Council_Mark_POS_RGB

22 April 2020

 

Dear Councillor,

In pursuance of the provisions of the Local Government Act, 1993 and the Regulations thereunder, notice is hereby given that an ORDINARY MEETING of Penrith City Council is to be held remotely using audio visual links and audio streamed on the Council website on Monday 27 April 2020 at 7:00PM.

Attention is directed to the statement accompanying this notice of the business proposed to be transacted at the meeting.

Yours faithfully

 

 

Warwick Winn

General Manager

 

BUSINESS

 

1.           LEAVE OF ABSENCE

 

2.           APOLOGIES

 

3.           CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES

Ordinary Meeting - 23 March 2020.

 

4.           DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

Pecuniary Interest (The Act requires Councillors who declare a pecuniary interest in an item to leave the meeting during discussion of that item)

Non-Pecuniary Conflict of Interest – Significant and Less than Significant (The Code of Conduct requires Councillors who declare a significant non-pecuniary conflict of interest in an item to leave the meeting during discussion of that item)

 

5.           ADDRESSING COUNCIL (Statements to be read out)

 

6.           MAYORAL MINUTES

 

7.           NOTICES OF MOTION TO RESCIND A RESOLUTION

 

8.           NOTICES OF MOTION AND QUESTIONS ON NOTICE

 

9.           ADOPTION OF REPORTS AND RECOMMENDATION OF COMMITTEES

Local Traffic Committee Meeting - 6 April 2020.

 

10.         DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

11.         REQUESTS FOR REPORTS AND MEMORANDUMS

 

12.         URGENT BUSINESS

 

13.         COMMITTEE OF THE WHOLE


ORDINARY MEETING

 

Monday 27 April 2020

 

table of contents

 

 

 

 

 

STATEMENT OF RECOGNITION OF PENRITH CITY’S ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER CULTURAL HERITAGE

 

 

PRAYER

 

 

 

meeting calendar

 

 

confirmation of minutes

 

 

MAYORAL MINUTES

 

 

report and recommendations of committees

 

 

DELIVERY program reports


 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 


Statement of Recognition of

Penrith City’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cultural Heritage

 

 

Council values the unique status of Aboriginal people as the original owners and custodians of lands and waters, including the land and waters of Penrith City.

 

Council values the unique status of Torres Strait Islander people as the original owners and custodians of the Torres Strait Islands and surrounding waters.

 

We work together for a united Australia and City that respects this land of ours, that values the diversity of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural heritage, and provides justice and equity for all.

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

PRAYER

 

 

 

“Sovereign God, tonight as we gather together as a Council we affirm that you are the giver and sustainer of life.  We come together as representatives of our community to make decisions that will benefit this city and the people within it. 

 

We come not in a spirit of competition, not as adversaries, but as colleagues.  Help us to treat each other with respect, with dignity, with interest and with honesty.  Help us not just to hear the words we say, but also to hear each others hearts.  We seek to be wise in all that we say and do.

 

As we meet, our concern is for this city.  Grant us wisdom, courage and strength.

 

Lord, help us.  We pray this in the name of Jesus Christ our Lord.  Amen.”

 

 

 

 

 


Council Chambers

Seating Arrangements


For members of the public addressing the meeting


 

 

 

Lectern


 

 

     Directors


 

 

 

General Manager
Warwick Winn

His Worship the Mayor Councillor Ross Fowler OAM



Governance Coordinator Adam Beggs






Minute Clerk

MediaClr Marcus Cornish

North Ward

 

Clr Bernard Bratusa

East Ward

 

 

Clr Tricia Hitchen

East Ward

 

 

Clr Brian Cartwright

South Ward

 

 

Clr Mark Davies

South Ward

 

 

Clr Jim Aitken OAM

Public GallerySouth Ward

 

 

Clr Kevin Crameri OAM

North Ward

 

 

Clr John Thain

North Ward

Clr Karen McKeown OAM

South Ward

 

Clr Aaron Duke

North Ward

 

Clr Todd Carney

East Ward

 

Clr Greg Davies

East Ward

 

Clr Robin Cook

East Ward

 

Clr Kath Presdee

ManagersSouth Ward

 

 

Directors


 


Oath of Office

 

I swear that I will undertake the duties of the office of Councillor in the best interests of the people of Penrith and the Penrith City Council and that I will faithfully and impartially carry out the functions, powers, authorities and discretions vested in me under the Local Government Act 1993 or any other Act to the best of my ability and judgment.

 

 

Affirmation of Office

 

I solemnly and sincerely declare and affirm that I will undertake the duties of the office of Councillor in the best interests of the people of Penrith and the Penrith City Council and that I will faithfully and impartially carry out the functions, powers, authorities and discretions vested in me under the Local Government Act 1993 or any other Act to the best of my ability and judgment.

 

 

2016 General Election – taken/made at the Ordinary Meeting of Council on 26 September 2016, Minute Number 272

 

2018 By-Election – taken/made by Councillor Brian Cartwright on 17 May 2018 and Councillor Robin Cook on 21 May 2018 before the Chief Governance Officer, Stephen Britten, an Australian Legal Practitioner

 

 

Local Government Act 1993, Section 233A

 


Council_Mark_POS_RGB2020 MEETING CALENDAR

January 2020 - December 2020

(adopted by Council - 25 November 2019 & amended - 25 March 2020)

 

 

 

TIME

JAN

FEB

MAR

APRIL

MAY

JUNE

JULY

AUG

SEPT

OCT

NOV

DEC

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

 

Ordinary Council Meeting

7.00pm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

24@

23

27v

25#

22*

27

24@

  28^ü

26

23#+

14

Policy Review Committee

7.00pm

 

10

 

 

 

15

 

10

 

 

9

7

 

 

 v

Meeting at which the draft corporate planning documents (Delivery Program and Operational Plan) are endorsed for exhibition

 *

Meeting at which the draft corporate planning documents (Delivery Program and Operational Plan) are adopted

 #

Meetings at which the Operational Plan quarterly reviews (March and September) are presented

 @

Meetings at which the Delivery Program progress reports (including the Operational Plan quarterly reviews for December and June) are presented

 ^

Election of Mayor/Deputy Mayor

 ü

Meeting at which the 2019- 2020 Annual Statements are presented

 

Meeting at which any comments on the 2019-2020 Annual Statements are adopted

 +

Meeting at which the Annual Report is presented

Briefing to consider Budget, draft fees & charges and corporate documents

-            Extraordinary Meetings are held as required;

-            Members of the public are invited to observe meetings of the Council (Ordinary and Policy Review Committee).

Should you wish to address Council, please contact Governance Coordinator, Adam Beggs on 4732 7597.

 


UNCONFIRMED MINUTES

 OF THE ORDINARY MEETING OF PENRITH CITY COUNCIL HELD IN THE

COUNCIL CHAMBERS

ON MONDAY 23 MARCH 2020 AT 7:04PM

NATIONAL ANTHEM 

The meeting opened with the National Anthem.    

WEBCASTING STATEMENT

His Worship the Mayor, Councillor Ross Fowler OAM read a statement advising that Council Meetings are recorded and webcast.

STATEMENT OF RECOGNITION

His Worship the Mayor, Councillor Ross Fowler OAM read a statement of recognition of Penrith City’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cultural Heritage.

PRAYER

The Council Prayer was read by the Governance Co-ordinator, Mr Adam Beggs.

PRESENT

His Worship the Mayor, Councillor Ross Fowler OAM, Deputy Mayor, Councillor Karen McKeown OAM, and Councillors Bernard Bratusa (arrived 7:05pm), Todd Carney, Brian Cartwright, Robin Cook, Kevin Crameri OAM, Mark Davies, Aaron Duke, Tricia Hitchen, Kath Presdee and John Thain.

 

APOLOGIES

41  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM seconded Councillor Brian Cartwright that apologies be accepted from Councillors Aaron Duke, Jim Aitken OAM, Marcus Cornish and Greg Davies.

 

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES - Ordinary Meeting - 24 February 2020

42  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Tricia Hitchen seconded Councillor Todd Carney that the minutes of the Ordinary Meeting of 24 February 2020 be confirmed.

 

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

There were no declarations of interest.


 

 

Mayoral Minutes

 

1        Retirement of Murray Wilcockson                                                            

43  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Ross Fowler OAM seconded Councillor Tricia Hitchen that the Mayoral Minute on Retirement of Murray Wilcockson be received.

 

2        Council's response to COVID-19                                                              

44  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Ross Fowler OAM seconded Councillor John Thain that the Mayoral Minute on Council's response to COVID-19 be received.

 

Reports of Committees

 

1        Report and Recommendations of the Access Committee Meeting held on 12 February 2020                                                                          

45  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Mark Davies seconded Councillor Todd Carney that the recommendations contained in the Report and Recommendations of the Access Committee meeting held on 12 February, 2020 be adopted.

 

2        Report and Recommendations of the Heritage Advisory Committee Meeting held on 19 February 2020                                                            

46  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Mark Davies seconded Councillor Todd Carney that the recommendations contained in the Report and Recommendations of the Heritage Advisory Committee meeting held on 19 February, 2020 be adopted.

 

3        Report and Recommendations of the Local Traffic Committee Meeting held on 2 March 2020                                                                   

47  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Mark Davies seconded Councillor Todd Carney that the recommendations contained in the Report and Recommendations of the Local Traffic Committee meeting held on 2 March, 2020 be adopted.

 

DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Outcome 2 - We plan for our future growth

 

1        Adoption of Penrith's Local Strategic Planning Statement                   

48  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Tricia Hitchen seconded Councillor John Thain

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Adoption of Penrith's Local Strategic Planning Statement be received

2.     Council adopt the Local Strategic Planning Statement provided in Attachment 1.

3.     The immediate actions identified in the Local Strategic Planning Statement be incorporated into Council’s 2020-21 Operational Plan.

 

In accordance with Section 375A of the Local Government Act 1993, a DIVISION was then called with the following result:

For

Against

 

Councillor Kath Presdee

 

Councillor Robin Cook

 

Councillor Todd Carney

 

Councillor Karen McKeown OAM

                                                        

Councillor John Thain  

 

Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM

 

Councillor Mark Davies

 

Councillor Brian Cartwright

 

Councillor Tricia Hitchen

 

Councillor Bernard Bratusa   

 

Councillor Ross Fowler OAM

 

 

2        Section 7.12 Development Contributions Plan for non-residential development                                                                                                

49  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM seconded Councillor Brian Cartwright

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Section 7.12 Development Contributions Plan for non-residential development be received

2.     Council endorse the draft Section 7.12 Development Contributions Plan for non-residential development for public exhibition.

3.     The plan is exhibited for a period of 28 days and undertaken in accordance with the requirements of Councils Community Participation Plan and the Environmental Planning & Assessment Act Regulations.

4.     A report be presented to Council on submissions received during the public exhibition.

5.     Council adopt the draft additional works list for a higher rate level in order to commence discussions with the Department of Planning, Industry and Environment on pursuing a greater rate levy for this Plan.

In accordance with Section 375A of the Local Government Act 1993, a DIVISION was then called with the following result:

For

Against

 

Councillor Kath Presdee

 

Councillor Robin Cook

 

Councillor Todd Carney

 

Councillor Karen McKeown OAM

                                                        

Councillor John Thain  

 

Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM

 

Councillor Mark Davies

 

Councillor Brian Cartwright

 

Councillor Tricia Hitchen

 

Councillor Bernard Bratusa   

 

Councillor Ross Fowler OAM

 

 

 

3        Penrith Development Control Plan 2014 Housekeeping Amendments for Public Exhibition                                                                                   

50  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM seconded Councillor Todd Carney

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Penrith Development Control Plan 2014 Housekeeping Amendments for Public Exhibition be received.

2.     The General Manager be authorised to make any minor changes to the draft Penrith Development Control Plan 2014 prior to exhibition.

3.     Amendments to draft Penrith Development Control Plan 2014 be publicly exhibited, in accordance with the relevant provisions of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act, 1979 and associated Regulations and Councils Community Participation Plan.

4.     A further report be presented to Council following the public exhibition.

In accordance with Section 375A of the Local Government Act 1993, a DIVISION was then called with the following result:

For

Against

 

Councillor Kath Presdee

 

Councillor Robin Cook

 

Councillor Todd Carney

 

Councillor Karen McKeown OAM

                                                        

Councillor John Thain  

 

Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM

 

Councillor Mark Davies

 

Councillor Brian Cartwright

 

Councillor Tricia Hitchen

 

Councillor Bernard Bratusa   

 

Councillor Ross Fowler OAM

 

 

 

4        Draft submission to Fernhill Estate Future Use Options Paper            

51  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Kath Presdee seconded Councillor Robin Cook

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Draft submission to Fernhill Estate Future Use Options Paper be received

2.     Council endorse the Fernhill Estate Future Use Submission to be provided to Department of Planning, Industry & Environment for consideration.

 


 

 

5        Planning Proposal 33-43 Phillip Street, St Marys                                   

52  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Tricia Hitchen seconded Councillor John Thain

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Planning Proposal 33-43 Phillip Street, St Marys be received.

2.     Council endorse the Planning Proposal for Station Plaza at 33-43 Phillip Street, St Marys provided in the separate enclosure to this report, subject to the VPA being signed.

3.     The Department of Planning, Industry and Environment are notified of Councils intention to make the amendment to Penrith Local Environmental Plan 2010 after the VPA is executed.

4.     A VPA be prepared in accordance with the Environmental Planning & Assessment Act 1979 and letter of offer, and be notified and executed.

5.     The draft VPA be reported back to Council for its consideration.

6.     Council officers forward the Planning Proposal to Parliamentary Counsel for an opinion in accordance with the plan making process, after the VPA has been executed.

7.     Consistent with our plan making delegations, Council make the required amendment to Penrith Local Environmental Plan 2010.

8.     Council authorise the General Manager to execute all necessary documents and do all necessary things to give effect to the Council’s decision to make the amendment to the Penrith Local Environmental Plan 2010.

9.     The Department of Planning, Industry and Environment be provided with a copy of the amended plan for notification.

In accordance with Section 375A of the Local Government Act 1993, a DIVISION was then called with the following result:

For

Against

 

Councillor Kath Presdee

Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM

Councillor Robin Cook

 

Councillor Todd Carney

 

Councillor Karen McKeown OAM

                                                        

Councillor John Thain  

 

Councillor Mark Davies

 

Councillor Brian Cartwright

 

Councillor Tricia Hitchen

 

Councillor Bernard Bratusa   

 

Councillor Ross Fowler OAM

 

 

 

 


 

 

Outcome 3 - We can get around the City

 

6        2020-21 Blackspot and Safer Roads Program Funding Offer               

53  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Karen McKeown OAM seconded Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on 2020-21 Blackspot and Safer Roads Program Funding Offer be received.

2.     Council acknowledge acceptance of grant funding of $1,250,000 offered for the Blackspot and Safer Roads Projects shown in Tables 1 for the 2020/21 financial year.

3.     Council write to relevant State and Federal Members thanking them for their continued support of road safety improvements.

 

Outcome 4 - We have safe, vibrant places

 

7        Application to NSW Government Infrastructure Grant 2019-20            

54  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor John Thain seconded Councillor Mark Davies

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Application to NSW Government Infrastructure Grant 2019-20 be received

2.     Council endorse the allocation of $83,750 from the Grant Funded Projects Reserve

3.     Council endorse Neighbourhood Renewal’s application to the NSW Government’s Infrastructure Grant 2019-20 for a new BBQ facility, playspace and dynamic fitness equipment at Robin Wiles Park, North St Marys.

 

8        RFT19/20-27 Kingswood Pedestrian Lighting                                         

55  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM seconded Councillor Kath Presdee

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on RFT19/20-27 Kingswood Pedestrian Lighting be received

2.     Remaining available funds from the rescinded Kingswood Neighbourhood Centre Development Contributions Plan be allocated toward the Kingswood Pedestrian Lighting Project.

3.     The proposal and Lump sum price from Stowe Australia Pty Ltd of $529,494.00 excluding GST be accepted for RFT19/20-27Kingswood Pedestrian Lighting, Kingswood.

4.     The Common Seal of the Council of the City of Penrith be placed on all documentation as necessary.

 

 

9        RFT19/20-37 Design and Construction of Shade Sails and Structures

56  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Mark Davies seconded Councillor Karen McKeown OAM

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on RFT19/20-37 Design and Construction of Shade Sails and Structures be received

2.     Tender received from Central Industries Pty Ltd, be accepted to form a three (3) year schedule of rates contract, with an option to extend two (2) x one (1) year periods by mutual agreement, subject to satisfactory performance

3.     The Common Seal of the Council of the City of Penrith be placed on all documentation as necessary.

 

 

Outcome 5 - We care about our environment

 

10      Penrith Central Business District Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan                                                                                            

57  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM seconded Councillor Bernard Bratusa

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Penrith Central Business District Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan be received.

2.     The Penrith CBD Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan Final Report dated March 2020 be adopted.

3.     The Penrith CBD Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan Final Report dated March 2020 be published and made available on Council’s website.

4.     Council further consider the recommended mitigation works in the Penrith CBD Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan for inclusion by Council in future Capital Works Programs and for grant funding applications.

5.     Council consider the flood planning recommendations listed in the Penrith CBD Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan Final Report dated March 2020 when reviewing its Development Control Plan 2014, and the Local Environmental Plan 2010.

6.     Council write to those who made submissions advising of Council’s resolution.

7.     Council write to relevant State and Federal Members of Parliament advising them of the adoption of the Penrith CBD Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan and thanking them for their continued support of Council’s Floodplain Management program.

 


 

 

11      St Marys (Byrnes Creek) Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan                                                                                            

58  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM seconded Councillor Bernard Bratusa

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on St Marys (Byrnes Creek) Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan be received.

2.     The St Marys (Byrnes Creek) Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan Final Report dated February 2020 be adopted.

3.     The St Marys (Byrnes Creek) Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan Final Report dated February 2020 be published and made available on Council’s website.

4.     Council further consider the recommended mitigation works in the St Marys (Byrnes Creek) Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan for inclusion by Council in future Capital Works Programs and for grant funding applications.

5.     Council consider the flood planning recommendations listed in the St Marys (Byrnes Creek) Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan Final Report dated February 2020 when reviewing its Development Control Plan 2014, and the Local Environmental Plan 2010.

6.     Council write to those who made submissions advising of Council’s resolution.

7.     Council write to relevant State and Federal Members of Parliament advising them of the adoption of the St Marys (Byrnes Creek) Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan and thanking them for their continued support of Council’s Floodplain Management program.

 

 

Outcome 6 - We are healthy and share strong community spirit

 

12      RFT19/20-36 Construction of Kingsway Sports Fields

Councillor Todd Carney left the meeting, the time being 7:36pm.                        

59  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Bernard Bratusa seconded Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on RFT19/20-36 Construction of Kingsway Sports Fields be received

2.     The tender received from Romba Pty Ltd, for the amount of $1,176,445.59 (excluding GST) be accepted for construction the fields and all associated works subject to the provision of additional securities.

3.     Tender options one $223,104.75, option two $16,500.00, option three $39,226.00, and option nine $115,500.00 (all excluding GST) be accepted for a total of $394,330.75 (excluding GST).

4.     The Common Seal of the Council of the City of Penrith be placed on all documentation as necessary.

 

Outcome 7 - We have confidence in our Council

 

Councillor Todd Carney returned to the meeting, the time being 7:37pm.

 

13      Caddens Road Upgrade - Dedication of Council Land for Road Widening Purposes                                                                                    

60  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM seconded Councillor Brian Cartwright

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Caddens Road Upgrade - Dedication of Council Land for Road Widening Purposes be received.

2.     Council dedicate part Lots 196 -197 DP1169281 and part Lot 4 DP813516 for the purposes of Public Road in accordance with the terms and conditions listed in the report.

3.     The Common Seal of the Council of the City of Penrith be placed on all necessary documentation.

 

14      Caddens Road Upgrade - Easement for Electrical Purposes -Lot 499 DP 1197976                                                                                                  

61  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM seconded Councillor Brian Cartwright

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Caddens Road Upgrade - Easement for Electrical Purposes -Lot 499 DP 1197976 be received.

2.     Council grant an easement over Lot 499 DP 1197976 as per the terms and conditions listed within the report.

3.     The Common Seal of the Council of the City of Penrith be placed on all necessary documentation.

 

15      2020 Australian Local Government Association (ALGA) Annual General Assembly                                                                                      

62  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Kath Presdee seconded Councillor Robin Cook

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on 2020 Australian Local Government Association (ALGA) Annual General Assembly be received.

2.     Subject to the Annual General Assembly being held, the motion outlined in tonight’s report with respect to the Fire Technician Course be endorsed. 

 


 

 

16      Council Nursery Revitalisation Project - Easement for underground cables - Lot 112 DP774782                                                                         

63  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Robin Cook seconded Councillor Brian Cartwright

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Council Nursery Revitalisation Project - Easement for underground cables - Lot 112 DP774782 be received.

2.     Council grant an Easement over Lot 112 DP774782 for the electrical infrastructure as per the terms and conditions listed within the report.

3.     The Common Seal of the Council of the City of Penrith be placed on all necessary documentation.

 

17      Summary of Investment & Banking for the Period 1 January 2020 to 31 January 2020                                                                                          

64  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Mark Davies seconded Councillor Brian Cartwright

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Summary of Investment & Banking for the Period 1 January 2020 to 31 January 2020 be received.

2.     The certificate of the Responsible Accounting Officer and Summary of Investments and Performance for the Period 1 January 2020 to 31 January 2020 be noted and accepted.

3.     The graphical investment analysis as at 31 January 2020 be noted.

 

18      Summary of Investment & Banking for the Period 1 February 2020 to 29 February 2020                                                                                        

65  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Mark Davies seconded Councillor Brian Cartwright

That:

1.   The information contained in the report on Summary of Investment & Banking for the Period 1 February 2020 to 29 February 2020 be received. 

2.    The certificate of the Responsible Accounting Officer and Summary of Investments and Performance for the Period 1 February 2020 to 29 February 2020 be noted and accepted.

3.    The graphical investment analysis as at 29 February 2020 be noted

 

 


 

 

REQUESTS FOR REPORTS AND MEMORANDUMS

 

RR 1           Refunds for Sportsfield and Recreation Facility Bookings   

Councillor Bernard Bratusa requested a memo reply advising whether refunds could be granted to organisations who have booked sportsfields and recreation facilities which have now become unavailable for hire.

 

RR 2           Fees for Use of Footpath for Dining    

Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM requested a memo reply regarding not charging cafes and restaurants in the Penrith Local Government Area the fee for use of footpaths for outdoor dining during the current Coronavirus crisis, as they are unable to trade in this manner.

 

UB 1           Personnel Matter       

Councillor Ross Fowler OAM requested that a Personnel Matter be referred to Committee of the Whole as the report refers to personnel matters concerning particular individuals and discussion of the matter in open meeting would be, on balance, contrary to the public interest.

 

 

Committee of the Whole

 

66 RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Karen McKeown OAM seconded Councillor Mark Davies that the meeting adjourn to the Committee of the Whole to deal with the following matters, the time being 7:47pm.

 

1        Presence of the Public

 

CW1 RESOLVED on the motion of Councillor Karen McKeown OAM seconded Councillor Mark Davies that the press and public be excluded from Committee of the Whole to deal with the following matters:

 

 

Outcome 7

 

2        Seeking Council resolution to use Reasonable Force - 5 Whitbeck Place, Cranebrook                                                                                                                                              

 

This item has been referred to Committee of the Whole as the report refers to personnel matters concerning particular individuals and discussion of the matter in open meeting would be, on balance, contrary to the public interest.

 

3        Removal of Easement over Property at 149-155 Boundary Road, Cranebrook        

 

This item has been referred to Committee of the Whole as the report refers to personnel matters concerning particular individuals and discussion of the matter in open meeting would be, on balance, contrary to the public interest.


 

 

4        Property Matter - Proposed Acquisition (Commercial Matter – Diversification of Council’s Property Investment Portfolio)                                                                       

 

This item has been referred to Committee of the Whole as the report refers to information that would, if disclosed, confer a commercial advantage on a person with whom the Council is conducting (or proposes to conduct) business and discussion of the matter in open meeting would be, on balance, contrary to the public interest.

 

5        Personnel Matter

 

This item has been referred to Committee of the Whole as the report refers to personnel matters concerning particular individuals and discussion of the matter in open meeting would be, on balance, contrary to the public interest.

 

The meeting resumed at 8:05pm and the General Manager reported that the Committee of the Whole met at 7:47pm on 23 March 2020, the following being present

 

His Worship the Mayor, Councillor Ross Fowler OAM, Deputy Mayor, Councillor Karen McKeown OAM, and Councillors Bernard Bratusa, Todd Carney, Brian Cartwright, Robin Cook, Kevin Crameri OAM, Mark Davies, Tricia Hitchen, Kath Presdee and John Thain.     

 

and the Committee of the Whole excluded the press and public from the meeting for the reasons set out in CW1 and that the Committee of the Whole submitted the following recommendations to Council.

 

 

CONFIDENTIAL BUSINESS

 

2        Seeking Council resolution to use Reasonable Force - 5 Whitbeck Place, Cranebrook                                                                                                                        

RECOMMENDED on the MOTION of Councillor Brian Cartwright seconded Councillor John Thain

CW2 That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Seeking Council resolution to use Reasonable Force - 5 Whitbeck Place, Cranebrook be received.

2.     Council resolve under s.377(p) of the Local Government Act 1993 allowing Council’s Compliance officers and engaged contractors to use reasonable force to enter 5 Whitbeck Place, Cranebrook to give effect to the terms of the Order issued on 13 December 2019.

 

3        Removal of Easement over Property at 149-155 Boundary Road, Cranebrook        

RECOMMENDED on the MOTION of Councillor Karen McKeown seconded Councillor Tricia Hitchen

CW3 That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Removal of Easement over  Property at 149-155 Boundary Road, Cranebrook be received.

2.    No further action be taken by Council in this matter except in extenuating circumstances, should they arise.

Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM requested that his name be recorded has having voted AGAINST the MOTION.

 

4        Property Matter - Proposed Acquisition (Commercial Matter – Diversification of Council’s Property Investment Portfolio)                                                                       

RECOMMENDED on the MOTION of Councillor Mark Davies seconded Councillor Brian Cartwright

CW4 That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Property Matter - Proposed Acquisition (Commercial Matter – Diversification of Council’s Property Investment Portfolio) be received.

2.    Council resolve to adopt the recommendations as listed within the body of this report.

3.    The Common Seal of the Council of the City of Penrith be placed on any necessary documentation.

4.    A further report be presented to Council detailing the outcome of any negotiations in this matter.

 

 

5      Decision-making arrangements between Council meetings   

RECOMMENDED on the MOTION of Councillor Mark Davies seconded Councillor Brian Cartwright

CW5 That:

1.      The information contained in the report on Decision making arrangements between Council meetings be received

2.      Council’s functions which would normally warrant reporting to Council be determined under the General Manager’s delegation by the General Manager, after consultation with the Mayor, or in his absence the Deputy Mayor.

