Council_Mark_POS_RGB

5 November 2019

 

Dear Councillor,

In pursuance of the provisions of the Local Government Act, 1993 and the Regulations thereunder, notice is hereby given that a POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING of Penrith City Council is to be held in the Passadena Room, Civic Centre, 601 High Street, Penrith on Monday 11 November 2019 at 7:00PM.

Attention is directed to the statement accompanying this notice of the business proposed to be transacted at the meeting.

Yours faithfully

 

 

Warwick Winn

General Manager

 

BUSINESS

 

1.           LEAVE OF ABSENCE

Leave of absence has been granted to:

Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM

Councillor Marcus Cornish

 

2.           APOLOGIES

 

3.           CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES

Policy Review Committee Meeting - 21 October 2019.

 

4.           DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

Pecuniary Interest (The Act requires Councillors who declare a pecuniary interest in an item to leave the meeting during discussion of that item)

Non-Pecuniary Conflict of Interest – Significant and Less than Significant (The Code of Conduct requires Councillors who declare a significant non-pecuniary conflict of interest in an item to leave the meeting during discussion of that item)

 

5.           ADDRESSING THE MEETING

 

6.           MAYORAL MINUTES

 

7.           NOTICES OF MOTION TO RESCIND A RESOLUTION

 

8.           NOTICES OF MOTION

 

9.           DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

10.         REQUESTS FOR REPORTS AND MEMORANDUMS

 

11.         URGENT BUSINESS

12.         CONFIDENTIAL BUSINESS


POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING

 

Monday 11 November 2019

 

table of contents

 

 

 

 

 

 

meeting calendar

 

 

confirmation of minutes

 

 

DELIVERY program reports

 


Council_Mark_POS_RGB2019 MEETING CALENDAR

January 2019 - December 2019

(Adopted by Council - 26 November 2018, Amended 1 May, 28 May and 27 June 2019)

 

 

 

TIME

JAN

FEB

MAR

APRIL

MAY

JUNE

JULY

AUG

SEPT

OCT

NOV

DEC

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

 

Ordinary Council Meeting

7.00pm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

25@

25

29v

27#

24*

22

26@

  23^ü

28

25#+

16

Policy Review Committee

7.00pm

 

11

11

8

 

 

 

12

9

21

11

9

 

 

 v

Meeting at which the draft corporate planning documents (Delivery Program and Operational Plan) are endorsed for exhibition

 *

Meeting at which the draft corporate planning documents (Delivery Program and Operational Plan) are adopted

 #

Meetings at which the Operational Plan quarterly reviews (March and September) are presented

 @

Meetings at which the Delivery Program progress reports (including the Operational Plan quarterly reviews for December and June) are presented

 ^

Election of Mayor/Deputy Mayor

 ü

Meeting at which the 2018-2019 Annual Statements are presented

 

Meeting at which any comments on the 2018-2019 Annual Statements are adopted

 +

Meeting at which the Annual Report is presented

Briefing to consider Budget, draft fees & charges and corporate documents

-            Extraordinary Meetings are held as required;

-            Members of the public are invited to observe meetings of the Council (Ordinary and Policy Review Committee).

Should you wish to address Council, please contact Governance Coordinator, Adam Beggs on 4732 7597.

 


UNCONFIRMED MINUTES

 OF THE POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING OF PENRITH CITY COUNCIL HELD IN THE PASSADENA ROOM, PENRITH

ON MONDAY 21 OCTOBER 2019 AT 7:00PM

PRESENT

His Worship the Mayor, Councillor Ross Fowler OAM, Deputy Mayor, Councillor Karen McKeown OAM, and Councillors Jim Aitken OAM, Bernard Bratusa, Todd Carney, Brian Cartwright, Robin Cook, Kevin Crameri OAM, Greg Davies, Mark Davies, Aaron Duke, Tricia Hitchen and Kath Presdee. 

