rely on sub-contractors to deliver the required service.

 

 

Each company was provided a score 1 -10 on each criteria based on the panels review of their submission. After this process was completed, the top 6 tenderers were taken through to the short-listed tenderer’s review.

 

With consideration to the above evaluation criteria, each company fell into three groups. These are:

 

Group 1 – Tenderer’s within Group One were culled due to poor responses to tender requirements, lack of experience in government related work, number, qualifications and experience of staff available to respond to asbestos matters, standard of asbestos registers and asbestos management plans and concerns with integration with Councils Asbestos Management Framework.

 

·    ADE Consulting Group Pty Ltd

·    Akai Renga Ltd

·    Asset Geotechnical Engineering Pty Ltd

·    Aurecon Australasia Pty Ltd

·    Australasia Safety Services Pty Ltd

·    ClearSafe Environmental Solutions Pty Ltd

·    Coffey Services Australia Pty Ltd

·    Douglas Partners Pty Ltd

·    EP Risk Management Pty Ltd

·    Greenplus Worldwide Pty Ltd

·    Integrated Environmental Pty Ltd

·    JMB Environmental Consulting Pty Ltd

·    Newcastle Asbestos Consulting Pty Ltd

·    Riskology Pty Ltd

·    Site Environmental and Remediation Services (WA) Pty Ltd

·    The Trustee of ELS Trust

·    WSP Australian Pty Ltd

 

 

Group 2 – All provided appropriate responses to the tender requirements and showed demonstrated ability to complete the work required of this tender. However, after the overall scores were tallied, this group scored lower than Group 3 and were therefore culled.

 

·    EHO Consulting Pty Ltd

·    Hibbs and Associates Pty Ltd

·    JTA Health and Safety and Noise Specialists

·    Regional Enviroscience Pty Ltd

·    SLR Consulting Pty Ltd

 

Group 3 – All tender’s in this group provided very good responses to the tender requirements and showed that they had the ability to complete the work required of this tender. The overall scores collated through the aforementioned evaluation processes showed that this group was to move forward as the shortlist candidates.

 

·    Greencap Pty Ltd

·    Alliance Geotechnical Pty Ltd

·    Trinitas Group Pty Ltd

·    EDP Consultants Pty Ltd

·    Getex Pty Ltd

·    Presna Pty Ltd

 

Short Listed Tenderers

 

The third-round review was based on the review and comparison of the pricing schedules provided by the top 6 tenderers. As the services covered in this tender are covered by hourly rates, it was important to ensure adequate consideration was given to how long the service would take to perform, if travel time was included and how many people would be involved.

 

The below ‘Monthly Price’ was based only on hourly rates provided by each tenderer. Based on the nature of asbestos incident management, it was not possible for the pricing schedule to outline how long each job would take or how many staff would be involved. In addition, some tenderer’s included travel time in their hourly rate while others did not.

 

To assist with the costing review, the pricing provided below is based on a standard set of work over a month. This allowed a standardised approach to evaluate the prices provided by each of the selected companies. In addition, each of the 6 tenderers were provided a scenario to allow the panel to compare how much it would cost each company to undertake the works prescribed in that scenario.

 

 

Company

Monthly Price

Scenario Cost

Notes

Greencap Pty Ltd

$8800

$480

Average monthly price was considered acceptable.

Scenario based cost was acceptable and benchmarked well against other tenders.

Alliance Geotechnical Pty Ltd

$8070

$330

Average monthly price was considered acceptable.

Scenario based cost was acceptable and benchmarked well against other tenders.

Trinitas Group Pty Ltd

$6130

$450

Average monthly price was considered acceptable.

Scenario based cost was acceptable and benchmarked well against other tenders.

EDP Consultants Pty Ltd

$8395

$880

Average monthly price was considered acceptable.

However, the scenario-based cost was not acceptable and did not benchmark well against other tenders.

Getex Pty Ltd

$9620

$450

Average monthly price was considered acceptable.

The scenario-based cost was acceptable and benchmarked well against other tenders.

Presna Pty Ltd

$16800

$855

Average monthly price was considered unacceptable.

The scenario-based cost was not acceptable and did not benchmark well against other tenders.

 

Evaluation of the Preferred Tenderers

 

Based on the evaluation process outlined above, it was determined that each of the companies below demonstrated to the satisfaction of the panel that they had the ability to complete the work outlined in this tender. In turn, each company also demonstrated that their pricing schedules were reasonable and in line with market value.

 

It is recommended that each of the following companies be placed on a panel (without ranking) to provide the services outlined in the tender. Suitable operational procedures will be established to monitor contract performance and to ensure each company is provided equal opportunities across the scope of the service.

 

·    Trinitas Group Pty Ltd

·    Alliance Geotechnical

·    Getex Pty Ltd

·    Greencap Pty Ltd

Appropriate monitoring and mitigation procedures, including financial controls, will be implemented to ensure that the contracts pose minimal risk to Council.

Financial Services Manager’s Comment

Included in the assessment of tenders was the commissioning of independent reference checks, financial analysis, and performance analysis on Trinitas Group Pty Ltd, Alliance Geotechnical, Getex Pty Ltd, and Greencap Pty Ltd. These checks were completed by Corporate Scorecard Pty Ltd and have been reviewed by Financial Services. Based on this review, concerns were raised as to the ability of some of the tenderers to perform the services described. Appropriate monitoring and mitigation procedures, including financial controls, will be implemented to ensure that the contracts pose minimal risk to Council. The services provided for in this tender will be funded from within current asset operational budgets and projects as required.

Tender Advisory Group Comments

The objective of the Tender Advisory Group (TAG) is to support the Council to achieve fair and equitable tender processes. The TAG, consisting of John Gordon – Acting Director City Services, Glenn McCarthy - Governance Manager, Neil Farquharson – Financial Services Manager and Lana Axford – Supply Coordinator were briefed on the background and the process followed to establish a panel to provide asbestos consulting services. The TAG considered the recommendations in relation to the tender, noting that the four companies recommended to be included on the panel are considered to be the most capable of providing the services required and offer the most advantageous proposals to Council. The TAG reviewed the evaluation process outlined within the report and is satisfied that the selection criteria have been correctly applied in making the recommendations.

Conclusion

Six tenders were short listed based on a range of criteria. Of those it is recommended that the following four companies be placed on a panel (without ranking) to provide the services outlined in the tender:

 

·    Trinitas Group Pty Ltd

·    Alliance Geotechnical

·    Getex Pty Ltd

·    Greencap Pty Ltd

 

Suitable operational procedures will be established to monitor contract performance and to ensure each company is provided equal opportunities across the scope of the service.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on RFT18/19-20 Asbestos Consulting Services be received.

2.    A panel of experts for asbestos consulting services be established that includes Trinitas Group Pty Ltd, Alliance Geotechnical, Getex Pty Ltd and Greencap Pty Ltd.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.  


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


Outcome 5 - We care about our environment

 

Item                                                                                                                                                Page

 

7        Hawkesbury River County Council (HRCC) Additional Maintenance Funding               45

 

 

 



Ordinary Meeting                                                                                               26 August 2019

 

 

 

7

Hawkesbury River County Council (HRCC) Additional Maintenance Funding   

 

Compiled by:               Murray  Halls, Acting City Presentation Manager

Authorised by:            John Gordon, Acting Director - City Services 

Requested By:            Councillor Marcus Cornish

 

Outcome

We care for our environment

Strategy

Protect the environment of our City

Service Activity

Maintain Council's natural areas

      

 

Executive Summary

At the Policy Review Committee Meeting of 11 March 2019, following a presentation by the General Manager of Hawkesbury River County Council (HRCC), Council resolved that a further report be presented to Council for it to consider increasing its annual contribution of $175,000 to HRCC by $25,000 to total $200,000.

 

This report seeks Council’s approval for $25,000 additional annual funding to HRCC.

 

The additional $25,000 in funding will be used to increase the removal of targeted weeds within roadside reserves and open space areas specifically within the Penrith LGA.  These works will be managed by HRCC. These funds will not be an additional contribution to HRCC’s general funding pool.

Background

In March 2019, the General Manager of Hawkesbury River County Council (HRCC), provided Council with an update on HRCC’s role in administering the Biosecurity Act 2015 requirements for its four member Councils – Penrith City Council, Blacktown City Council, Hawkesbury Council and the Hills Shire Council. The update also provided an overview of HRCC’s Community Based Social Marketing (CBSM) approach to weed management education, including an overview of the planned education activities for Penrith.

 

Council’s 2019/20 contribution to HRCC is $180,199.  This annual contribution is indexed and provides HRCC with necessary funding from member councils to undertake weed management across the region, with a focus on early detection of new incursions and containment of high-risk plant species that impact on biodiversity, agriculture and property. 

 

In addition to the $180,199 annual capital funding, Council has received a ‘one-off’ request from HRCC for an additional $10,000 to assist with it’s Landcare Program in the current financial year.

 

Following the HRCC presentation, Council resolved that a further report be presented to allow consideration of a $25,000 increase in the 2019/20 contribution.  This additional funding will be used to increase the removal of targeted weeds within roadside reserves and open space areas specifically within the Penrith LGA by HRCC and not as an additional contribution to HRCC’s general funding pool.

 

It is proposed that the funds be initially allocated for 1-year and be the subject of a further report to Council on the outcomes achieved.  This report would guide future funding decisions of Council to HRCC.

 

Financial Services Manager’s Comments

 

Should Council support the 1-year trial proposed in this report, sufficient funding is contained in the Environment / Sullage reserve which has a predicted closing balance of $215,213 for the 2019-20 financial year prior to this allocation. Use of the Environment reserve is considered appropriate given the proposed projects environmental nexus. The funding source would need to be re-evaluated if the program is to continue beyond the trial period.

 

Conclusion

 

That Council consider providing HRCC with an additional $25,000 from its 2019/20 budget. These funds will be used to increase the removal of targeted weeds within selected roadside reserves and open spaces areas specifically within the Penrith LGA by HRCC’s contractor.

 

Funding for the 1 year trial to be sourced from the Environment/Sullage reserve.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Hawkesbury River County Council (HRCC) Additional Maintenance Funding be received.

2.    Council consider providing the Hawkesbury River County Council in 2019/20 with an additional $25,000 for a project aimed at increasing removal of priority weeds within selected road reserves and open spaces areas specifically within the Penrith LGA.

3.    A further report be provided to Council on the outcomes of the 1-year trial project.

4.    Funding for the 1 year trial to be sourced from the Environment/Sullage reserve.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.  


Outcome 6 - We are healthy and share strong community spirit

 

Item                                                                                                                                                Page

 

8        Community Assistance Program Planned Component 2019-20                                     49

 

9        Feasibility of Preparing Plans for Small Sporting Clubs                                                  59

 

 

 

 



Ordinary Meeting                                                                                               26 August 2019

 

 

 

8

Community Assistance Program Planned Component 2019-20   

 

Compiled by:               Casey Holtom, Community Projects Officer - Social Sustainability

Authorised by:            Tracy Leahy, Acting Community and Cultural Development Manager  

 

Outcome

We are healthy and share strong community spirit

Strategy

Provide opportunities for our community to be healthy and active

Service Activity

Deliver programs and work with government and community organisations to improve health and wellbeing

      

 

Executive Summary

This report informs Council of the applications received in the 2019-20 Planned Component of the Community Assistance Program (CAP).

Council has an annual Community Assistance Program through which small grants are provided to non-profit organisations and community groups to meet local community needs. CAP enables many organisations and groups across the City to deliver activities, programs and events that build community capacity and contribute to the wellbeing of our communities. Each application under the program can be for up to $1,200. The available budget is $40,000.