3.      Councillors be advised of the functions of the Council exercised by the General Manager under delegation should such be made.

 

 

ADOPTION OF Committee of the Whole

 

67 RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor John Thain seconded Councillor Mark Davies           that the recommendations contained in the Committee of the Whole and shown as CW1, CW2, CW3, CW4 and CW5 be adopted.

 

 

There being no further business the Chairperson declared the meeting closed the time being 8:06pm.

 



PENRITH CITY COUNCIL

 

Procedure for Addressing Meetings

 

Anyone can request permission to address a meeting, providing that the number of speakers is limited to three in support of any proposal and three against.

 

Any request about an issue or matter on the Agenda for the meeting can be lodged with the General Manager or Public Officer up until 12 noon on the day of the meeting.

 

Prior to the meeting the person who has requested permission to address the meeting will need to provide the Public Officer with a written statement of the points to be covered during the address in sufficient detail so as to inform the Councillors of the substance of the address and a written copy of any questions to be asked of the Council in order that responses to those questions can be provided in due course.

 

In addition, prior to addressing the meeting a person addressing Council or Committee will be informed that they do not enjoy any privilege and that permission to speak may be withdrawn should they make inappropriate comments.

 

It should be noted that persons who wish to address the Council are addressing a formal part of the Council Meeting. All persons addressing the Meeting should give consideration to their dress attire. Smart casual is a minimum that is thought to be appropriate when addressing such a forum.

 

It should be noted that speakers at meetings of the Council or Committee do not have absolute privilege (parliamentary privilege).  A speaker who makes any potentially offensive or defamatory remarks about any other person may render themselves open to legal action.

 

Prior to addressing the meeting the person will be required to sign the following statement:

 

“I (name) understand that the meeting I intend to address on (date) is a public meeting.  I also understand that should I say or present any material that is inappropriate, I may be subject to legal action.  I also acknowledge that I have been informed to obtain my own legal advice about the appropriateness of the material that I intend to present at the above mentioned meeting”.

 

Should a person fail to sign the above statement then permission to address either the Council or Committee will not be granted.

 

The Public Officer or Minute Clerk will speak to those people who have requested permission to address the meeting, prior to the meeting at 6.45pm.

 

It is up to the Council or Committee to decide if the request to address the meeting will be granted.

 

Where permission is to be granted the Council or Committee, at the appropriate time, will suspend only so much of the Standing Orders to allow the address to occur.

 

The Chairperson will then call the person up to the lectern or speaking area.

 

The person addressing the meeting needs to clearly indicate:

 

·    Their name;

 

·    Organisation or group they are representing (if applicable);

 

·  Details of the issue to be addressed and the item number of the report in the Business Paper;

 

·  Whether they are opposing or supporting the issue or matter (if applicable) and the action they would like the meeting to take;

 

·         The interest of the speaker (e.g. affected person, neighbour, applicant,    applicants spokesperson, interested citizen etc).

 

Each person then has five minutes to make their address.  Those addressing Council will be required to speak to the written statement they have submitted.  Permission to address Council is not to be taken as an opportunity to refute or otherwise the points made by previous speakers on the same issue. 

 

The Council or Committee can extend this time if they consider if appropriate, however, everyone needs to work on the basis that the address will be for five minutes only.

 

Councillors may have questions about the address so people are asked to remain at the lectern or in the speaking area until the Chairperson has thanked them.

 

When this occurs, they should then return to their seat.

 

Glenn McCarthy

Public Officer

02 4732 7649                                               

   


Mayoral Minutes

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

1        The Passing of David King                                                                                                 1

 

2        The Passing of Garry Rumble OAM                                                                                  2

 

3        Mayoral Charity Golf Day                                                                                                   4

 

4        Louise Petchell Sustainability Scholarship                                                                        5

 

5        COVID - 19 Community Support                                                                                        7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                   27 April 2020

 

Mayoral Minute

The Passing of David King

           

 

It is with sadness that I mark the passing of former Penrith Alderman David King, who died on the 20th of March following an 11-year battle with cancer.

 

David followed in his father’s footsteps into politics. He was elected in the East Ward in 1971 alongside his father, Brian King, and ultimately served 17 years as an Alderman, as Councillors were then known. In 1980 David transferred to the North Ward, whose residents he served until 1987.

 

David’s contemporaries at Council described him as a safe pair of hands and “a thoroughly good and decent Alderman”. David never sought higher office, rather he listened to his constituents and worked hard on their behalf.

 

Among his achievements were advocating for the Joan Sutherland Performing Arts Centre and Council run childcare centres. The latter came at a time when many young families were moving into the area, and his support saw Penrith become a national leader in early childhood education.

 

David always had a strong sense of what was important for the community. Because of this, he gave his sustained support to the establishment of Dunheved Road – a development that continues to bring substantial investment and employment opportunity to Penrith. 

 

As a long-standing local government representative, David made many more decisions that were critical for families and never lost his focus on the people of Penrith. As a member of the Labor party, he also gave many hours to the ALP, fundraising and electioneering for candidates at all levels of government.

 

David was also well known as a local electrician and, later, the manager of his family’s electrical business, King and Lewis, which I understand is the oldest continuously owned family business in Penrith. Under his leadership, the company grew, diversified and expanded into Queensland, Western Australia and Victoria.

 

David will be remembered for his quiet determination, his business acumen and outstanding contribution to our city.

 

On behalf of Penrith Council, I would like to extend my sincere condolences to David’s wife Therese, his children Melinda, Andrew and Jeremy, their families and his many friends.

 

 

 

Councillor Ross Fowler OAM

Mayor

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the Mayoral Minute on The Passing of David King be received.

 


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                   27 April 2020

 

Mayoral Minute

The Passing of Garry Rumble OAM

           

 

Penrith lost another community stalwart recently with the passing of Garry Rumble OAM this month.

 

Garry worked for Council for 31 years and, after his retirement, spent a term as a Penrith Councillor. He contributed a great deal to our city and our community, in particular through his roles with the service organisations Apex, Rotary and Probus.

 

Garry’s career in Local Government spanned 42 years. He worked at Blue Mountains and Bankstown councils before joining Penrith Council as District Health Surveyor in 1970. Garry progressed through the organisation to become Health and Building Services Manager in 1988. His final position with the organisation was Safety, Emergency and Waste Services Manager.

 

During his time with Council, Garry led the introduction of ‘wheelie’ bins, oversaw the development of the organisation’s first computer system to track development applications and the installation of a floating weir on the Nepean River.

 

He held the position of Local Emergency Management Officer from 1989 and represented Council on the Flood Mitigation Management Authority of NSW. In this role he acted as the liaison with both the State Emergency and Rural Fire services.

 

In addition, Garry was on the Civic Centre Construction Project Team and was Chief Warden for the Civic Centre from the time of its opening in 1994.

 

Following his retirement from Council in 2001, Garry was elected to Council. He served from 2004-2008, a time when Penrith was undergoing rapid growth and transformation. He received an Order of the Australia Medal in 2009 for service to the community of Penrith and to Local Government.

 

His community work involved eight years as President of Penrith Apex Club and as a member of Penrith Rotary. He went onto charter Nepean Rotary Club in 1993, serving as President and in other executive roles. Through his work with these clubs, Garry did much to foster youth leadership and support older residents.

 

On top of these responsibilities, Garry was a member of the Olympic Torch Relay and Paralympics Games committee from 1998 to 2000, led the formation of Nepean Riverlands Probus Club in 2003 (of which he was President in 2012) and of Glenmore Park Probus Club in 2005.

 

For these services he was awarded Life Membership of Penrith Apex in 1982 and of the Nepean Riverlands Probus Club, announced a Rotary Paul Harris Fellow in 1998 and received the Paul Harris Sapphire and Centenary Medal in 2000.

 

Garry was also part of the committee which championed the relocation of the Penrith Museum of Fire to its current location, was the Museum’s Chairman from 2001 to 2018 and a Clean-Up Australia Day Coordinator for the past 20 years.

 

This is an extraordinary list of achievements that represent a wonderful legacy.

 

I would like to express my sincere condolences to Garry’s wife Louise, his son Chris, daughter Jodie, their families and his many friends. He will be remembered well and with affection by all who knew him.  

 

 

Councillor Ross Fowler OAM

Mayor

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the Mayoral Minute on The Passing of Garry Rumble OAM be received.

 


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                   27 April 2020

 

Mayoral Minute

Mayoral Charity Golf Day

           

 

 

On Friday 13 March, Council held its annual Mayoral Charity Golf Day at Penrith Golf Club.  This year the Life Education Centre at Colyton was chosen as the 2020 partner charity.  

The Golf Day brings Council and local businesses together to foster philanthropy and highlight how we can partner to support vulnerable people in our community.

 

Over the years, the Charity Golf Day has supported a range of local charities including LikeMind Penrith, Riding for the Disabled, Penrith Women’s Refuge and Rotary House Nepean Hospital.

 

I am always overwhelmed by the generosity of our sponsors and the participants on the day. All proceeds are donated to the partner charity and this year, Council was able to donate $7,400 to Life Education.  

 

Life Education’s programs help children and young people make safe, healthy life choices. With the funds received, hundreds of students in the Penrith LGA will receive access to these valuable programs, which include information on food and nutrition, personal safety, cyber safety, physical activity, the human body and social and emotional wellbeing.

 

I would like to thank Council’s Events team for organising this wonderful event, the staff who took part, and the many local businesses for their generous support.

 

 

 

 

Councillor Ross Fowler OAM

Mayor

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the Mayoral Minute on Mayoral Charity Golf Day be received.

 


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                   27 April 2020

 

Mayoral Minute

Louise Petchell Sustainability Scholarship

           

 

I am pleased to congratulate six Council staff who have been awarded the Louise Petchell Sustainability Scholarship for 2020.

 

They are:

 

·    Social Planning Coordinator, Melissa McSeveny

·    Neighbourhood Renewal Coordinator, Lila Kennelly

·    Landscape Architect, Victoria Patterson

·    Senior Planner, Danielle Fox

·    Development Assessment Planner, Sufyan Nguyen, and

·    Environmental Health Team Leader, Paul Reynolds

 

These staff were chosen from a very competitive pool of applicants.

 

The scholarship allows recipients to attend a Liveable City Study Tour of Adelaide and surrounding areas to see award winning local government projects in practice. The Study Tour visits several sites that showcase sustainability and liveability in practical ways, including urban communities, recreational areas, smart cities, parklands, water sensitive urban designs and innovation districts.

 

The Study Tour was to be held in May, but has been postponed in line with Government restrictions on travel and social distancing regulations. The opportunity will be offered to recipients at the appropriate time once restrictions are lifted.

 

While only limited staff members can attend, our whole organisation and community benefit from this annual opportunity. Under the scholarship guidelines, when recipients return, they share their knowledge with their teams and other departments. This helps strengthen our services and enhances our sustainability practices.

 

Established in 2009, the scholarship honours former Sustainability Unit Coordinator Louise Petchell, who passed away suddenly in April of that year. 

 

It is a lasting tribute to Louise’s dedication to the principles of sustainability and her passion for encouraging others, no matter what their role at Council, to embrace every opportunity to learn and “do things better”. 

More than a decade later, Louise’s legacy continues to benefit our organisation and community.

 

I would particularly like to acknowledge Louise’s widower Bernard Proctor, who continues to support and be part of the committee that assesses the scholarship applications each year.

 

I look forward to hearing more about the recipients’ activities once they have had the chance to take part in the Study Tour and the difference they are making for Council and the community.

 

 

 

 

Councillor Ross Fowler OAM

Mayor

 

  

RECOMMENDATION

That the Mayoral Minute on Louise Petchell Sustainability Scholarship be received.

 


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                   27 April 2020

 

Mayoral Minute

COVID - 19 Community Support

           

 

I want to acknowledge the significant measures Penrith City Council has already implemented to support our community and ask Councillors to support the expanded community assistance that is being announced tonight by endorsing our 2020-21 Operational Plan. I am also calling on Councillors to support the local government sector’s campaign for assistance in dealing with the health and economic crisis caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

The pandemic is placing a strain on the economy and personal relationships and our community is not immune, with many experiencing financial hardship.

 

Ratepayers will soon receive their final quarterly rates notices for the 2019-20 year, but the message from Council is “please don’t worry”. While Council has legal obligations to continue to send rates notices according to the pre-determined schedule, there are plans in place to assist those who have been adversely affected by the current COVID-19 crisis. Businesses and ratepayers can enter a payment arrangement or seek to amend an existing payment arrangement to suit their current financial position. Council’s Rates team will continue to deal with everyone experiencing hardship with compassion. I encourage anyone in our community experiencing financial strain to contact our Rates team.

 

Council has already announced significant support for impacted local businesses with relief from fees for outdoor dining, food shop inspections and Annual Fire Safety Statements. Council has also waived commercial rents for those affected by mandatory closures. This has provided over half a million dollars in immediate relief.

 

Council’s support doesn’t stop there. The strength of our City is our community and supporting our community during this challenging time has been our key priority. We have focused on maintaining essential services along with responding to specific needs. We have:

 

•     Waived all hire fees for sports groups in winter 2020 ($72,000), irrespective of any shortened season being proposed

•     Provided rental relief to community groups that provide essential support for some of the most vulnerable in our community

•     Ensured our Childcare Centres have remained open so that parents can continue to work

•     Reconfigured our teams to ensure service levels are maintained across our City

•     Continued to assess DAs, answer increased calls to our Contact Centre, and collect waste services, including more than 5,000 bulky waste requests in the last 3 weeks.

 

 

 

 

The innovation of our staff has also seen a unique and rapid transition of services as we:

•     Transform our Good Neighbour program to include neighbourly isolation cards, which are now being adopted by surrounding Councils

•     Move our traditional Open Mic Nights online, with Council live streaming a weekly one-hour gig featuring a local musician on our Facebook page for the Thursday Night Live: Lockdown Series

•     Deliver our Library “Storytime” and “Babytime” online

•     Provide logistical and financial support to Nepean Food Services to ensure their Meals on Wheels program can meet the expanding demand.

 

Tonight, we will consider our 2020-21 Operational Plan. The Plan has been developed to continue to support our Community and ensure we are able to rise again on the other side of COVID-19.

 

I am recommending that the measures in the Plan are endorsed by Council, including the establishment of the COVID-19 Hardship Relief Fund. This will enable those in our community impacted by the pandemic to gain fee relief, by application, on Community and Business based fees. 

 

The Plan recommends automatic eligibility for Sporting Ground hirers, with all fees waived for 2020-21, providing $216,623 of immediate relief.

 

The Plan also commits nearly $300 million of investment into our local economy that will help maintain vital services and community programs. It will see the commencement of significant expenditure in infrastructure projects including the Regatta Park upgrade, Soper Place multi deck car park and Commercial building, City Park, and final planning for the Gipps Street recreational precinct.

 

In addition to this, I am recommending that Council supports the local government sector’s campaign, which is being coordinated by Local Government NSW (LGNSW) and the Australian Local Government Association (ALGA).

 

It is critical that the sector receives adequate resources to coordinate and deliver the goods and services needed as we navigate through the challenges presented by COVID-19, and its massive impacts on our people and our local economy.

 

 

 

Councillor Ross Fowler OAM

Mayor

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That:

 

1.   The Mayoral Minute on COVID - 19 Community Support be received and the measures announced adopted.

 

2.   Council commend the NSW and Australian Governments on their stewardship during this crisis and commit to working in partnership to protect community health and sustain local economies through this crisis.

 

3.   Council endorse Local Government NSW’s sector-wide campaign to obtain financial assistance, employment support and stimulus funding for the local government sector.

4.   Council call on the Australian and NSW Governments to deliver comprehensive and multifaceted financial support and stimulus packages to local government, to enable local government to continue operating effectively and providing essential services during the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond.

 

  


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


Notices of Motion

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

1        Grading of Rural Gutters                                                                                                    1

 

 

 



Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                   27 April 2020

Notice of Motion

1          Grading of Rural Gutters            

 

 

Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM TO MOVE:

 

“That Council bring a report to a meeting that addresses how we can increase our program of grading for all rural gutters on a two or three year cycle to assist in preventing gutters becoming overgrown and increased water flow which causes damage to roads and property.

 

Response/Note

 

Council currently has 447.2 kilometres of unsealed rural road shoulders / gutters across the City. This figure excludes state roads.

 

Council currently has no scheduled program for rural gutter grading with the majority of maintenance work being reactive. These reactive work requests are typically generated by staff or by residents following periods of rain where underlying drainage issues become apparent. Council currently operates a single construction grader that is used to grade unsealed Council roads (11.61 km), prepare carparks for sealing and undertaking road construction and reconstruction works. The majority of road shoulders are not suitable to be graded by this piece of plant. Backhoes and bobcats are also being used to reshape table drains table drains in order to minimise any disturbance to existing vegetation.

 

It is generally considered best practice to maintain grass cover as a protection against erosion in roadside drains and drainage channels.  Broad scale grading or disturbance of drainage channels is generally avoided, and where necessary must be complemented with temporary erosion control measures until revegetation occurs.  Mowing is the preferred maintenance option, except where sediment has built up to an unacceptable level.

 

Council currently undertakes the scheduled mowing of a number of rural gutters through the Intersection Mowing Program, the Open Drain Maintenance Program and through the scheduled rural roadside mowing program undertaken by the Public Spaces Maintenance team.

 

The grading and rectification capacity of our current road shoulder crew is approximately 500 metres of rural gutter per day. Given the total length of our rural gutter network is 447.2 km, a 3 year scheduled program would fully occupy a dedicated crew for a 3 year period. It should be noted that not all rural gutters require regular scheduled maintenance.   

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.  


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


Reports of Committees

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

1        Report and Recommendations of the Local Traffic Committee Meeting held on 6 April 2020                                                                                                                                              1

 

 

 



Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                   27 April 2020

 

REPORT AND RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE
 Local Traffic Committee MEETING

HELD ON 6 April, 2020

 

 

 

(Note: due to prevailing public health crisis, and related COVID-19 protocols, the Local Traffic Committee Business Paper and reports were referred to members and dealt with via electronic correspondence).

DISTRIBUTED TO

Deputy Mayor, Councillor Karen McKeown OAM (Council Representative), Councillor Robin Cook (Representative for the Member for Londonderry), Councillor Tricia Hitchen (Representative for the Member for Penrith), Councillor Marcus Cornish, Wayne Mitchell - Director Development and Regulatory Services (Chair), Sergeant Matthew Shirvington - Nepean Police Area Command (PAC), Senior Constable Stephen Page - Nepean Police Area Command (PAC), Brana Ravichelvan - Transport for NSW (TfNSW), Charles Choucair - Transport for NSW (TfNSW), David Lance - Transport for NSW (TfNSW), Steve Grady - Busways, Ben Cantor – Busways, Jodie Mallia – CDC Bus NSW, Asith Nagodavithane - Transit Systems, Adam Wilkinson – Engineering Services Manager, David Drozd – Traffic Engineering Coordinator, Graham Green – Senior Traffic Engineer, Daniel Davidson – Senior Traffic Engineer, Kablan Mowad – Senior Traffic Engineer, Anthony Baradhy – Traffic Engineering Officer, Wendy Read – Road Safety Officer, Isaac Mann - Trainee Engineer, Bernie Meier – Signs and Lines Marking Supervisor, Andrew Pierce – Coordinator Ranger and Animal Services, Kiera Murphy – Senior Ranger,

 

APOLOGIES

NIL.

 

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES - Local Traffic Committee Meeting - 2 March 2020

The minutes of the Local Traffic Committee Meeting of 2 March 2020 were confirmed.

 

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

 NIL.

 

DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

In response to the emerging COVID-19 situation, Council has determined that all non-essential committee meetings such as the Local Traffic Committee are to be cancelled through until late May (at this time).

 

Accordingly, Penrith Council will not be convening the LTC Meeting on 6 April 2020. Instead we would like to complete the scheduled business remotely through electronic correspondence.

 

So, in relation to the upcoming LTC Meeting for 6 April 2020, we propose a “virtual” process;

1.   The Business Paper is prepared as per normal and goes out electronically to the membership – A week before the first Monday of every month

2.   Non-essential LTC items are not reported on – but may be emailed to TfNSW, Police and Busways as per normal protocols

3.   The membership is given 5 working days to provide comment, from the day the Business Paper is emailed out – with all comments directed through (and compiled by) the David Drozd.

4.   Those matters (recommendations) which are not commented on are moved / endorsed after the 5 day period

5.   Those matters which are commented on / don’t reach agreement, are deferred for further information or changes to these reports

6.   A set of “Minutes” will be prepared as usual based on the comments received from the members

7.   Endorsement by the Monday night Council proceeds as usual – (usually three weeks post LTC)

As usual, the minutes will be available to all of the membership post Council meeting on Council’s webpage.

 

Outcome 3 - We can get around the City

 

1        Links Road and Dunheved Circuit, St Marys - Changes to Line Marking and Parking Restrictions                                                                                                    

Brana Ravichelvan of Transport for NSW (TfNSW) advised that TfNSW are supportive of the proposed yellow line marking in Links Road and Dunheved Circuit, St Marys, however, the ‘YELLOW LINE INDICATES NO STOPPING’ sign is no longer in use and is not supported.

 

David Drozd – Traffic Engineering Coordinator advised that whilst the ‘YELLOW LINE INDICATES NO STOPPING’ sign is no longer regulatory, Council would like to install the sign on a 6 month trial basis for education purposes to ensure motorists are aware of these rules.

 

RECOMMENDED

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Links Road and Dunheved Circuit, St Marys - Changes to Line Marking and Parking Restrictions be received.

2.    Affected properties be notified of the proposed changes to parking and line marking on Links Road and Dunheved Circuit, St Marys, as shown in Attachment 2.

3.    Subject to no substantial objections being received, the proposed changes to parking and line marking on Links Road and Dunheved Circuit, St Marys be installed as shown in Attachment 2.

4.    Council’s Rangers be advised of Council’s resolution.

 

 

 


 

 

2        St Andrews Drive and Garswood Road, Glenmore Park - Proposed Alterations of Parking Restrictions during School Zone Times at Surveyors Creek Public School                                                                                                                           

Ben Cantor of Busways requested Council to give Busways 1 weeks’ notice of the relocation of the Bus Zone with the ‘No Parking’ zone so that bus drivers can be notified of the changed location. 

RECOMMENDED

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on St Andrews Drive and Garswood Road, Glenmore Park - Proposed Alterations of Parking Restrictions during School Zone Times at Surveyors Creek Public School be received.

2.     Affected properties be notified of the proposed relocation of the ‘Bus Zone’ with ‘No Parking’ during school zone on St Andrews Drive; and ‘15 minute’ parking restrictions during school zone times on Garswood Road, Glenmore Park as shown in Appendix 1 & 2.

3.     Subject to no substantial objections being received, the ‘Bus Zone’ restriction signage be installed; ‘No Parking’ during school zone times restrictions and ‘15 minute’ parking restrictions be installed as shown in Appendix 1 & 2.

4.     The Principal of Surveyors Creek Public School and the Department of Education Road Safety Officer be advised of Council’s resolution.

5.     Council’s Rangers, Busways and the resident who reported the matter be advised of Council’s resolution.

 

 

 

3        Bruce Neale Drive, Penrith - Proposed Median Island Intersection Treatment    

RECOMMENDED

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Bruce Neale Drive, Penrith - Proposed Median Island Intersection Treatment be received.

2.     A project for an appropriate median island intersection treatment be entered into Council’s Traffic Facilities Prioritisation Program.

3.     When the project receives priority against other listed sites, consultation be undertaken with Transport for NSW, the Rowing Club and other affiliated clubs contained within the Rowing Club precinct.

4.     Subject to no substantial objections being received, Council’s Design Coordinator be requested to prepare a design for the facility, with a further report submitted to the Local Traffic Committee for design plan finalisation and endorsement.

5.     The resident who raised the safety concerns be advised of Council’s resolution.

 

 


 

 

4        Boomerang Place, Cambridge Gardens - Proposed Double Barrier Line Marking                                                                                                                          

RECOMMENDED

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Boomerang Place, Cambridge Gardens - Proposed Double Barrier Line Marking be received.

2.     Consultation be undertaken with affected residents and businesses regarding the proposed double barrier line marking on the 90-degree bend on Boomerang Place, Cambridge Gardens as shown in Appendix 1.

 

3.     Subject to no substantial objections being received, double barrier line marking be installed for a length of 26 metres on the 90-degree bend of Boomerang Place, Cambridge Gardens as shown in Appendix 1.

 

4.     The resident that reported the matter be advised of Council’s resolution.

 

 

 

5        Parkes Avenue and Victoria Street, Werrington - Proposed Speed Cushion and Associated Signage at Intersection Approach                                                         

RECOMMENDED

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Parkes Avenue and Victoria Street, Werrington - Proposed Speed Cushion and Associated Signage at Intersection Approach be received.

2.     Consultation be undertaken with affected residents regarding the proposed speed cushion and associated signage to be installed in Parkes Avenue, Werrington.

3.     Subject to no substantial objections being received, the proposed speed cushion and associated signage be installed in Parkes Avenue, Werrington.

4.     This project be funded from a future Urgent Traffic Facilities budget.

5.     The resident and property owner who contacted Council be advised of Council’s resolution.

 

 

 

GENERAL BUSINESS

 

GB 1           O’Connell Street, Caddens – CCX19/0062 Caddens Retail Precinct Plans      

Background

Caddens Retail Precinct is adjacent to Caddens Hill, a new residential development situated between the suburbs of Kingswood, Claremont Meadows, and the rural area of Orchard Hills. The precinct is located at O’Connell Street approximately 5km south-east of Penrith City Centre, at “Caddens Corner” being the intersection of O'Connell Street and O'Connell Lane, which continues to the south. The shopping centre will service the needs of Caddens residents and others further afield.

 

In association with the centre, a roundabout is to be constructed by the developer at no cost to Council, at the intersection of O'Connell Lane and O'Connell Street, Caddens. O’Connell Street has been previously upgraded and was recently closed for an extended period whilst works were undertaken, which will now tie into the proposed Retail Precinct Plans.

 

At its meeting of 7 May 2018, Council’s Local Traffic Committee considered a report on “O’Connell Street, Caddens – Proposed Traffic Management Plan”, which outlined the need and provisions for the recent closure and upgrade. At its Ordinary Meeting of 28 May 2018 Council subsequently resolved on the recommendations of the Committee;

 

“That:

1.       The information contained in the report on O’Connell Street, Caddens – Proposed Traffic Management Plan be received.