 

LEAVE OF ABSENCE

Leave of Absence was previously granted to Councillor Marcus Cornish for the period 14 October 2019 to 11 November 2019 inclusive.

 

APOLOGIES

PRC27  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Karen McKeown OAM seconded Councillor Tricia  Hitchen that the apology from Councillor John Thain be accepted.

 

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES - Policy Review Committee Meeting - 9 September 2019

PRC28  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Brian Cartwright seconded Councillor Jim Aitken OAM that the minutes of the Policy Review Committee Meeting of 9 September 2019 be confirmed.

 

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

 

Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM declared a Non-Pecuniary Conflict of Interest - Less Than Significant in Item 1 – Penrith City Children’s Services Cooperative Ltd, as his daughter-in- law works at a child care centre operated by Penrith City Council.

 

DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Outcome 1 - We can work close to home

 

1          Penrith City Children's Services Cooperative Ltd

 

Councillor Mark Davies and Councillor Greg Davies arrived at the meeting, the time being 7:06pm.

Councillor Bernard Bratusa arrived at the meeting, the time being 7:20pm.

PRC29  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Kath Presdee seconded Councillor Greg Davies

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Penrith City Children's Services Cooperative Ltd be received

2.    Council underwrite the operations of the PCCSC Ltd until the presentation to Council of the Penrith City Children’s Services Cooperative Ltd Annual Report for 2020-21.

3.     Council staff be thanked for their efforts and contributions in 100% of our services now exceeding or meeting the National Quality Standard.

 

 

Outcome 4 - We have safe, vibrant places

 

3        St Marys Town Centre Annual Report 2018-2019 and Business Plan 2019-2020

Councillor Todd Carney left the meeting, the time being 7:25pm.

Councillor Todd Carney returned to the meeting, the time being 7:27pm.

PRC30  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Tricia  Hitchen seconded Councillor Greg Davies that the information contained in the report on St Marys Town Centre Annual Report 2018-2019 and Business Plan 2019-2020 be received.

 

 

Councillor Greg Davies left the meeting, the time being 7:52pm.

 

Councillor Tricia Hitchen left the meeting, the time being 7:52pm.

 

Outcome 7 - We have confidence in our Council

 

6        ARIC Annual Report

Councillor Greg Davies returned to the meeting, the time being 7:54pm.

 

Councillor Tricia Hitchen returned to the meeting, the time being 7:54pm.

 

PRC31  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Kath Presdee seconded Councillor Brian Cartwright that the information contained in the report on ARIC Annual Report be received.

 

Outcome 2 - We plan for our future growth

 

2        Planning Proposal for 4 sites in Penrith and St Marys                            

PRC32  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Planning Proposal for 4 sites in Penrith and St Marys be received.

2.    Council endorse the Planning Proposal to Reclassify Council owned land from Community to Operational in St Marys and Penrith provided separately to Councillors as an enclosure and available on Council’s website.

3.    The General Manager be granted delegation to make any necessary minor changes required to the Planning Proposal before submitting it to the Department of Planning, Industry and Environment.

4.    Council officers forward the Planning Proposal to the Department of Planning, Industry and Environment seeking:

i.    that an application for the Governors approval to remove the public reserve status of 12A and 32A Champness Crescent and 110A Dunheved Circuit in St Marys be submitted and,

ii.    the necessary amendments to Penrith Local Environmental Plan 2010 be made to reclassify Council owned land on four sites in St Marys and Penrith from Community to Operational.