Council received 58 applications requesting a total of $64,356 from a diverse range of organisations that provide services to residents across all areas within the Penrith LGA. Of these, 50 have been recommended with a high ranking for either full or part funding as outlined in Table 2 of this report. The total amount recommended for funding is $40,435. It is proposed that the shortfall of $435 be taken from the Rolling Component of the Community Assistance Program, which has a total budget in 2019-20 of $ 8,746.

The remaining 8 applications have been assigned a low ranking. A rationale against the assessment criteria for the low ranking applications is provided at Appendix 1. All applicants are offered feedback on their application, including advice for unsuccessful applicants to improve their application and possible alternative funding sources for their project.

The report recommends that the information contained in the report on the CAP Planned Component 2019-20 be received and that Council approve funding as outlined in this report for an amount totalling $40,435.

Background

As CAP celebrates a quarter of a century in 2019, this achievement also celebrates the reach and impact of CAP in the communities of Penrith. With small grants provided by Council over the last twenty-five years, local groups have delivered hundreds of projects across the City and impacted many thousands of residents.

For relatively small amounts of money, CAP provides a significant impact, from important resources to keep volunteer groups going and get new groups started, to cultural celebrations for the whole community to come together. CAP supports organisations to meet local community needs, building community capacity and contributing to the wellbeing of our communities. By funding local groups to run local activities, CAP provides opportunities for residents to get involved in their local community, including through volunteering and helping others.

There are two components of the Community Assistance Program:

·    Planned Component –

Undertaken once a year, the Planned Component supports local community organisations with funds for programs and activities planned for the current financial year. The majority of CAP funds ($40,000) are allocated under the Planned Component.

·    Rolling Component –

Recognising that not all funding needs can be foreseen, the Rolling Component allows for one-off requests to be considered by Council at any time during the year. This provides a flexible supplement to the Planned Component of the program. The Rolling Component has a total budget of $ 8,746 in 2019-20.

Eligibility and Assessment Criteria

All projects must satisfy the following eligibility criteria to be eligible for CAP funding:

·    Community based non-profit organisations providing one off activities

·    Direct benefit to, and participation by, Penrith City residents

·    Project and project management in line with Council’s Access and Equity Principles.

Fundraising programs or organisations whose main role is to fundraise are not eligible.

Recommendations for funding are made according to the assessment criteria listed below:

·    How effectively the proposed project addresses priority social needs of Penrith City residents;

·    The expected outcomes and beneficiaries of the project, ensuring the distribution of funds to meet the needs of the diverse communities of Penrith City;

·    The willingness of the applicant to work collaboratively with residents and other community groups;

·    How effectively the proposed project contributes to capacity in the community or community groups;

·    The capacity of the applicant to access alternative resources or funding for the proposed project, including whether the proposed project is a core responsibility of an existing Government funded program;

·    How achievable and cost-effective the proposed project is.

All Planned and Rolling Component applications are assessed against these eligibility and assessment criteria, which were reviewed and endorsed by Council in July 2018.

2019-20 Planned Component

The 2019-20 CAP Planned Component funding round opened for five weeks between 7 June and 17 July, with promotion via the Western Weekender, Council’s website and social media, as well as local community networks and interagencies. To apply, an application form must be submitted, identifying project objectives, population target groups, budget and benefits to the local community.

 

As part of our commitment to building the skills of local community groups, Community and Cultural Development and Neighbourhood Renewal officers worked together to host two events for interested applicants. Over 40 community members attended the Grant Info Session on 10 May to learn about a range of Council grant programs including Heritage Assistance, Hall Hire Fee Waiver, Travel Assistance for amateur sportspersons and Arts or cultural representatives, Magnetic Places and CAP. A Grant Writing Workshop was held a week later on 17 May, with nearly 30 participants attending to learn about how grants work and how to improve their grant applications. Due to the positive response from the community, we are planning to host both events again in 2020 to improve access to and understanding of assistance available for local community groups. In addition, all CAP applicants are offered feedback on their application, including advice on possible alternative funding sources for unsuccessful applications.

 

In this round, Council received 58 applications requesting a total of $64,356, significantly exceeding the available budget which is $40,000.

Applications Highly Ranked for Funding

Of the 58 applications received, 50 have been recommended with a high ranking for funding, either for the requested amount, or an adjusted amount considering the merit of the project. Where there is a recommendation for part funding, we have considered information provided in the application form including the project budget and the response to the question; “If your Group only received part of the requested funding, would your Project still be able to go ahead? How would you change the Project so that it could still happen?

 

The total amount recommended for funding is $40,435. Table 2 below is a summary of all projects with a high ranking that are recommended for funding.

Table 2 – Highly Ranked for Funding

No

Group

Project Title

Project Description

Amount Requested

Amount Recommended

1

Adele House

Art My Way

Art therapy for men affected by addiction, to support recovery and independence.

$915

$750

2

Barnardos Penrith Children's Family Centre

Barnardos Open Day

Open day in Cranebrook with a fair atmosphere to promote and strengthen community engagement.

$1,200

$1,000

3

Bridging the Gap

RAGE Anger Management Program

6 week program in St Marys for young males 12 - 25 years to learn strategies to manage anger.

$1,200

$1,200

4

Bridging the Gap

Worth Strength Purpose

8 week resilience building program in St Marys for vulnerable women.

$1,200

$1,200

5

Cancer Wellness Support

Arty Bra Metamorphosis

Art exhibitions and auction with the purpose of providing subsided therapies for people who are living with cancer, their families and carers.

$1,200

$1,000

6

Caring Hearts Community Quilters

Electronic Communications

Laptop to support communication with members, organisation of quilt show, sourcing ideas for quilt patterns and record-keeping.

$1,000

$500

7

Checkyourtackle

Nuts and Bolts Men's Health

Men's Health and Wellbeing Day during Men's Health Week June 2020.

$1,200

$1,000

8

Community Junction Inc - Neighbourhood Centres

The Welcome Project

Work with local groups to make welcome signs for neighbourhood centres to welcome diverse community members.

$1,100

$800

9

Community Junction Inc - North St Marys

School Holiday Eggstravaganza

Free school holiday program in North St Marys for the local community, with free Easter activities and games for children and young people.

$1,170

$1,000

10

Community Junction Inc - St Clair

Messy Play Fun Day

A free event in St Clair for families with primary school aged children to explore messy play, enjoy food and access information and services.

$1,000

$750

11

Community Junction Inc - Werrington

Clothes to Conquer

Corporate outfits for job interviews or court cases, for women and men who are financially unable to purchase suitable clothing.

$1,200

$1,200

12

Community Junction Inc - Youth Team

Friday Night Youth Outings

Bring together young people from across Colyton, Erskine Park, North St Marys, St Clair and Werrington youth spaces for joint activities and experiences.

$1,200

$1,000

13

Community Junction Inc - Youth Team

St Clair Youth Space - Mural Design

Design and create a new mural to put on the front wall at St Clair Youth Centre.

$1,200

$600

14

COTA NSW

Make your older residents stronger and more independent

Upskilling local exercise professionals to safely and effectively deliver strength and balance sessions for older adults.

$1,200

$600

15

Craft Circle

Craft group for women

Equipment and materials for group in Caddens to use making items to support charities, homeless people, women and children leaving domestic violence. Auspiced by Penrith Baptist Church.

$1,200

$600

16

Empowerability Castlereagh Community Support Program

Photography Art Program

Photography art therapy program in Castlereagh for people with a disability to express themselves and communicate through a visual form.

$1,200

$600

17

Kingswood Community Working Group

Eid Festival

Community celebration to build awareness of diverse cultures and traditions, encourage community pride and overcome social isolation.

$1,200

$1,000

18

Kingswood Park Public School P&C

Kingswood Park Moonlight Cinema

Community movie and celebration in Kingswood Park, with information and activities provided by local services.

$1,200

$900

19

Llandilo Maltese Seniors Group

Cultural & Educational Presentations

IT equipment to provide the older people with information on health, wellbeing, cultural heritage and safety. Auspiced by Maltese Community Council Of NSW Inc.

$1,097

$800

20

Luke Priddis Foundation

Carers Lunch

Luncheon for carers for those with a disability, to build social connections and overcome isolation.

$1,200

$1,200

21

Mama Lana's Community Foundation

Portable Heaters for Outdoor Area

Portable gas heaters to keep homeless and disadvantaged community members warm during outside meals services 6 nights a week.

$1,107

$500

22

Mama Lana's Community Foundation

Xmas luncheon for disadvantaged in the Penrith LGA

Provide a Christmas luncheon and hampers for disadvantaged and homeless Penrith community members.

$1,200

$600

23

Messy Play Playgroup

Bringing the community together through play

Affordable playgroup in Jordan Springs for families, offering sensory activities.

$1,200

$500

24

Mini Movers

Mini Movers Equipment

Resources for sensory and musical play for toddlers in Caddens. Auspiced by Penrith Valley Community Care.

$1,149

$500

25

Nepalese Community of Western Sydney

nCOWS Dance & Fitness

Nepalese traditional dance lessons in Kingswood to promote culture and fitness.

$1,200

$600

26

Nepean Community & Neighbourhood Services - Closing the Gap Team

Health Awareness Workshops

A series of workshops that provides information about chronic conditions, for those living with the conditions and those that care for them.

$1,200

$1,200

27

Nepean Community & Neighbourhood Services - Cranebrook

Community Connections

Resources for volunteer group in Cranebrook that supports their local community through cooking and sewing.

$1,100

$550

28

Nepean Community & Neighbourhood Services - Early Childhood Team

Inclusive Fun Day 0-8yrs

Event for families in Cranebrook to stay engaged over the school holidays and get ideas for easy affordable activities to do at home.

$1,200

$900

29

Nepean Community & Neighbourhood Services - Early Childhood Team

Multicultural Music Box

Musical instruments from around the world, allowing children/families to be creative, express themselves, explore and discuss different cultures.

$1,200

$500

30

Nepean Community & Neighbourhood Services - Kingswood Park

KP Community Kids Connection

Develop a group of local children in Kingswood Park to organise, liaise and provide fun activities once a term for other children in the local park area.

$1,100

$900

31

Nepean Community & Neighbourhood Services - Youth Team

Art Tasters

Five art sessions in Cranebrook for young people hosted by a professional artist teaching new styles and techniques.

$1,200

$600

32

Penrith Gorillas Soccer Club

Sports Week

Indoor and outdoor sports events to bring together people from all backgrounds for social harmony, fun and fitness awareness.

$1,200

$600

33

Penrith Rainbow Families Playgroup

Playgroup

Resources for playgroup that fosters resiliency by connecting, supporting and empowering LGBTQI+ families. Auspiced by Rainbow Families.

$1,000

$1,000

34

Penrith Valley Rotary Club

Educational Aids for needy, mainly ATSI, students

Laptops and calculators to support educational participation of financially disadvantaged students at Kingswood High School

$1,200

$900

35

Platform Youth Services

Handy Stuff living skills program

Program to equip young people with basic living skills that may be missing due family environment and a history of adversity.

$1,200

$1,200

36

Riding for the Disabled Association (NSW) - Nepean Centre

Family Fun Day 2019 at RDA Nepean

Annual open day making inclusive access to horse related entertainment and activities available to local community.

$1,200

$900

37

St Clair and District Men's Shed Inc

Clean up our parks

Equipment to tidy up parks in St Clair, Erskine Park, Colyton and St Marys.

$470

$470

38

St Clair and District Men's Shed Inc

Membership Drive

Promotional banners and equipment to raise awareness and support lonely and isolated men in St Clair area to socialise and cooperate in community projects.