 

2.       The Traffic Management Plan be endorsed subject to concurrence with relevant authorities including Roads and Maritime Services, Transport for NSW, Busways and Emergency Services.

 

3.       A comprehensive communications package be put forward to the community regarding the proposed changes to the road network.”

 

The construction of the proposed roundabout (and associated road works, footpaths and bus shelters) is the next step in the development of the precinct and its linkages to the north and south, including the WELL Precinct.

 

Current Situation

 

The O’Connell Street road upgrade was completed by July 2019, and the shopping centre is currently under construction. The next stage is to undertake roadworks associated with the centre. The plans have been received by Council and assessed and reviewed. These are now submitted for Local Traffic Committee endorsement (as per the Dropbox link above).

 

The proposed road works include the construction of the roundabout and also include construction of the following:

 

•        Footpaths and kerb ramps with connections to north, south, east and west of the site.

•        Three vehicular access points to the centre, which includes a service access accommodating heavy vehicles.

•        Two new bus shelters, immediately north of the proposed roundabout, on O’Connell Street.

•        Associated land acquisitions, excavation, drainage works, protection of and/or relocation of external services, batter construction, signage and line marking.

 

It is recommended that the Caddens Retail Precinct Plans be endorsed as per the Recommendations below.

_________________________________________________________________________

 

Councillor Robin Cook (Representative for the Member for Londonderry) expressed her support of the proposal and the below Recommendations.

 

 

RECOMMENDED

That:

 

1.   CCX19/0062 Caddens Retail Precinct Plans be endorsed subject to concurrence with relevant authorities including Roads and Maritime Services, Transport for NSW, Busways and Emergency Services.

 

2.   Construction be funded by the developer at no cost to Council.

 

3.   The developer be advised of Council’s resolution and requested to provide a comprehensive communications package to be put forward to the community regarding the proposed changes to the road network.

 

4.   The developer be requested to amend the plans (CCX19/0062), and subsequent construction to follow accordingly, as shown indicatively in Appendix 1.

 

5.   A street lighting assessment be conducted in accordance with Council’s Public Domain Lighting Policy (August 2004) to ensure compliance with the relevant lighting category, and with implementation being at no cost to Council.

 

6.   Council’s Asset Section be notified for inclusion of signs and line marking in Council’s asset management records and processes.

 

7.   Council’s Rangers and Busways be notified with regard to proposed signage and line marking, including bus zone signage and adjustments and proposed bus shelters.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the recommendations contained in the Report and Recommendations of the Local Traffic Committee meeting held on 6 April, 2020 be adopted.

  



DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

Outcome 2 - We plan for our future growth

 

1        Interim Centres Strategy for the East West Corridor                                                         1

 

 

Outcome 4 - We have safe, vibrant places

 

2        Greater Sydney Women's Safety Charter                                                                         9

 

3        Kingswood Park Community Action Plan 2019-22                                                          12

 

4        Neighbourhood Renewal Action Plans - Progress Report                                              17

 

5        RFT 19/20-34 Soper Place Infrastructure                                                                        26

 

6        RFT19/20-28 Supply and Installation of Workstations and Office Furniture                   31

 

 

Outcome 5 - We care about our environment

 

7        South Creek Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan                                           39

 

 

Outcome 6 - We are healthy and share strong community spirit

 

8        Penrith Sport and Recreation Strategy                                                                            57

 

9        Waterplay Facility in Jamison Park                                                                                  63

 

10      NSW Government Grants - Everyone Can Play and Community Building Partnership - Successful Projects                                                                                                          67

 

 

Outcome 7 - We have confidence in our Council

 

11      Exhibition of Draft Delivery Program (2017-22) and Draft 2020-21 Operational Plan (including Draft 2020-21 Fees & Charges)                                                                      77

 

12      Union Road Project                                                                                                          92

 

13      Registration of a restriction and a positive covenant over Council owned land located at 86 Reid Street Werrington, Lot 5 DP28248                                                                          95

 

14      Audit, Risk & Improvement Committee                                                                            99

 

15      Insurance Contributions 2020/21                                                                                   107

 

16      Summary of Investment & Banking for the Period 1 March 2020 to 31 March 2020    112

 


 

 

Outcome 1 - We can work close to home

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


Outcome 2 - We plan for our future growth

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

1        Interim Centres Strategy for the East West Corridor                                                         1

 

 

 



Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                   27 April 2020

 

 

 

1

Interim Centres Strategy for the East West Corridor   

 

Compiled by:               Paula Tomkins, Executive Planner

Authorised by:            Carlie Ryan, City Deal Manager

Kylie Powell, Director - City Futures  

 

Outcome

We plan for our future growth

Strategy

Facilitate development in the City that considers the current and future needs  of our community

Service Activity

Support and influence tri-government strategic planning in the Western Parkland City by responding to the City Deal opportunities

      

 

Executive Summary

Preparing a Centres Strategy for our Local Government Area (LGA) is an immediate action in the recently adopted Local Strategic Planning Statement (LSPS). Building on community feedback from the LSPS, a draft Interim Centres Strategy has been prepared to set the vision and structure for the East West Corridor to best support its existing strengths and the opportunities it represents for our community. The Corridor stretches from Penrith Lakes in

the west, through the centres of Kingswood and Werrington, encompasses our health and education precinct The Quarter and finishes at St Marys in the east. The draft Interim Centres Strategy also provides priorities and actions for each of the centres along the East West Corridor - Penrith, Kingswood, Werrington and St Marys. 

 

The Interim Centres Strategy is interim because strategic work is unable to be progressed beyond the East West Corridor for the rest of the LGA without station locations being identified by State Government for the North South Rail Corridor. Whilst Council awaits Government announcements relating to the North South Rail Corridor, this Interim Centres Strategy will be used to provide direction in developing further strategic work, such as an Employment Lands Strategy and Integrated Transport Master Plan, whilst collaborating with Government on City Deal projects including North South Rail.

 

Pending Government announcements on station locations and completion of strategic work it is hoped that by the end of 2020 a draft Centres Strategy for the LGA will progressed. To set strategic direction in the interim, it is recommended that Council endorse the Interim Centres Strategy for the East West Corridor (Attachment 1).

Background

The Western Sydney City Deal, signed in 2018, committed to ongoing collaboration in delivering key projects, such as North South Rail, that will change the future landscape of the Penrith LGA. These commitments provide the opportunity to rebuild Council’s strategy platform to best leverage these projects for our community.

 

The process of rebuilding our strategy platform began with the adoption of the Local Strategic Planning Statement (LSPS) by Council in March 2020. The LSPS introduces the concept of the economic triangle with Penrith, St Marys and the Western Sydney Airport at its apexes. The East West Corridor, stretching from Penrith Lakes and including the centres of Penrith, Kingswood, Werrington and St Marys, forms one side the economic triangle, with the North South Rail Corridor and its future centres forming another side. The LSPS also identifies the preparation of a Centres Strategy for our LGA as an immediate action.

 

At this point in time, work towards the LGA wide Centres Strategy is focussed on the North South and East West Corridors and their centres, recognising the important role both these corridors will have in the future. The LSPS includes a high level structure plan for the North South Rail Corridor which depicts Council’s preferred station locations. This work cannot be progressed without confirmation by Government of station locations along the North South Rail Corridor. Notwithstanding this, the strength of the North South Rail Corridor will be anchored by the already established East West Corridor. Therefore we have prioritised visioning and strategy work on the East West Corridor that builds on its existing strengths and harnesses future opportunities.

Interim Centres Strategy – East West Corridor

The Interim Centres Strategy for the East West Corridor builds on the economic triangle concept from the LSPS and the LSPS’s four visionary principles of a LGA that is healthy, connected, innovative and balanced. The Interim Centres Strategy and a map of the economic triangle is at Attachment 1.

 

The Interim Centres Strategy presents a vision and structure plan for the East West corridor and actions that identify the work required, such as an Integrated Transport Master Plan, to move the strategy from interim to final. Similarly, for each of the centres the Interim Strategy identifies a vision, priorities, structure plan and actions for the future.

 

By identifying a coordinated position on the vision, structure and priorities for the East West corridor and its centres the Interim Centres Strategy will:

·    Provide a clearly articulated Council view;

·    Support integrated land use planning and infrastructure delivery;

·    Help coordinate Council’s activities within the corridor; and

·    Allow Council to clearly advocate to different levels of government, as well as industry and developers, on what our priorities are for this corridor.

 

Financial Implications

Endorsement of the Interim Centres Strategy would not have any financial implications. While the Interim Centres Strategy includes actions identifying additional projects being undertaken by Council, these projects, such as the Transport Master Plan and Green Grid Strategy are already funded in other ways i.e. through the Metropolitan Greenspace Program or the Accelerated Local Environmental Plan (LEP) Review program.

 

Risk Implications

The key risk of not endorsing the Interim Centres Strategy for the East West Corridor is that, by not clearly articulating our future vision and priorities for this important corridor, we may compromise our ability to achieve the best outcomes in these centres for our existing and future community.

 

Next Steps

This Interim Centres Strategy will be used to provide direction in developing further strategic work, such as an Employment Lands Strategy and Integrated Transport Master Plan, whilst collaborating with Government on City Deal projects. The Interim Centres Strategy is interim because strategic work is unable to be progressed beyond the East West Corridor without station locations identified by State Government for the North South Rail Corridor.

 

Once station locations are known and other strategic work is completed, we will build towards the Centres Strategy for the LGA, including centres along the North South Rail Corridor. Pending Government announcements on station locations and completion of additional strategic work it is hoped that by the end of 2020 a draft Centres Strategy for the LGA will progressed, with a view to releasing it for community consultation early in 2021.

 

Conclusion

This report presents an Interim Centres Strategy for the East West Corridor. The Interim Strategy is important as it provides a coordinated Council position on the future of the East West Corridor whilst Council awaits Government announcements on station locations for North South Rail. It is recommended that Council endorse the Interim Centres Strategy for the East West Corridor (Attachment 1).

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Interim Centres Strategy for the East West Corridor be received

2.     Council endorse the Interim Centres Strategy for the East West Corridor.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

East-West Corridor Interim Centres Straetgy - FINAL

15 Pages

Attachments Included

   


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


 

 

Outcome 3 - We can get around the City

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


Outcome 4 - We have safe, vibrant places

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

2        Greater Sydney Women's Safety Charter                                                                         9

 

3        Kingswood Park Community Action Plan 2019-22                                                          12

 

4        Neighbourhood Renewal Action Plans - Progress Report                                              17

 

5        RFT 19/20-34 Soper Place Infrastructure                                                                        26

 

6        RFT19/20-28 Supply and Installation of Workstations and Office Furniture                   31

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                   27 April 2020

 

 

 

2

Greater Sydney Women's Safety Charter   

 

Compiled by:               Allison Kyriakakis, Community Safety Co-ordinator

Authorised by:            Jeni Pollard, City Activation, Community and Place Manager  

 

Outcome

We have safe, vibrant places

Strategy

Make our public places safe and attractive

Service Activity

Maintain a Community Safety Plan for the City

      

 

Executive Summary

Penrith City Council has been invited to become a signatory of the Greater Sydney Women’s Safety Charter (the Charter) – an initiative of the Greater Sydney Commission.

The Charter is voluntary and non-binding, bringing together businesses, government agencies, peak groups and not-for-profit organisations to take collective actions to improve the safety for women and girls across the Greater Sydney region.

As a participant, Council would commit to upholding the principles outlined in this report and will implement practical ways to actively promote women’s safety across our city and through our organisational practices.

This report recommends that the information contained in the report on Greater Sydney Women's Safety Charter be received; and that Council accept the Greater Sydney Commission’s invitation to become a signatory to the Women’s Safety Charter.

Background

In December 2019, The Greater Sydney Commission (the Commission) and Transport for NSW co-hosted a Symposium, A City for People – Women and Safety in the City.

The symposium was attended by representatives from a variety of agencies across a range of government and non-government organisations. It explored issues relating to the safety of women and girls in our communities, and the importance of practical measures to promote social inclusion and participation in public life through improved feelings of safety. Officers from Council’s Community Safety team were participants in this process.

An important outcome of the symposium was a commitment to develop a Women’s Safety Charter to make a practical, positive difference to women’s safety in Greater Sydney.

The Charter was recently launched as part of 2020 International Women’s Day celebrations. Penrith Council has been invited to participate by becoming a signatory to the Charter, alongside a number of other local councils, non-profit organisations and business across the Greater Sydney Region.

What is the Women’s Safety Charter?

The Women’s Safety Charter is a voluntary, non-binding commitment to build and promote a safer city for women and girls, which means a safer city for everyone.

The objective of the Charter is to support a cross-sector approach to take collective actions that improve safety for women and girls in Greater Sydney. It aims to influence member organisations’ policy, practice, services, planning and delivery in ways that support women and girls to feel safer and more confident participating in social, economic and cultural life.

The Charter has been developed collaboratively with the input of 80 organisations from government, business and not-for-profit sectors across Greater Sydney. It recognises the diverse experiences of women and aims to promote a safer city for women of all ages, abilities, identities and social and cultural backgrounds.

The Charter is based on three foundation principles that guide nine key outcomes, as summarised below:

1.   Commitment to a culture of gender equity

i.    Design for Equality - ensure women’s participation in the design and decision-making process is “business as usual”.

ii.    Leadership - create an environment where all staff are encouraged to participate.

iii.   Champion and Communicate - tap into existing capability within your organisation to co-ordinate, advocate and participate in initiatives related to women’s safety.

 

2.   Commitment to listen, share and reflect

i.    Communication - share best practice around safety solutions and clearly communicate policies and principles on women’s safety.

ii.    Data - collect and share data insights to build a better picture of the issues and make informed decisions on how to resolve them.

iii.   Reporting - women are supported to report safety incidents and there is a clear, straight-forward process to get help if needed.

 

3.   Commitment to collective action and continuous improvement.

i.    Evaluation - track and evaluate the effectiveness of initiatives implemented in your organisation.

ii.    Collaboration - work with members of the Charter to build a safer city for women.

iii.   Process - design organisational policies and procedures to respond to evidence.

 

Benefits for Council

Guided by the above principles, the Charter signifies a ‘good will’ commitment to women’s safety across Greater Sydney

It is acknowledged that Council already delivers a number of valuable actions relating to community safety and gender equity. Involvement in the Charter would not seek to override our current efforts, but rather provides an opportunity to add value to our existing work, share our successes and explore new initiatives.

The Charter aligns with existing projects and advocacy work by our Community Safety team under the current Penrith Community Safety Plan 2018-22. For example, physical projects to improve public space safety (e.g. public lighting and place projects) and events designed to raise awareness for the elimination of gendered violence (e.g. Walk Against Domestic Violence) both contribute to women’s safety across our city.

As a signatory to the Charter, Council would be further demonstrating a commitment to the safety of women and children across our city, including our staff and our community. Any actions that result from the Charter would continue to be reported through the Community Safety Partnership meetings and to Council.

Council would also have access to practical solutions, programs and policies designed to promote a safer city for women and children, and the community as a whole. This could include opportunities for our City Activation, Community and Place team to work collaboratively with other member agencies on local projects, such as safety campaigns and public space audits.

Financial Implications

 

The Greater Sydney Women’s Safety Charter is voluntary and non-binding therefore there is no cost to Council in signing the Charter. Any projects that are carried out as a result of joining the Charter are at the discretion of Council and will be funded within the existing Community Safety budget allocations.

Risk Implications

There are no identified risk implications associated with this report.

Conclusion

The Greater Sydney Commission has invited Penrith City Council to become a signatory of the Greater Sydney Women’s Safety Charter.

The Charter is voluntary and non-binding, bringing together businesses, government agencies, peak groups and not-for-profit organisations to take collective actions to improve the safety for women and girls across the Greater Sydney region.

This report recommends that Council become a signatory based on the benefits in terms of shared information and demonstrating our aim to be a safe city for all. 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Greater Sydney Women's Safety Charter be received

2.     Council become a signatory to the Greater Sydney Women’s Safety Charter.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                   27 April 2020

 

 

 

3

Kingswood Park Community Action Plan 2019-22   

 

Compiled by:               Sophia Purtell, Community Engagement Officer

Lila Kennelly, Neighbourhood Renewal Coordinator

Authorised by:            Jeni Pollard, City Activation, Community and Place Manager

Kylie Powell, Director - City Futures  

 

Outcome

We have safe, vibrant places

Strategy

Work with our communities to improve wellbeing and infrastructure in their neighbourhoods

Service Activity

Deliver projects that address local issues and improve the wellbeing of local communities

      

 

Executive Summary

This report informs Council of the Neighbourhood Renewal team’s recent community engagement in Kingswood Park and presents the Kingswood Park Community Action Plan 2019-22 for consideration and endorsement.

 

Over the last 10 months, Neighbourhood Renewal delivered a community engagement program called My Kingswood Park inviting residents to have their say on local priorities and aspirations. The summary of that program, Kingswood Park Community Engagement Report is attached (Attachment 1). The project engaged with approximately 600 residents and their feedback has informed the development of the Kingswood Park Community Action Plan (Attachment 2).

 

Kingswood Park residents shared a vision for a proud, connected and safe community with a vibrant and accessible local environment. This report recommends that Council receive the information and endorse the delivery of the Kingswood Park Community Action Plan 2019-22.

Background

Council’s Neighbourhood Renewal Program works with local residents to enhance the wellbeing of their neighbourhoods as healthy, safe and vibrant places. The program operates in the City’s 12 older established areas, enabling resident participation and driving positive outcomes for communities impacted by disadvantage.

 

In 2019, Council endorsed that Neighbourhood Renewal continue a place by place approach, delivering a community engagement program in Kingswood Park (2019-20), Llandilo (2020-21), Cranebrook (2021-22) and St Marys (2022-23). 

 

The Neighbourhood Renewal Program was last active in Kingswood Park in 2008. Recent feedback from local services has identified that the area continues to experience high levels of disadvantage manifesting in a decline of social cohesion. Data also suggests that pockets of Kingswood Park continue to experience some of the highest levels of disadvantage in Penrith City.

 

In 2019-20, Neighbourhood Renewal was able to engage with both long term and newer residents in Kingswood Park. Their feedback highlighted that Neighbourhood Renewal’s process of engaging with residents to drive local outcomes is an ongoing one. As communities continue to evolve and change, Neighbourhood Renewal responds to emerging issues and builds further upon local strengths.

 

Across 2019-20, Neighbourhood Renewal delivered My Kingswood Park, a community engagement program aimed at identifying a community vision for the area. The Kingswood Park Community Engagement Report detailing this process and a demographic profile of the area is attached.

 

The delivery of My Kingswood Park led to the development of a community vision and the ensuing Kingswood Park Community Action Plan 2019-22, also attached to this report. The purpose of this plan is to enable the vision shared by Kingswood Park residents.

 

My Kingswood Park – Community Engagement Process

Over a 10-month period, Neighbourhood Renewal delivered a series of community events, engagement pop-ups and consultation meetings as part of the My Kingswood Park project. These activities aimed to build relationships with residents, establish trust and encourage people to have their say on what matters in Kingswood Park.

 

Neighbourhood Renewal was able to engage with a diverse range of residents, reaching over 600 people through My Kingswood Park activities. This included Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, single-parent families, people from non-English speaking backgrounds and young people.

 

Community engagement activities focused on drawing out Kingswood Park’s strengths and the stories of local residents. Some of the key strengths shared through My Kingswood Park include community resilience and adversity, pride in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture, passion for the local environment and a willingness to lend a hand to others. Neighbourhood Renewal intends to amplify and encourage these strengths in future work with the Kingswood Park community.

 


Local children have their say at a My Kingswood Park event in Illawong Ave Reserve.

 

Overall, residents shared their appreciation for the often quiet nature of the locality and its proximity to Cambridge Gardens, Cranebrook and Penrith. Residents also shared concerns around community safety and cohesion, the wellbeing of young people and limited access to recreation opportunities. 

 

Feedback from residents highlighted three main priorities for change; community pride and connectedness, community safety and an improved local environment. These priorities form the basis of the Kingswood Park Community Action Plan.

 

Kingswood Park Community Action Plan overview

The Kingswood Park Community Action Plan 2019-22 captures the priorities shared by local residents and provides a series of coordinated responses. The purpose of this plan is to provide a framework for Council to collaborate across departments, with local services and residents to drive positive outcomes for Kingswood Park.

 

The community vision statement below highlights three key areas for action based on local priorities. A series of short term (6-12 months), medium term (12-18 months) and longer term (18-36 months) actions have been developed to enable this vision.


Kingswood Park Community Action Plan 2019-22– Vision Statement

 

Whilst most actions are planned to be delivered in the short-medium term, a sustained commitment is required to allow Council to proactively and effectively respond to the challenges and opportunities within Kingswood Park.

 

Overall, the Kingswood Park Community Action Plan serves as a mechanism for driving impact, promoting positive narratives and responding to the things that matter to Kingswood Park residents. Neighbourhood Renewal will continue leading its delivery and working closely with residents and services in the area.

Next steps

 

In the short term, Neighbourhood Renewal seeks to deliver Community Action Training with residents in Kingswood Park to enable their advocacy and leadership skills. The training program has also been an effective tool through which to build community connection and active participation. The aim of this training is to work closely with Kingswood Park residents on the ways they can enable the vision for a proud, connected and safe community with a vibrant and accessible local environment.

 

Within the next 12 months, Neighbourhood Renewal will work closely with Council’s Community Safety team and local residents on addressing perceptions of safety in Kingswood Park. This will include working with residents on a community-led safety audit and delivering Good Neighbour programming.

Neighbourhood Renewal will lead the delivery of the action plan and continue working across departments and collaborating with services and residents on actions. Council will be provided with progress updates through Neighbourhood Renewal’s reporting frameworks.

 

Young people share what they love about Kingswood Park at a community event.

 

Financial Implications

The actions within the Kingswood Park Community Action Plan will be delivered within existing Council resources. This includes actions enabled through Neighbourhood Renewal’s operational and capital budget. Forthcoming investigations of identified actions within the plan will provide further guidance on additional projects required to respond to the challenges and opportunities within Kingswood Park. Grant funding opportunities will be investigated to assist Council with the delivery of any additional projects.

Risk Implications

 

Potential risks associated with the Kingswood Park Community Action Plan will be mitigated through a comprehensive risk assessment process for each relevant action.

 

Conclusion


This report has provided Council with an overview of the Kingswood Park Community Action Plan 2019-22, developed in response to the community vision shared by Kingswood Park residents. This plan provides a framework for Council, local services and residents to collaborate on driving positive change in Kingswood Park and will enable a range of outcomes to be achieved.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Kingswood Park Community Action Plan 2019-22 be received

2.     That Council endorse the delivery of the Kingswood Park Community Action Plan 2019-22.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

Kingswoood Park Community Engagement Report

11 Pages

Attachments Included

2.

Kingswood Park Community Action Plan 2019-22

7 Pages

Attachments Included

  


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                   27 April 2020

 

 

 

4

Neighbourhood Renewal Action Plans - Progress Report   

 

Compiled by:               Lila Kennelly, Neighbourhood Renewal Coordinator

Authorised by:            Jeni Pollard, City Activation, Community and Place Manager

Kylie Powell, Director - City Futures  

 

Outcome

We have safe, vibrant places

Strategy

Work with our communities to improve wellbeing and infrastructure in their neighbourhoods

Service Activity

Work with local communities to identify priority issues in their area

      

 

Executive Summary

This report provides Council with an update on the progress of all Neighbourhood Renewal Action Plans produced with residents since 2015. A comprehensive report is included (Attachment 1) providing further detail on all actions identified within the Colyton, North St Marys, Oxley Park and Kingswood Action Plans.

Since 2015, approximately 50 community engagement events, activities, and programs have been undertaken by the Neighbourhood Renewal Program. It is estimated that more than 5,000 residents have participated in the various activities to contribute to the development of Colyton, North St Marys, Oxley Park and Kingswood Action Plans. Over 94% of the actions included in those plans are now complete or underway, delivering a range of positive outcomes for residents in the City’s older established areas.

 

Since its inception, the Neighbourhood Renewal model has continued to evolve with the changing needs of the community whilst the fundamental principles of resident led engagement and achievable delivery have remained constant. The program focuses on maximum impact with minimal resources, building a strong narrative within communities about their strengths as well as building positive relationships with Council.

 

This report provides Council with an overview and wrap up of the key achievements delivered through each of the Neighbourhood Renewal Action Plans over the last four years and recommends that Council receive the information.

Background

Council’s Neighbourhood Renewal Program supports positive change across the City’s older established communities. The program engages directly with residents to identify local priorities and delivers projects that enhance the social wellbeing and infrastructure of neighbourhoods impacted by disadvantage.

 

Neighbourhood Renewal responds to Council’s long-standing commitment to resourcing older established neighbourhoods and providing opportunities for resident participation. The program enables Council to build relationships and trust within disadvantaged communities, ensuring social harmony is maintained across the City in the context of increasing growth and change.

 

The Neighbourhood Renewal Program has been active since 2006, reaching over 32,000 residents since its inception. It has delivered a range of award-winning projects that have responded to the needs and aspirations of local communities. Many of these projects have been delivered by leveraging the existing resources of Council and local services or through external grant funding.

 

In 2015, Council endorsed the delivery of a pilot program that led to the development of local teams and Community Action and Place Plans in Colyton, North St Marys and Kingswood. Work was also undertaken in Oxley Park (2017-18) to develop the Oxley Park Place Plan 2017-19. The development of these plans has achieved a range of outcomes, including enhanced local infrastructure and opportunities for residents to actively participate in improving their neighbourhoods. 

 

In 2019, Council endorsed Neighbourhood Renewal to continue a place by place approach, delivering the program in Kingswood Park (2019-20), Llandilo (2020-21), Cranebrook (2021-22) and St Marys (2022-23).  The process of identifying priorities and working closely with residents is ongoing and continues to evolve as communities grow and change. Neighbourhood Renewal’s programming ensures Council responds to current challenges across the City’s older established areas as they emerge.

 

Over the next 6 months, staff are working on reviewing the current model with the aim to develop a project model to increase resilience across a range of Neighbourhood Renewal communities with an emphasis on impact measurement.  This proposed model will be brought to Council for discussion late in 2020.


Current Situation

 

Neighbourhood Renewal has worked closely with residents in Colyton, North St Marys, Oxley Park and Kingswood to develop action plans responding to priorities shared by these communities. Following extensive community consultation, Council endorsed the following action plans:

·    Colyton Community Action Plan 2015-18

·    North St Marys Community Action Plan 2017-2020

·    Oxley Park Place Plan 2017-19

·    Kingswood Place Plan 2018-22

 

A report is included (Attachment 1) providing detailed information on the status of each action within these plans. In addition, Neighbourhood Renewal has developed the Kingswood Park Community Action Plan 2019-22 which is also on the agenda for this meeting of Council.