In accordance with Section 375A of the Local Government Act 1993, a DIVISION was then called with the following result:

 

For

Against

 

Councillor Kath Presdee

Councillor Jim Aitken OAM

Councillor Karen McKeown OAM

 

Councillor Robin Cook

 

Councillor Mark Davies

 

Councillor Brian Cartwright

 

Councillor Bernard Bratusa   

 

Councillor Ross Fowler OAM

                           

Councillor Todd Carney

                                     

Councillor Aaron Duke

 

Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM

 

Councillor Tricia Hitchen

                          

Councillor Greg Davies

 

 

 

Outcome 4 - We have safe, vibrant places

 

4        Kingswood Pedestrian Lighting Audit and Strategy                                

PRC33  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Karen McKeown OAM

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Kingswood Pedestrian Lighting Audit and Strategy be received

2.     The draft Kingswood Pedestrian Lighting Strategy be adopted.

 

Councillor Greg Davies left the meeting, the time being 8:11pm.

 

Councillor Greg Davies returned to the meeting, the time being 8:13pm.

 

5        Draft CCTV Strategy 2019-22                                                                       

PRC34  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Robin Cook

That:

1.   The information contained in the report on Draft CCTV Strategy 2019-22 be received.

      

2.   The Draft CCTV Strategy 2019-22 be endorsed.

 

  

There being no further business the Chairperson declared the meeting closed the time being 8:13pm.

    



DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

  

Outcome 4 - We have safe, vibrant places

 

1        St Marys Night Time Economy Audit and Study                                                                1

 

2        Draft Special Places Usage Policy (Penrith City Centre and St Marys Town Centre)      5

 

 

Outcome 5 - We care about our environment

 

3        Regional Illegal Dumping Squad (RID) - EPA Project Agreement                                  11

 

Outcome 7 - We have confidence in our Council

 

4        Draft Fraud and Corruption Prevention Policy                                                                 19

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


 

 

Outcome 1 - We can work close to home

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


 

 

Outcome 2 - We plan for our future growth

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


 

 

Outcome 3 - We can get around the City

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


Outcome 4 - We have safe, vibrant places

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

1        St Marys Night Time Economy Audit and Study                                                                1

 

2        Draft Special Places Usage Policy (Penrith City Centre and St Marys Town Centre)      5

 

 

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                            11 November 2019

 

 

 

1

St Marys Night Time Economy Audit and Study   

 

Compiled by:               Rebekah Elliott, City Engagement Coordinator

Authorised by:            Jeni Pollard, Place Manager  

 

Outcome

We have safe, vibrant places

Strategy

Help make our major centres and important community places safe and attractive

Service Activity

Support the revitalisation of Penrith City Centre and St Marys Town Centre

      

 

Executive Summary

St Marys is a key regional centre offering a strategic role and community focus to a significant catchment of residents, businesses and workers.  St Marys Town Centre is poised for growth, with the North South Rail Link heralding the town centre as a place for significant residential development over the coming decade.

 

With residential growth comes a demand for a more diverse economy with a spread of activities that extends into the evening so that residents can confidently walk around the town centre on their way to meet friends, grab a meal or go to an entertainment venue.

HillPDA Consulting was contracted by Council to describe and analyse the current night time economy (NTE) in the St Marys Town Centre and identify opportunities and strategies to enhance activity over time.

 

HillPDA worked with Council and key stakeholders to assess the current situation of the NTE with the compilation of key demographic and economic data, together with on the ground audits of what activities and destinations are already active along Queen Street in the evening. The study has identified insights into how the town centre functions ‘after sunset’ and providing a base for us to explore further collaboration with our partners such as the St Marys Town Centre Corporation.

 

In managing this growth, Council will be called upon to balance and maintain safety and amenity for all residents. Thus, the approach taken is one that recognises that we want to support existing businesses to stay open longer, developing an ‘afternoon’ economy whilst supporting a fledgling ‘evening’ economy.

 

Attached to this report is the documentation provided by HillPDA, the St Marys Night Time Economy Audit and Study (Attachment 1) including recommended actions to improve the short and medium term performance of the town centre in the evening.

This report recommends that Council endorse the St Marys Night Time Economy Audit and Study as a proactive approach to supporting a safe and vibrant St Marys Town Centre.