$671

$671

39

St Marys Area Community Development

Cherishing Food and Art

Learning healthy cooking and food sustainability, as well as pottery to make serving plates.

$1,200

$500

40

St Marys Interagency

Peace of Mind Expo 2020

Community event in St Marys with free activities and information on local support services. Auspiced by St Marys Area Community Development.

$1,000

$500

41

St Thomas' Anglican Church Cranebrook

Outside Play Storage Area for Community Group

Storage shed for educational toys and equipment for outside play in Cranebrook.

$294

$294

42

Sunnyfield

Creative Minds

Resources for arts, crafts, photography and scrap booking programs in St Marys for clients with intellectual disability.

$750

$750

43

Team Colyton

Colyton Carols

A free event hosted by Team Colyton to bring Colyton community together for an evening of local entertainment at Christmas. Auspiced by Community Junction Inc.

$1,200

$1,200

44

Tenant Advisory Group

Let’s Get Together

Two social gatherings organised by tenants for tenants of social housing. Auspiced by Wentworth Community Housing.

$1,200

$1,200

45

The Westies

West-Tea Talks

High tea and discussion aimed at creating connections and provoking deep conversation.

$1,200

$800

46

Thornton Community Group

Conversational English Class

Engage people isolated by language and cultural barriers by teaching written and spoken English in a supportive and inclusive community environment.

$1,200

$1,200

47

Thornton Community Group

Thornton Community Quarterly Clean-up

Equipment to clean up parks and public places in Thornton, bringing together community and building pride.

$500

$400

48

Thornton Community Group

Thornton Village Pop-Up Tea Room

Bring people in Thornton to together to connect with each other and local services which focus on their wellbeing.

$960

$800

49

Unity Support Group - Penrith Mum's Group

Diwali Deepavali Festival

Community event in Glenmore Park to build community pride, community participation and cultural awareness in community. Auspiced by Harman Foundation.

$1,200

$800

50

Wentworth Community Housing

Garden Flat Seminar

Seminar to raise awareness and support private homeowners to rent out garden flats to people who are homeless or at risk of homelessness.

$1,200

$1,200

 

The remaining 8 applications did not sufficiently meet the assessment criteria and have been allocated a low ranking. These are listed in Appendix 1 with a rationale for the low ranking.

Conclusion

Council received 58 applications requesting a total of $64,356 for CAP funding in the 2019-20 Planned Component. The available budget for the CAP Planned Component is $40,000. After careful consideration against the identified criteria, 50 projects totalling $40,435 have been ranked highly and are recommended for funding. It is proposed to take the additional $435 from the available Rolling Component budget of the Community Assistance Program.

The projects recommended for funding cover a range of target groups and suburbs across the city. These projects address many different social needs, including several city-wide initiatives as well as projects targeted to improve access to opportunities for disadvantaged community members.

A Mayoral Certificate Presentation to all successful recipients is planned for 27 September 2019. The presentation event celebrates the significant contribution that local community groups make to Penrith City. The 2018 event was highlighted by a strong sense of community and mutual achievement, and the 2019 event will be a valuable opportunity to learn more about the many, varied groups and their work.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Community Assistance Program Planned Component 2019-20 be received.

2.    Council approve funding the highly ranked applications and amounts totalling $40,435 as outlined in Table 2 of this report with $40,000 allocated from the Planned Component and $435 allocated from the Rolling Component of the 2019-20 Community Assistance Program.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

Community Assistance Program 2019-20 Planned Component - Low Ranked Applications

2 Pages

Appendix

  


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                            26 August 2019

Appendix 1 - Community Assistance Program 2019-20 Planned Component - Low Ranked Applications

 

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Ordinary Meeting                                                                                               26 August 2019

 

 

 

9

Feasibility of Preparing Plans for Small Sporting Clubs   

 

Compiled by:               Andrew Robinson, Community Facilities and Recreation Manager

Authorised by:            John Gordon, Acting Director - City Services 

Requested By:            Councillor Todd Carney

 

Outcome

We are healthy and share strong community spirit

Strategy

Provide opportunities for our community to be healthy and active

Service Activity

Support sport and recreation partners

      

 

Executive Summary

This report has been prepared in response to Councillor Carney’s request for information about the feasibility of preparing plans for small sporting clubs so they have something ready for grant applications when they become available.

 

Council Officers have assisted 41 community sports organisations to enable them to submit 78 grant applications, to NSW Government, Federal Government and State Sports Organisation grant programs, in the last five years (2015-2019, selected as a sample time period).

 

During the same 5-year time period, Council Officers have collaborated with clubs and Associations to enable Council to directly submit 28 of its own grant applications.

 

Council Officers have worked with the community sports organisations and Associations by providing; notification of upcoming grant programs, initial planning advice and coordination of site inspections, opinions of probable cost, estimates and quotes, indicative concept designs, assistance with writing responses to enable the grant program criteria and objectives to be met, and letters of support as well as land owners consent.

 

Council’s Asset Management Department is currently developing a set of standardised specifications for a range of sporting infrastructure including buildings, playing surfaces and associated infrastructure. When finalised, these documents will be available to community sporting organisations to include, or refer to, as part of any application for grant funding to improve their sporting facilities.

 

The report recommends that the information provided be received. It also recommends that Council’s Community Facilities and Recreation Department continue to promote grant opportunities to community sports clubs and Associations and support the completion of grant applications for sport infrastructure and services.

 

Background

 

Since 2015, Council and community sports organisations have been successful through applications to NSW Government, Federal Government and State Sports Organisation grant programs. Each program has its own eligibility criteria and required deliverables. The programs have included:

 

 

 

NSW Government

 

§  2019 My Community Project

§  2015 – 2018 Community Building Partnership Program

§  2016 – 2018 Local Sport Grant Program

§  2018 Greater Sydney Sports Facility Fund

§  2018 ICC T20 2020 Cricket Legacy Fund

§  2017 – 2018 Local Sport Defibrillator Grant Program

§  2017 - 2018 Asian Cup 2015 Legacy Fund

 

Australian Government

 

§  Sport Australia 2018 Community Sport Infrastructure Program

§  2015 Stronger Communities Fund

 

State Sports Organisations

 

§  2018 Australian Cricket Infrastructure Fund

§  NSW Cricket 2017 Community Facilities Fund

 

Current Situation

 

Council Officers have worked with local sporting clubs and Associations to provide initial planning advice and coordination of site inspections, opinion of probable costs, estimates and quotes, indicative concept designs assistance in writing responses to best meet the grant program criteria and objectives, letters of support including land owner’s approval.

 

When providing indicative concept designs for building projects, this has been to a level to allow consideration by the grant administrators and are typically based on facility guidelines of the sport (if available) and designs and specifications previously developed for other similar projects, tailored to the specific project site if required. 

 

In the last 5 years, Council Officers have worked with clubs and Associations to leverage grant funding available within existing Council budget programs including Local Open Space Developer Contributions, Building Asset Renewal Program, Parks Asset Renewal Program, Grants Reserve and, the Telecommunication Access Fund. Clubs and associations have also, on occasion contributed funds to projects. In many cases, contributing funds have not been required for club submitted grant applications with these being made for the full amount of the project.

 

In summary, Council Officers have assisted club and Associations submit 78 grant applications which, in some instances, have included multiple project elements. Projects have included.

 

§  14 irrigation and sports field renovations;

§  13 fencing, seating or shade installations;

§  28 applications for amenity upgrades, including canteens and requests for additional storage;

§  4 baseball facility improvement projects (batting cage, seating, diamonds, dug outs);

§  2 softball facility improvement projects;

§  5 sports field floodlight upgrades;

§  9 Cricket Practice wicket and long jump run upgrades, and

§  7 defibrillators.

 

A full list of projects has been included in Attachment 1.

 

During the same time period Council has directly submitted 28 grant applications, which, in some instances, have included multiple project elements. Projects have included;

 

§  7 irrigation and sports field renovations;

§  17 applications for amenity upgrades, including canteens and requests for additional storage;

§  2 softball facility improvement projects;

§  10 sports field floodlight upgrades;

§  1 cricket wicket installation;

§  4 synthetic sportsground applications.

 

A full list of projects has been included in Attachment 2.

Council’s Asset Management Department is currently developing a set of standardised specifications for a range of sporting infrastructure including buildings, playing surfaces and associated infrastructure. When finalised, these documents will be available to community sporting organisations to include, or refer to, as part of any application for grant funding to improve their sporting facilities.

 

Conclusion

 

Council Officers regularly communicate with sports clubs and Associations to determine future facility needs and provide advice and support to capitalise on opportunities afforded by grants programs, and to best maximise and leverage Council resources. 

 

Council Officers, in addition to developing a set of standard specifications for a range of sporting infrastructure, also continue to encourage sports to coordinate the development of prioritised facility plans. Combined this will better enable a more proactive approach to future Council resource allocation and grant applications.

 

In addition to the support provided to clubs and Associations by Council Officers, there are a range of resources available through NSW Office of Sport, Sport NSW, Sport Australia, State and National Sports Organisations, and agencies such as Sport Community.  Periodically, these organisations offer workshops for facility planning, grant writing and the like. Council Officers will continue to endeavour to increase the capacity of local sports clubs and organisations to submit grant applications capitalising on the opportunities and resources currently available in this regard.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Feasibility of Preparing Plans for Small Sporting Clubs be received

2.    Council’s Community Facilities and Recreation Department continue to promote grant opportunities to community sports clubs and Associations and support the completion of grant applications for sport infrastructure and services.

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

Club and Association Grant Applications Supported by Council

3 Pages

Appendix

2.

Grant Applications Submitted by Council

2 Pages

Appendix

  


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                            26 August 2019

Appendix 1 - Club and Association Grant Applications Supported by Council

 

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Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                            26 August 2019

Appendix 2 - Grant Applications Submitted by Council

 

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Outcome 7 - We have confidence in our Council

 

Item                                                                                                                                                Page

 

10      Dedication of Council Land for Road Widening Purposes - Erskine Park Road Upgrade                                                                                                                                            71

 

11      Results of the 2019 Community Satisfaction Survey                                                      74

 

12      Local Government Rating Review - IPART Final Report                                                78

 

13      Organisational Performance and Financial Review - June 2019                                    88

 

14      Regional Strategic Alliance                                                                                              94

 

15      Summary of Investments & Banking for the Period 1 July 2019 to 31 July 2019           98

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



Ordinary Meeting                                                                                               26 August 2019

 

 

 

10

Dedication of Council Land for Road Widening Purposes - Erskine Park Road Upgrade   

 

Compiled by:               Karen  Luka , Senior Development Manager

Authorised by:            Nathan Ritchie, Property Development Manager  

 

Outcome

We have confidence in our Council

Strategy

Manage our money and our assets to be sustainable now and into the future

Service Activity

Provide property services and manage community and commercial requests for the use of Council owned or controlled land

      

 

Executive Summary

This report seeks Council’s concurrence for the dedication of several parcels of community land for the purposes of road widening associated with the intersection upgrades required as part of the Erskine Park Road and Bennett Road, St Clair upgrade works.

Background

The Australian Government is funding a $200 Million Local Roads Package (LRP) as part of the Western Sydney Infrastructure Plan (WSIP). Funding of $25.7 Million has been allocated for Council to improve road safety and traffic flow efficiency at key intersections along Erskine Park Road.

 

The intersections and works include: -

1.   Erskine Park Road and Bennett Road Intersection – upgrade the intersection and install new traffic signals.

2.   Erskine Park Road and Peppertree Drive Intersection – upgrade the existing intersection to a new seagull intersection.

3.   Erskine Park Road and Coonawarra Drive Intersection – upgrade the existing intersection to a new seagull intersection.