 

Each of the action plans engaged residents in a process of setting priorities for their neighbourhoods and empowered them to participate in driving local change. These plans have also resulted in the coordination of resources across Council and local services to deliver significantly improved outcomes for these neighbourhoods.

 

In total, Council has endorsed 132 actions to improve the physical, infrastructure and social wellbeing for residents in these communities. Of a combined 132 identified actions, over 94% are now complete, underway or considered business as usual, as displayed in Figure 1.

A very small number of projects are no longer deemed necessary to proceed, these are in Colyton.

A close up of a logo

Description automatically generated

Figure 1.

 

 

Neighbourhood Renewal Action Plans – Progress by Suburb

Since 2015, over 5,000 residents have participated in community engagement activities leading to the development of the Colyton, North St Marys, Oxley Park and Kingswood action plans. A total of 50 community engagement events, projects and workshops were held in each of these neighbourhoods, many in conjunction with local residents and services. These events alone have supported improved community connections in these areas and enabled many traditionally harder to reach residents to have their say.

 

Significant cross-departmental collaboration has occurred in responding to resident requests and delivering the following action plans. One of the strengths of the Neighbourhood Renewal as a ‘place’ focused model is that it works to leverage existing resources across Council to enhance outcomes for the community with collaboration across a range of departments enabling community priorities to be achieved.

 

A snapshot of each action plan’s progress to date is included below.


Colyton Community Action Plan 2015-18

In 2015, residents of Colyton shared a vision for their neighbourhood that led to the development of the Colyton Community Action Plan 2015-18. Endorsed by Council at a Policy and Review Committee Meeting on 14 March 2016, this plan included the following priorities:

·    Strengthening community connections

·    Celebrating Colyton’s community spirit

·    Improving perceptions of Colyton

·    Enhancing the local environment

·    Supporting young people

To date, 90% of the Colyton Community Action is complete, with many actions undertaken by residents involved in Team Colyton. Neighbourhood Renewal established Team Colyton in 2015 as a group of residents, businesses and services working together to improve the neighbourhood. Since Team Colyton’s inception, over 85 community meetings have been held and residents continue to deliver projects in their community with support from Community Junction and local businesses.

 

Some notable achievements of the Colyton Community Action Plan include:

·    Establishment of the annual, community led, Colyton Carols event

·    Installation of new fitness equipment in Kevin Maley Park

·    Establishment of the Colyton Walking Group and the Colyton Book Club

·    An upgrade to the public amenity at Day St shopping strip

·    Installation of public wall art on Bennett Rd

·    Delivery of numerous local community events

·    Delivery of a Magnetic Places funded project by Team Colyton

 

While most objectives within the Colyton Community Action Plan have been achieved, a small number of actions are not proceeding following further investigation by Team Colyton or local services. These include establishing a carer’s support group, a street tree planting program and establishing a community garden. Currently, Team Colyton continues to set goals for the neighbourhood and collaborate on local initiatives. 

 

North St Marys Community Action Plan 2017-20

In 2016 Neighbourhood Renewal undertook engagement activities to identify local priorities in North St Marys. As part of this work, #NorthStMarysMatters was established, inviting residents and services to work together on local issues. Through a series of community events and meetings, residents shared priorities for North St Marys that included:

·    Building a more active and inclusive community

·    Enhancing the area’s vibrancy and safety

·    Improving local recreation areas

·    Improving traffic and pedestrian safety

 

These priorities informed the development of the North St Marys Community Action Plan 2017-20, endorsed by Council at an Ordinary meeting on 14 August 2017. To date, all the actions within this plan are either complete, underway or business as usual. Significant progress has been made on the priorities shared by the North St Marys community. Notable achievements include: 

 

·    Development and ongoing delivery of the Village Café project

·    Co-design and ongoing enhancement of Robin Wiles Park

·    Upgrades to Parklawn Place as part of the Parklawn PlaceMakers project

·    Delivery of resident led Community Safety Audits

·    Delivery of numerous resident led community events

·    Installation of a new basketball court in Poplar Park

·    Facilitation of 2 Community Action Training workshops

·    Installation of a new footpath in Maple Lane


Residents involved in #NorthStMarysMatters now meet on an ‘as needed’ basis and continue supporting local events and projects where possible and with great pride.

 

Oxley Park Place Plan 2017-19

In early 2017 Council received numerous concerns from Oxley Park residents in relation to parking, traffic, and waste issues. In response to these emerging issues, Neighbourhood Renewal was able to reach out to residents and develop the Oxley Park Place Plan 2017-19. This plan was endorsed by Council at a Policy and Review Committee Meeting on 11 September 2017 and includes the following community priorities:

·    Improving the tidiness of the neighbourhood

·    Improving pedestrian and road safety

·    Enhancing local play and recreation spaces

·    Enhanced vibrancy of the Sydney Street shops

·    Improved knowledge of how to advocate for local issues


A group of people standing next to an umbrella

Description automatically generated
Mayor of Penrith, Clr Ross Fowler OAM, Clr Robin Cook and local MP Prue Car celebrate recent upgrades to Ridge Park Playground in Oxley Park.

 

To date, 96% of all actions are either complete, underway or business as usual. This place plan was able to successfully coordinate Council’s resources in response to a range of emerging issues. Notable outcomes of the Oxley Park Place Plan include:

·    Delivery of Council’s Community Action Training program

·    Development of the Good Neighbour project

·    Improvements to parking conditions at Sydney Street Shops and Oxley Park Public School

·    Delivery of two new bus shelters on Brisbane St

·    Co-design and delivery of new playgrounds (Australia St and Brisbane St, Brian King Park – currently underway)

·    Delivery of successful illegal dumping campaigns

·    Installation of a new shade sail at Ridge Park playground

 

Council is currently upgrading Brian King Park as part of the Penrith Mayoral Challenge project and has successfully secured additional funding from the NSW Government’s Community Building Partnership to further enhance the park.

 

Funding for a formal walkability study and shared bike path within Oxley Park remains unsecured. Neighbourhood Renewal continues to investigate funding opportunities.

 

Kingswood Place Plan 2018-22


In 2018, people living, working or studying in Kingswood shared a vision for their neighbourhood that led to the development of the Kingswood Place Plan 2018-22. Endorsed at Policy Review Committee meeting on 12 November 2018, the plan included the following priorities:

·    Growing community safety and connectedness

·    Improving access to essential services/goods

·    Improving knowledge of how to advocate and access Council services

·    Improving walkability and local traffic safety issues

·    Enhancing the amenity of public spaces

 

A picture containing grass, light, sitting, night

Description automatically generated

Bright Nights Kingswood attracted a total of 600 local residents to events held in June, July and August 2019, encouraging positive perceptions of the area after dark.

 

The delivery of the community informed Kingswood Place Plan is currently underway, with recent achievements including:

 

·    Ongoing delivery the Village Café in Wainwright Park

·    Endorsement of a Pedestrian Lighting Strategy for Kingswood

·    Delivery of three Bright Nights Kingswood evening activation events

·    Installation of new rubber soft-fall at Wainwright Park

·    Delivery of Community Action Training, leading to the development of local resident group, ‘Kingswood Together’ and delivery of resident led events

·    Successful grant applications, including the Light My Way project

Council’s Community Safety team received $400,000 for Light My Way to install new pedestrian lighting in Kingswood, funded by a grant from the Commonwealth Department of Industry, Innovation and Science. Council was also a successful recipient of the NSW Government’s 2019 Community Building Partnership grant and recently secured funding for a new outdoor fitness station in Chapman Gardens.

 

While significant progress has been made on the delivery of the existing Kingswood Place Plan, several actions remain unfunded priorities. These include actions to deliver a wayfinding project and to design and implement broader public amenity upgrades in Kingswood. These actions will be further pursued through the recommendations of the Think Bold Kingswood Place Plan.

 

As Kingswood is both a neighbourhood as well as a strategic hub attracting students, a range of workers and investment opportunities, Council is further building on the existing Kingswood Place Plan to enable an integrated longer-term ‘Place’ vision. Council recently contracted JOC Consulting to develop the Think Bold Kingswood Place Plan which will enable a strategic direction for Kingswood that incorporates the vision shared by both residents, businesses as well as key stakeholders. Councillor received an overview on this project at the Councillor Briefing held on April 6th. Recommendations from this project will inform the delivery of currently unfunded actions within the existing Kingswood Place Plan along with the development of new actions.

 

Ongoing Neighbourhood Renewal activities

Neighbourhood Renewal will commence engagement in Llandilo in 2020-21 to identify local priorities and work with the local community. The team will focus on building connections with residents, delivering creative arts and cultural programming and encouraging local leaders to participate in Council’s Community Action Training program.

 

Alongside Neighbourhood Renewal’s community engagement program, the team continues to deliver a range of projects aimed at improving local wellbeing including:

 

Village Café

The Village Café project now operates in North St Marys, Kingswood, and most recently in Llandilo. The project continues to attract residents who are able to connect with Council, each other and local service providers. Village Café provides a valuable informal setting for residents to learn about Council and community services and reach out for support.

 

Residents report enjoying the opportunity to connect with others and access fresh and healthy produce. The project has also enabled many residents to spark new friendships, access new services, and share their creative ideas and skills with others.

Local residents enjoy connecting at Village Café Llandilo held in January 2020.

 

Since June 2017, Council has delivered a total 105 sessions of the Village Café reaching approximately 3,000 residents across North St Marys, Kingswood and mostly recently, Llandilo. Funding for the Village Café project remains unsecured after June 2021 and further evaluation of the project’s social impact is currently underway.

 

Penrith Mayoral Challenge

Neighbourhood Renewal continues to lead Council’s Penrith Mayoral Challenge, working with local young people to co- design new playgrounds. The 2019 Penrith Mayoral project is well underway with construction commencing on the new Brian King Playground designed by Oxley Park Public School students.

 

The site for the 2020 Penrith Mayoral Challenge project is Spence Park, Penrith. Neighbourhood Renewal will work with students at Penrith Public School to co-design a new playground focused on improved accessibility for people with disabilities.

 

Since its inception in 2015, the Penrith Mayoral Challenge project has worked with over 150 local students to design and deliver 6 new playgrounds in Cranebrook, Colyton, Kingswood, Cambridge Park and Oxley Park.

 

The project has also successfully attracted over $141,000 of additional funding from NSW Government grant programs.


Magnetic Places

Since 2015, Council’s Magnetic Places program has initiated over 36 successful placemaking and activation projects. Celebrating creativity, diversity and culture across Neighbourhood Renewal areas, these projects have reached over 9,000 residents.

 

For the 2019 program, seven funded projects are currently underway in St Marys, Kingswood, North St Marys, Colyton, Londonderry and Llandilo. Local Londonderry artist, Christine Huynh, has been working with residents and RFS volunteers on new mosaic and painted artworks for Londonderry and recently shared the following update:


“In a time when we are all feeling a little anxious, local residents love seeing the colour and art and feel encouraged by it during these crazy times”.

 

A group of people sitting at a table eating food

Description automatically generated


Londonderry artist, Christine Huynh, works with RFS volunteers to create new artworks as part of a Magnetic Places 2019 funded project.

Financial Implications

 

There are no direct financial implications from the recommendations of the Neighbourhood Renewal Action Plans - Progress Report, however, there are some unfunded priorities that remain at present. The Neighbourhood Renewal team continues to investigate grant funding opportunities, mostly using existing annual funding allocations to deliver these projects.

 

Conclusion

 

This report provided Council with a summary of all Neighbourhood Renewal led action plans produced with residents from 2015-20. Over 94% of all actions are either complete, underway or business as usual. A small number of actions remain unfunded priorities and Neighbourhood Renewal continues to investigate possible funding opportunities.

 

Since 2015, the Neighbourhood Renewal Program has reached over 11,000 residents. Approximately 5,000 residents in Colyton, North St Marys, Oxley Park and Kingswood participated in engagement activates leading to the development of local action plans.

Together, these action plans have achieved significant outcomes for these communities. They have enabled collaboration and resourcing across Council and the community sector to drive positive changes and amplify the pride residents have for their neighbourhoods.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the information contained in the report on Neighbourhood Renewal Action Plans - Progress Report be received.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

Neighbourhood Renewal Action Plans Review 2015-20

29 Pages

Attachments Included

  


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                   27 April 2020

 

 

 

5

RFT 19/20-34 Soper Place Infrastructure   

 

Compiled by:               Marco De Stefanis, Major Projects Coordinator

Authorised by:            Michael Jackson, Design and Projects Manager  

 

Outcome

We have safe, vibrant places

Strategy

Make our public places safe and attractive

Service Activity

Plan and deliver Council's major capital projects for public spaces

      

 

Executive Summary

The Soper Place Multi-storey Carpark is a priority for Council and will contribute to the provision of over 1,000 additional parking spaces for the City Centre, with over 600 additional spaces being provided on this site.  The relocation of significant trunk drainage assets which currently cut across the development site is an important milestone that commences the onsite works in achieving the the goal of constructing the multi-deck car park.  Late last year saw the outcome of the Design Excellence competition announced and works are progressing now to finalising that design for construction. This initial component of the project includes the realignment of major storm-water culverts and required utilities’ relocation work including a High Voltage line.

 

A tender for the construction, testing and commissioning of Soper Place Infrastructure at Soper Place, Penrith was advertised on the 13th of February 2020 in the Western Weekender and the 18th of February 2020 in the Sydney Morning Herald and closed on Thursday 2 April 2020 at 11.00am.

 

This report advises Council of the outcome of the tender process and recommends that the tender from Statewide Civil Pty Ltd, for the amount of $2,343,498 (excluding GST) be accepted for construction, testing and commissioning of Soper Place Infrastructure at Soper Place, Penrith.

Background

A consultant (GHD Pty Ltd) was engaged to produce civil design, specifications and acquire utility providers’ design certification. This included also investigating the underground services, traffic and flooding requirements in order to avoid potential re-work later down the track.

The works require a suitably experienced contractor for the installation of storm water culverts and associated electrical trenching, conduits and sewer/water-supply works in a busy environment, used by the public as car park and with regard to the operations of the surrounding businesses.

The Contractor will have to interface with Transport for NSW (RMS), Endeavour Energy, Sydney Water and NSW Health.  Therefore, they have had proven previous experience in dealing with multiple Authorities at the same time.

Tenderers were required to submit their tender on the basis of the design provided and tailor their methodology to the Soper Place context. The methodology was to reduce potential risks of disrupting businesses activities and nuisance to the public, such as limiting required road closures or parking closures and include a framework to support the community during the construction works.

The Evaluation Panel

The Tender Evaluation Panel (TEP) consisted of Michael Jackson – Design and Projects Manager (Chair), Matthew Buckley – Major Projects Coordinator, Marco De Stefanis – Major Projects Coordinator and Ari Fernando – Major Projects & Design Coordinator.

Laura Stott, Procurement Business Partner fulfilled the role of tender administrator and Bill Stanley, Procurement and Contract Management Specialist was probity officer for the tender.

Tender Evaluation Criteria

The selection criteria advertised and used in selecting the successful tenderer were:

•        Demonstrated Ability 

•        Methodology

•        Financial Viability

•        Company Structure and Employment Practices

•        Quality Assurance

•        Environmental Assurance

•        Cost/Price

•        Work Health & Safety

•        Local Supplier

 

Tender Summary of Tenders Received

The following tenders have been received in price order:

 

DEVCON CIVIL PTY LIMITED

$2,079,308

Sunnyholt Road, Blacktown, NSW 2148

DALSKI PTY LTD

$2,157,877

Unit 5, 743 The Horsley DR Smithfield, NSW 2164

STATEWIDE CIVIL PTY LTD

$2,343,498

Unit 9/40 Brookhollow Ave, Baulkham Hills NSW 2153

ANTOUN CIVIL ENGINEERING (AUST) PTY LTD

$2,432,556

1A, 2 Costello Place, Seven Hills, NSW 2147

MENAI CIVIL CONTRACTORS PTY. LTD.

$2,724,446

1/15 Blackmore Road, Smeaton Grange, NSW 2567

ERTECH PTY LTD

$4,247,924

Level 5, 35 Saunders Street Pyrmont, NSW 2009

BREFNI PTY LTD

$4,679,482

Bridge St, Picton, NSW 2571

Evaluation of Tenders

The process for the evaluation of tenders involved scoring of all tenders against the evaluation criteria and then a shortlisting once pricing was taken into consideration.

The offers received from Ertech Pty Ltd and Brefni Pty Ltd were ruled out due to exceeding project budget.  The offer received from DAFNI Pty Ltd was also excluded, due to low scores on the non-price criteria.

Four remaining tenders were consequently shortlisted based on price and effectiveness:

DEVCON CIVIL PTY LIMITED

$2,079,308

STATEWIDE CIVIL PTY LTD

$2,343,498

ANTOUN CIVIL ENGINEERING (AUST) PTY LTD

$2,432,556

MENAI CIVIL CONTRACTORS PTY. LTD.

$2,724,446

The committee performed a detailed analysis of the offers received. Assumptions, exclusions and options within the offers have been evaluated in order to identify potential risks.

The offer received from Devcon Civil was the lowest price.  The committee performed a more detailed check on their abilities and experience to ensure their capability.

Looking at their provided history, Devcon Civil has worked under RMS conditions only once. The associated works were performed on the road shoulder (no traffic diversions or road opening) for a relatively small dollar value. This was considered to pose a potential high risk of delays.  In addition, Devcon Civil experience is mostly related to green-fields sites (new development). Given the location of Soper Place a contractor with more experience on brown-field (already developed) sites is recommended.

Due to the above analysis the Committee does not recommend Devcon Civil to be appointed for the construction of Soper Place Infrastructure.

The offer received from Antoun Civil Engineering, although scoring high on effectiveness, included numerous contractual objections which raised significant risk of not being able to agree a contract and potential costs associated with the clauses they were seeking to vary.

Due to the risks associated with the above, the offer from Antoun Civil Engineering was not recommended by the Committee.

The Committee performed reference checks on Statewide with other councils to assess their ability & the feedback was positive. The tenderer demonstrated sufficient experience on infrastructure works and cooperation with multiple Authorities and have been employed by Cumberland Council on a similar job.

The Committee agreed the offer from Statewide Civil represented the best value for money among the offers received and recommends them to be appointed for Soper Place Infrastructure contract providing a satisfactory financial check is received.

Preferred Tender

The recommended company, Statewide Civil Pty Ltd, was selected based on their:

1.       Compliance with Tender Evaluation Criteria

2.       Demonstrated ability to meet Council expectations; and

3.       Best Value for Money

The Tender Evaluation Committee thoroughly reviewed the information provided pertaining the experience of the recommended tenderer and conducted reference checks.

The Committee is convinced that Statewide Civil Pty Ltd has covered all aspects of the tender and demonstrated the required level of expertise and experience, to deliver the best results for the project.

 

Financial Implications

Included in the assessment of tenders was the commissioning of independent reference checks, financial analysis, and performance analysis on Statewide Civic Pty Ltd and Menai Civic Contractor Pty Ltd. These checks are being completed by Equifax Australasia Credit Ratings Pty Ltd but have not yet been returned. The report recommends acceptance of the tender by Statewide Civic Pty Ltd, subject to the return of acceptable financial report.

 

Funding for the Soper Place Multi-Storey car park will be priovided from loan income which will then be repaid from SRV reserve funds. This can be achieved since the 2016-17 Special Rate Variation (SRV) included provision for repayment of loan funding for multi-deck carparking. This provision identified an allocation Soper Place carpark.               

Tender Advisory Group Comments

The objective of the Tender Advisory Group (TAG) is to support the Council to achieve fair and equitable tender processes. The TAG, consisting of Brian Steffen Director City Services, Glenn McCarthy - Governance Manager and Neil Farquharson – Financial Services Manager were briefed by the Design & Projects team about the background and the process followed.

The TAG considered the recommendations in relation to the tender for the construction of Soper Place Infrastructure, it was noted that the recommended proposal is not the lowest cost but the company has demonstrated their ability to meet Council’s requirements and their proposal was considered to be the most advantageous to Council.

The TAG reviewed the evaluation process outlined within the report and is satisfied that the selection criteria have been correctly applied in making the recommendations.

Risk Implications

The tender process outlined in this report includes controls regarding probity and ensuring value for council, overseen by the Tender Advisory Group. 

The works will be undertaken in accordance with Work Health & Safety systems. Site safety and controls will be of paramount importance during construction period.

Traffic controls, detours for cars and pedestrians and exclusion zones will be implemented on site in accordance with the Contractor Safety plans.

Conclusion

Seven tenders were received and evaluated. Four of these were shortlisted and evaluated considering also risks and potential issues associated with the offer. Statewide Civil Pty Ltd provided the best value for money and it is recommended that the proposal and lump sum price for the amount of $2,343,498 (excluding GST) be accepted for the construction of Soper Place Infrastructure subject to the return of an acceptable financial report.

 

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on RFT 19/20-34 Soper Place Infrastructure be received.

2.     The proposal and lump sum price from Statewide Civil Pty Ltd Pty Ltd for the amount of $2,343,498 (excluding GST) be accepted for the construction of Soper Place Infrastructure subject to the return of an acceptable financial report.

3.     The Common Seal of the Council of the City of Penrith be placed on all documentation as necessary.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                   27 April 2020

 

 

 

6

RFT19/20-28 Supply and Installation of Workstations and Office Furniture   

 

Compiled by:               Siva Sivakumar, Project Coordinator – Capital Works

Authorised by:            Michael Jackson, Design and Projects Manager  

 

Outcome

We have safe, vibrant places

Strategy

Make our public places safe and attractive

Service Activity

Implement the Building Asset Renewal Program

      

 

Executive Summary

Tender reference RFT19/20-28 for Supply and Installation of Workstations and Office Furniture was advertised in the Sydney Morning Herald on 3 December 2019 and the Western Weekender on 5 December 2019. The tender closed on 23 January 2020.

 

This report advises Council of the outcome of the tender process and recommends that a panel of suppliers comprising Krost Business Furniture Centre Pty Ltd as preferred supplier and Accent Furniture as second preferred supplier is established for the scope of works outlined in RFT 19/20-28 supply and installation of workstations and office furniture.

Background

The workspace layout of the ground floor of the Civic Centre was constructed in 1993 and the intent of this tender is to allow us to provide contemporary staff workspace through future projects.  To date furniture has been supplied through State Govt panel contracts and this tender has allowed us to test the market and secure advantageous pricing on a wide range of office furniture product.  The recommended preferred tender has resulted in a saving of approximately 30% on workstations in comparison to our previous supplier.

 

To this end it is proposed to establish a panel of furniture suppliers for all future office refurbishment projects.

Tender Structure

The tender was structured such that the scope of works was split into Separable Portions A and B. Separable Portion A included all types of required furniture for the Civic Centre Ground and Second Floors, and Separable Portion B is to establish a panel of preferred suppliers of furniture for all Council future office space upgrade works within Penrith City Council Local Government Area. Separable Portion B forms a term contract for a period of two years with possible extension of further two (2) years at a time for additional two (2) terms.

 

The unites rates received for both Separable Portions A and B, with estimated quantities, take the form of a Schedule of Rate Contract.

Tender Evaluation Process

The Tender Evaluation Committee consisted of Siva Sivakumar – Project Coordinator, Peter Foster – Project Supervisor and was chaired by Michael Jackson – Design & Projects Manager. 

 

Laura Stott from Council’s Procurement team performed the role of tender administration and probity officer for this tender.

 

The evaluation criteria advertised and used in assessing the tenders received included the following:

 

·    Business References

·    Demonstrated Ability

·    Project Appreciation

·    Works Method and Program

·    Financials

·    Employment Policies and details (Direct labour and Sub Contractors)

·    Support of Local Businesses within the Penrith LGA – Suppliers and Contractors

·    Quality Assurance Systems

·    Environmental Management Systems

·    Work Health & Safety

·    Value for money

Initial Tender Review

A full listing of the unit rates (ex GST) of the main items in the tenders received is detailed below in price order for the typical desk and furniture items.  There are 28 different items in each schedule and comparisons were calculated with provisional quantities inserted for each item in the schedule as well as for the limited range of items listed here.

 

Company

Workstation

1800mm x 800mm

Chair

Under desk Caddy

Company Location

Directors

Adaptive Trading Pty Ltd

 

-

 

$208.00

 

-

24 Jones Street, Wagga Wagga NSW 2650

Lester Pridham

Specfurn Commercial Furniture NSW

 

-

 

$185.00

 

$340.00

Unit 11, 19 McCauley Street, Port Botany NSW 2036

Tony Hall 

 

Guy Masson

Sturdy Components Pty Ltd

 

-

 

$370.00

 

$375.00

95 Gow Street, Padstow

NSW 2211

Bradley Denny

Krost Business Furniture Centre Pty Ltd

 

$1,126.94

 

$188.39

 

$404.51

33 Ricketty Street, Mascot NSW 2020

Tyron, Gareth & Colin Krost

Complete Office Supplies Pty Ltd

 

$1,115.00

 

$349.00

 

$348.00

25 Nyrang Street

Lidcombe NSW 2141

Dominique Lyone

Accent Furniture

 

$1,180.00

 

$205.00

 

$295.00

4 Excelsior Street, Lisarow NSW 2250

Daniel, Roger, Richard & Jerry Kennard

Trusource Space Solutions Pty Ltd

 

$1,310.00

 

$178.00

 

$320.00

3 Walsh Close

Illawong NSW 2234

Glenn Turnbull

Workspace Commercial Furniture Pty Ltd

 

$1,430.00

 

$236.00

 

$330.00

4/809-821 Botany Road, Rosebery NSW 2018

Trevor Gould, Peter Byrnes, Tom Clark

Winya Indigenous Furniture Pty Ltd

 

$1,433.91

 

$264.00

 

$375.46

Unit 4, 2 Southridge Street, Eastern Creek NSW 2766

Debbie Barwick / Anthony Mankarious

Bowemans Office Furniture

 

$1,672.71

 

$318.18

 

$375.46

591 Church Street, North Parramatta NSW 2151

Alan Stephenson

Schiavello Systems (NSW) Pty Ltd

 

$1,692.70

 

$304.60

 

$406.00

69 Campbell Street, Surry Hills NSW 2010

Not Provided

Aspen Commercial Interiors Pty Ltd

 

$1,735.00

 

$395.00

 

$475.00

53 Holbeche Road, Arndell Park NSW 2148

David, Stephen, Paul & Mark Heaney

Work Arena Pty Ltd

 

$1,753.00

 

$304.00

 

$391.00

34 Waterloo Road, Macquarie Park

NSW 2113

Ross Harding

Maxton Fox Furniture Systems Pty Ltd

 

$1,825.00

 

$375.00

 

$390.00

378 Vardys Road, Kings Park NSW 2148

Rick Lewis

Watts Office Furniture Manufacturing Pty Ltd

 

$1,895.00

 

$210.00

 

$420.00

350a Edgar Street, Bankstown NSW 2200

Dane Walsh, Pasquale Leto, Mark Hemmings, Brian Smith

Lianavale Pty Ltd

 

$2,513.00

 

$203.00

 

$413.00

4 Lucca Road, Wyong NSW 2259

Mark & Lisa Moffett

Kulbardi Pty Ltd

 

$2,589.00

 

$228.00

 

$442.00

Unit 2, 171–173 Orchard Road, Chester Hill NSW 2162

Kim Collard

 

Tenders received from Zenith Interiors and AMS Furniture were incomplete and deemed to be nonconforming tenders. Also, the Tenders received from Adaptive Trading Pty Ltd and Workspace Commercial Furniture Pty Ltd included only the Separable Portion A and therefore, tenders from these two companies deemed to be nonconforming.