Background

To improve the performance of the evening economy it was necessary to understand the existing characteristics of the general town centre economy and the level of activity in the evenings.  The St Marys Night Time Economy Audit and Study (Attachment 1) identified strengths in the existing economy and a range of areas where the growth and increased diversity could occur at night.

 

HillPDA consultants were engaged to describe and analyse the current situation in St Marys, compare it with other successful places and recommend key interventions to grow the night time economy. The consultants undertook a number of night time audits in the town centre to best understand and measure the current environment. This was followed up with a focus group and survey of stakeholders and individual businesses. 

 

The Study encompasses five main components:

 

1.   Description of the social and economic characteristics of the place

2.   Night time audits

3.   SWOT Analysis

4.   Community consultation

5.   Night Time Economy Opportunities

 

This report outlines the findings of the St Marys Night Time Economy Audit and Study.  It describes the existing evening economy and recommends four key actions as part of an overall strategy which builds on the existing strengths of the night time economy and grows other supporting complementary elements.

 

Main Findings

The audit identified a number of challenges to the development of the NTE in St Marys. Firstly, through consultation and engagement with the stakeholders it recognised that there is still a perception about St Mary’s as an unsafe environment, particularly at night. This perception leads to a stigma that holds the centre back and is unwarranted based on actual data. Implementing night time place making interventions to positively influence the perception of the centre is encouraged through a strong collaboration strategy for the centre.

 

In general, the study found that the St Marys Town Centre has a range of strengths, including a dynamic takeaway food and beverage industry.  The diverse economic base included businesses that currently brought people into the centre in the evening such as gyms, chemists and doctor’s surgeries that could be retained for longer by activations and the local food and beverage outlets. 

 

The audit identified that presently there are limited spaces available in the centre that could support community events and they are not effectively linked with the existing retailers or transport links. Coachman’s Park is relatively well used as a community space during daylight hours but does not sit within any of the existing night time activity clusters. Defining a clear night time activation space that is well lit, has the infrastructure to support outdoor entertainment and has passive surveillance will be important.

 

Anticipated population growth in and around the town centre will continue to support the growth of the night time economy.  The commencement of residential development projects in and close to the city centre are evidence of the future potential for the growth of night time business and people activity.  A greater focus on the promotion and marketing of the St Marys Town Centre as a place of activity and interest for people will assist in making it a more desirable place to live and, in turn, encourage more residential development within the centre.

Night Time Economy Strategy

The St Marys Night Time Economy Audit and Study has four keys actions to foster grown and diversification of the existing night time economy. This includes:

 

1.   Defining a night time activity cluster

 

Define the night time activity cluster can assist in enhancing activation, attracting business and managing community expectations. Activation in a more confined area increases vibrancy and activity.

 

2.   Implementing night time place making interventions

 

Facilitate a diverse, active and interesting evening economy that establishes St Marys as an evening destination through interventions such as marketing, event activation program and creative lighting installations. An important element of the marketing will be challenging the perception of safety in the town centre.

 

3.   Creating a destination within a walkable catchment

 

Encourage a balance of commercial and residential uses in the centre that support activation both during the day and night.

 

4.   Activate street frontages 

 

Facilitate active street frontages that can increase the perceived vibrancy of a centre, and optimise surveillance.

Implementation

The implementation of the Night Time Economy Audit and Study will take time and resources.  The actions within the suggested actions in the Study will be implemented over the short, and medium term.  Some of the actions already form part of existing projects in the town centre, including the work on the East West Corridor.

 

The Place Management Department will seek opportunities within Council and with external partners to find the necessary commitment and resources to implement the study recommendations over time. The key actions will be delivered in close partnership with the St Marys Town Centre Corporation. In the future, the success of the Study will be assessed, and review of its success and future direction will be made.

Conclusion

The St Marys Night Time Economy Audit and Strategy has been the first investigation into the structure and function of this emerging component of the town centre’s economy and social life. The study found that St Marys already had a significant night time economy and that it was focussed on food and beverage businesses.