4.   Erskine Park Road & Explorers Way Intersection – upgrade the intersection and install new traffic signals.

5.   Erskine Park Road between Coonawarra Drive and Bennett Road – upgrade to four lane median separated dual carriageway (two lanes in each direction) and new shared user path.

 

At the completion of the upgrade, Erskine Park Road will be a four lane dual carriageway road between Bennett Road and Explorers Way to join the existing four lane section towards the M4 Motorway and Swallow Drive.

 

The upgrade will significantly improve road safety and traffic efficiency.

Property Acquisition

To facilitate delivery of the upgrades, acquisition of one property and partial acquisition of three properties is required for road widening.

 

The proposed acquisitions are shown in Annexure 1 and comprise the following: -

 

a)   Lot 8169 DP 260615 comprising an area of 854.7m² being 285 Bennett Rd St Clair

b)   Part Lot 1114 DP 709078 comprising an area of 255.8m² being 186 Erskine Park Rd Erskine Park

c)   Part Lot 4 DP 32285 comprising an area of 920.4m² being 4 Erskine Park Rd Erskine Park

d)   Part Lot 9141 DP261 572 comprising an area of 1014.9m² being 185 Explorers Way

Road Dedication

Under Section 47F(2)(a) of the Local Government Act 1993, Council is permitted to dedicate community land as public road for the purpose of widening an existing public road.

 

Upon endorsement of the road dedication by Council, the survey plan will be registered, and the proposed lots will be gazetted as public road in accordance with the provisions of Section 10 of the Roads Act 1993.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Dedication of Council Land for Road Widening Purposes - Erskine Park Road Upgrade be received

2.    Council dedicate:

a.   Lot 8169 DP 260615 comprising an area of 854.7m² being 285 Bennett Rd St Clair

b.   Part Lot 1114 DP 709078 comprising an area of 255.8m² being 186 Erskine Park Rd Erskine Park

c.   Part Lot 4 DP 32285 comprising an area of 920.4m² being 4 Erskine Park Rd Erskine Park

d.   Part Lot 9141 DP261 572 comprising an area of 1014.9m² being 185 Explorers Way

 

for the purposes of Public Road and Gazette the land as public road in accordance with the terms and conditions listed in the report.

3.    The Common Seal of the Council of the City of Penrith be placed on all necessary documentation.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

Erskine Park Rd Acquisitions Map

1 Page

Appendix

  


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                            26 August 2019

Appendix 1 - Erskine Park Rd Acquisitions Map

 


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                               26 August 2019

 

 

 

11

Results of the 2019 Community Satisfaction Survey   

 

Compiled by:               Snezana  Gorgieva, Corporate Planner

Allegra Zakis, Corporate Planning Coordinator 

Authorised by:            Andrew Moore, Director - Corporate Services  

 

Outcome

We have confidence in our Council

Strategy

Keep our community informed about what Council is doing  and how they can have their say in decisions that affect them

Service Activity

Ensure our corporate planning documents reflect how council will respond to community needs within organisational capacity

      

 

Executive Summary

The 2019 Community Satisfaction Research Report (separate enclosure) showed residents are significantly more satisfied with Council’s performance than in 2017, with 90% of residents indicating they are at least somewhat satisfied with Council’s overall performance in the past 12 months. Looking forward, residents continue to be most concerned about the impacts of population growth, with traffic congestion, managing urban sprawl and ensuring infrastructure caters to population growth identified as the top challenges facing Penrith’s future.

Background

Every two years, Council contracts a research company to conduct an independent random telephone survey of a statistically representative sample of Penrith City residents. The research data informs Council’s understanding of community levels of satisfaction and importance with 35 services and facilities, community wellbeing and general performance. The information is used as part of tracking our progress towards achieving the seven Community Plan Outcomes and assessing the effectiveness of the Delivery Program.

Research Sample

A research sample of 551 Penrith residents was independently selected using computer based random selection and number harvesting through face to face contact in various high foot traffic locations across the LGA. A representative cross-section of the community was interviewed, with age, gender, cultural diversity, ward and area (established urban, release and rural) reflecting the ABS community profile of Penrith. 

Research Methodology

Research participants were engaged in a 20-minute phone interview between 22 March to 2 April 2019. In previous years, community research was conducted using a 10-point rating scale. To reduce sampling error and align Penrith’s community satisfaction research with industry standards the 2019 survey was conducted using a 5-point rating scale. To inform trend and performance comparisons Micromex recalculated and reported previous years’ results to a 5-point scale.

Research Results

Overall, 2019 research findings reported increased levels of community satisfaction with Council’s performance since 2017. In the last 12 months 54% of the research sample had contacted Council, with 87% stating they were at least somewhat satisfied with the customer service they received. Residents were at least moderately satisfied with 30 out of 35 key services and facilities provided by Council, and at least 90% reported to be at least somewhat satisfied with Council’s overall performance in the last 12 months. Comparisons with the research consultant’s LGA metro data indicate Council performed marginally higher than the benchmark..

n = 551

Value for the rate dollar

Value for rate dollar is used to gauge if residents believe they are receiving value for money for their rate payments, 64% of residents stated services and facilities provided by Council are ‘good’ to ‘excellent’ value. Residents in established urban areas who have lived in the area for more than 10 years were significantly more likely to rate the value in the rate dollar high, while residents from rural areas who have lived in the area for more than 10 years were significantly more likely to rate it low.

n  = 551

The NSW State Government is currently reviewing the local government rating system. Council is preparing a submission advocating for changes to the legislation to allow for additional rate structure options that could deliver some fairer ways of providing lower rates for rural property owners.

 

Quality of life

The community indicated positive feelings towards everyday life in Penrith, with 90% of residents rating their overall quality of life to be ‘good’ to ‘excellent’. A total of 8 (2%) residents stated life in Penrith to be ‘very poor’ or ‘poor’. Most of these people have been a Penrith resident for more than 10 years and are more likely to live in a rural area.     

When asked what residents valued most about life in Penrith, the community reported location (proximity to city, services, work and facilities), the natural environment and the peacefulness of the area as cherished aspects of the LGA.

Importance

Residents were asked to score the importance of 35 Council services and facilities. The importance of each service was rated between ‘not very important’ to ‘very important’.

Household waste management was reported to be of greatest importance to the community, with 77% of residents scoring the service as ‘very important’. Residents who have lived in Penrith for more than 10 years were significantly more likely to rate the service of higher importance.

Library services received the ‘lowest’ importance score, with 55% of residents scoring the service as ‘important’ or higher. Library services was one of only two services with reported importance scores significantly decreasing since 2017. It is imperative to note although the service was rated of ‘lowest’ relative importance, library services was still at the high end of the 5-point scale scoring 3.52.

Provision of car parking was the other service that experienced a significant decrease in level of importance since 2017, with an importance score of 4.24 reported in 2019. Further research and service monitoring would need to be undertaken to better understand the importance trend, with the following potentially contributing to the decrease:

-     meeting car park provision needs through the delivery of North Street’s 243 car spaces and 2019-21 planned car park projects,

-     meeting community parking type expectations, and

-     community parking expectations changing, with more residents willing to walk further to a destination from a parking area since the expected 1-5 minute walk reported by 51% of residents in the 2017 follow up community research.

Satisfaction

Residents who rated service or facility a 4 or 5 in importance were asked a follow up question around their satisfaction with that service or facility.

Ease of traffic flow received the lowest satisfaction score, with 42% of residents who reported the service of high importance reported they were ‘not at all satisfied’ or ‘not very satisfied’ with the service. Library services received the highest satisfaction rating, with 80% of residents reporting they were ‘satisfied’ or ‘very satisfied’ with the service. A significant increase in satisfaction was reported for library services since 2017, with the service being scored a 4.18 satisfaction rating in 2019. All areas in the Penrith LGA equally rated the service with high satisfaction scores.

Household waste management experienced the most significant declining trend in satisfaction since 2017. Influencing factors in the significant decrease could potentially be attributed to the significant increase in importance in 2019 and community perceptions associated with the new waste contract. Further research and service monitoring will be undertaken as part of the implementation of the new waste contract and the ‘reduce, reuse and recycle waste communication strategy’ to ensure the community’s waste service needs and perceived expectations are met.

 

Conclusion

 

The community satisfaction survey results continue to inform our understanding of community perceptions of Council’s service delivery. Our response to the survey is partly reflected in two 2019-20 Operational Plan actions, with a review of the Resourcing Strategy and talking to the community about the new Community Plan providing an opportunity to explore sustainable community service level expectations.

 

Furthermore, the finalisation of Council’s Engagement Strategy in November will identify community engagement preferences, define engagement principles and communicate Council’s decision processes to the community as well as stakeholders. Improving communication on Council services and activities as well as providing opportunities for informed engagement in Council’s decision making could influence a continued increasing trend in reported perceptions of community satisfaction with Council’s performance.     

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the information contained in the report on Results of the 2019 Community Satisfaction Survey be received

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                               26 August 2019

 

 

 

12

Local Government Rating Review - IPART Final Report   

 

Compiled by:               Matthew Saunders, Rates Coordinator

Authorised by:            Neil Farquharson, Financial Services Manager

Andrew Moore, Director - Corporate Services  

 

Outcome

We have confidence in our Council

Strategy

Manage our money and our assets to be sustainable now and into the future

Service Activity

Support financial sustainability through financial planning and budget management

      

 

Executive Summary

The NSW Government has released IPART’s Final Report into the Review of Local Government Rating, that was delivered to them in December 2016. Now that the report has been released, the NSW Government is calling for public submissions in response to the Report. Submissions are due by 13 September 2019.

 

There are 42 separate recommendations in the Final Report with the main recommendations that are significant for Penrith City Council being:

 

·    Changing to a Capital Improved Valuation method.

·    Removing the use of Minimum Rate structures (Only “Ad Valorem only” or

“Base Rate plus Ad Valorem” rate structures will be allowed)

·    Remove current Residential sub-category restrictions, allowing Residential sub-categories by residential areas (relevant for Rural property owners).

·    Allowing sub-categorisation of Business land as Industrial or Commercial.

·    Allowing sub-categorisation of Farmland by geographic area.

·    Reducing the time-frame when a property can be sold to recover unpaid rates from 5 to 3 years.

·    Removing postponement of rates to encourage urban development.

 

Some of the recommendations may give Council greater flexibility with setting rates, particularly for differential rates for Rural property owners through changes to sub-categorisation criteria. The proposed use of Capital Improved Values and a Base Rate structure may also provide rates relief for Rural owners by levelling out the rates base and reducing the impacts of rates increases for properties with mid-ranged values.

This report recommends that Council provide a submission to the Office of Local Government, which supports or partially supports a majority of the recommendations. The proposed submission is included as an attachment to this report.

The NSW Government has not indicated what the timeline will be for implementation of any of the recommendations but have said that they intend to carry out widespread consultation with residents, council staff, councillors, peak bodies and other key stakeholders before they finalise their response.

Background

Following Destination 2036, the NSW Government appointed a four-person taskforce to review the Local Government Act 1993 and the City of Sydney Act 1988. The taskforce looked at ways to modernise the legislation, to ensure that it would meet the future needs of councils and communities. The Taskforce completed its work in late 2013 and its final report and recommendations were exhibited for public comment in early 2014.

 

The NSW Government delivered its response to the recommendations of the Independent Panel and Acts Taskforce in September 2014, with the launch of the Fit for the Future package. One of the recommendations of the Panel was to review the Local Government Rating system.

 

In December 2015 the NSW Government directed the Independent Pricing and Regulatory Tribunal (IPART) to review the Rating legislation component of the NSW Local Government Act 1993. The Terms of Reference asked IPART to review:

 

1)    The rating burden across and within communities, including consideration of multi-unit

dwellings.