 

Tenders were evaluated using Apet360 software to provide a ranking for conformance with the evaluation criteria. 

Evaluation of the Preferred Tender

The tenders submitted by Lianavale Pty Ltd and Kulbardi Pty Ltd were outside of the available budget and were not evaluated further.

 

Following the assessment of effectiveness, the tenders submitted by the following 3 firms scored relatively poorly in comparison to the other firms evaluated and these three firms were removed from the short list.

 

·    Schiavello Systems (NSW) Pty Ltd

·    Aspen Commercial Interiors Pty Ltd

·    Winya Indigenous Furniture Pty Ltd

 

The following 2 companies were unable to supply all the furniture items listed in the tender and thus tendered schedules were incomplete. Therefore, the tenderers submitted by these companies were not evaluated further.

 

·    Specfurn Commercial Furniture NSW

·    Study Components Pty Ltd

 

Upon detailed analysis of the tendered prices, the following three firms have been shortlisted.

 

·    Accent Furniture

·    Krost Business Furniture Centre Pty Ltd

·    Trusource Space Solutions Pty Ltd

 

These three companies were provided with the opportunity to demonstrate to Council of the quality and safety aspects of furniture included in their tender submissions. An evaluation team of Council officers including a Work Health and Safety representative visited the manufacturing facilities and showrooms of Krost Business Furniture Centre Pty Ltd and Accent Furniture. These two companies make all their furniture locally and rely on some imported components. Also, though most of the furniture was of similar quality, the workstations made by Krost Business Furniture Centre Pty Ltd were found to be sturdier than the sample shown by Accent Furniture.

 

Trusource Space Solutions Pty Ltd is a company operated by a Sole Trader and relies on sourcing all of the furniture in the tender from China, with local storage and installation by another subcontractor in Sydney. As this company had arranged for an inspection of the job it completed for a client in Sydney this has not eventuated due to the restrictions placed by its client because of the COVID-19 epidemic reasons. Trusource Space Solutions Pty Ltd was not given further consideration based on their potential difficulties in servicing the installed furniture, meeting the warranty requirements, and in sourcing varying quantities of furniture over time under Separable Portion B which forms the term contract.

 

Complete Office Supplies Pty Ltd provided good pricing on the workstation component as evident in the pricing table above, however their comparatively high pricing on the remaining items in the 28 item schedule resulted in their potential combined price being above that of the three shortlisted firms.

 

The recommended companies Krost Business Furniture Centre Pty Ltd as preferred supplier, and Accent Furniture as second preferred supplier were selected based on their;

 

1)    Compliance with the tender evaluation criteria,

2)    Demonstrated ability to meet Council’s requirements; and

3)    Competitive price for the services offered along with demonstrating its overall effectiveness in performing of works under contract.

 

Financial Implicationscan

Included in the assessment of tenders was the commissioning of independent reference checks, financial analysis, and performance analysis on Krost Business Furniture Centre Pty Ltd and Accent Furniture. These checks were recently completed by Equifax Australasia Credit Ratings Pty Ltd and have been reviewed by Financial Services. Based on this review, no concerns were raised as to the ability of Krost Business Furniture Centre Pty Ltd to perform the works described under Separable Portions A and B of the contract, and Accent Furniture to perform the works described under Separable Portion B of the contract as the second preferred supplier.

 

The 2020-21 Building Asset Renewal Program has an allocation for current renewal and replacement of office furniture. Provisions for office furniture outside of this program will be funded by individual department operational budgets.

 

Tender Advisory Group (TAG) Comment

The objective of the Tender Advisory Group (TAG) is to support the Council to achieve fair and equitable tender processes. The TAG, consisting of the Director City Services - Brian Steffen, Governance Manager - Glenn McCarthy, Financial Services Manager - Neil Farquharson and Chris Lawrence – Supply Coordinator, were briefed by the Design & Projects team about the background and the process followed. The TAG noted that the recommended tenders submitted are not only provide best value for money but also the recommended companies provided evidence of their ability to meet Council’s requirements through their compliance with the tender evaluation criteria. The TAG considered the recommendations in relation to the tender for the Supply and Install Wokstations and Office Furniture, reviewed the evaluation process outlined within the report and is satisfied that the selection criteria have been correctly applied in making the recommendations.

Risk Implications

The tender process outlined in this report includes controls regarding probity and ensuring value for money, overseen by the Tender Advisory Group. The works will be undertaken in accordance with Council Work Health & Safety systems and legislative requirements.

Conclusion

The Tender Evaluation Committee is in the opinion that a panel of suppliers comprising Krost Business Furniture Centre Pty Ltd as preferred supplier and Accent Furniture as second preferred supplier is established for the scope of works outlined in RFT 19/20-28 supply and installation of workstations and office furniture.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on RFT19/20-28 Supply and Installation of Workstations and Office Furniture be received

2.     A panel of suppliers comprising Krost Business Furniture Centre Pty Ltd as preferred supplier and Accent Furniture as second preferred supplier be established for the scope of works outlined in RFT 19/20-28 supply and installation of workstations and office furniture.

 

3.     The Common Seal of the Council of the City of Penrith be placed on all documentation if necessary.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.  


 

 

 

 

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Outcome 5 - We care about our environment

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

7        South Creek Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan                                           39

 

 

 



Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                   27 April 2020

 

 

 

7

South Creek Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan   

 

Compiled by:               Mylvaganam Senthilvasan, Engineering Coordinator

Authorised by:            Adam Wilkinson, Engineering Services Manager

Wayne Mitchell, Director - Development and Regulatory Services  

 

Outcome

We care for our environment

Strategy

Minimise risks to our community from natural disasters and a changing climate

Service Activity

Manage the risk to and impact on life and property from the existing and potential future use of the floodplain

      

 

Executive Summary

In accordance with the NSW Government’s Floodplain Development Manual (April 2005), Council has undertaken a Floodplain Risk Management Study for South Creek and developed a Floodplain Risk Management Plan.

 

The Draft South Creek Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan, August 2019 was placed on public exhibition from 31 October to 28 November 2019 for public comment.  The purpose of this report is to provide Council with the outcome of the public exhibition.

 

The report recommends that the South Creek Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan be adopted.

Background

The NSW Government’s Flood Policy is directed at providing solutions to existing flooding issues in developed areas and ensuring that new developments are compatible with the relevant flood hazard and do not create flooding problems in other areas.  Under the Policy the management of flood prone land remains the responsibility of Councils.  The policy and floodplain management practices are defined in the NSW Government’s Floodplain Development Manual, April 2005. The policy sets out a staged process Council must follow, which includes data collection, a flood study, a floodplain risk management study and plan, and implementation of the plan as shown in Figure 1 below.

Figure 1


 

The State Government, under its policy, provides technical advice and in some instances financial support to councils to manage their floodplains.

 

South Creek and its floodplains were identified as priority floodplains requiring a detailed flood study and a floodplain risk management plan to effectively manage flooding impacts within the catchment.

 

South Creek is a tributary of the Hawkesbury Nepean River that drains about 414 km2 of catchment area into the Hawkesbury River at Windsor.  It has many tributaries including Ropes Creek, Kemps Creek, Badgerys Creek, Cosgroves Creek, Blaxland Creek, Claremont Creek and Werrington Creek.  The catchment area comprises Local Government Areas (LGA) under the control of Penrith City Council, Blacktown City Council, Fairfield City and Liverpool City Council.

 

In 2014, Penrith City Council together with Blacktown City Council, Liverpool City Council, and Fairfield City Council prepared the Updated South Creek Flood Study.  The Flood Study covers the South Creek catchment extending from Bringelly Road to the south through to Blacktown Road - Richmond Road Bridge to the north.  On 24 November 2014 Penrith City Council adopted the Flood Study.

 

The next stage of the floodplain management process is to undertake a Floodplain Risk Management Study and to develop a Floodplain Risk Management Plan for the floodplain.  The Study Area is shown on Appendix 1.

 

The Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan was undertaken by Engineering Consultancy firm, Advisian, on behalf of Council, with the technical guidance and financial assistance from the NSW Department of Planning, Industry and Environment (DPIE) (formerly Office of Environment and Heritage). The Study and Plan have been overseen by a Technical Working Group comprising members from Council, the consultant, the DPIE, adjacent councils and the NSW State Emergency Services (SES). The Study and Plan have been endorsed by Council’s Floodplain Risk Management Committee.

The primary objective of this Study and Plan is to develop a floodplain risk management plan for the study area that addresses the existing, future and continuing flood impacts, taking into account the potential impacts of climate change, in accordance with the NSW Government Flood Policy, as detailed in the NSW Floodplain Development Manual, April 2005.

 

On 23 September 2019 Council resolved that (part): 

1.  “The public exhibition draft of the South Creek Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan, August 2019 be endorsed for public exhibition for a period of no less than 28 days.

2.  A further report to be presented to Council on the results of the public exhibition of the public exhibition draft of the South Creek Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan, August 2019 addressing any submissions received during the exhibition period.”

Public Exhibition

The Draft South Creek Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan was placed on public exhibition from 31 October 2019 and the submissions closed 28 November 2019.  The exhibition process included direct exhibition through the catchment and public notification of that exhibition period. The following were undertaken as part of the public exhibition.

·      Advertisements placed in the local newspaper inviting residents, ratepayers and business owners to review the draft reports and make submissions;

·      Letters were sent to residents and businesses within the areas affected by the PMF informing them about the public exhibition and requesting them to review the draft report and make submissions;

·      Community Information Sheet (Factsheet) detailing the flood management process and the steps involved in developing a floodplain risk management plan were prepared and distributed. This was also be made available through Council’s Website.

·      Council’s website updated to access the study documents and arranged for making submissions electronically;

·      Printed study documents were displayed at the Civic Centre, St Marys Library and Penrith Library for viewing by the public; and

·      Two community drop-in sessions were held so as the public to directly view the relevant documents and discuss with staff and the consultant as required.

13 November 2019, 6pm-8pm, at the St Marys Memorial Hall and

14 November 2019, 6pm-8pm, at the Llandilo Community Hall.

Presentations were given at the community drop-in sessions outlining the purpose of the study and key recommendations. More than one hundred (100) residents and business owners attended the drop-in-sessions.

From the public exhibition, Council received fifteen (15) written submissions. The submissions are summarised together with Council’s response in the Table 1 below.

Table 1: Summary of Submissions and Responses

Submission Number

Summary of Submissions

Responses to Submissions

1

This submission is from Endeavour Energy that has many substations within the study area, and some may be affected by flood. Endeavour Energy advised that maintaining road access to their substations sites during flood is important and will allow them to maintain electricity supply for longer periods and in case of failure or breakdown a quicker restoration of supply.

 

This submission does not raise any objections to the Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan.

The Floodplain Risk Management Study includes community data sheets which provides details of road flooding that will be very useful for emergency response management purposes.  The data sheets and other flood information are very valuable to the State Emergency Services as well as electricity companies to plan their emergency response management activities during flooding. The flood information will be made available to relevant authorities involving emergency management.

2

The writer raised questions about when the proposed flood mitigation works will be implemented and who will be funding the works.

 

This submission does not raise any objections to the Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan.

Council contacted the writer and advised that at this stage there is no funding nor timeframe allocated for the recommended works. When available, Council will be meeting the cost of these projects. Further Council will be seeking flood management grant flooding from the NSW Government for implementing some of the recommended works.

3

The writer raised concerns regarding an existing stormwater drainage problem in front of their industrial property located at Charles Street, St Marys.

 

This submission does not raise any objections to the Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan.

This matter is not related to the Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan. This matter has been referred to the relevant Council Officer for investigation. Inspection have been undertaken and response provided to the property owner.  Submission requires no amendments to the study documents.

 

4

The writer requested flooding information regarding their property at Madison Circuit, St Clair.

 

This submission does not raise any objections to the Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan.

The writer’s property is located outside the 1 in 100-year flooding extent but within the Probable Maximum Flood extent. Council staff contacted the writer and advised the level of flooding affecting the property and provided flood information of the area.

5

The writer attended one of the community drop-in-session and raised questions regarding the exhibited draft Penrith Local Strategic Planning Statement.

 

This submission does not raise any objections to the Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan.

This matter is not related to the Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan. This matter has been referred to the relevant Council Officer for investigation and advice.

6

The writer made the following comments:

1.   Filling of floodplains particularly Jordon Springs and Marsden Park in Blacktown LGA causing more flooding to Llandilo and Berkshire Park areas; and

2.   The recently exhibited draft Penrith Local Strategic Planning Statement is not allowing change (development) within Llandilo and Berkshire Park areas whereas surrounding areas are allowed to fill and develop.

1.   Larger developments, such as South West and North West Growth Centres, are assessed on their merit and suitable flood and drainage mitigation measures are incorporated so that any adverse flood impacts (flood level and velocity) outside the development areas will be kept to minimum or negligible.  The Department of Planning and respective Councils are responsible to ensure this.

2.   This matter is not directly related to the Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan. This matter has been referred to the relevant Council Officer for investigation and advice.

7

The writer made the following comments:

1.   Filling of floodplains particularly Jordon Springs and Marsden Park in Blacktown LGA causing more flooding to Llandilo and Berkshire Park areas;

2.   Regular cleaning of South Creek is required to reduce flooding; and

3.   The PMF maps are unnecessary and should be removed from the study documents.

1.   This comment is the same as comment Number 1 in Submission 6. Refer to response above.

2.   The comment is concerning the channel maintenance of South Creek.  Channel clearing option was considered and found that the clearing of the channel will have negligible flood mitigation benefits whereas same will likely have significant adverse environmental impacts. And as such channel clearing is not recommended. This matter is also referred to Council’s City Presentation Division for regular inspection and take action to minimise blockages of bridges. The report has been amended to include commentary that channel clearing will have no benefit.

3.   The preparation of the Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan is undertaken in accordance with the NSW Government’s Floodplain Development Manual, April 2005. The flood analysis undertaken and the mapping of the PMF is required to meet the requirements detailed in the Manual and also to assess all flood impacts up to and including the PMF.

8

The writer appreciated the large amount of work undertaken by Council and made the following comments:

1.   We should plan for more than 1 in 100-year flood or 1 in 500-year and preferably should plan for zero chance of flooding; and

2.   Why the Floodplain Risk Management Plan is not recommending a large flood detention, possibly within creek channel with possible navigation.

1.   The Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan is prepared to meet the NSW Government’s flood prone land policy as detailed in the NSW Floodplain Development Manual, April 2005. When development is undertaken NSW Government and Councils consider flood impacts up to and including the PMF. Avoiding development within any flood prone land is unnecessary and that is against the NSW Government flood prone land policy.

2.   Detention basins are mainly provided in new development areas for mitigating adverse flood impacts as a result of development. Areas such as Llandilo and Berkshire Park are affected by upper catchment runoffs as well as backwater flooding from Hawkesbury River.  A large detention within creek channel with navigation is not a feasible option for this type of flooding and as such not supported.

9

The writer made the following comments:

1.   The voluntary house purchasing is not supported;

2.   Examine the possibility of a flood protection levee for Llandilo areas along western side of South Creek;

3.   Examine the possibility of widening the Sackville Gorge;

4.   Regular cleaning of debris and litter that block Eighth Avenue bridge is required;

5.   Raising Warragamba Dam wall another 14m will exacerbate the flooding rather than alleviate the situation;

6.   Install a flood boom gate for Eighth Avenue bridge;

7.   River gauge proposed near Sydney Water pipeline is about 20km away, similar gauge is required near Eighth Avenue; and

8.   Council needs to be proactive in communication with individual residents.

1.   Voluntary house raising and voluntary house purchase are valid flood mitigation options that are voluntary, and it is up to residents affected to take up the opportunity when and if funds required are made available.

2.   The possibility of flood mitigation levee for Llandilo areas was investigated but the levee option is not feasible. The detail of this option analysis has been added to the study documents as amendments.

3.   The investigation of the possibility of widening the Sackville Gorge is outside the scope of this study. This option was previously considered by the NSW Government and not supported due to various reasons.

4.   The removal of debris that could block Eighth Avenue bridge will be referred to Council’s City Presentation Unit for regular inspection and action. This will also be listed as an action plan in the study documents as amendment.

5.   Comment noted however this matter is outside the scope of this study.

6.   The possibility of installing a boom gate for Eighth Avenue will be considered in consultation with Blacktown City Council. This will also be listed as an action plan.

7.   The location of the proposed river gauge depends on several factors such as the available time for warning and the feeding catchment area. On this basis the proposed location is selected. A river gauge near Eighth Avenue will have minimal benefits for flood warning times.

8.   Regarding this study Council undertook two levels of consultation, firstly to inform about the study and to seek flood information and possible mitigation options for investigation, and secondly to seek comments to the draft Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan. The consultations took place by various ways of communication with residents and businesses as listed in the body of this report under the heading “Public Exhibition”.

10

The writer made the following comments:

1.   The mapping of flood extent in Figure B.14 and C.1 are incorrect and that is significantly different to our land by approximately 3,000 sq. m. when compared to the flood extent mapped in the 2015 Flood Study prepared by Worley Parsons;

2.   It is not practical to measure the difference in flood levels to 20mm as opposed to 100mm currently applied. Flood impact assessment from 100mm to 20 mm as detailed in page 131, section11.9 is not supported;

3.   Not agreeing with the Flood Hazard categories detailed in Figure 7.3. Splitting the floodplain into H1, H2, H3 and so on is not proportionate; and

4.   The mapping is not the true reflection of our experience of our land and the surrounding areas for over 40 year we lived here.

1.   The comments regarding the accuracy of mapping were referred to the consultant to check the accuracy and the hazard categorisation.  The consultant has confirmed that there is a small difference in the flood extent.  This is a consequence of re-mapping of the study results to the 2012 LiDAR (new landform information). To be consistence with the mapping of the study results minor amendments are made to the figures.

2.   The recommendation regarding the proposed changes to flood impact differences from 100mm to 20mm was again reviewed by the consultant and Council staff.  Flood level increase of 100mm are significant and not acceptable in most instances. Increases of this magnitude can result in substantial increases in flood extents, changes to flood hazard and increased flood damages for flood affected properties.  The recommendation to change the current policy to limit the impact of development on the 1% AEP flood levels to a maximum of 20mm is considered a reasonable upper limit which is in keeping with standard practice in the industry and with flood policies adopted elsewhere in New South Wales.

3.   The updated hazard mapping is based on the application of current industry standard.

4.   It is acknowledged that the writer has experienced the 1986 and 1988 floods, which were significant flood events in the South Creek Valley. However, the 1% AEP flood is rarer flood event than both flood events.

11

This submission is from planning consultants on behalf of landowner (developer) related to a land parcel at Aldington Road, Kemps Creek.  The submission specifically raised the following Matters:

1.   A notation be included in the Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan, which acknowledges that the flood mapping scale is limited in its capacity to review specific creek line and tributaries particularly in identified development precincts;

2.   Notations to be included on the plans and diagrams which indicate the release areas such as the Mamre Road Precinct are subject to further investigation;

3.   Any flood mapping of “no new development areas” exclude identified release areas including Mamre Road Precinct; and

4.   Developer supports the preparation of a site specific DCP for the Mamre Road Precinct.

The comment regarding (1) in this submission to include a notation in the study documents has been reviewed by the consultant and amended as required.

 

Matters raised at (2), (3) and (4) are not directly related to the Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan and have been referred to relevant Council Officer.

12

This submission is from WaterNSW and raised the following matters:

1.   The pipelines run from the Warragamba Dam to Prospect Reservoir are incorrectly referenced throughout the study documents as belonging to Sydney Water when they are under WaterNSW’s ownership and management. The study documents should refer to the pipeline as the “Warragamba Pipelines”;

2.   The flooding present is a real safety hazard to WaterNSW staff and contractors who may be working on the pipelines. It is critical that any flood warning notification be directed to WaterNSW (incident number 1800 061 069);

3.   WaterNSW requests that the Study and Plan include a new action in the recommendations for Council to provide a copy of the final Study and Plan to the NSW SES to inform the update of their Local Flood Plan; and

4.   The study identifies that the Pipelines and associated corridor are subject to flooding risk where they cross South Creek and Ropes Creek. WaterNSW believes the flooding risk and risk management options for the Warragamba Pipelines have not been given due consideration;

5.   The study identifies a potential risk of Kemps and South Creeks farm dams failing under extreme conditions. WaterNSW considers that the risk of these farm dams failing and their potential effect on the Warragamba Pipelines needs to be assessed in consultation with WaterNSW. This should be as a recommendation of the Study;

6.   WaterNSW requests the statements in Table 11.1 regarding ‘Flood Risk and Land Use Planning” made in relation to Areas 1 and 2 (lands adjacent to the Warragamba Pipelines) be amended from “No land use changes recommended to “retain existing land use zones and minimum lot sizes out to the PMF”. This strengthens reasons for not increasing development intensity in these areas.

7.   Figure 11.3 is also showing the Flood risks associated with Ropes Creek. The lands adjoining the Warragamba Pipelines corridor as being zoned IN1 and E2. It would be useful for the study to check the alignment of the E2 zoning either sides of the pipelines corridor with the extent of flood prone land, to see whether the two align and whether this area would benefit by better alignment of the E2 zone with the PMF limit. The Study could examine the DCP provisions for this area of land, and recommend industrial development being excluded from land within the PMF boundary where the development occurs upstream of the Pipelines. This would help reduce any exacerbation from increased development.  

8.   The proposed new gauge near the Warragamba Pipelines is supported;

9.   Several base maps used to prepare the hazard categories in Figure B.3 but they do not appear in the study. If these base maps are included in the study, it can be better understood the risk associated with the pipelines.

10.  Recommendations are brought forward and stand at the front of the document with the Executive Summary;

11.  Executive Summary of the Study would benefit by including a map of the study area;

12.  Time taken for the 1%AEP flood to traverse South Creek from Elizabeth Drive to Richmond Road appears to be 51/2 hours not 61/2 hours as stated (PSS2 in reference to Table S1).

1.   Noted. The study documents have been corrected as required to refer to the pipelines as Warragamba Pipelines.

2.   Emergency warning is a matter for the State Emergency Services. Safe Work Method procedures are a matter for WaterNSW.

3.   This is part of Council’s standard practice. Once the Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan are adopted the study documents including flood models will be provided to the State Emergency Services.

4.   Risk management for the Warragamba Pipelines is a matter for the owner of that asset, i.e. WaterNSW.

5.   Refer to point 4 above.

6.   Noted. Land Use Planning is a matter for further consideration through relevant authorities.

7.   Land Use Planning and Zoning are not directly related to the Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan. That said, the matter will be referred to relevant Council Officer for further review.

8.   Noted.

9.   Noted. Base maps used to prepare flood hazard categories are from the 2015 Flood Study. These maps are already made available to the public and relevant authorities such as State Emergency Services.

10.  Noted.

11.  Noted.

12.  Noted. Document corrected. 

 

13

The writer is concerned that:

1. The base information of the Study is out of date, with flooding data of 2015 and the costing of 2017;

2. The South Creek flooding will be influenced by several factors in the future and that needs to be considered and cannot be ignored.

1.   The writer is referring the South Creek Updated Flood Study completed and adopted by Council in 2015. The current Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan is the continuation of the floodplain risk management process and uses information and data from the Flood Study. However, the current study uses updated terrain information and guidelines.

2.   Council is fully aware of the current and proposed landform changes within the South Creek catchment. However, it is to be noted that when larger developments are considered they are assessed on their merit and suitable flood and drainage mitigation measures are incorporated so that any adverse flood impacts (flood level and velocity) outside the development areas will be kept to minimum or negligible.

14

The writer attended a community drop-in-session and requested flood maps affecting his property located at Christie Street, St Marys.

Requested information has been provided to the resident.

15

Several residents of Putland Street, St Marys attended a Community drop-in-session and requested that Council construct a footpath for Putland Street, St Marys for safety reasons.

This matter is not related to the Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan. This matter has been referred to the relevant Council Officer for investigation and advice.

 

In addition to the above written submissions, the following three matters were raised at the Community drop-in-session held at Llandilo.

 

1.   Why a flood levee is not recommended to protect Llandilo and Berkshire Park areas from flooding of South Creek?

2.   It was commonly observed that during flood the Eighth Avenue bridge was fully or partially blocked. Regular channel cleaning is required to prevent blocking of Eighth Avenue bridge by tree branches and debris.

3.   A flood boom gate is required for the Eighth Avenue bridge to prevent vehicles entering the bridge during flooding.

 

Response

 

An option of a flood protection levee for Llandilo and Berkshire Park areas was initially identified and investigated.  During further investigation it was found that this levee option is not feasible and as such this option is not recommended in the Floodplain Risk Management Plan.

 

Channel clearing option was considered and found that the clearing channel will have negligible flood mitigation benefits whereas same will likely have significant adverse environmental impacts. And as such channel clearing is not recommended. That said, maintenance of the Eighth Avenue bridge is critical and has been referred to Council maintenance team.

 

Providing a flood boom gate has merit and is now recommended for detail investigation and consultation with NSW State Emergency Services and Blacktown City Council regarding the feasibility particularly the protocols for operation of the gates during the onset of flooding.

 

In summary fifteen (15) submissions were received from the public exhibition. Most of the submissions raised clarifications at local levels but generally raised no objections to the Study and Plan.  The consultant has addressed all the issues raised. The exhibited Study and Plan report has now been amended to reflect the changes undertaken. The proposed amendments to the exhibited South Creek Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan Draft Report, August 2019 are listed in the “Schedule of Amendments” included as Appendix 2. The amendments made to the study documents are of very minor nature such as fixing some minor typo errors and providing comment on the public exhibition held.

 

Endorsement of the Floodplain Risk Management Committee

On 2 March 2020, the outcome of the public exhibition was presented to the Floodplain Risk Management Committee. The Committee resolved that (in part):

 

“1. South Creek Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan Final Report February 2020 be endorsed to go to Council for formal adoption subject to no substantial objection from members of the Committee for the amendments made to the study documents addressing the submissions received from the public exhibition.