 

The growth and diversification of the night time economy will be dependent on the promotion and marketing of night time businesses, events and entertainment and ongoing residential and commercial development in and near the city centre. The St Marys Night Time Economy Audit and Study makes recommendations to support this growth and diversification and is a significant first step in a balanced approach with a range of multi-faceted interventions designed to improve people and business activity in the town centre at night.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on St Marys Night Time Economy Audit and Study be received

2.     Council endorse the St Marys Night Time Economy Study and Audit.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

St Marys Night Time Economy Audit and Study

52 Pages

Attachments Included

  


Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                            11 November 2019

 

 

 

2

Draft Special Places Usage Policy (Penrith City Centre and St Marys Town Centre)   

 

Compiled by:               Rebekah Elliott, City Engagement Coordinator

Dimity  Mullane, City Project Officer

Authorised by:            Jeni Pollard, Place Manager  

 

Outcome

We have safe, vibrant places

Strategy

Help make our major centres and important community places safe and attractive

Service Activity

Support the revitalisation of Penrith City Centre and St Marys Town Centre

      

 

Executive Summary

Council has transformed and upgraded both Queen Street, St Marys and High Street, Penrith in two important city-shaping projects. These major city renewal programs have delivered benefit for residents, workers, visitors and local businesses. With Council’s significant investment in our public domain, it is timely to consider how we foster and manage opportunities for activation and enlivening our city centres.

 

As Council officers work with the Penrith City Centre and St Marys Town Centre Corporations and businesses to activate and market the centres these is an opportunity for Council to consider the development of guiding principles and decision-making criteria for the activation of identified city centre special places.

 

The aim of the policy will be to manage appropriate activities that add vibrancy whilst ensuring safety, compliance and positive impact in public spaces. By clarifying expectations, it will foster an environment that encourages and enables appropriate activations and programming in the identified special places. 

 

The report recommends that Council endorse the attached draft Special Places Usage Policy (Attachment 1).

Background

The Penrith City Centre Public Domain Masterplan and the St Marys Streetscape Improvement Project lists a network of special places that have a unique offering or landmark to attract people to the places.

 

These ‘special places’ help to support the local economy and foster a more positive experience for the community in visiting the centres. In some cases they are a meeting point for people or in the case of the very long Queen Street streetscape, they offer an opportunity to navigate the street and create “landmarks”. The network of special places supports Council’s vision for the two centres to be places where people live, work and play in welcoming, vibrant and accessible environments.

Rationale

Currently there is no framework or guidelines to support the prioritising of the network of special places for the centres that balances small and large scale gatherings and active and passive activity. There is also no set of conditions on permissible and non-permissible activities in the spaces including the suitability for commercial activity. Thus, the opportunity for groups, profit or non-profit to use these spaces is limited.

 

Draft Policy Aims and Objectives

The aim of the policy is to manage activities that add vibrancy and support Council’s aspirations to revitalise our city centre, whilst ensuring that safety and compliance in our special places.

 

The draft policy objectives are to ensure that activities and events undertaken on Council land are in accordance with the rules that protect the public interest and that these activities compliment and do not conflict with retail and commercial businesses in the city centres.

 

In addition, the draft policy will serve as an opportunity to encourage and promote positive activations in our public spaces, whilst contributing to the vibrancy, safety and appeal of our city centres. All the identified special places will be subject to change of usages as required from time to time.

 

Outline of the Draft Policy

The policy itself provides the framework, objectives, locations of the special places network, guiding principles and conditions of usage for a special place.

 

Attachment 1 of the policy specifies the hierarchy of the special places in the wider context of the area and their significance in the greater community. The hierarchy identifies where the special places sit in the context of the centres and Penrith Local Government Area. It defines their role as a mixture of passive and active spaces. 