2)    The appropriateness and impact of current rating categories and exemptions, and mandatory concessions.

3)    The land valuation methodology used as the basis for determining rates in comparison to other jurisdictions.

4)    The capacity of a newly merged council to establish a new equitable rating system and transition to it in a fair and timely manner, and

5)    The objectives and design of the rating system according to recognised principles of taxation.

 

In April 2016 IPART released an Issues Paper in relation to the review and called for submissions from council’s and other stakeholders. Penrith City Council submitted a response to the Issues Paper in May 2016.

 

On 22 August 2016 IPART released their draft report to the NSW Government outlining their recommendations for changing the rating legislation. The report addressed some of the main concerns raised by the Council, particularly in relation to recommending the removal of some rate exemptions and removing council subsidised pensioner concessions. Penrith City Council made a submission on 14 October 2016.

 

A Final Report to the NSW Government was delivered by IPART in December 2016, however the Final Report was not released by the NSW Government until June 2019.

 

Due to the restrictions of the current Local Government Act that did not enable Council to modify the rates structure to deliver lower rates for Rural property owners, Penrith City Council made many representations to the NSW Government to bring in IPART’s proposed changes, and we also supported a Motion at the NSW Local Government conference in October 2018 for the NSW Government to release the Final Report.

 

Now that the Final Report has been released, the Government is asking for submissions in response to the recommendations and have set up an online form to take submissions in a set format only. The submission form asks us in relation to each recommendation to tick whether we (1) Support; (2) Partially Support; (3) Don’t Support or; (4) Unsure; and provides space for comments of up to 100 words each. There is one space for extra comments at the end of the submission form for general comments.

 


 

What are the issues for Penrith City Council with the existing rating legislation?

 

·    The use of unimproved land values restricts how Councils can fairly assess rates for apartment owners where a majority of development is occurring. Council is required to use a minimum rate structure to assess strata property owners and to capture adequate rates growth from these properties. This leads to high rates for property owners of high valued land such as rural owners when other limiting factors come in to play as well, such as a 50% cap on the number of properties allowed on the minimum rate.

·    Restrictive criteria for sub-categorisation of rating categories have not allowed Council to provide differential rating in our rural areas, meaning rural owners have faced high level of rates.

·    Outdated exemption criteria require ratepayers of Penrith City Council to subsidise rates for occupiers of properties operating under State sponsored schemes such as charitable organisations and affordable housing institutions.

·    The pension rebate concessions require ratepayers to subsidise 45% of all pensioner concessions granted. This impacts local government areas with greater proportions of pensioner owners. NSW is the only State where pensioner concessions are not fully funded by the respective State government.

·    Council is required to write off around $61,000 of postponed rates each year due to high rates for undeveloped properties due to the use of unimproved land values, which assess rates as if the property is developed already.

 

IPART’S Final Report

 

IPART’s Final Report to the NSW Government consists of 205 pages of information about their recommendations, with 42 separate recommendations listed for comment. The Draft Submission in response to the recommendations are included in the attachment to this report. This Paper provides commentary of the main recommendations that may impact Council and/or ratepayers (and in particular rural ratepayers):

 

a)   Changing to a Capital Improved Valuation method.

b)   Removing the use of Minimum Rate structures (Only “Ad Valorem only” or

“Base Rate plus Ad Valorem” rate structures will be allowed).

c)   Remove current Residential sub-category restrictions, allowing Residential sub-categories by residential areas (relevant for Rural property owners).

d)   Allowing sub-categorisation of Business land as Industrial or Commercial.

e)   Allowing sub-categorisation of Farmland by geographic area.

f)    Reducing the time-frame when a property can be sold to recover unpaid rates from 5 to 3 years.

g)   Removing postponement of rates to encourage urban development.

 

a)  Changing to a Capital Improved Valuation method

Councils currently use an unimproved land value for the basis of calculating rates.  IPART found that in Metropolitan areas that Capital Improved Valuation (CIV) performed better against tax principles (efficiency, equity, sustainability & simplicity) and that CIV better reflects the benefits the ratepayer receives from council services.

 

IPART recommended change to CIV would not increase Council’s income but would redistribute the rates throughout the City, with the burden shifted to wealthy property owners. IPART believes that the capital value of a property, as opposed to the unimproved land value, is a more appropriate indicator of a person’s “wealth” and ability to pay.

 

Basic modelling of impacts of removing minimum rates (and moving to a base rates structure), as long as CIV comes in at the same time, indicates that the change to a base rates structure will not have as severe impact as under the current unimproved land value system.

 

Under the current unimproved land value system, if Council moved to a base rate structure, the rates for lower and high valued properties would decrease and mid-ranged valued properties would increase greatly.

 

Under the CIV system, the reduction of lower valued properties (apartments and townhouses) would not be as great due to the capital value of strata properties evening out the lower end of the rates base. This means that reductions will mainly occur for higher valued properties only, so the reduction in rates will be redistributed onto a higher number of lower valued properties and thereby reducing the impact of increases to other properties (than under a base rate using unimproved land value).

 

The basic indicative modelling using recent sales figures for a small selection of properties indicates that if a base rate and CIV were used, suburban residential properties would increase by around $100 whilst higher valued properties, including most rural properties would decrease by around $1,000. Any increases or decreases would be only in the first year when the rate structure changes, and then from there the increases would be in line with the rate peg increases each year, subject to the cyclic changes due to new valuations every three years.

 

The exact impact on individual rates amounts will not be known however, as details as to how the CIV’s will be calculated have not been released or modelled. Should the eventual modelling be done when the CIV’s are released it should show that increases and discounts would be less than desirable, Council could use new sub-categorisation measures to further refine the discounts and increases, particularly during the transition phase from unimproved to capital improved values.

 

The Draft Submission states partial support by Council on the basis that other changes to sub-categorisation come in as well, adequate funding is provided to councils to implement the changes, and the Government conducts a state-wide information campaign prior to the changes.

 

b) Removing the use of Minimum Rate structures (Only “Ad Valorem only” or “Base Rate plus Ad Valorem” rate structures will be allowed)

 

IPART understood that councils used a minimum rate structure to adequately assess rates for strata properties.

 

IPART believe that the use of Minimum rates is not an efficient means of taxation as all the lower valued properties rates are exactly the same despite there being considerable differences between benefits received and their ability to pay. With a move to CIV, they believe that the inadequacy of rates for strata properties under the unimproved land value system will be fixed, and fair rates will be able to be assessed along more equitable means using a base rate structure.

 

Councils current issue of rates income growth losses if we move away from a minimum rate structure, would not exist under a CIV as long as we move to a base rate structure as well.

 

The Draft Submission states partial support by Council as long as it is not mandated prior to the use of CIV

 

 

.

 

c)  Remove current Residential sub-category restrictions, allowing Residential sub-categories by residential areas

IPART recommended that councils be given greater flexibility when setting Residential rates, as current legislation is restrictive and there are questions as to its legal practical use, particularly in metropolitan council areas. The intention of giving greater flexibility is to set rates that take account of differences in access to, demand for and cost of providing council services across the residential ratepayer base.

 

The current legislation only allows sub-categorisation for “rural residential” properties which must meet set size and occupation criteria, or by “Centre of Population” where there must be a degree of difference between non-contiguous localities which is difficult to determine, particularly in metropolitan areas.

 

IPART has recommended that sub-categorisation criteria be changed to allow councils to set differential rating by geographical area, using geographical markers such as suburb boundaries, waterways, bushland, arterial roads or railway lines to determine the geographical area. These changes would be particularly important for Council in determining rates for rural vs urban areas as these areas could be treated as separate geographical areas and be assessed at different rates if required.

 

Whilst the use of a base rate structure may provide the necessary means to provide lower rates for rural areas without the need for sub-categorisation, as may have been our intention over recent years, the additional option to set differential rates would allow other options as well, should the base rate not provide the necessary level of rates, or during the transition from unimproved land value to CIV, where rates increases could be phased in over time to minimise severe impacts.

 

The Draft Submission states support by Council, with a comment that in the submission that these boundaries should specifically include zoning boundaries between rural or urban areas. The submission also asks for these changes be brought in as soon as possible rather than waiting for the introduction of CIV, which may take a number of years.

 

d) Allowing sub-categorisation of Business land as Industrial or Commercial.

Presently, the only sub-categorisation allowed for business land is by “centre of activity” which is a business centre, industrial estate or a concentration of like activities. IPART proposes to add in additional optional sub-categorisations of “Commercial” or “Industrial” land. This will give councils more flexibility to target the costs of providing services within the business category if desired.

 

The Draft Submission states support by Council.

 

e)  Allowing sub-categorisation of Farmland by geographic area.

 

Existing sub-categorisations for farmland are by: intensity of use; the irrigability of the land; or economic factors affecting the land.

 

IPART proposes to include an additional optional sub-categorisation of geographical area, so that councils can take account of differences in access to, demand for and cost of providing council services across the farmland ratepayer base. This will give councils more flexibility to target the costs of providing services within the farmland category if desired.

 

The Draft Submission states support by Council with some suggestions for improving criteria for this category to assist owners and councils with determining eligibility and to reduce court action.

 

f)  Reducing the time-frame when a property can be sold to recover unpaid rates from 5 to 3 years.

Existing legislation allows councils to sell land for unpaid rates after three years (if it vacant land) or after five years if it is non-vacant land. IPART proposes to allow councils to align this so that all land can be sold after three years.

 

This will align the time-frames with those of other states and reduce costs and delays in recovering outstanding rates.

 

The Draft Submission states support by Council.

 

g) Removing postponement of rates to encourage urban development

The intention of existing postponement of rates legislation is to give property owners some rates relief where their property’s value has significantly increased due to zoning changes which allow subdivision, but they continue to occupy the property solely for residential purposes. The use of land values for assessing rates assumes that a property is used at its highest and best use and owners of these properties were paying inflated rates as if they had been developed.

 

Penrith City Council currently has six properties with postponed rates. IPART has considered the NSW State Government’s agenda of promoting urban renewal and development and have therefore determined that postponement goes against this Policy by allowing owners incentives to not develop the land.

 

Under a CIV, an undeveloped property will be valued according to its existing use and level of development and therefore these owners’ rates assessments will be lower (than if it was developed). Basic modelling indicates that if Council adopts a Base Rate that they may pay slightly less than what they are paying now (even with their postponed portion deducted), so current owners should not be negatively impacted.

 

The intention of IPART’s recommendation to encourage development may not eventuate for these properties due to the rates amounts lowering, however Council will benefit from not having to write off some postponed amounts. Council writes off around $60,000 per annum in postponed rates and interest charges with only the last five years of postponed rates and interest charges payable by the owner when the property is developed (every year Council writes off postponed rates and interest from six years prior).

 

The only issue for these owners if the postponement of rates is removed, is what will happen to the postponed amount for property owners and Council. This has not been explained in IPART’s recommendation.  The Draft Submission states partial support by Council, but only if there are transitional arrangements to protect owners with current postponed rates.

 

Recommendations that have already been ruled out by the NSW Government

 

Despite recommendations from both the Independent Local Government Review Panel and IPART, the  NSW Government has ruled out these two recommendations as they feel that these changes would have adverse impacts on vulnerable community members. Whilst they have been ruled out, it is recommended that Council still responds to the recommendations by including responses to these items as a general comment on the feedback form, as not bringing in these changes is adversely impacting our ratepayers:

 

a)   Removing some exemptions from rates where the property is used for residential or commercial purposes. (Current exemptions for affordable housing operators and properties owned by Sydney Water for water supply services are likely to continue).

b)   Introducing a pensioner deferment scheme operated by the NSW Government and allowing pensioners the choice of a $250 rebate or deferring up to $1,000 per year. (The existing pension rebate scheme (55% State/45% Council funded) will likely remain).