2.  Arrangements be made to report to Council seeking adoption of the South Creek Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan Final Report February 2020.”

On 2 March 2020 the Schedule of Amendments to the exhibited study reports were made available to the members of the Floodplain Risk Management Committee and requested that the members to forward their comments on the amendments by 17 March 2020. No members raised any objections to the amendments.

 

Financial Implications

 

The South Creek Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan recommends a number of flood mitigation works for which funds will be sought through future flood mitigation grant programs from the State and Federal Governments as well as through Council’s Drainage Programs which are partly funded by Stormwater Management Services Charges.

Risk Implications

Adoption of the South Creek Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan works in part to meet Council’s obligation and good faith provision under the NSW Floodplain Development Manual, April 2005.

Conclusion

The South Creek Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan exhibition draft reports, August 2019 were exhibited for public comment from 31 October to 28 November 2019. Fifteen (15) written submissions received. Summary of the submissions and responses are detailed in the body of this report. Most of the submissions raised clarifications at a local level but generally raised no objection to the Study and Plan.  Some questions raised have merit and needed further investigation and some amendments to the study documents.

 

The consultant has now addressed all issues raised. The exhibited Study and Plan reports are now amended to reflect the changes undertaken.  The proposed amendments to the exhibited South Creek Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan Draft Reports, August 2019 are considered of minor nature and hence of negligible impact on the Study and Plan.

 

The “Schedule of Amendments” to the exhibited study documents is included as Appendix 2.

 

The South Creek Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan Final Reports dated February 2020 (the size of the study report is very large and therefore the reports are provided separately for the information of Councillors and are made available to the public on Council’s website) are now recommended for the consideration by Council for formal adoption.

 

The South Creek Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan Final Reports dated February 2020 have been completed in accordance with the NSW Government’s Floodplain Development Manual, April 2005. The Plan provides the most feasible flood management solutions to assist Council to meet its floodplain management obligations.  It is recommended that the South Creek Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan Final Reports dated February 2020 be adopted.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on South Creek Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan be received.

2.     The South Creek Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan Final Report dated February 2020 be adopted.

3.     The South Creek Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan Final Report dated February 2020 be published and made available on Council’s website.

4.     Council further consider the recommended mitigation works in the South Creek Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan reports dated February 2020 for inclusion by Council in future Capital Works Programs and for grant funding applications.

5.     Council consider the flood planning recommendations listed in the South Creek Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan Final Reports dated February 2020 when reviewing its Development Control Plan 2014, and the Local Environmental Plan 2010.

6.     Council write to those who made submissions advising of Council’s resolution.

7.     Council write to relevant State and Federal Members of Parliament advising them of the adoption of the South Creek Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan and thanking them for their continued support of Council’s Floodplain Management program.

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

South Creek Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan - Study Area

1 Page

Appendix

2.

Schedule of Amendments - South Creek Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan

2 Pages

Appendix

  


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                                 27 April 2020

Appendix 1 - South Creek Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan - Study Area

 

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Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                                 27 April 2020

Appendix 2 - Schedule of Amendments - South Creek Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan

 

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Outcome 6 - We are healthy and share strong community spirit

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

8        Penrith Sport and Recreation Strategy                                                                            57

 

9        Waterplay Facility in Jamison Park                                                                                  63

 

10      NSW Government Grants - Everyone Can Play and Community Building Partnership - Successful Projects                                                                                                          67

 

 

 

 

 



Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                   27 April 2020

 

 

 

8

Penrith Sport and Recreation Strategy   

 

Compiled by:               Andrew Robinson, Community Facilities and Recreation Manager

Virginia Tuckerman, Community Facilities and Recreation Planning and Projects Coordinator

Authorised by:            Brian Steffen, Director - City Services  

 

Outcome

We are healthy and share strong community spirit

Strategy

Provide opportunities for our community to be healthy and active

Service Activity

Plan for the provision of and facilitate the delivery of community, sport and recreation facilities

      

 

Executive Summary

The purpose of this report is to seek Council’s adoption of Penrith’s Sport and Recreation Strategy (SRS), following its public exhibition period. Extensive consultation was undertaken in the development of the comprehensive draft SRS which was publicly exhibited between 13 January and 1 March 2020.

 

The communications strategy for the public exhibition period created a variety of opportunities for submissions over a six-week period, including interaction via a web-based mapping tool. There was positive feedback about the documents, particularly from sporting organisations. In many cases, the submissions received from both sports and the wider community reinforced strategies and actions already in the document. A summary of feedback is included at Attachment 1.

 

The SRS provides strategic frameworks and direction for future open space, play, sport and recreation provision over the next 15 years. It also includes a program of work, including $125m for capital projects (new, upgrades and renewal) to be delivered in the first 5 years.

 

The SRS has been divided into timeframes for delivery, these being short term (1-5 years), medium term (6-10 years) and long term (10-15 years). Reviews will be undertaken during each period to consider progress of implementation, community need, infrastructure development in the City, contemporary trends in sport and recreation, and resource availability.

 

An Executive Summary document has been developed which should be read in conjunction with the main SRS document. The documents integrate with and will inform other planning strategies that have been either completed or are being developed for the City. It will also be a critical document in informing the development of the City’s future s7.11 Developer Contributions Plan. The Executive Summary and full SRS have both been separately enclosed.

It is recommended Council adopt both the Penrith Sport and Recreation Strategy and the Executive Summary.

 

 

 

Background

The core objectives in the development of the SRS are to:

 

Plan for Growth – ensure that the provision and delivery of sport, play recreation and open space meets the needs of the City’s current population and future growth.

 

Promote Accessibility and Inclusion – encourage active and healthy lifestyles for all in the community by optimising access and functionality.

 

Support Environmental Sustainability – conserve and enhance the City’s natural values as an integral part of the landscape of public open space and, respond to climate change.

 

Create Economic Benefits – foster recreation-based participation, infrastructure development and visitation to the City that benefits the local economy.

 

Manage the City’s Assets – inform strategic asset management strategies to ensure effective and contemporary provision of facilities through efficient and ongoing maintenance and renewal.

 

Resource Strategies – design, maintain and review open space, play and sport and recreation facilities and services with associated funding and resourcing strategies.

 

Monitor and Evaluate Outcomes – review and refine strategies based on an ongoing assessment of success against key performance indicators.

Current Situation

Engagement

 

The public exhibition of the draft SRS, between 13 January and 1 March 2020, was the final stage of community consultation in the SRS’s development. Through the development of the SRS there had been extensive engagement:

 

-        Online community surveys – 485 responses

-        Online sports organisational surveys – 61 responses

-        10 x Pop up workshops – held at St Clair Shopping Centre, Glenmore Park Shopping Centre, Mulgoa Shopping Centre, Penrith Paceway Markets, Queen Street Mall, Coachman’s Park St Marys, Cranebrook Shops, Londonderry Shops, Penrith Train Station as well as Jamison Park on Saturday morning.

-        2 x Sports summits – attended by 56 sports organisations

-        Community forum – attended by 2 participants

 

Council Officers implemented a communications strategy for the public exhibition period which included:

 

-        Citywide flyer distribution to 76,000 households.

-        Email distribution to over 600 community representatives

-        Posters distributed across the Local Government Area 

-        Print Media (Western Weekender multiple page article)

-        Social media posts and email throughout the exhibition period.

-        Exhibition of documents at Penrith City Council, St Mary’s Library, St Clair Library and Penrith Library.

-        Comments and feedback through www.yoursaypenrith.com.au  

-        Online website interactive mapping tool.

-        Meeting invitations to State and local sporting organisations.

-        Community workshops at 3 locations

-        Attendance at Village café – Llandilo 

 

As a result of this communication:

 

-         Council Officers held 16 meetings with 50 representatives from local and State Sports Organisations representing approximately 32,000 sports participants in the Penrith Local Government Area.

-         There were 953 visitors to the haveyoursay website page, with 347 document downloads and 41 submissions received.

-        In terms of social media it is estimated that there was a 35,491 online reach. Social media included 29 posts (1 video post), stimulating 331 reactions (likes), 68 comments, 29 shares, and 4919 video views (1 video post).

 

Key changes following exhibition

The following outlines key areas of focus and proposed changes to the draft SRS which have been made in response to comments received during the pubic exhibition period.

i)        Open space provision rates

 

A submission was received from Western Sydney University (WSU) which fully endorses the aims and objectives in terms of planning for active open space within the Penrith LGA. WSU, and its appointed consultants, made submissions outlining concerns relating to the use of a metric benchmark rate for active open space. WSU recommended that the draft Strategy should allow flexibility and reasonable alternative solutions to the provision of open space where key elements and principles are met.

It is noted in the existing documents that, in terms of provision rates and performance measures:

‘These are not exclusive outcomes and will not be the only approach used. Open space detailed planning and design will locate spaces and places that meet criteria for recreation opportunities and have capacity to accommodate expected demand.’

In response, it is not proposed to change the provision rates and performance measures in the SRS.

 

ii)       Indoor Sports Courts

 

Multiple submissions have been received from both Penrith Valley Regional Sports Centre (PVRSC) and community basketball participants seeking the expansion of PVRSC.

 

Submissions have been received from Penrith District Netball Association and Netball NSW seeking a commitment to constructing a 4-court facility in Jamison Park within the next 5 years, preferably the next two.

 

A submission has been received from Nepean Football Association seeking the development of a dedicated 4 court Futsal and football administration centre in Jamison Park.

 

Benchmark figures for the City show an immediate shortage of 4 courts and a potential future shortage of an additional 10 courts.

 

 

It is proposed that the Strategy states:

 

·     Plan for the expansion Penrith Valley Regional Sports Centre to include up to an additional six courts (this is a change to the existing text which suggests increasing the number of courts by a minimum of 4 courts)

·     Review the feasibility study for an indoor multi-use sports centre in Jamison Park (this remains as written)

·     Within the next five years, investigate the viability of providing an additional 10-court indoor facility. Consider new release areas South of the M4 (this remains as written).

 

In terms of planning for the expansion of PVRSC an action to masterplan the Werrington Lakes Precinct has been included in Year 1 of the Strategy program.

 

iii)      Sportsground provision, particularly in flood affected areas

 

A submission has been received regarding providing sportsgrounds on land that is non-flood affected. The draft Strategy supports this and it is proposed that the text reflects this to state:

 

·     The development of new sport and recreation facilities are not to be located within detention basins and, first consideration must be given to the development of non-flood affected land for such facilities.

·     If flood affected land is to be developed for any sport and recreation facilities, the basis for this must be demonstrated. Additionally, any subsequent design must ensure:

- Quality sport and recreation outcomes

- Safe access and evacuation

- Effective flood management strategies

- Minimal or no impact to sport and recreation infrastructure, and the capacity for the facility to be available for use shortly after any flood event.

 

iv)      General Amendments

The following proposed amendments have also been made to reflect exhibition feedback received from internal and external stakeholders;

·       Updates to the Strategy include:

 

-        Updating existing Structure Plan and inclusion of the new Blue and Green Grid maps consistent with the adopted Local Strategic Planning Statement.

-        Amending tree canopy cover to 14% for consistency with other documents.

-        Recognition that 10% of open space demand will be generated through employment and this will be considered accordingly in precinct planning.

-        Recognition that there will be 6 city-wide playspaces in the Local Government Area, originally listed as 2 in error.

-        Change of name from Werrington Sports Complex to Werrington Lakes Precinct,

-        Clarification included to outline that it is a playspace upgrade at Armstein Crescent and not only shade provision.

-        Text updated for the listed development of a masterplan for Jamison Park to consider including a waterplay facility within the existing playground.

-      Action to provide for a (minimum of five) sports grounds in the proposed Glenmore Park Stage Three has been moved to the correct South West Aggregated Area.

 

·    New items included in the 1 – 5 year delivery program;

 

-           Berkshire Park –playspace upgrade to include courtyard games area.

-           Penrose Park – playspace upgrade following community consultation,

-           Mount Vernon Reserve – Install shade over playground,

-           Install new kayak pontoons close to the Weir and Factory Road Reserve subject to grant success.

 

·    The following projects have been included in 1 – 5 year advocacy and forward thinking:

 

-             Improve storage, field drainage and carpark facilities Andromeda Reserve, Cranebrook.

-             Improve storage at Allsopp Oval, Cambridge Park and Myrtle Road Reserve, Claremont Meadows.

-             Improve floodlights and canteen facilities at Gow Park Reserve, Mulgoa.

As a document, the SRS content has been revised to improve grammar and readability. Some layout changes have been made to accommodate additional graphics and text.

The SRS is a long term strategic plan that will guide future Sport and Recreation planning decisions over the next 15 years. It is anticipated that the SRS will be an evolving document and undergo regular review, and currently reflects a point in time

Financial Implications

 

A work program has been developed to the value $125m for capital projects (new, upgrades and renewal) for delivery in the first 5 years of the Strategy. The proposed program in years 1-5 is to be primarily funded from a combination of sources that have been budgeted in the Long-Term Financial Plan. These include Council’s established Parks and Building Asset Renewal programs, grants currently approved (including the Liveability fund for Regatta Park), S7.11 (LOSP and District, subject to re-exhibition) and, funding from the transfer of $1m annually from the City Centre Renewal Program (given the nexus with the draft Strategy) which has available funds from 2019-2020 as a result of being delivered over an accelerated period.

 

The proposed investment in open space, play, sport and recreation projects outlined will be required to be incorporated in future operational plans, as well as annual asset renewal and maintenance budgets.

Risk Implications

Penrith’s population is expected to grow and is Council is required to meet the needs of the growing and diverse population. There are major infrastructure growth initiatives that will continue to impact on open space planning provision into the future. These risks will be minimised by adopting the Penrith Sport and Recreation Strategy. Risks associated with the delivery of this project will be managed within the organisation’s Risk Register

Conclusion

The Strategy reflects the needs and expectations of our growing community while setting a framework for the creation of an active, safe, healthy and vibrant city that enhances Penrith’s reputation as a liveable city.

 

The public exhibition of the draft SRS has been completed and Council staff have considered the feedback received to date. This report seeks Council’s adoption of the Penrith Sport and Recreation Strategy.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Penrith Sport and Recreation Strategy be received

2.     Council adopt the Penrith Sport and Recreation Strategy.

3.     Council adopt the Penrith Sport and Recreation Strategy Executive Summary.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

Penrith Sport and Recreation Strategy - Results of Public Exhibition

40 Pages

Attachments Included

  


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                   27 April 2020

 

 

 

9

Waterplay Facility in Jamison Park   

 

Compiled by:               Andrew Robinson, Community Facilities and Recreation Manager

Virginia Tuckerman, Community Facilities and Recreation Planning and Projects Coordinator

Authorised by:            Brian Steffen, Director - City Services 

Requested By:            Councillor Marcus Cornish

 

Outcome

We are healthy and share strong community spirit

Strategy

Provide opportunities for our community to be healthy and active

Service Activity

Plan for the provision of and facilitate the delivery of community, sport and recreation facilities

      

Executive Summary

At Council’s Ordinary Meeting, on 25 November 2019, Councillor Marcus Cornish requested a report outlining the cost and method of funding a children’s waterplay facility in Jamison Park, like the water fountain located in the Triangle Park, Penrith.

Should waterplay be provided at Jamison Park an area (Appendix 1) has been identified that could accommodate a waterplay facility similar to Triangle Park.

The installation of a reticulated system is estimated to cost $374,000 and have a $60,000 annual maintenance cost. A reticulated system will best meet Council’s sustainability principles.

A non-reticulated system is estimated to cost $255,000 and have a $15,000 annual maintenance cost.

The installation costs could increase subject to further site investigation, below ground surface conditions and detailed design.

There are currently no identified budgets available to realise this project. It is proposed that should there be budget savings as a result of the delivery of projects included in the Penrith Sport and Recreation Strategy 1-5 year work program, then these be allocated towards the installation of a water play facility at Jamison Park. 

Opportunities exist in the City for the future provision of significant water play areas with master planning currently well advanced for Regatta Park, Gipps Street, and Central Precinct (Jordan Springs East) which propose water play and have project funding allocated.

This report recommends that the information be received.

Background

a)      Current Waterplay Opportunities

There are currently six free waterplay playspaces in the City at;

·        Werrington Lakes, Werrington

·        Triangle Park, Penrith CBD

·        Phoenix Reserve, Erskine Park

·        Ron Mullock Oval, Thornton

·        Livvis Place Playground, Jordon Springs

·        Mulgoa Sanctuary, Glenmore Park

Council has also invested over $2.5m in major water play infrastructure at Ripples St Marys and Ripples Penrith.

Waterplay facilities operate by either a reticulated or non-reticulated system.

In a reticulated system the water is collected in a tank, the pressure and volume of water is dependent on the size of pump and the collection reservoir.  The water is recirculated through a filtration system which is then reused. As per NSW Health guidelines, this requires daily water quality inspections, system and filtration checking and maintenance where required.

 

A non-reticulated system operates from potable mains water pressure. The water used in play is discharged to waste. The pressure and volume of water is dependent on mains supply. No daily inspections are required.

Current Situation

In considering a suitable location to provide waterplay in Jamison Park, Council Officers have identified that the preferred option would be to locate it adjacent to the existing children’s playspace, which is part of the activity zone. Three cost estimates have been prepared for providing similar water play facilities to that installed at Triangle Park, which includes eighteen jet sprays.

Option 1

A reticulated system where water is collected in a tank, recirculated through a pump/filtration system and reused $374,000, with an annual maintenance cost of $60,000.

This reticulated system will require the installation of a 10,000 litre tank and electrical operating kiosk with connections to existing sewer, stormwater and potable water. The proposed site will require pre-project environmental assessment and services checks prior to detailed design.

Option 2

A non-reticulated system using a potable water supply and draining to sewer $255,000 with an annual maintenance cost of $15,000.

Option 3

A non-reticulated system using a potable water supply which drains to an in-ground tank which becomes a source for an irrigation system $310,000, with an annual maintenance cost of $20,000.

The cost for each option allows for the installation of a shade structure and a 10% contingency allowance.

 

Financial Implications

 

This report outlines various options for a waterplay facility at Jamison park with the preferred option being a reticulated system as this best meets Council’s sustainability principles. The cost to construct such a facility is estimated to be $374,000. The ongoing maintenance cost of the preferred option is significant at $60,000pa which will need to be incorporated into future maintenance budgets should construction go ahead. The new facility will also need to be incorporated into future asset renewal programs.

There are currently no identified budgets available to realise this project. It is therefore proposed that, should there be budget savings as a result of the delivery of projects included in the Penrith Sport and Recreation Strategy 1-5 year work program, then these be allocated towards the installation of a water play facility at Jamison Park. 

Risk Implications

While a site has been identified further detailed site assessment could identify ground conditions and design solutions that require a greater budget investment, which cannot currently be quantified.

Conclusion

The Penrith Sport and Recreation Strategy identifies the need for future provision of waterplay to be more strategic and associated with a ‘district’ and ‘city-wide’ classification of park, with Jamison Park being in this classification. In considering this provision it is outlined that operational, maintenance and renewal costs are to be assessed.

In terms of Jamison Park, the draft Strategy also outlines that for future advocacy and planning there is an action to complete a masterplan for the Park. The masterplan will include the provision of waterplay.

Currently, masterplans for Gipps Street, Jordan Springs East (Central Precinct), and Regatta Park all include significant water play opportunities, with project funds allocated, which will ensure that there is a diversity of type and scale of opportunities to access water play into the future across the Penrith Local Government Area. These will complement existing water play opportunities.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the information contained in the report on Waterplay Facility in Jamison Park be received.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

Proposed Jamison Park Waterplay Location

1 Page

Appendix

  


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                                 27 April 2020

Appendix 1 - Proposed Jamison Park Waterplay Location

 

PDF Creator


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                   27 April 2020

 

 

 

 

10

NSW Government Grants - Everyone Can Play and Community Building Partnership - Successful Projects   

 

Compiled by:               Tim Whiticker, Recreation and Community Facilitites Planner

Lila Kennelly, Neighbourhood Renewal Coordinator

Authorised by:            Brian Steffen, Director - City Services  

 

Outcome

We are healthy and share strong community spirit

Strategy

Provide opportunities for our community to be healthy and active

Service Activity

Plan for the provision of and facilitate the delivery of community, sport and recreation facilities

      

 

Executive Summary

Council Officers have received notification that funding of $445,500 has been awarded through two NSW State Government grant programs for ten sport, play and community infrastructure projects in the Penrith Local Government Area. Council’s contribution to the projects, from existing budgets, is $427,380, resulting in an overall investment of $872,880 in community facilities across the City.

Grant applications were submitted to the NSW State Government’s Community Building Partnership (CBP) and the Everyone Can Play (ECP) Programs in September and December 2019.

Community Building Partnership 2019

 

Council has been successful in being awarded $113,770 from the CBP grant program towards implementing four projects at:

 

-    Brian King Park, Oxley Park – New outdoor fitness equipment and play improvements.

-    Robin Wiles Park, North St Marys – Park security lighting.

-    Myrtle Road Playground, Claremont Meadows – Upgrade shade, shelter, seating.

-    Chapman Gardens, Kingswood – New outdoor health and fitness equipment.

 

Information is also provided about four successful applications, to the CBP program, made by sports clubs and community organisations totalling $191,730. Council Officers supported these applications through the provision of project scopes and designs, reviewing and compiling grant documentation, and providing letters of support. Organisations included; St Clair Comets Junior Rugby League; St Marys Netball Club; Penrith BMX; Nepean Naval Museum.

 

Everyone Can Play Grant 2019

 

Council has been successful in being awarded $140,000 from the ECP grant program to implement additional accessibility improvements and upgrades at:

 

-      Brian King Park, Oxley Park – Additional equipment, tree planting and shelter.

-      Ironbark Reserve, Cranebrook - Additional equipment, tree planting and shelter

-      The Carriageway, Glenmore Park - Equipment and seating.

 

The report recommends Council accept the grant awards of $113,700 from the 2019 CBP grant program, endorse Council’s financial contribution, and sign funding agreements for the following projects.

 

Applicant

Facility

Project

Grant

Council

Other

Total Cost

Penrith City Council

Brian King Park, Oxley Park

Additional play/fitness equipment, fencing, handball court

 

$140,000

$50,000

(ECP)

$239,775

Penrith City Council

Robin Wiles Park, North St Marys 

Park security lighting

$9,245

$12,000

$0

$21,245

Penrith City Council

Myrtle Road Playground, Claremont Meadows

Upgrade shade, shelter, seats

$24,750

$22,500

$0

$47,250

Penrith City Council

Chapman Gardens, Kingswood

New fitness equipment

$30,000

$40,000

$0

$70,000

 

TOTAL

 

$113,770

$214,500

$50,000

$378,270

 

The report also recommends that Council accept the grant awards of $140,000 from the Everyone Can Play 2019 grant program, endorse Council’s financial contribution and sign funding agreements for the following projects to improve playspace accessibility.

 

Applicant

Facility

Project

Grant

Council

Other

Total Cost

Penrith City Council

Brian King Park, Oxley Park

Additional fitness equipment, tree planting and pathway

$50,000

$140,000

$49,775 (CBP)

$239,775

Penrith City Council

Ironbark Reserve, Cranebrook

Additional   equipment, tree planting and shelter

$50,000

$121,400

$0

$171,400

Penrith City Council

The CarriagewayGlenmore Park

Additional equipment & seating

$40,000

$40,000

$0

$80,000

 

TOTAL

 

$140,000

$301,400

$49,775

$491,175

 

The report further recommends that letters be provided to the successful community organisations providing Council approval to accept the award of CBP grant awards.

 

Applicant

Facility

Project

Grant

Council

Other

Total Cost

Penrith BMX Club

Penrith BMX Blair Oval, St. Marys

Fencing, sandstone block seats

$8,250

0

0

$8,250

St Marys Netball Club

Boronia Reserve, North St. Marys

2 asphalt netball courts

 

$51,480

$51,480

0

   $102,960

St. Clair Comets JRL

Peter Kearns Oval, St. Clair

carpark upgrades

$125,000

0

0

 

 

$125,000

Nepean Naval Museum

Weir Reserve, Penrith

Fencing & Pathway

$7,000

0

0

$7,000

 

TOTAL

 

$191,730

$0

$0

$243,210

The final recommendation of the report is that correspondence is provided to community organisations thanking them for their support provided for the CBP and ECP applications; as well as The Hon. Stuart Ayres MP, The Hon. Tanya Davies MP, and Ms Prue Car MP thanking them for allocating funding for the projects.

Background

The CBP grant program provides funds for community groups and Councils to invest in community infrastructure throughout NSW. In 2019, there was a maximum of $300,000 to allocate in each electorate. Incorporated not-for-profit community organisations and Councils were eligible to apply for grants of between $2500 and $300,000. As a guide, the average grant awarded is around $20,000. The grant application submission deadline was 27 September 2019.

 

The ECP Grant Program is a commitment by the NSW Government to support councils in creating new and upgrading existing playspaces across NSW to ensure people of all ages, abilities and cultural backgrounds can play. Funds are awarded to councils on a matched dollar for dollar basis. The ECP grant program was established in 2018 and will be in operation for a five-year period. The program is administered by NSW Department of Planning, Industry & Environment. The grant submission deadline for the 2019 round of the program was 11 December.

Current Situation

a)      Community Building Partnership Grant

 

Council Officers collaborated internally to identify existing and future projects that met the CBP grant program guidelines. Council Officers further engaged with external sporting and community organisations to support the submission of applications. Council Officers supported these applications through the provision of project scopes and designs, obtaining quotations, reviewing and compiling grant documentation, and providing letters of support. All applications were submitted prior to the 27 September 2019 deadline.

 

Notification of grant award success, or otherwise, was provided on 26 March 2020. The following lists successful and unsuccessful projects and outlines both the grant awarded or the grant request. All projects must be delivered by 31 October 2021.

 

i)   Successful Council Applications

 

-    Brian King Park, Oxley Park

 

The grant award of $49,775 is the full amount requested. This project will deliver new fitness equipment stations, nature play, fencing, and a handball court in addition to the $140,000 improvements underway through Council’s Penrith Mayoral Challenge Program.

 

Throughout 2019, Council’s Neighbourhood Renewal team has consulted on improvements to Brian King Park as part of Council’s Penrith Mayoral Challenge Program. Council Officers have actively engaged with Oxley Park Public School students and local residents to co-design improvements to Brian King Park. Delivery of this project is jointly funded through Council’s Park Asset Renewal and Neighbourhood Renewal Programs.

 

This project has also received additional grant funding of $50,000 from the ECP grant program.

 

-    Robin Wiles Park, North St Marys

 

The grant award of $9,245, is the full amount requested. The project will deliver new lighting within the reserve as part of the Robin Wiles Park Masterplan delivery, developed in consultation with local residents. Council’s allocation of $12,000 for this project has been allocated from the Neighbourhood Renewal and Community Safety capital programs.