 

Special Places Network

The network of special places across the Penrith City Centre and St Marys Town Centre are outlined as follows. Maps of the locations can be found in Attachment 2.

Penrith City Centre:

·    Future City Park

·    Memory Park

·    Triangle Park

·    The Mondo

·    Linear Plazas in High Street

·    Woodriff Lane

·    Chambers Court

 

St Marys Town Centre:

·    Coachmans Park

·    Highway Gateway

·    King Street Bus Stop

·    Library

·    Crana Street Junction

·    Post Office

·    Baldo’s Laneway

·    Mid Block Laneway

·    Oxley Arcade

·    Telstra Exchange

·    Nariel Street

·    Station Plaza

 

Partnerships

The Penrith City Centre Corporation and St Marys Town Centre Corporation, and the businesses surrounding the identified locations have been consulted regarding the development of the policy. As a result of the engagement process, there have been changes to the proposed activities and further changes are possible should there be compelling issues raised. Until the spaces begin to be used regularly any unintended outcomes may not be known.

 

It is anticipated that the policy will guide the work of the two corporations in their activations as well as giving location options for community or commercial ventures.

 

Conclusion

The Draft Special Places Usage Policy will support the growth of our city centres as vibrant and safe places. The proposed requirements of the policy will ensure that the public interest is protected and activity will take place in a safe and appropriate environment.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Draft Special Places Usage Policy (Penrith City Centre and St Marys Town Centre) be received

2.     Council endorse the Draft Special Places Usage Policy (Attachment 1).

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

Draft Special Places Usage Policy

11 Pages

Attachments Included

2.

Location maps of Special Places

2 Pages

Attachments Included

   


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


Outcome 5 - We care about our environment

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

3        Regional Illegal Dumping Squad (RID) - EPA Project Agreement                                  11

 

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                            11 November 2019

 

 

 

3

Regional Illegal Dumping Squad (RID) - EPA Project Agreement   

 

Compiled by:               Greg McCarthy , Environmental Health and Compliance Manager 

Authorised by:            Wayne Mitchell, Director - Development and Regulatory Services  

 

Outcome

We care for our environment

Strategy

Protect and improve the environment of our City

Service Activity

Collaboratively manage illegal dumping across Western Sydney (RID Squad)

      

 

Executive Summary

This report provides Council with information on the current status of the Western Sydney Regional Illegal Dumping (RID) Squad, and the Project Agreement 1 July 2017 – 30 June 2021 which has been endorsed by the Environmental Protection Authority (EPA).

Background

Councils have responsibilities under the Protection of the Environment Operations Act 1997, the Local Government Act 1993 and the Environment Planning & Assessment Act 1979 with respect to the regulation of waste management in their local government areas.

 

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) carries out functions under the Waste Avoidance and Resource Recovery Act 2001 to develop, implement and/or coordinate programs for the prevention of litter and illegal dumping.

 

The EPA is leading the implementation of Waste Less, Recycle More which is a $802 million initiative to transform waste and recycling in NSW. A key action in tackling illegal dumping is the ongoing support and funding of Regional Illegal Dumping (RID) squads and programs.

 

The Western Sydney RID Squad was formed in 1999 as a response to the growing problem of the illegal dumping of waste. The RID Squad is a partnership between the EPA and local councils aimed at addressing the illegal dumping of waste material throughout Western Sydney. Current members of the RID Squad include:

 

·  Blacktown City Council

·  Fairfield City Council

·  The Hills Shire Council

·  Cumberland Council

·  Blue Mountains City Council (12 month trial)

·  Penrith City Council

 

Penrith City Council Penrith City Council has hosted the RID Squad since 1999, and includes managing the operations, budget and employment arrangements of the squad.

 

The RID Squad is funded through a co-contribution from the EPA and the Member Councils. The Host Council is responsible for the administration of each RID Squad and program, and a Strategic Alliance Agreement and an EPA Project Agreement set the framework and reporting requirements for the operation of the RID Squads and programs.