 

a)  Exemption from rates:

IPART made a recommendation to remove some exemption from rates where a property is used for either residential or commercial purposes, irrespective of who is the owner. This would be for properties owned and used by organisations such as affordable housing owners who are accessing exemptions mandated under the charity provisions. Rates for these properties are effectively being subsidised by Penrith City Council ratepayers, despite ratepayers and Penrith City Council not getting any direct benefit from these properties being located within the LGA. Under the existing legislation, councils with high proportions of these kinds of properties are adversely impacted, with councils in lower socio economic areas mainly impacted.

 

Under IPART’s recommendations, these properties would change to being rateable, however Council would not profit from rates for these properties as the properties would come into the rates base and reduce the amount of rates payable by other property owners.

 

Penrith City Council currently has around 230 properties that are exempt from rates but would be rateable under IPART’s recommended changes for affordable housing organisations, with around $330,000 worth of exemptions (based on a residential rate). These numbers will likely increase each year as these affordable housing properties are continually being developed under State housing policies.

 

They have also recommended that properties owned by Sydney Water and used for water supply services to no longer be entitled to an exemption. These properties are estimated to receive around $50,000 in exemptions each year.

 

IPART have also recommended other properties be liable for rates also such as university housing, however the value of these exemptions are unable to be ascertained as the university lots are not separately valued.

 

Whilst most of the recommendations relate to removing some exemptions, it has also proposed adding exemptions for private hospitals, in line with the exemption granted to public hospitals. The Nepean Private Hospital currently pays around $30,000 per annum in rates. In our submission to IPARTS’s Draft Report in 2016, Council supported the exemption for private hospitals on the basis that other exemptions would be removed. It is proposed that Council should no longer support additional exemptions if the Government does not remove the other exemptions.

 

It is recommended that Council strongly supports IPART’s recommendations to remove the exemptions on the basis that the properties are of benefit to the State and not the Penrith LGA directly, and therefore funding for the continuing operations of these organisations should be provided from State revenue and not by Penrith City Council ratepayers.

 

 

b)  Pension Rebates

In their draft report, IPART proposed three different options for providing pension rebates including (1) continuing with the current rebate and funding provisions (55% State/45% councils), (2) continuing with the current rebate but 100% funded by the NSW Sate Government, and (3) introducing a rates deferral scheme for pensioners funded by the NSW Government. The Final Report removed the recommendation for the existing rebate to be fully funded by the State Government, but the other two were retained. The NSW Government has strongly rejected changing from the existing pension rebate scheme, thereby ruling out the deferral scheme. It is important to point out that IPART clearly stated that the current scheme is inequitable and unsustainable and therefore Council should still support changes to the pension rebate scheme.

 

IPART proposed that pensioners be given the option of choosing between two rebate schemes:

 

1)   $250 annual rebate funded between the NSW Government and councils under the existing 55%/45% scheme respectively. Note: The Federal Government ceased its 5% funding contribution towards the rebate in 2014 and the NSW State Government increased its funding from 50% to 55% to make up the shortfall. Current legislation only mandates that the NSW Government fund 50% of the rebates and Council could become liable to higher contributions if the additional 5% support is withdrawn.

2)   A deferral of up to $1,000 per year where the deferred amount would be payable to councils by the NSW Government and the pensioner would pay back the deferred rates to the government (plus interest charges) when the property is sold in the future.

 

In its Report, IPART provided many reasons why the existing pension rebate scheme was not an adequate mechanism including:

 

·    It is contrary to vertical equity principles where households with higher net wealth have a subsidy funded by other households with less net wealth (older persons including pensioners have higher net wealth than persons in younger households).

·    It provides no assistance to pensioners who rent. Pensioners who rent generally have lower wealth and income than pensioners who own property and are paying higher indirect costs through their rent.

·    Pensioner rebates are funded within the council area where the pensioners own properties which are mainly in areas with generally lower socioeconomic means. The current scheme is becoming unsustainable as it is imposing additional costs on those least able to bear such costs.

 

Presently, Penrith City Council provides rebates to around 10,000 properties annually for around $2.5 million in total rebates, with Council subsidising $1.125 million. This council subsidy amounts to around $14 per rateable property.  This amount would differ by Council area with the amount payable depending on the proportion of pensioner owners and not the means of the ratepayers and council area themselves.

 

Whilst the NSW Government has ruled out changes on the basis that changes would impact vulnerable community members, IPART’s findings were that the existing scheme is already adversely impacting vulnerable communities. Although the Feedback form does not allow a comment, it is expected that a comment will be made at the “general comment” section at the end of the feedback form. It is intended that Council will reiterate previous responses in relation to pensioner concessions by asking for a rebate scheme fully funded by the Government and indexed each year.

 

Other recommended changes:

 

A summary of the other IPART recommendations are:

 

·    Non-metropolitan councils can use unimproved or capital improved values.

·    There will be a gradual transition to CIV when it is operational and there will be a 10% cap on rates increases per year during the transition. No details have been given as to how this would be implemented.

·    Rates growth each year above the rate peg to be determined according to increases in capital value from supplementary valuations provided during the year, similar to current rates growth calculations.

·    The NSW Government should fund the upfront costs of establishing a CIV database.

·    Allowing a new special rate for infrastructure projects where the project is to be shared with other levels of government.

·    Allowing councils up to 10 years to catch up shortfalls in rates income (presently 2 years), particularly where councils under-levy due to drought or other economic factors.

·    Removal of exemptions that don’t apply to Penrith City Council e.g. land vested in the Sydney Cricket & Sports Ground Trust.

·    Councils to report the value of exemptions in the Annual Report.

·    A new rating category of environmental land for categorisation of land subject to a State conservation agreement.

·    Allowance of a vacant land sub-category for residential, business and mining land.

·    Councils can choose the default rating category (presently business is the default category).

·    Allowing a discount to ratepayers that elect to receive notices electronically.

·    Allowing councils to buy valuations from private valuers.

 

How the proposed recommendations may benefit rural property owners

 

·    Only Base Rate or Ad valorem only rate structures would be allowed, with Minimum Rate structures to be abolished. Previous rates modelling under the Unimproved Land Value method show that Base Rates aren’t workable for Council due to the lowering of rates for properties currently on a minimum rate. As strata apartments and townhouses will be assessed on their capital value under the new regime, the discounts to the lower valued properties will not be as significant, and therefore the impost on mid-ranged properties will not be as significant. Higher valued properties including rural properties should see discounts under a Base Rate.

·    Proposed new sub-categorisation changes would remove current restrictions and allow Council to sub-categorise by separate towns or villages or by residential area. This would allow councils to sub-categorise by urban vs rural areas and set differential rates for rural areas.

·    Due to the use of Capital Improved Values, Rural property owners with older or smaller dwellings may have rates bills which are lower than neighbours with bigger and newer houses and therefore the rates bill will better reflect their ability to pay.

 

Next Steps

 

The NSW Government has not indicated what the timeline will be for implementation of any of the recommendations but have said that they intend to carry out widespread consultation with residents, council staff, councillors, peak bodies and other key stakeholders before they finalise their response.

 

Conclusion

 

The IPART Final Report recommendations if implemented, give Council greater flexibility to be able to respond to the needs of the community whilst at the same time ensuring that the costs of delivering those needs are fairly distributed among ratepayers. It is recommended that Council support or partially support the proposed changes.

 

The recommendations will not reduce Council’s income but some ratepayers will see some rates increases or decreases when the proposed changes are phased in.

 

The Draft Submission to the Final Report is included as an attachment. The due date to lodge the Submission is 13 September 2019.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Local Government Rating Review - IPART Final Report be received.

2.    Council send the formal submission to the Office of Local Government in response to IPART’s recommendations.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

Draft Submission to NSW Government

11 Pages

Attachments Included

  


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                               26 August 2019

 

 

 

13

Organisational Performance and Financial Review - June 2019   

 

Compiled by:               Neil Farquharson, Financial Services Manager

Geraldine Brown, Strategic Finance Coordinator

Craig Shepherd, Corporate Reporting Coordinator

Authorised by:            Andrew Moore, Director - Corporate Services  

 

Outcome

We have confidence in our Council

Strategy

Manage our money and our assets to be sustainable now and into the future

Service Activity

Support financial sustainability through financial planning and budget management

      

 

Executive Summary

This report outlines Council’s progress towards implementing its four-year Delivery Program 2017-21 and annual Operational Plan 2018-19, and focuses on the period of 1 January to 30 June 2019. The report should be read in conjunction with the separate enclosure Organisational Performance Report – June 2019, which records significant Variations, Reserve movements, proposed Revotes, Contracts, Consultancies and Legal Expenses, Cash and Investments position, Income and Expenses by Program and our progress in completing the organisation’s Operating and Capital projects for the final quarter of 2018-19.

 

At 30 June 2019, 82% of Council’s 293 projects, and 84% of Council’s 83 actions were ‘on target’ or ‘completed’. 

 

Council projected a balanced Budget in the adoption of the original 2018-19 Operational Plan. The actual cumulative result for the year as at June 2019 is the achievement of a $258,185 surplus which is proposed to be transferred to the Financial Management Reserve to help provide for any variation to assumptions in the 2019-20 Operational Plan. If endorsed then this would result in a balanced Budget position for 2018-19.

 

All actual figures are subject to end-of-year adjustment, external audit checking and confirmation. Once finalised the 2018-19 Financial Statements will be presented to the Council on 23 September 2019 and will include a detailed explanation of Council’s audited financial position.

 

This report recommends that the Organisational Performance Report – June 2019 is received and that the revised budget estimates identified in the report and detailed in the Organisational Performance Report – June 2019 be adopted.  

 

Organisational Performance Summary

The Organisational Performance Report provides information on Council’s progress, achievements and challenges for the six-month period between 1 January 2019 to 30 June 2019. At 30 June 2019:

·    all 132 service activities were on target

·    84% of 83 actions

·    78% of 149 capital projects

·    87% of 144 operating projects were ‘on target’ or ‘completed’

 

Table 1 provides a performance summary, which overall demonstrates that Council is successfully delivering its services and programs. 

 

 

Completed

On Target

Attention Required

Total

 

No.

%

No.

%

No.

%

Service Activities

0

0

132

100

0

0

132

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Actions

37

44%

33

40%

13

16%

83

Capital Projects

68

46%

48

32%

33

22%

149

Operating Projects

62

43%

63

44%

19

13%

144

Total:

Actions & Projects

167

45%

144

38%

65

17%

376

Table 1

 

Organisational Highlights

Council’s programs and services delivered a number of significant achievements during the past six months. These include:

 

·    $5.5bn in funding for North South Rail Link and significant grant funding for key recreation projects.

·    Completed the new North St carpark creating an additional 230 car spaces.

·    Our annual report won gold in the Australasian Reporting Awards for the fourth year running

·    Hosting a wide range of events that injected $27 million into our local economy and brought 10s of thousands of visitors to Penrith. This includes the Sydney International Whitewater Festival, Rowing NSW State Championships

Financial Position Summary

This report covers the final quarter of the 2018-19 financial year. Details of significant Variations, Reserve Movements and the status of Council’s Operating and Capital Projects compared to Budget are included in this document. 

 

Council projected a balanced Budget in the adoption of the original 2018-19 Operational Plan. The actual cumulative result for the year as at June 2019 after allowing for proposed Reserve allocations, including the allocation of the small surplus to the Financial Management Reserve, is the achievement of a balanced Budget position.