 

-    Myrtle Road Playground, Claremont Meadows

 

The grant award of $24,750 is the full amount requested. The project will deliver new shade, shelter and accessible seating. Council’s contribution of $22,500 has been allocated from the Grants Reserve for this project.

 

-    Chapman Gardens Outdoor Gym, Kingswood

 

The grant award of $30,000 is for part of the full amount requested. The original request was for $40,000. This project will deliver new fitness equipment in close proximity to the existing play space. The project is a key outcome of Council’s Kingswood Place Plan 2018-22, developed following extensive consultation with Kingswood residents to identify local priorities. Council’s contribution of $40,000 has been allocated from the Grants Reserve for this project.

 

ii)  Successful Club/Organistion Applications

 

-    Penrith BMX Blair Oval, St. Marys

 

The grant award of $8,250 is the full amount requested. This project will deliver new fencing and sandstone block seating for spectators at the track.

 

-    St. Marys Netball Courts, Boronia Park, North St. Marys

 

The grant award of $51,480 is half of the amount requested. A sum of $102,960 is required to construct two new asphalt netball courts. Council’s draft Sport and Recreation Strategy includes upgrades to Boronia Park in its 1-5 year proposed work program, which would include playing surface improvements encompassing netball courts as well as sports fields. Once the Strategy is adopted by Council, the shortfall of $51,480 can be realised through the work program to achieve the full scope of work.

 

-    Peter Kearns Memorial Oval, St. Clair

 

The grant award of $125,000 will realise the upgrade and improvements to the car park, including ingress and egress. This funding will complement Council’s recent investment in car park improvements and will enable the completion of all required work.

 

-    Nepean Naval Museum Weir Reserve, Penrith

 

The grant award of $7,000 is the full amount requested. The project will see the installation of fencing and a pathway near the boundary of the site.

 

 

iii) Unsuccessful Applications

 

-     Upgrade of St. Clair dog park. Grant request was $42,500 with a total project cost of $85,000. Submitted by Penrith City Council. This project is identified in the draft Sport and Recreation Strategy 1-5 year works program and will be funded once the Strategy is adopted.

 

-     Leonay Parade playground upgrade. Grant request was $60,00 with a total project cost of $120,000. Submitted by Penrith City Council. This project is identified in the draft Sport and Recreation Strategy 1-5 year works program and will be funded once the Strategy is adopted.

 

-     Allsopp and Patterson Oval storage building. Grant request was $88,000. Submitted by Cambridge Park JRLFC. This project is identified in the draft Sport and Recreation Strategy as an advocacy and forward planning project with no funds currently identified to realise the work.

 

-     Surveyors Creek Softball Diamond 1 reconstruction of field surface. Grant request was $20,000. Submitted by Penrith City Softball Association. Opportunities to fund this project will be considered in the development of future Parks Asset Renewal programs.

 

-     Peppertree Oval fencing and seating upgrade. Grant request was $65,000. Submitted by St. Clair Comets JRLC. This project has not been identified in the draft Sport and Recreation Strategy and there are no budgets allocated for this proposed project at this time.

 

-     Resealing of Jamison Park netball courts. Grant request was $50,000 with a total project cost of $95,000 to reseal 8 courts. Submitted by Penrith District Netball Association (PDNA). The project to reseal 8 courts has now been completed to accommodate the planned NSW Junior State Titles utilising the Parks Asset Renewal budget.

 

-     Grey Gums Oval grandstand seating and shelter. Grant request was $28,000. Submitted by Penrith Giants Junior AFC. This project has not been identified in the draft Sport and Recreation Strategy and there are no budgets allocated for this proposed project.

 

b)         Everyone Can Play Grant

 

At Council’s Ordinary Meeting, on 25 November 2019, it was resolved that 4 Expressions of Interest be submitted to the NSW Government’s Everyone Can Play Grant. Council Officers subsequently submitted these applications by the deadline of 11 December 2019.

 

Notification of grant award success, or otherwise, was provided on 1 April 2019. The following lists successful and unsuccessful projects and outlines both the grant awarded or the grant request. All projects must be delivered by 1 November 2021.

 

i) Successful Applications

 

-    Brian King Park, Oxley Park

 

The grant award of $50,000 is the full amount requested. The project will deliver fitness equipment, path connection and new tree plantings. This is in addition to the $140,000 improvements underway through Council’s Penrith Mayoral Challenge Program.

 

Throughout 2019, Council’s Neighbourhood Renewal team has consulted on improvements to Brian King Park as part of Council’s Penrith Mayoral Challenge Program. Council Officers have actively engaged with Oxley Park Public School students and local residents to co-design improvements to Brian King Park. Delivery of this project is jointly funded through Council’s Asset Renewal and Neighbourhood Renewal Programs.

 

This project has also received additional grant funding, $49,775, from the CBP program.

 

-    Ironbark Reserve, Cranebrook

 

A community engagement process was undertaken to design the playspace and costs were established of $170,114 to realise the project. The project will deliver new play equipment, accessible play opportunities, shade, seating, shelter and tree planting

 

The grant award is for full amount requested, $50,000, with Council contributing $90,000 from the 2019-2020 Parks Asset Renewal program and $30,114 from the Local Open Space Developer Contributions Plan.

 

-    The Carriageway, Glenmore Park

 

A community engagement process was undertaken to design the playspace and costs were established of $80,000 to realise the project. The project will deliver new play equipment and seating.

 

The grant award is for full amount requested, $40,000, with Council contributing $40,000 from the 2019-2020 Parks Asset Renewal program.

 

ii)  Unsuccessful Applications

 

-    Banks Drive Playground, St. Clair

 

Council recently adopted the naming of this playspace as the David Currie Playground at its Ordinary Meeting on 24 February 2019.

 

A concept plan has been developed for the park and, if successful the grant would have enabled the installation of accessible connecting path to and around the playspace, accessible seating, and installation of an accessible picnic shade shelter.

 

While the grant application has been unsuccessful, as part of Council’s playspace shade program, a shade structure will be installed at the playspace. The project has been included in the draft Sport and Recreation Strategy 1-5 year works program and it is proposed that this could be achieved through re-prioritising other funding sources including the Telecommunications Access Fund.

 

Financial Implications

Both the CBP and ECP grant programs provide Council with the opportunity to leverage existing funding to improve facility standards, access, and participation in line with Council’s plans, programs and strategies.

Where co-contribution funding has been identified as part of the project budget, these can be accommodated through Council’s existing programs and reserves including; Asset Renewal Programs, s7.11 Developer Contributions Plans, Neighbourhood Renewal & Community Safety programs and Grants Reserve.

When completed, the new and upgraded facilities will be required to be reflected in Council’s future maintenance budgets and asset renewal programs.

Risk Implications

All grant applications were submitted based on project cost estimates that reflect the designs and scope of work and, budgets to support the applications were developed accordingly. Funding agreements will be reviewed to ensure terms are agreeable and, once signed will be implemented accordingly. Project management processes will be implemented to manage delivery. Communication strategies will be implemented as projects progress. Risks will be managed within Council’s Risk Register.

Conclusion

Successful grant applications by both Council and organisations supported by Council has realised $445,500 in grant funding. This will ensure a total investment of $872,880 in play, sport, recreation and community infrastructure which, when delivered will contribute to the improved liveability of the City, including the health, wellbeing and greater social connection of our community.

 

In terms of project process, Council is required to enter into funding agreements with both the NSW State Government Community Building Partnership and Department of Planning, Environment & Infrastructure (ECP) for the respective projects. Subject to finalisation of these agreements a project program will be established including consultation with user groups of each facility. Information will be provided to Council as the projects progress.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on NSW Government Grants - Everyone Can Play and Community Building Partnership - Successful Projects be received

2.     Council endorse the Community Building Partnership (CBP) grants awarded and the funding contribution for the projects at;

-     Brian King Park Playspace, Oxley Park

§ CBP $49,775; Council $140,000

-     Robin Wiles Park Playspace, North St. Marys

§ CBP $9,245; Council $12,000

-     Myrtle Road, Claremont Meadows

§ CBP $24,750; Council $22,500

-     Chapman Gardens Outdoor Fitness Gym, Kingswood

§ CBP $30,000, Council $40,000

 

3.     Council endorse the Everyone Can Play (ECP) grants awarded and the funding contribution for projects at;

-     Brian King Park Playspace, Oxley Park

§ ECP $50,000; Council $140,000

-     Ironbark Reserve, Cranebrook

§ ECP $50,000; Council $121,400

-     The Carriageway, Glenmore Park

§ ECP $40,000; Council $40,000

 

4.     Council endorse entering into funding agreements with NSW Government for the successful CBP and ECP grants awarded.

 

5.     Letters be provided to the successful community organisations providing Council approval to accept the award of CBP grant awards including; Penrith BMX, St Clair Comets JRLC, St Marys Netball Club, and Nepean Naval Museum.

 

6.     Letters of appreciation be provided to community organisations that supported Council’s ECP and CBP grant applications.

 

7.     Letters of appreciation be provided to  The Hon. Stuart Ayres MP, The Hon. Tanya Davies MP, and Ms Prue Car MP thanking them for allocating funding to the CBP and ECP projects.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.  


Outcome 7 - We have confidence in our Council

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

11      Exhibition of Draft Delivery Program (2017-22) and Draft 2020-21 Operational Plan (including Draft 2020-21 Fees & Charges)                                                                      77

 

12      Union Road Project                                                                                                          92

 

13      Registration of a restriction and a positive covenant over Council owned land located at 86 Reid Street Werrington, Lot 5 DP28248                                                                          95

 

14      Audit, Risk & Improvement Committee                                                                            99

 

15      Insurance Contributions 2020/21                                                                                   107

 

16      Summary of Investment & Banking for the Period 1 March 2020 to 31 March 2020    112

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                   27 April 2020

 

 

 

11

Exhibition of Draft Delivery Program (2017-22) and Draft 2020-21 Operational Plan (including Draft 2020-21 Fees & Charges)   

 

Compiled by:               Geraldine Brown, Strategic Finance Coordinator

Allegra Zakis, Corporate Planning Lead

Authorised by:            Neil Farquharson, Financial Services Manager

Andrew Moore, Director - Corporate Services  

 

Outcome

We have confidence in our Council

Strategy

Manage our money and our assets to be sustainable now and into the future

Service Activity

Support financial sustainability through financial planning and budget management

      

 

Executive Summary

The Draft 2017-22 Delivery Program, including the Draft 2020-21 Operational Plan and Fees & Charges are being presented to Council tonight, seeking endorsement for the documents to be placed on public exhibition. Amendments to the Community Participation Plan, incorporated within the Community Engagement Strategy, are also presented for exhibition. These changes respond to updated requirements within the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act and do not change the intent of the Strategy. Following the exhibition, details of all submissions received and how they have been responded to will be presented to the Ordinary Meeting of Council scheduled for 22 June 2020. 

 

This Operational Plan will now be the fourth instalment of a 5-year Delivery Program (2017-22) and while being developed in extraordinary times it will at this stage contain specific actions for 2020-21 that aim to continue effective service delivery and progress actions for the identified priorities. At this stage a balanced budget position is reported in the Draft 2020-21 Operational Plan.

 

The budget development for 2020-21 has been overshadowed by current world events and the impact the COVID-19 pandemic will have on both the local and global economy. While much of the budget presented tonight has been formulated on a business as usual approach, there are a number of key elements that are proposed to support the Community through this time.  Over the past few weeks Council has announced significant support for local businesses that have been impacted and continued to support our Ratepayers that are experiencing difficulties during this time.  In addition to this, the 2020-21 budget being considered tonight recommends the establishment of the COVID-19 Hardship Relief Fund to ensure that those experiencing hardship as a result of the pandemic can gain fee relief, by application, on Community and Business based fees. The Draft Operational Plan being presented tonight also recommends automatic eligibility for Sporting Ground hirers, with all fees waived for 2020-21, providing $216,623 of immediate relief.

 

The impact of the pandemic is being felt on Council’s 2019-20 budget, and many of these impacts will likely carry forward to 2020-21. As the situation evolves, updates will be provided to Councillors ahead of the formal adoption of the 2020-21 Operational Plan in June.

 

It is proposed that the draft corporate planning documents be placed on public exhibition from Monday 4 May to Monday 1 June 2020 (inclusive). A report summarising the outcomes of the public exhibition and seeking Council’s adoption of the Draft Delivery Program (2017-22) including the 2020-21 Operational Plan and Fees & Charges, will be presented to Council at the Ordinary Meeting of 22 June 2020.

 

Adopted Corporate Planning Documents

The Integrated Planning and Reporting (IP&R) framework for local government came into force in 2009 as an amendment to the Local Government Act 1993. Council has had a long-term Community Strategic Plan, a Community Engagement Strategy, a Resourcing Strategy, a Delivery Program and Operational Plans in place since then. Together these documents guide Council’s operations to deliver the services and facilities our community needs, and improve Penrith as a place to live, work and visit. All documents include indicators to measure our progress, which are reported on in 6 monthly progress reports, the Annual Report and the End of Term Report. 

The Community Plan and Delivery Program were revised in 2017 to reflect the priorities of the new Council and respond to community feedback about the complexity of the plans.  This year the intent of these documents remains unchanged, with minor updates to reflect changes to structure and responsibilities and progress in priority areas. The activities to be undertaken by Council to deliver on the Community Outcomes are consistent with previous years.

Council has included the annual Operational Plan as part of the Delivery Program since 2013-14. Each year new actions and new budget information is incorporated within the structure of the Delivery Program. Actions for 2020-21 highlight the specific activities or services that will be prioritised over the next 12 months, including the priority projects of the City Park, Soper Place multi deck carpark, Gipps Street and Regatta Park. 

The Delivery Program 2017-22 provided as attachment 1 also sets out Council’s financial intentions for five years (2017-22) as well as more detailed financial information for 2020-21, including:

·     A Funding Summary for 2017-21;

·     Detailed financial information by Function for 2020-21;

·     Graphs showing where the money will come from and where it will be spent;

·     The basis for Council’s Rates and Domestic Waste Charges for 2020-21;

·     Reserve movements for 2020-21;

·     A detailed list of Capital and Operating projects (by Service) and Program of Works, and

 

The Draft Fees and Charges 2020-21 component provides full details of Council proposed fees and charges and is provided as attachment 2.

 

 

Community Participation Plan

Changes to the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 (the Act) were enacted on 29 November 2019 through the Environmental Planning and Assessment Amendment

(Community Participation Plans) Regulation 2019. These changes were made after Council adopted the Community Engagement Strategy and Community Participation Plan at the Ordinary Meeting of 25 November 2019. As a result, the Community Participation Plan needs to be updated.

 

Updates proposed to the Community Participation Plan:

·    set out the minimum public exhibition periods for certain development consent

applications and certain modification of development consent applications,

·    set out the mandatory notification or advertising periods for the review of certain

determinations and decisions of consent authorities,

·    clarify what information is required to be included in mandatory development notifications under the Act, and

·    make minor wording changes to improve readability.

 

The amended Community Participation Plan is provided as attachment 3.

Changes to the Community Participation Plan are required to be publicly exhibited for a minimum of 28 days. Public exhibition is proposed to coincide with the public exhibition of the Draft 2017-22 Delivery Program, including the Draft 2020-21 Operational Plan and Fees & Charges.

 

Budget Background

In 2015 Penrith was deemed ‘Fit for the Future’ by IPART providing an independent validation of the strategies in place and also the strategies proposed for the future. Council’s submission to IPART included the 2016-17 Special Rate Variation (SRV) and the continuation of AREAS.

 

The 2016-17 SRV incorporated 4 annual increases of 9.09% in 2016-17, 5.0% in 2017-18, 5.2% in 2018-19 and 5.4% in 2019 and included allocations for the following:

1.   Asset management, renewal and backlog

2.   Realignment of service costs

3.   Increased investment to drive productivity initiatives

4.   Major Projects and Regional City infrastructure

5.   Building capacity to respond to emerging priorities

 

This 2016-17 SRV was one important element of a broader suite of Council strategies and actions developed over the past few years, including reform of our financial structures and commitment to the continuous pursuit of productivity. Savings from better ways of doing things, harnessing technology improvements, implementing new systems and reviewing service delivery will provide the capacity to continue to service our growing city. The development of the draft 2020-21 Budget will incorporate annual savings already identified in prior years and will continue to focus on identifying areas where further productivity savings can be achieved. 

 

To clarify our direction the financial strategies implemented to improve our financial capacity have been summarised under the acronym “Sustain”. 

 

 

These seven strategies will provide a framework to guide our approach, set outcomes, assist in decision making, and measure success in achieving ongoing financial sustainability.

In the current financial year strong financial management of Council’s Budget has been maintained throughout the first half of 2019-20 with a surplus currently predicted after allocations to reserves. The current 2019-20 Operational Plan will continue to be closely monitored for the remainder of the financial year, with Council’s commitment to strong budgetary control ensuring that we are in the best available position to establish a balanced budget for 2020-21. 

The budget development for 2020-21 has been overshadowed by current world events and the impact it will have on both the local and global economy. The preparation of the Draft 2020-21 Operational Plan and Budget has been undertaken with a focus on maintaining service delivery levels addressing identified community priorities.  The impact on Council’s financial position as a result of the current global health crisis is continuing to be assessed and it is anticipated that adjustments to Council’s budget will be required prior to the formal adoption scheduled for 22 June 2020. Government’s around the world are responding with stimulus packages, including those announced by the Commonwealth and NSW State Governments, and once these are better understood further adjustment of Council’s financial position will be required.

At this stage the Draft 2020-21 Budget presents a balanced budget. In the event the Draft Budget moves to a surplus position at the time of Exhibition it is proposed to reserve this amount for significant movements in the current assumptions during 2020-21. Areas that may be affected include the Financial Assistance Grant (currently estimated with no increase on the actual 2019-20 Grant), and the impact of the new Award when announced. Once the 2020-21 Budget and associated assumptions have been confirmed, any remaining reserved funds will provide Council with capacity to respond to additional priorities that have been identified or emerge.

 

Budget and Revenue Policy, Service Plans and Statutory Statements

The Budget, Revenue Policy and Commentary are contained in the Draft 2020-21 Operational Plan. This section of the document includes information regarding Rating Income, Waste Management, Borrowings, Grants, Reserves, Employee Costs, Asset Replacement Programs, and Capital and Operating Projects.

 

The Draft 2020-21 Budget is summarised below:

 

BUDGET - FUNDING SUMMARY

2019-20 Original  Budget               $'000

2020-21 Draft  Budget               $'000

 

 

 

Income

 

 

Rates

129,228

135,846

Fees & Charges

84,443

87,487

Grants & Contributions

66,277

48,437

Net Reserve Movements

(1,167)

(15,872)

Other Income

7,933

16,591

Total Income

286,714

272,489

 

 

 

Expenditure

 

 

Employee Costs

108,802

113,712

Materials,Contracts & Other

115,491

99,106

Interest

1,697

1,262

Principal

10,874

9,122

Capital Works

49,850

49,287

Total Expenditure

286,714

272,489

 

 

 

Net Budget Position Surplus/(Deficit)

0

0

 

 

Rates Income

 

Ordinary Rates

Each year Council must determine a Rating Policy for the next financial year. The Local Government Act 1993 provides for a number of rating structures so that councils have the flexibility to develop a structure that best provides equity for their Local Government Area.

Council currently applies a rate structure in which rate assessments are based on property valuations (Ad Valorem) with a Minimum Amount. This means that rates are predominantly based on the land value of the property as determined by the NSW Valuer-General.

 

Council charges rates on three types of Land Categories:

a.   Residential

b.   Farmland

c.   Business – with the following sub-categories

            i.    Penrith CBD

            ii.    St Mary’s Town Centre

 

The maximum rate revenue for the next financial year is calculated by:

a.   Taking last year’s revenue and adding an inflation adjustment announced by IPART or an approved SRV amount;

b.   Adding rates on new properties created by subdivision, and on new strata-titles; and

c.   Adding income lost due to valuation objections.

 

The differentiation between Rating Categories and Sub-categories is:

·    the rate in the dollar for all Residential properties are the same (subject to a Minimum Amount);

·    the Farmland rate is 50% of the Residential rate;

·    all Business Minimum Amounts the same; and

·    two Business rating sub-categories for Penrith CBD and St Marys Town Centre which have different Ad Valorem rates to the Ordinary Business category.

 

Every three years Council receives updated valuations for all properties in the Local Government Area. The Valuer General has recently provided the General Valuation of land for the LGA with a Base Date 1 July 2019 and these will be first used for rates purposes from 1 July 2020.

A revaluation does not impact Councils’ overall rates income.  It does however redistribute the rates income throughout the City with property owners’ change in rates payable in 2020-21 dependent on their relative change compared to the average change.

Whilst the average valuation increase for all residential properties was 19%, different Residential suburb valuation increases ranged from 1% for Jordan Springs up to 78% for Kemps Creek.  The change to the amount that property owners will pay for rates in 2020-21 will depend on how their valuation change compared to this average.  Some property owners will have rates decreases, some will stay the same and others will increase.

NSW councils have limited options under the NSW Local Government Act to be able to change the way that rates are assessed. Council has explored the limited alternate options many times over the years to try to limit the impact of increasing rates and land valuations, particularly for rural property owners.

The options available include:

A.      Setting a different and lower rate for Rural Residential properties; or

B.      Changing the way that the rates are structured.

In considering each option, Council must take into consideration who is impacted by any changes from the current method, particularly vulnerable property owners such as pensioners.

Option A: Unfortunately, the option of using a different rate for Rural Residential properties restricts eligibility depending on the size and occupation of the land with less than half of rural properties owners actually being eligible. This means that a majority of rural owners would increase by even more to fund the discount for the eligible rural owners. Under the current rules, Council believes that this option is not viable or equitable.

Option B: NSW councils have three options with the way that rates are structured. Under each option, the total amount of rates collected by Council is the same, however the rates are shared differently among property owners:

1.       Ad Valorem (only) -Land value multiplied by a rate.

2.       Base Rate plus Ad Valorem - Combination of a part Base (fixed) amount plus Part land value multiplied by a rate.

3.       Ad Valorem with a Minimum Rate (Council’s current method) - Land value multiplied by a rate, but properties under a certain land value threshold subject to a minimum rate.

The Ad Valorem only method was not considered by Council as it would result in even greater increases for rural property owners and couldn’t be supported. Council did however investigate the likely impact of changing to a Base Rate option in 2020-21. When a comparison was done between the two different methods, the impacts of the Base Rate method showed the following adverse impacts (when compared to continuing with the current method of Ad Valorem with a Minimum Rate):

•        20,000 more property owners with rates increases greater than $200

•        4,000 more pensioners with rates increases greater than $200

•        Average rates increase for pensioners of 10% (compared to 2% under current method)

•        60% of properties would pay greater than $100 rates increase (compared to only 10% under current method).

Due to these adverse impacts, particularly the impacts on pensioners, Council was unable to support a change from the current rating method at this time. The existing rate structure of an ad valorem rate with a minimum rate will continue for 2020-21.

The rating components of the NSW Local Government Act are under review by the NSW Government. In 2015 the NSW Government directed IPART to review the rating legislation and IPART delivered their Final Report to the Government in December 2016. The Final Report was released by the NSW Government on 21 June 2019

 

Penrith City Council lodged many formal submissions over the term of the Review and the recommendations that have been made, and we have also written to the NSW Premier, Local Government Minister and Local Members on many occasions to ask for an update on the implementation of the reforms. The NSW Government has not indicated if or when the recommendations will be implemented, only that due to the large-scale, complexity, and potential impacts of the recommendations, the Government will not rush the process of carefully considering these matters in order to develop a formal response to the Final Report.

 

Council currently has 76,523 rateable properties contributing approximately 50% of Council’s total revenue. It is expected that both the Penrith CBD Corporation and the St Marys Town Centre Corporation will request a continuation of Business Sub-category rates to fund their respective activities. A total of $468,429 will be raised from Penrith CBD rates and

$356,528 will be raised from St Marys Town Centre rates.

 

Council provides eligible pensioners a pensioner subsidy. Council’s policy provides for a 50% rebate of rates and domestic waste charges to a maximum of $250. In addition, pensioners are not subject to the Stormwater Management Service Charge.

 

The Draft 2020-21 Budget includes initial estimates for rates income with a net increase of $6.6m for Rates Income over the original estimate for 2019-20 included. This includes the 2.6% rate peg announced for 2020-21. Also factored into estimates is a prediction for growth of both Residential and Non-Residential rates.

 

PROPOSED 2020-21 RATES LEVY INCOME 

 

Rate Category

Ad Valorem Rate in

$

 

MINIMUM RATE

Total Anticipated Gross Revenue

$’000s

Number of Properties

2020-21

$

Increase

$

Residential

0.00323715

1,133.00

20.00

103,716

72,733

Farmland

0.001618575

1,133.00

20.00

1,804

318

Business

0.00523805

1,381.20

35.00

22,804

2,830

Business - Penrith CBD Rate

0.00734112

1,381.20

35.00

3,208

408

Business - St Marys Town Centre Rate

0.0788458

1,381.20

35.00

974

 

234

 Total

 

 

 

$132,506*

76,523

 

*N.B. The revenues identified in this section represent the gross anticipated revenues from the Rates Levy on 1 July 2020 prior to the application of Pensioner Subsidies, Part year growth, Provision for Doubtful debts, and other subsidies and abandonments. These rates presented are indicative only and are subject to change due to supplementary valuations, categorisation changes and valuation objections processed to 30 June 2019.

 

 

Stormwater Management Service Charge (SMSC)

In July 2012 Council replaced stormwater funding from an expiring Special Rate Variation, with a new annual charge for urban properties. The introduction of a Stormwater Management Service Charge (SMSC) ensures that programs are provided to deliver a wide range of stormwater management initiatives essential to the health of the catchment and responding to community expectations.

Whilst the maximum charge for urban businesses is capped by legislation at $25 plus an additional $25 for each 350 square metres or part of 350 square metres by which the area of parcel of land exceeds 350 square metres, Council’s levy for businesses is presently set below the maximum level at $22.80 plus an additional $22.80 for each 350 square metres or part of 350 square metres by which the area of parcel of land exceeds 350 square metres. When it was introduced, the SMSC contributed by business properties was capped to match the level of revenue paid by businesses for the stormwater components prior to the Special Rate Variation expiring.

 

The charge for urban residential properties is set at the maximum amount of $12.50 for residential strata properties and $25.00 for no-strata residential properties.

Rural properties and vacant properties are exempt from the SMSC. Pensioners are given a rebate equal to the SMSC, so are effectively exempt also.

The table below shows the anticipated number of properties to be subject to the annual SMSC, and an estimate of the revenue to be generated in 2020-21. Note that some part year SMSC charges are included for new services that come on throughout the year, so the calculation of the number of assessments by the annual charge does not equate exactly to the forecast revenue totals.