 

Under the Project Agreement the EPA provides significant funding to the project to offset operational costs (approximately 78,000 per Council).

Current Situation

 

The RID Squad is a deterrent program utilising a team of specialist investigators, targeting the illegal disposal of waste throughout Western Sydney. The Squad is unique in that staff employed by one Council operate across five local government areas, providing a service that would otherwise not be able to be afforded by a single Council.

 

Significant outcomes of the RID Squad include:

 

·    It has provided member councils with a significant resource without all the inherent costs

·    Each Council is provided with the ability to target a specific area or issue with all staff of the Squad

·    The community has benefited from the reduction in illegal dumping

·    The community has also benefited through the cost savings derived from the sharing of RID project and staff resources

·    Illegally dumped waste that has been successfully tracked to a responsible person or company is required to be removed by that person or company, thereby saving the community the costs of removal and disposal of the waste

·    In 2018/19, the RID Squad conducted 2,351 investigations and issued 129 Penalty Infringement Notices

The current RID squad has continued to provide an important function as part a regional approach to illegal dumping, using a strategic, coordinated approach to preventing illegal dumping within the region. They continue to meet their key objectives of identifying illegal dumping hotspots, investigating illegal dumping incidents and taking action against offenders. They also organise clean-ups, track down illegal landfills, identify changes and trends in illegal dumping across the region, deter and educate community members about illegal dumping and run joint compliance campaigns with the EPA, WorkCover, NSW Police and other regulatory authorities.


Conclusion

 

The Western Sydney Regional Illegal Dumping (RID) Squad is performing strongly under the terms of the EPA Project Agreement 2017 – 2021.

 

The current team are responding efficiently to illegal dumping in a prompt and efficient manner whilst delivering a service that is reflective of the EPA and member Council’s key objectives. 

 

We are currently meeting other Western Sydney Councils and the EPA to discuss expanded membership of the Western Sydney RID Squad.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the information contained in the report on Regional Illegal Dumping Squad (RID) - EPA Project Agreement be received.

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.  


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


 

 

Outcome 6 - We are healthy and share strong community spirit

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


Outcome 7 - We have confidence in our Council

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

4        Draft Fraud and Corruption Prevention Policy                                                                 19

 

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                            11 November 2019

 

 

 

4

Draft Fraud and Corruption Prevention Policy    

 

Compiled by:               Avanthi Fernando, Governance Officer

Adam Beggs, Governance Coordinator

Authorised by:            Glenn McCarthy, Governance Manager  

 

Outcome

We have confidence in our Council

Strategy

Be open and fair in our decisions and our dealings with people

Service Activity

Promote ethical behaviour through awareness and advice and manage investigations of alleged corruption, maladministration or breaches of the Code of Conduct

      

 

Executive Summary

The purpose of this report is to provide council with draft Fraud and Corruption Prevention Policy (the policy) consistent with recommendations made by Council’s Audit Risk and Improvement Committee (ARIC). The draft policy has been prepared in order to implement an integrity framework to eliminate and prevent internally and externally instigated fraud and corruption against Council. It is intended that the implementation of this policy will add to council’s suite of documents that contribute towards the creation of an ethical culture where Council addresses potential or actual occurrences of fraud and corruption and responds to them in a timely manner.

Background

Council’s Model Code of Conduct outlines that Council officials should ‘comply with standards of conduct expected of them, fulfil their statutory duty, and act in a way that enhances public confidence in local government’. Council expects all staff to promote Council values, commit to high standards of legal, ethical, and moral behaviour whilst carrying out their duties. Council maintains zero tolerance to acts of fraud and corruption within its work environment. Council also recognises the need for a comprehensive and up-to-date policy to establish Council’s position on fraud and corruption.