 

During the final quarter of 2018-19 the variations to Budget continued to be mainly positive including savings in Emergency Services Management ($281,810), additional Rates income ($202,968), and savings on employee costs after end of year adjustments to reflect the movement in ELE ($1.1m). These positive variations were partially offset by additional expenditure on Field Based and Passive Recreation ($789,474), Building Maintenance ($732,950), Security Operations ($346,789), and Drainage Maintenance ($255,590).

 

The balance of the 2018-19 end of year surplus ($258,185) is proposed to be transferred to Reserve. This allocation provides capacity to respond to any current and emerging priorities, including some of the priority resource requests. 

 

This final review for 2018-19 highlights the strengthening financial sustainability that underpinned Council’s Fit for the Future submission and has been foreshadowed in the Long Term Financial Plan in recent years. Continued commitment to the strategies endorsed by the Financial Capacity Review and the 2016-17 Special Rate Variation (SRV) will continue to reinforce Council’s financial sustainability and Regional City role.

 

Additionally, a total of $8.1m of Capital and Operating Project revotes are proposed within this June 2019 Quarter Review, as all works have not been completed in the 2018-19 financial year. Further details on proposed major variations and revotes are provided later in this report and in the Organisational Performance Report – June 2019.

 

This report recommends that the revised Budget estimates as at 30 June 2019, including revotes, identified in this report and detailed in the separate enclosure Organisational Performance Report – June 2019 be adopted.

Financial Position for the June 2019 Quarter

The financial position of Council for the quarter is expressed by providing information in compliance with Quarterly Budget Review Statement (QBRS) requirements on:

·    Budget position (whether balanced/surplus/deficit)

·    Significant variations

·    Identified revotes

·    Funding summary

·    Reserve movements for the quarter

·    Capital and Operating Budget Projects list for the quarter

·    Key performance indicators

·    Income and expenses

·    Income and expenses by program

·    Capital budget

·    Cash and investments

·    Contracts and other expenses

·    Consultancy and legal expenses.

 

Budget Position

 

$’000s

Original Budget Position

0

September 2018 Quarter Variations Adopted by Council

58

December 2018 Quarter Variations  Adopted by Council

109

March 2019 Quarter Variations Adopted by Council

12

June 2019 Quarter Review Proposed Variations

79

Less: June Review Proposed Allocation to Reserve from Surplus

(258)

Revised Budget Position Surplus/(Deficit) as at 30 June 2019

0

 

This review recommends a number of both favourable and unfavourable adjustments to the adopted Budget for 2018-19. Council has essentially managed its finances to achieve a $258,185 favourable Budget surplus for 2018-19 (after proposed June Review variations). This report recommends Council allocate this end of year surplus balance into a Reserve to provide Council with the capacity to respond to emerging priorities in 2019-20 onwards. If these proposals are endorsed by Council a balanced budget result will be achieved in 2018-19.

Commentary is provided below on some of the more significant variations in the June Quarterly Review (F= Favourable, U= Unfavourable, A= Allocation). Further details of all proposed variations impacting the Budget position, variations with no impact on available funds, revotes, and reserve movements are detailed in the Organisational Performance Report – June 2019.

 

Proposed Variations impacting the Budget:

 

Net Employee Costs- $1,115,060 F (1%)

During the first three quarters of the year salary savings of $532,500 were identified and retained in the Employee cost budget to offset any additional costs and assist in year-end balancing of this expenditure area. In the final quarter, salary savings (e.g. from delays in filling vacancies) were combined with the provision for retirement/resignations, and the movement in ELE entitlements calculated as part of the end of year process resulting in a $1,115,060 net favourable impact on employee costs.

Field Based and Passive Recreation $789,474 U (32%)

Council has continued to proactively manage asbestos within the City. With an increase in the awareness of asbestos and its health impacts, Council has had a significant increase in the number of reported asbestos related incidents. To ensure that Council meets SafeWork NSW and Environment Protection Authority requirements, all these matters have been attended to by licensed asbestos contractors with the asbestos being disposed of at lawful waste facilities. In addition, Council has undertaken a number of remediation projects to ensure that Council's assets are safe for our workers and the community. Some examples of remediation projects include Eileen Cammack Reserve, South Penrith; William Street, Werrington; Brisbane street Playground, Oxley Park.

 

Building Maintenance $732,950 U (30%)

A significant amount of buildings maintenance work (including minor unplanned mechanical plant replacement work) has been carried out throughout the year at various neighbourhood centre facilities, Kingswood Depot, Queen Street centre, and various childcare centres. Such works include air-conditioning system replacements and structural building rectification work.

 

These assets were not included in the asset renewal program, however were considered essential to ensure the ongoing operation of the facilities. A more proactive maintenance approach that will link in with the Building Assets Renewal Program is being developed with the aim of reducing the overall cost of maintenance of all building assets.

 

Security Operations $346,789 U (94%)

Additional patrols throughout the LGA and the provision of 24/7 security at Judges Car Park has had a significant impact on unscheduled expenditure. A more permanent solution has been installed (mesh fencing). However, a security presence is still required at the request of local businesses.

 

Drainage Maintenance $255,590 U (63%)

A specialised contractor was required for the removal and disposal of waste along a 150-metre length of open drain, with a large siltation pond, at Park Avenue from Rail Corridor to Victoria Street in Kingswood. Due to development works upstream, additional maintenance was required over a 3-month period.


Gross pollutant traps (GPTs) along Irwin Street, Werrington and Racecourse Road, South Penrith required major clean-outs as they were retaining water and significant amounts of pollutants. Additional clean-outs on top of regular scheduled maintenance, were required and removed just under 50 tonnes of rubbish.

 

Transfer to Reserve - $258,185 A

The development of the annual Budget each year requires a number of assumptions to be made in relation to both expenditure and income that are dependent on factors that are outside Council’s control. To safeguard against movements in these assumptions and forecasts it is proposed that the balance of the available 2018-19 end of year $258,185 surplus be transferred to Reserve. In addition, this allocation will provide capacity to respond to some current and emerging priorities, including some of the priority resource requests. The use of these reserve funds will be reported to the Council.

 

Other variations with no impact on Available Funds and Proposed Revotes

A number of other variations, proposed as part of this review, do not have an impact on the available funds. Details of these adjustments are provided in the separate enclosure Organisational Performance Report – June 2019.

 

In addition to these adjustments, a total of $8.1m of planned Operating and Capital projects are proposed for revote this June 2019 quarter. The total value of revotes for the year is $19.3m (including the proposed June Quarter revotes), compared to $26.4m for the same period in 2017-18. The most significant revotes in 2018-19 include Building Asset Renewal, Regatta Park Stage 1, Outdoor Mobility Implementation and City Centre Review and Traffic Study. A full list of revotes is included in the Organisational Performance Report – June 2019.

Conclusion

This report, and the more detailed Organisational Performance Report – June 2019, demonstrates that Council has made significant progress over the past six months. The

June 2019 Review indicates that all services have met Council’s challenging annual program.  The Organisational Performance Report – June 2019 indicates that the performance of Council’s Capital and Operating projects are on track to meet Council’s challenging annual program.

 

The pre-audit end of year result is an excellent outcome and Council’s financial position remains sound with a surplus achieved in 2018-19 that has allowed Council the ability to transfer funds into Reserve for current and emerging priorities, resulting in a balanced position for June 2019. This Review and the proposed allocations continue to demonstrate Council’s commitment to strong financial management.

 

The Organisational Performance Report – June 2019 will be placed on Council’s website and will be available in hard copy on request.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Organisational Performance and Financial Review - June 2019 be received.

2.    The Organisational Performance and Financial Review - June 2019 as at 30 June 2019, including the revised estimates outlined in this report, and detailed in the Organisational Performance Report, be adopted.

3.    Council revote the works as detailed in the Recommended Revoted Works Lists, detailed in the Organisational Performance Report June 2019 for inclusion in the 2019-20 Operational Plan.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                               26 August 2019

 

 

 

14

Regional Strategic Alliance   

 

Compiled by:               Adam Beggs, Governance Coordinator

Authorised by:            Stephen Britten, Chief Governance Officer  

 

Outcome

We have confidence in our Council

Strategy

Be open and fair in our decisions and our dealings with people

Service Activity

Promote ethical behaviour through awareness and advice and manage investigations of alleged corruption, maladministration or breaches of the Code of Conduct

      

 

Executive Summary

The Regional Strategic Alliance (RSA) Board at its meeting of 7 August 2019 resolved that the RSA Management Agreement between Penrith City Council, Blue Mountains City Council and Hawkesbury Council be terminated within 3 months. This report seeks agreement to the termination of the RSA Management Agreement as it is considered that Council resources can now be better served through our membership of the Western Sydney City Deal.

 

Background

The Independent Local Government Review Panel Report ‘Revitalising Local Government’ (October 2013), identified elements that the Panel regarded as essential to effective local government reform. The need for stronger and more effective regional groupings of councils was a consistent theme of this and other reform reports.

 

Stronger regional alliances are seen as vital to achieving long-term sustainability of local government and to ensure that local government is a more effective partner in regional planning with State and Commonwealth Government. As a result, Penrith City Council, Blue Mountains City Council and Hawkesbury City Council commenced dialogue with regard to forming a strategic alliance that would provide opportunities to strengthen ability to deliver on key regional priorities.

 

In September 2014 a Working Party that included the Mayor, Deputy Mayor and General Manager from each Council was established to oversee and progress the development of a joint proposal. In April 2015 a Regional Strategic Alliance Co-operation & Management Agreement between Penrith, Blue Mountains and Hawkesbury City Councils was formally established to progress the establishment of a Regional Strategic Alliance.

 

The RSA Management Agreement between the three councils was entered into on 21 March 2016. The RSA was established to work towards shared outcomes that benefitted the region between the three councils.

 

The RSA formed prior to the emergence of the Western Sydney City Deal (City Deal) and became a significant focus for each of the three council’s in working on a number of priority action areas that would benefit the region and each council.

 

The Regional Strategic Alliance

 

The RSA was innovative and ambitious when originally established and despite some challenges, including resourcing, it has provided positive outcomes including co-operation and positive regional outcomes around tourism, auditing, procurement, waste management and asset management.

 

The initial objectives of the RSA were to:

 

·    Optimise State and regional planning within the region;

·    Strengthen advocacy and funding for the region;

·    Formalise and strengthen the organisational effectiveness of each Council;

·    Maximise opportunities for service delivery and innovation (including exploring the provision of shared services) within each local government area;

·    Create and promote advantages and relevance of the region to industry, State and Commonwealth Governments and internationally bodies or companies; 

·    Consideration and reviews of the government structures of each Council; and

·    Achieve such other objectives as the Councils determine from time to time should be adopted for the RSA.

 

The RSA has strengthened working relationships and significantly increased collaboration between the three councils, allowed for joint and holistic consideration of regional issues and resulted in extensive networking opportunities for staff and councillors. It has also been particularly successful in attracting significant funding from Destination NSW for regional tourism and better sharing of knowledge.

 

Significantly, a new and more extensive regional alliance has now impacted directly on the Penrith, Blue Mountains and Hawkesbury RSA, namely the Western Sydney City Deal.

 

Western Sydney City Deal

The Western Sydney City Deal was signed on 4 March 2018 and has presented a fundamental opportunity to facilitate the transformation of Western Sydney. It brings together eight Western Sydney Councils into a strategic alliance including the cities of Penrith, Blue Mountains, Hawkesbury, Wollondilly, Camden, Campbelltown, Liverpool and Fairfield.

 

Over the past year City Deal governance arrangements have commenced on a number of work programs including significant infrastructure projects such as North South Rail.