          2020-21 Estimated Stormwater Management Service Charge Revenue

 

Stormwater Category

Annual Charge

No. of Properties

2020-21

Total Revenue

Urban Residential

Residential

$25.00

 

44,938

$1,116,750

 

 

Residential (Strata)

$12.50

12,165

$   148,725

Residential (Pensioner)

$25.00*

8,159

-

Residential (Strata -

Pensioner)

$12.50*

1,156

 

-

Urban Business

Business

$22.80 plus an additional $22.80 for each 350 square metres or part of 350 square metres by which the area of parcel of land exceeds 350 square metres

3,109

$   866,990

 

Total Revenue

 

 

$2,132,465

 

 

*Councils Policy has provided a 100% rebate for eligible pensioners

 

Reserves

Details of Council’s Reserves are also included in the Draft 2020-21 Operational Plan, these are amounts held for specific purposes. The Council’s Reserves are divided into Internal Reserves (set up to apply to Council policy) and External Reserves (required by law). Some Reserves are set up to ensure that Council’s policies with regard to a particular outcome are safeguarded, while others provide funds for a particular expressed purpose, sometime in the future.

 

Voted Works

Also included in the Reserves is an allocation to ‘Voted Works’. Council Policy is that an amount of $53,000 is allocated to each of the three Wards each year. These funds are normally applied to particular purposes of an urgent nature, in one or more of the Wards, by resolution of Council. Voted Works also provides an opportunity to allow some discretionary funding for items that arise unexpectedly during the year, and when all other funding in the annual program has been allocated. It is Council policy that any unexpended amounts in Voted Works are revoted to the following year.

 

Section 7.11 (formerly s94) Program of Works

A central feature of the Draft 2020-21 Operational Plan is the inclusion of the program of infrastructure works and community facilities, funded by Section 7.11 Contributions. A summary of the proposed Section 7.11 Program Capital Works expenditure for 2020-21 under each relevant Plan is provided below. They have been included in the Capital and Operating Projects section of the draft documents.

 

DRAFT 2020-21 S7.11 PROJECTS

 

 

PLAN / PROJECT

 

BUDGET ($)

 

 

 

 

Penrith City Local Open Space

 

 

 

Local Open Space s7.11 Funded Capital Works

 

       221,000

 

Rance Oval Amenities Upgrade Stage 2

 

       195,121

 

 

 

 

 

Total Penrith City Local Open Space

 

       416,121

 

 

 

 

Penrith City District Open Space

 

 

 

Jamison Park Multi-Sport Synthetic Surface

 

       282,155

 

 

 

 

 

Total Penrith City District Open Space

 

       282,155

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL DRAFT S7.11 PROJECTS

 

       698,276

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fees and Charges

As part of the Draft 2020-21 Operational Plan process, Council’s Fees and Charges have been reviewed with the proposed increases in the fees set generally in the vicinity of the estimated CPI increase. The Draft Fees and Charges section details a description of each item, the 2019-20 charge and the proposed 2020-21 charge.

 

The Draft 2020-21 Operational Plan being presented tonight recommends that Council establishes a COVID-19 Hardship Relief fund for those impacted by the pandemic to gain fee relief, by application, on the Community and Business based fees.  The Draft Operational Plan also recommends automatic eligibility for Sporting Ground hirers, with all fees waived for 2020-21, providing $216,623 of immediate relief.

 

Children’s Services fees have been incorporated into the Fees and Charges document at the amounts recommended by the Board of the Penrith Children’s Services Co-operative. The Fees and Charges for the Controlled Entities are set and published by those organisations. Fees set by regulation are included at the current rates, however they are subject to change when the regulations change.

 

The 2020-21 Domestic Waste Management Charge is calculated for full cost recovery. All waste charges are set by Council to cover the cost of domestic waste collection services, clean up, waste processing/disposal, landfill, education, communications, illegal dumping, provision for future waste service planning, new technologies and associated services.

The Fees and Charges section of the Draft 2020-21 Operational Plan provides for different Domestic Waste Service combinations. A summary of the main services is summarised in the following table:

Domestic Waste Service

Rate per Week

$

Annual Charge

$

Percentage Increase

(decrease)

%

Anticipated Revenue

 

$

Vacant Land

1.35

70.00

2.9

112,070

1 Waste Management Service

Dom Waste – Sustainable Service

Dom Waste – War on Waste Service

Dom Waste – Large Service

Dom Waste – Weekly

Dom Waste – Large Weekly

 

Dom Waste – Collect and Return

 

7.67

5.75

9.31

11.81

15.29

 

9.02

 

 

399.00

299.00

484.00

614.00

795.00

 

469.00

 

 

0

0

0

2.6

2.6

 

2.5

 

 

18,561,081 

7,774

5,730,076

5,371,272

1,807,035

 

5,748,533

 

 

 

 

Total

37,225,771

 

Overall the average increase in fees and charges included in the Draft 2020-21 Fees and

Charges is 4.35%. This category of income is estimated to be worth $87.5m, or 32% of Council’s total estimated revenue for 2019-20. 

 

Entities

The Council subsidy for all entity budgets is currently being reviewed. The overall impact of the Controlled Entities on the proposed budget is discussed below.

Included in the Draft 2020-21 Budget at this stage are the following subsidies/contributions:

·     Penrith Performing and Visual Arts - total of $2.241m (2019-20 - $2.185m)

·     Penrith Whitewater Stadium – Nil (2019-20- $120,000)

 

In addition, the Draft 2020-21 Budget currently includes:                                     

·     A contribution to the RID Squad of $84,000

·     A subsidy to the Children’s Services Co-operative of $90,000 assists with funding the cost of the Inclusion Development Fund (IDF) not met by government funding.

 

Long Term Financial Plan (LTFP)                                                                                                      

As part of the Council’s Resourcing Strategy Council prepares a 10-year Long Term Financial Plan (LTFP) which is to be updated annually as part of the development of the Annual Budget. The aim of the LTFP is to ensure that Council identifies financial issues at an early stage and reviews their effect on future activities.  The LTFP must be reviewed in detail as part of the four-yearly review of the Community Strategic Plan. The LTFP process involves four main elements:

§ Planning Assumptions;

§ Revenue Forecasts;

§ Expenditure Forecasts; and

§ Sensitivity Analysis.

The LTFP provides a key tool for the development and monitoring of Council’s Financial Strategy. The Plan outlines Council’s capacity to manage assets and deliver services over the next ten years. Council has a responsibility to manage its resources and finances to ensure its long-term sustainability. Recent actions by Council, including the 2016-17 SRV, has positioned the LTFP to demonstrate that Council has the capacity to manage its finances and deliver the services and programs identified in the Community Strategic Plan and Delivery Program.

 

Council’s LTFP is based on a set of assumptions which generally relate to those elements that are most likely to affect the overall outcome of the model.  Future years’ forecasts are linked to the Operational Plan and provide a means of assessing the long-term financial implication of current year decisions. Assumptions made in the plan include long term forecasts of:

§ Rating Revenue

§ Development Growth

§ Investment Return

§ Financial Assistance Grant

§ Employee costs

§ CPI or other agreed indexations

§ Capital works and services programs

§ Asset management programs

§ Anticipated Loan programs

§ Fees and Charges movements

§ Changes identified through ongoing improvement and review of services

 

It is important to keep in mind when projecting budgets over such a long period that estimates can alter significantly when assumptions are reviewed, particularly when the variances apply to larger items such as employee costs or rating income. However, the LTFP remains an important planning tool and is regularly updated with current data to ensure its usefulness in providing information for Council’s financial planning decisions.

At this stage a detailed review of the LTFP is currently being undertaken including incorporating the estimated impact of COVID-19 and this information will be included in the final 2020-21 Operational Plan presented to Council in June.

Financial Implications

This report and attachment includes information regarding the budget preparation process, and the resulting financial position for the Draft 2020-21 Budget to be presented tonight for Council’s approval. The Budget preparation and setting process aims to deliver a balanced or surplus Budget that funds the service level needs of the community, with a balanced budget currently predicted. The Budget and its financial implications will be publicly exhibited for comment and put forward for final adoption on 22 June 2020.  

The impact on Council’s financial position as a result of the current global health crisis is continuing to be assessed and it is anticipated that adjustments to Council’s budget will be required prior to the formal adoption scheduled for 22 June 2020. In the event the Draft Budget moves to a surplus position at the time of Exhibition it is proposed to reserve this amount for significant movements in the current assumptions during 2020-21.

Risk Implications

In developing the Annual Budget, Council is required to comply with two important pieces of legislation, i.e. the Local Government Act 1993, and the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005.

 

Section 405 of the Local Government Act 1993 has been temporarily modified in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Councils are not required to have copies of the plan physically available provided the document is published on the website and made available in electronic from. Additionally, an extension has been granted of one month for adoption of the Operational Plan. Other requirements which are still in place are:

·    A Council must have a plan (its "Operational Plan") that details the activities to be engaged in by the Council during the year as part of the Delivery Program covering that year.

·    An Operational Plan must include a statement of the Councils Revenue Policy for the year covered by the Operational Plan. The Statement of Revenue Policy must include the Statements and particulars required by the regulations.

·    A Council must prepare a draft Operational Plan and give public notice of the draft indicating that submissions may be made to the Council at any time during the period (not less than 28 days) that the draft is to be on public exhibition. The Council must publicly exhibit the draft Operational Plan in accordance with the notice.

·    In deciding on the final Operational Plan to be adopted, a Council must consider any submissions that have been made concerning the draft plan.

·    The Council must post a copy of its Operational Plan on the Council’s website within 28 days after the Plan is adopted

 

On the 17th April the NSW Government made a series of regulatory changes to ensure council resources continue to be focused on frontline COVID-19 response efforts and allow councils to provide financial relief to businesses and residents. Regulations have been made under section 747B of the Local Government Act 1993 to temporarily modify the application of the Act in response to the COVID‑19 pandemic. The impact of these changes will be reviewed and incorporated into the final 2020-21 Operational Plan, however at this stage it is expected that there will be no change to the adoption timeframe for the Plan.

 

As part of the Operational Plan, Clause 201 of the LG Regulation states that a statement of Council’s Revenue Policy be produced each year including:

·    Estimated income and expenditure

·    Ordinary rates and special rates

·    Proposed fees and charges

·    Council’s proposed pricing methodology

·    Proposed borrowings.

 

The Long Term Financial Plan is reviewed and updated as part of the Annual Budget process to ensure that forward projections reflect the most current assumptions. Long term forecasting minimises financial risk by supporting financial sustainability, transparency, and accountability.

 

Next steps

Section 405(3) of the Local Government Act 1993 requires Council to publicly exhibit, for not less than 28 days, its Draft Operational Plan. Subject to Council’s endorsement tonight, it is proposed to commence the Public Exhibition on Monday 4 May 2020, ending on Monday 1 June 2020.

 

The Office of Local Government has amended the Regulation to remove the requirement for draft documents to be physically available at Council offices as part of the exhibition. As a result, the Draft Plans will only be available for viewing or downloading on Council’s online engagement portal – www.yoursaypenrith.com.au. Summaries of key sections and an FAQ will also be available to help people access content of most interest. If restrictions change before mid-May physical exhibitions will be put up in the Civic Centre, Penrith Library and St Marys office. Public submissions can be submitted by completing the online feedback submission forms, email or letters. Specific extracted copies of the 2020-21 Fees & Charges will be made available at Council operated Childcare Centres. All submissions received on the draft documents will be individually acknowledged. This will be followed by a response that reflects Council’s established policy or Council’s determination of the particular issue.

 

Council must consider the matters outlined in all submissions. Depending on the nature and complexity of each submission, Council may choose to amend the Draft Delivery Program or Operational Plan or consider a submission but defer changes until a subsequent period. A full report on public submissions will be provided to Council’s Ordinary Meeting held on 22 June 2020.

 

Following consideration of the information presented at tonight’s meeting, the key dates and next steps are:

 

Key Dates

Action or Requirement

4 May – 1 June 2020

Public Exhibition of Draft 2017-22 Delivery Program (including the 2020-21 Operational Plan and Fees & Charges)

22 June 2020

Report to Ordinary Meeting:

·    Adoption of 2017-22 Delivery Program (including the 2020-21 Operational Plan and Fees & Charges).

·    Making of 2020-21 Rates and Charges

 

Conclusion

The Draft Delivery Program 2017-22, Draft 2020-21 Operational Plan and Fees & Charges have been developed to reflect the priorities and direction established through engagement with Councillors and our community. The Delivery Program reflects Council’s commitment to effective service delivery and fiscal responsibility whilst managing growth in step with the community’s outcomes for the City captured in the Community Plan.

 

The impact on Council’s financial position as a result of the current global health crisis is continuing to be assessed and it is anticipated that adjustments to Council’s budget will be required prior to the formal adoption scheduled for 22 June 2020. Any changes that are required as events continue to unfold over the coming months will be highlighted to Councillors through regular reporting. Details on all changes during the exhibition period will be provided to Council as part of the report on the final 2020-21 Operational Plan, including Fees and Charges.

 

It is proposed that the Draft Delivery Program (incorporating the Draft one-year Operational Plan for 2020-21 and Draft Fees and Charges 2020-21) be placed on public exhibition for community comment. It is recommended that Council endorse public exhibition of the draft corporate planning documents as outlined in this report.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Exhibition of Draft Delivery Program (2017-22) and Draft 2020-21 Operational Plan (including Draft 2020-21 Fees & Charges) be received.

2.     In accordance with the Local Government Act 1993 and Local Government (General) Regulation 2005, the Draft Delivery Program 2017-22 (incorporating the Operational Plan for 2020-21 and Draft Fees and Charges 2020-21) be placed on Public Exhibition for 28 days commencing on Monday 4 May 2020 and closing on Monday 1 June 2020 (inclusive).

3.     The Public Exhibition arrangements are implemented as detailed in this report, and submissions from the community are invited.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

Draft Delivery Program 2020-21

134 Pages

Attachments Included

2.

Draft 2020-21 Fees and Charges

79 Pages

Enclosed separately

3.

Community Engagement Strategy updated

40 Pages

Attachments Included

  


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                   27 April 2020

 

 

 

12

Union Road Project   

 

Compiled by:               Rebecca Marshall, Senior Development Manager

Authorised by:            Nathan Ritchie, Property Development Manager

Andrew Moore, Director - Corporate Services  

 

Outcome

We have confidence in our Council

Strategy

Manage our money and our assets to be sustainable now and into the future

Service Activity

Provide property services and manage community and commercial requests for the use of Council owned or controlled land

      

 

Executive Summary

Penrith City Council (Council) entered a Project Delivery Agreement with Frasers Property Group (Frasers) on the 27 March 2019 for the Union Road Project. In March 2020 Frasers formally notified Council of its intention to withdraw from the project, seeking mutual agreement not to continue with the project.

This report seeks approval for the General Manager to execute the Deed of Termination between Fraser Property Group (Frasers) and Council, to allow the parties to mutually withdraw from the Project Delivery Agreement.

Background

Frasers Property were nominated as the preferred proponent in late 2017 after a rigorous and competitive Request for Proposal process. Frasers’ proposed vision stood out as it set a new benchmark for urban living within Penrith. The vision presented a sophisticated and innovative urban design and would also deliver an extra 1,000 public parking spaces for the community. The key features of the proposal for the site included:

·    6 residential apartment buildings ranging in height from 17 to 34 storeys that would feature residential, retail and commercial space; a childcare centre, public plaza and landscaped communal spaces,

·    a public carpark of a minimum 1,434 spaces (in addition to required residential parking) progressively delivered and designed to accommodate alternative future uses,

·    the opportunity for Council to reallocate funds towards other parking projects within the City to offset any parking loss at the Union Road site during development and provide a further 1,000 additional parking spaces through work that is already underway at North Street, Soper Place and a lease agreement with Penrith Paceway,

·    an estimated $700 million of benefit to the Penrith local economy - up to 500 jobs each year, including construction, retail and associated local services.

On 27 August 2018, Council resolved to enter into the Project Delivery Agreement with Frasers. Penrith City Council formally executed the Project Delivery Agreement with Frasers Property Group (Frasers) on the 27 March 2019.

The proposal was considered as both aspirational and significant for the Penrith CBD. Both parties agreed that a project of this proposed size and scale must have robust stages, analysis and evaluations to ensure it delivers on the aspirations of both the Developer and Council. From concept to completion significant projects are often tested through various approval gateways and require scrutiny through both consultation and the approval process.

Deed of Termination

Since its execution Council and Frasers have collectively worked towards agreed milestones as defined by the Project Delivery Agreement. During this time concerns about the deliverability of the Project matured. In March 2020 Frasers formally notified Council of its intention to withdraw from the project, seeking mutual agreement not to continue with the project.

This provision is contemplated for in the Project Delivery Agreement, where both parties could mutually agree not to continue with the project. Council officers have been working with Frasers to realise this aspirational project and through the Project Control Group (PCG) have formed the same view, that the project is unable to continue. Council’s resolution is therefore sought to mutually agree to not to continue with the project.

Subject to Council’s approval, the General Manager is to execute the Deed of Termination between Fraser Property Group (Frasers) and Council, to allow the parties to formally withdraw from the Project Delivery Agreement.

Whilst it is regrettable, Council will continue with enabling works to de-constrain the site, while rescoping a new project and planning for future development opportunities.

More broadly it is expected that planning for the City Centre and our LGA will continue to be refined, which will continue to inform future options for this site in the future.

Parking at Union Road will remain at grade while further proposals for the site are investigated.

Financial Implications

 

Limited financial implications exist if both parties mutually withdraw from the Project Delivery Agreement. Sufficient funds are available within the 2019-20 project budget to undertake the required work associated with the Deed of Termination between Fraser Property Group (Frasers) and Council, to allow the parties to formally withdraw from the Project Delivery Agreement.

Risk Implications

The execution of the deed of termination represents a low risk to Council, if both parties mutually agree to withdraw from the Project Delivery Agreement.

Conclusion

Council is working with the community towards a vision of our City that provides access and opportunity to jobs, affordable housing, green spaces and diverse lifestyle options, supporting the aspirations of our community.

 

Not continuing with the Fraser's proposal for the site doesn't change Council’s or the Community’s desire to transform the Penrith City Centre. It provides an opportunity to reassess the project’s vision and test this against the latest market innovations. Council will continue with works to de-constrain the site a rescope future opportunities for the site and the role it will play in transforming the Penrith City Centre.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Union Road Project be received

2.     Council resolve to mutually agree to withdraw from the Project Delivery Agreement

3.     The General Manager be delegated to execute the Deed of Termination

4.     The Common Seal of the Council of the City of Penrith be placed on any necessary documentation.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                   27 April 2020

 

 

 

13

Registration of a restriction and a positive covenant over Council owned land located at 86 Reid Street Werrington, Lot 5 DP28248   

 

Compiled by:               Tara Braithwaite, Development Manager

Authorised by:            Nathan Ritchie, Property Development Manager

Andrew Moore, Director - Corporate Services  

 

Outcome

We have confidence in our Council

Strategy

Manage our money and our assets to be sustainable now and into the future

Service Activity

Provide property services and manage community and commercial requests for the use of Council owned or controlled land

      

 

Executive Summary

This report seeks Council’s approval for the registration of a restriction as to the user and a positive covenant relating to the stormwater management system along the eastern boundary of 86 Reid Street Werrington (Lot 5 DP28248) “the site” as per DA16/0211.02.

The restriction on the use of the land prevents the construction of a building or structure within the burdened land, prevents any alterations to the ground surface levels, grates, pipes, pits etc and prevents the erection of any fencing that could obstruct the flow of water across the land. The Positive Covenant imposes maintenance, repair and replacement responsibilities onto the landowner and gives Penrith City Council the right to request works be undertaken or for access to the burdened land to carry out works should they be required.

The restriction and positive covenant will be registered on the title of the site with Penrith City Council listed as the nominated authority, whose consent is required to release, vary or modify the restriction and/or positive covenant.

Background

On 23 July 2018, Council resolved to divest 86 Reid Street Werrington. While preparing this site it was noted that the adjoining site located at 88 Reid Street had secured development approval for 14 x townhouse development. 

To facilitate development of 88 Reid Street and to resolve localised drainage requirements, 86 Reid Street required filling and drainage infrastructure being installed to the eastern boundary connecting into the road reserve. Pursuant to legal advice, a decision was made to place the sale of 86 Reid Street on hold to coordinate development works with Gloza Pty Ltd (Directors Balram Kumar and Sukhvir Singh) “the developer” of 88 Reid Street, by facilitating earthworks and infrastructure sought to de-constrain and improve the site for disposal.

Since July 2018, the Property Development Department have managed the coordination of civil infrastructure works over 86 Reid street with the developer of 88 Reid Street.  Unfortunately, the development has encountered several delays over the past two years resulting in an extended amount of time for the completion of the works on 86 Reid Street.

Current Situation

The developer is nearing practical completion (PC) of the works under their approvals, including the agreement to complete civil works on 86 Reid Street. The developer is finalising the completion of the drainage infrastructure in the road reserve, including the connection to 86 Reid Street and obtaining compliance certification for the civil works.

Following the completion of this next phase of works, a restriction and positive covenant must be registered on the title of 86 Reid Street to protect the infrastructure and impose maintenance requirements on the site owner (the request of this paper). This maintenance requirement would transfer to a new future owner. 

The positive covenant is approximately four (4) metres wide on the eastern boundary of 86 Reid Street and totals approximately two hundred and forty four (244) square metres, subject to final survey. The positive covenant is considered a burden and reduces the development potential of the site. Council officers have advised that the affected area cannot be utilised as private courtyards or as communal open space, and therefore is considered undevelopable land.

Given changes in market conditions since July 2018 and changes to the developable area (due to the installation of drainage infrastructure) as a result of de-constraining the site, a future report will be brought back to Council to divest 86 Reid Street under the new sales and disposal conditions.

Financial Implications

The maintenance, repair and replacement of the drainage infrastructure on 86 Reid Street will be Council’s responsibility whilst we retain ownership of the land. Upon sale of the site, the maintenance, repair and replacement requirements will transfer to the new landowner. There are not any expected short-term costs associated with the care of the infrastructure.

The impact on anticipated sale proceeds of accepting this drainage infrastructure covenant over 86 Reid Street will form part of a future request to Council to dispose of the site to market.

Risk Implications

The risk implications for this project have been considered and there are no known risks that identified that would result from the matter being considered in this report.

Conclusion

It is recommended that Council approve the registration of a restriction as to user and a positive covenant relating to the stormwater management system along the eastern boundary of 86 Reid Street Werrington (Lot 5 DP28248) as per DA16/0211.02.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Registration of a restriction and a positive covenant over Council owned land located at 86 Reid Street Werrington, Lot 5 DP28248 be received

2.     Council permit the registration of a restriction as to the user and a positive covenant relating to the stormwater management system

3.     The Common Seal of the Council of the City of Penrith be placed on all necessary documentation.

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

Location Plan 86 Reid Street Werrington

1 Page

Appendix

  


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                                 27 April 2020

Appendix 1 - Location Plan 86 Reid Street Werrington

 

PDF Creator


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                   27 April 2020

 

 

 

14

Audit, Risk & Improvement Committee   

 

Compiled by:               Anthony Robinson, Risk and Audit Coordinator

Authorised by:            Matthew Bullivant, Legal Services Manager  

 

Outcome

We have confidence in our Council

Strategy

Be open and fair in our decisions and our dealings with people

Service Activity

Promote ethical behaviour through awareness and advice and manage investigations of alleged corruption, maladministration or breaches of the Code of Conduct

      

 

Executive Summary

This report provides information on the meeting of Council’s Audit, Risk and Improvement Committee held on 25 March 2020. The draft Minutes of the Audit, Risk and Improvement Committee meeting 25 March 2020 are appended to this report.

Background

The Local Government Act 1993 was amended in 2016 to require each Council to appoint an Audit, Risk and Improvement Committee (the ARIC). Although the amendments to the Act do not take effect until March 2021, Council resolved to appoint an ARIC in advance.

The ARIC operates under a Charter, most recently updated by Council resolution on 22 May 2017.

In accordance with the amendments to the Local Government Act 1993 and the ARIC Charter, the ARIC must keep under review the following aspects of the Councils operations:

 

a)   compliance

b)   risk management

c)   fraud control

d)   financial management

e)   governance

f)    implementation of the strategic plan, delivery program and strategies

g)   service reviews

h)   collection of performance measurement data by the Council, and

i)    any other matters prescribed by the regulations.

 

The ARIC must also provide information to the Council for the purpose of improving the Council’s performance of its functions.

Current Situation

The ARIC met on 25 March 2020. This was the first meeting of the ARIC for the calendar year. The draft Minutes of the prior meeting, as provided to Council on 24 February 2020, were adopted without alteration.

A copy of the draft Minutes for the meeting of 25 March 2020 are appended to this report.

In keeping with the ARIC’s practice, the ARIC identified the following five key take-outs from the meeting:

 

1.   Noted the mid-year risk review update, and that strategic and operational risks are being reasonably overseen by Council’s Leadership Team. Received an update on Council’s position on the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

2.   Reviewed the Audit Office’s Annual Engagement Plan for the 2020 external audit. Areas of focus will include infrastructure, property, plant and equipment (IPPE) and investment properties (revaluations and fair value); information technology general controls; new accounting standards (i.e. revenue from contracts with customers; leases; and income of not-for-profit entities); capital expenditure; consolidation of Ripples Leisure Centre; and Council growth risk. They will also follow-up prior audit recommendations.

 

3.   Noted the outcome of an internal audit of Property Development and Management, where the auditors recognised that the establishment of the Property Development Advisory Panel and Property Development Management Group established a sound governance framework. The ARIC will monitor implementation of audit recommendations, with the primary need to finalise the delivery and operational plan (in draft) and supporting business plans to drive achievement of property and development objectives.

 

4.   Considered an update on the implementation of internal audit recommendations for a 2019 audit of Voluntary Planning Agreements. The VPA audit identified 16 high risk recommendations, and all of these are currently implemented or on track for completion by mid to late 2020. A priority recommendation is the development of a new VPA Policy and this is well-advanced following wide consultation and collaboration.

 

5.   Received an update on the status of recommendations arising from an internal audit of Penrith Performing and Visual Arts (PPVA) in 2019, noting that the PPVA Board has generally accepted to implement the recommendations that were previously agreed with the PPVA CEO. Sought further information on a recommendation relating to Board governance (which is outside the purview of the PPVA CEO).

 

 

Financial Implications

There are no financial implications for Council associated with this report

Risk Implications

There are no risk implications for Council associated with this report.

Conclusion

A copy of the draft Minutes for the meeting of 25 March 2020 is appended to this report.