 

Grant Thornton Group conducted a review on Council’s fraud and corruption framework in January and February 2019 based on the 10 attributes of the NSW Audit Office Fraud Control Improvement Kit (2015). Number of Council staff including Chief Governance Officer, Legal Services Manager, Risk and Audit Coordinator, Governance Manager, Governance Coordinator, Corporate Planning Coordinator, Supply Coordinator, and Human Resources Coordinator were consulted during the review. The objectives of this review were to:

 

·    Assess Council’s current fraud control,

·    Develop a Fraud and Corruption Control Plan,

·    Review and recommend any updates to the Council’s current Fraud and Corruption 
Policy as necessary, and

·    Review Council’s training on fraud and corruption and prepare a training plan.

 

The detailed findings of the review identified that the current Fraud and Corruption Prevention Policy needed updating and that there were areas for improvement in terms of awareness for the organisation. The findings recommended 13 amendments to the current Fraud and Corruption Policy. Governance staff reviewed the recommendations and have largely incorporated them into the revised policy.

The draft Fraud and Corruption Prevention Policy now contains:

 

1. Principles of fraud and corruption and what is expected of Council staff whilst carrying out
    their duties.

2. Definitions of fraud and corruption.

3. Related legislation, policies, control and guidelines applicable to fraud and corruption.

4. Roles and responsibilities of Council staff, Managers, Legal and Governance managers,
    Disclosures Coordinator and Officers, Internal Audit, ARIC, and General Manager.

5. Fraud and corruption prevention and regular risk assessments to review changes to the
    risk environment.

6. Internal and external reporting mechanisms including who can report, what should be
    reported, and how to report.

7. Investigation protocols including feedback to reporters, maintaining confidentiality,
    protection against reprisal, available support, rights of the person who is the subject of the  
    report and action.

 

Current Situation

The draft policy has been reviewed by Legal and Governance team and was submitted to the Audit, Risk and Improvement Committee (ARIC) on 04 September 2019 for review. Further observations and recommendations by the ARIC have been incorporated into the draft document for Council’s consideration tonight.

 

Risk Implications

Fraudulent and corrupt behaviour are identified as inevitable risks to Council given the nature of our business and interactions with external parties. Therefore, it is imperative to bring together measures to eliminate, prevent, detect and report such behaviour to maintain the integrity of the Council. The implementation of the policy is considered an important measure in mitigating the inherent risks that Council is exposed to.

 

Conclusion

The attached draft Fraud and Corruption Prevention Policy has been prepared over some time with input from both external agencies, the ARIC and governance staff. The policy adds to an existing suite of documents in place that mitigate risks to Council and contribute to the effective governance framework Council has implemented.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Draft Fraud and Corruption Prevention Policy  be received

2.     Council adopt the Fraud and Corruption Prevention Policy as attached to the report.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

Draft Fraud and Corruption Prevention Policy

13 Pages

Attachments Included

   


 

ATTACHMENTS  

 

 

Date of Meeting:     Monday 11 November 2019

Report Title:            St Marys Night Time Economy Audit and Study

Attachments:           St Marys Night Time Economy Audit and Study



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                          11 November 2019

Attachment 1 - St Marys Night Time Economy Audit and Study

 

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ATTACHMENTS  

 

 

Date of Meeting:     Monday 11 November 2019

Report Title:            Draft Special Places Usage Policy (Penrith City Centre and St Marys Town Centre)

Attachments:           Draft Special Places Usage Policy

                                Location maps of Special Places



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                          11 November 2019

Attachment 1 - Draft Special Places Usage Policy

 

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Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   11 November 2019

Attachment 2 - Location maps of Special Places

 

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ATTACHMENTS  

 

 

Date of Meeting:     Monday 11 November 2019

Report Title:            Draft Fraud and Corruption Prevention Policy

Attachments:           Draft Fraud and Corruption Prevention Policy



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                          11 November 2019

Attachment 1 - Draft Fraud and Corruption Prevention Policy

 

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