 

Councils have continued to be represented by their respective Mayors, General Managers and Senior Officers (Lead Officers) in discussions with the Commonwealth and NSW State Governments. The Councils have also met with each other on a regular basis to put their local perspective as well as working cooperatively on issues that impact the Western Parkland City region.

 

There are a number of Working Groups established to work on some of the 38 commitments in the City Deal including:

 

·    North South Rail Land Use group

·    Communications & Engagement Sub Committee

·    Western Sydney Health Alliance Steering Committee

·    Collabora8e Steering Committee and working group

·    Western Sydney Industry Attraction Office Working Group

·    Planning Partnership

 

 

Future of the RSA – Proposed Dissolution

 

At its 7 August Board meeting the RSA considered its future and in particular weighed up the impact of the now well established Western Sydney City Deal strategic alliance.

 

The Board found that despite the significant achievements of the RSA to date, there is a strong argument that it is not effective or efficient for the RSA Councils to be participating in both the RSA and City Deal strategic alliances simultaneously. Rather that it would be more cost effective and productive for the RSA to be dissolved and for energy to focus on the City Deal alliance. This however, would not stop the three RSA councils from continuing to work together on key initiatives and projects of regional benefit.

 

The RSA Board therefore resolved at its 7 August Board Meeting relative to “Item 5: RSA Future” that:

 

“1.   In recognizing that processes associated with the Western Sydney City Deal have generally overtaken the need for the Regional Strategic Alliance, that the RSA Board recommends to the three member Councils that the Regional Strategic Alliance be dissolved within three months of the date of this Board Meeting.

 

2.    That the General Managers of the three Councils work together to confirm arrangements for resolving outstanding administration and financial matters

 

3.    That recommendations for the dissolution of the RSA, including arrangements required to resolve all administrative and financial matters upon the dissolution of the RSA, be considered by each member Council at the ordinary meeting of that Council to be held in August or September 2019.

 

4.    That the General Managers work together to identify ongoing projects and activities for continuation, notably in regional tourism, and the mechanisms that will enable this to occur.”           

 

Regional Tourism

In considering the cessation of the RSA, the Board expressed a strong desire to continue  joint work on key initiatives and projects where beneficial, notably in supporting the regional tourism agenda. There is a clear rational for the three local governments to continue this work, primarily as the City Deal area cuts across two Destination networks (Destination Sydney Surrounds North and South, as established by the state government), the RSA has budget for the current financial year to enable this.

 

Key deliverables for the regional tourism office to date have included:

 

·    Regional Cooperative Marketing Campaign results prepared by DNSW. These results have been presented to Penrith City Council, Blue Mountains City Council Executive, Hawkesbury City Council and Blue Mountains Tourism. The results were very positive and showed great growth and awareness for the region during the marketing campaign;

·    Partially grant funded project from the Destination Sydney Surround North Network. The Penrith element of the grant and matched RSA funding was used to create digital assets particularly around the culture of Penrith and will be used in their current campaign;

·    Experience Trail project was completed. The partially funded project from the Destination Sydney Surrounds North Network developed three experience drive trail across the region for digital and printed purposes to be used for the three councils and in future marketing campaigns. This project was developed in conjunction with identified stakeholders and consultation with stakeholders; and.

 

As a result, it is proposed to retain some capacity and identify a number of jointly agreed projects for delivery. Further, given that the RSA board will no longer exist, it is proposed to manage delivery of a regional tourism agenda through collaboration on well-defined projects. A review of progress and future directions will be considered by each general manager with a view to having some structure around these arrangements.

 

The RSA has retained funds of circa $180k. It is proposed that the General Managers from each council will further meet to discuss the allocation of these funds and those in the current budget with details finalised and provided through the next quarterly review.

 

Conclusion

The RSA has recommended that the RSA Management Agreement between Penrith City Council, Hawkesbury Council and Blue Mountains City Council be dissolved within 3 months. This report seeks agreement to the dissolution of the RSA Management Agreement and agreement to continue with a regional tourism program to deliver a range of priority projects.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Regional Strategic Alliance be received.

2.    Council dissolve the Regional Strategic Alliance between Penrith, Blue Mountains and Hawkesbury City Councils in accordance with the RSA Board Meeting recommendations detailed in the report.

 

3.    Council continue to engage with the other Councils to identify ongoing projects and activities for cooperation such as regional tourism.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                               26 August 2019

 

 

 

15

Summary of Investments & Banking for the Period 1 July 2019 to 31 July 2019   

 

Compiled by:               Cheryl Freeburn, Operational Finance Coordinator

Authorised by:            Neil Farquharson, Financial Services Manager  

 

Outcome

We have confidence in our Council

Strategy

Manage our money and our assets to be sustainable now and into the future

Service Activity

Provide accurate information to Council and the community on council’s financial activities

      

 

Executive Summary

This report on the Summary of Investments & Banking for July 2019 is submitted for the purpose of financial accountability and to satisfy the investment reporting requirements of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005 (clause 212), the Local Government Act 1993 (Section 625) and the Council’s Investment Policy.

 

The report certifies that the Council investments comply with the forms of investment made by order of the Minister under section 625(2) of the Local Government Act 1993. The current Ministerial Order was issued under Council Circular 11-01 on 17 February 2011.

 

The report provides a summary of investments for the period 1 July 2019 to 31 July 2019 and a reconciliation of invested funds as at 31 July 2019.

 

The investment returns versus the benchmark as a percentage for July 2019 are:

 

·    Council portfolio current yield (including FRNs)       2.31%

·    90 day Bank Bill Swap rate (Benchmark)                 1.11%

 

 

The report recommends that the information contained in the report be received.

 

Background

Attached to this report is a Summary of Investments including Economic Commentary for July 2019, Historical Investment Performance analysis tables and charts, a reconciliation of Invested Funds for July 2019 and various Investment Summary and Investment Portfolio analysis tables and charts.

CERTIFICATE OF RESPONSIBLE ACCOUNTING OFFICER

I hereby certify the following:

 

1.   All investments have been made in accordance with Section 625 of the Local Government Act 1993, relevant regulations and Council’s Investment Policy.

 

2.   Council’s Cash Book and Bank Statements have been reconciled as at 31 July 2019.

 

                                             

Andrew Moore

Responsible Accounting Officer

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Summary of Investments & Banking for the Period 1 July 2019 to 31 July 2019 be received.

2.    The certificate of the Responsible Accounting Officer and Summary of Investments and Performance for the period 1 July 2019 to 31 July 2019 be noted and accepted.

3.    The graphical investment analysis as at 31 July 2019 be noted.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

Investments and Banking July 2019

6 Pages

Appendix

  


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                            26 August 2019

Appendix 1 - Investments and Banking July 2019

 

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Committee of the Whole

 

DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

CONTENTS

 

Pecuniary Interests

 

Other Interests

 

Monday August 26 2019

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

1        Presence of the Public                                                                                                       1

 

2        Divestment of Property Asset - Lot 18 DP 1220719                                       2

 

3        Licence of suites 104 & 104A of 114-116 Henry Street Penrith (Community Connections Building) to Western Sydney Community Legal Centre Limited (WESTS)                       2

 

4        Commercial Matter - Diversification of Council's Property Investment Portfolio               2

 

5        General Manager's Annual Performance Review 2018-19                                               3

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                               26 August 2019

A Leading City

 

 

1        Presence of the Public

 

Everyone is entitled to attend a meeting of the Council and those of its Committees of which all members are Councillors, except as provided by Section 10 of the Local Government Act, 1993.

A Council, or a Committee of the Council of which all the members are Councillors, may close to the public so much of its meeting as comprises:

 

(a)          the discussion of any of the matters listed below; or

(b)          the receipt or discussion of any of the information so listed.

The matters and information are the following:

 

(a)          personnel matters concerning particular individuals;

(b)          the personal hardship of any resident or ratepayers;

(c)           information that would, if disclosed, confer a commercial advantage on a person with whom the council is conducting (or proposes to conduct) business;

(d)          commercial information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed:

·         prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied it; or

 

·         confer a commercial advantage on a competitor of the Council; or

 

·         reveal a trade secret.

 

(e)          information that would, if disclosed, prejudice the maintenance of the law;

(f)            matters affecting the security of the Council, Councillors, Council staff or Council property;

(g)        advice concerning litigation, or advice that would otherwise be privileged from production in legal proceedings on the ground of legal professional privilege.

The grounds on which part of a meeting is closed must be stated in the decision to close that part of the meeting and must be recorded in the minutes of the meeting.

The grounds must specify the following:

(a)          the relevant provision of section 10A(2);

(b)          the matter that is to be discussed during the closed part of the meeting;

(c)           the reasons why the part of the meeting is being closed, including (if the matter concerned is a matter other than a personnel matter concerning particular individuals, the personal hardship of a resident or ratepayer or a trade secret) an explanation of the way in which discussion of the matter in open meeting would be, on balance, contrary to the public interest.

Members of the public may make representations at a Council or Committee Meeting as to whether a part of a meeting should be closed to the public

The process which should be followed is:

 

·         a motion, based on the recommendation below, is moved and seconded

·         the Chairperson then asks if any member/s of the public would like to make representations as to whether a part of the meeting is closed to the public

·         if a member/s of the public wish to make representations, the Chairperson invites them to speak before the Committee makes its decision on whether to close the part of the meeting or not to the public.

·         if no member/s of the public wish to make representations the Chairperson can then put the motion to close the meeting to the public.

The first action is for a motion to be moved and seconded based on the recommendation below.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That:

 

Outcome 7

 

2        Divestment of Property Asset - Lot 18 DP 1220719 

This item has been referred to Committee of the Whole as the report refers to information that would, if disclosed, confer a commercial advantage on a person with whom the Council is conducting (or proposes to conduct) business and discussion of the matter in open meeting would be, on balance, contrary to the public interest.

 

3        Licence of suites 104 & 104A of 114-116 Henry Street Penrith (Community Connections Building) to Western Sydney Community Legal Centre Limited (WESTS)

This item has been referred to Committee of the Whole as the report refers to information that would, if disclosed, confer a commercial advantage on a person with whom the Council is conducting (or proposes to conduct) business and discussion of the matter in open meeting would be, on balance, contrary to the public interest.

 

4        Commercial Matter - Diversification of Council's Property Investment Portfolio

This item has been referred to Committee of the Whole as the report refers to information that would, if disclosed, confer a commercial advantage on a person with whom the Council is conducting (or proposes to conduct) business and discussion of the matter in open meeting would be, on balance, contrary to the public interest.


 

 

5        General Manager's Annual Performance Review 2018-19

This item has been referred to Committee of the Whole as the report refers to personnel matters concerning particular individuals and discussion of the matter in open meeting would be, on balance, contrary to the public interest.

 

 

 

 

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ATTACHMENTS  

 

 

Date of Meeting:     Monday 26 August 2019

Report Title:            Update on the Quarter, Penrith's health and education precinct Action Plan 2017

Attachments:           Quarter Action Plan 2019 Update - Action Plan Audit

                                The Quarter Action Plan prepared by Deloitte Access Economics



Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                            26 August 2019

Attachment 1 - Quarter Action Plan 2019 Update - Action Plan Audit

 

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Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                            26 August 2019

Attachment 2 - The Quarter Action Plan prepared by Deloitte Access Economics

 

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ATTACHMENTS  

 

 

Date of Meeting:     Monday 26 August 2019

Report Title:            Local Government Rating Review - IPART Final Report

Attachments:           Draft Submission to NSW Government



Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                            26 August 2019

Attachment 1 - Draft Submission to NSW Government

 

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ATTACHMENT       

 

 

 


Date of Meeting:     26 August 2019

 

Delivery Program:   Outcome 7

 

Service:                   Financial Services

 

Report Title:             2019-2020 Voted Works