Council_Mark_POS_RGB

25 September 2020

 

Dear Councillor,

In pursuance of the provisions of the Local Government Act, 1993 and the Regulations thereunder, notice is hereby given that an ORDINARY MEETING of Penrith City Council is to be held remotely using audio visual links and audio streamed on the Council website on Monday 28 September 2020 at 7:00PM.

Attention is directed to the statement accompanying this notice of the business proposed to be transacted at the meeting.

Yours faithfully

 

Warwick Winn

General Manager

 

BUSINESS

 

1.           LEAVE OF ABSENCE

 

2.           APOLOGIES

 

3.           CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES

Ordinary Meeting - 24 August 2020.

 

4.           DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

Pecuniary Interest (The Act requires Councillors who declare a pecuniary interest in an item to leave the meeting during discussion of that item)

Non-Pecuniary Conflict of Interest – Significant and Less than Significant (The Code of Conduct requires Councillors who declare a significant non-pecuniary conflict of interest in an item to leave the meeting during discussion of that item)

 

5.           ADDRESSING COUNCIL

 

6.           MAYORAL MINUTES

Mayoral Retrospective.

 

7.           NOTICES OF MOTION TO RESCIND A RESOLUTION

 

8.           NOTICES OF MOTION AND QUESTIONS ON NOTICE

 

9.           ADOPTION OF REPORTS AND RECOMMENDATION OF COMMITTEES

Access Committee Meeting - 12 August 2020.

Local Traffic Committee Meeting - 7 September 2020.

 

10.         DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

11.         REQUESTS FOR REPORTS AND MEMORANDUMS

 

12.         URGENT BUSINESS

 

13.         COMMITTEE OF THE WHOLE


ORDINARY MEETING

 

Monday 28 September 2020

 

table of contents

 

 

 

 

 

STATEMENT OF RECOGNITION OF PENRITH CITY’S ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER CULTURAL HERITAGE

 

 

PRAYER

 

 

meeting calendar

 

 

confirmation of minutes

 

 

MAYORAL MINUTES

 

 

report and recommendations of committees

 

 

DELIVERY program reports


 



 

Statement of Recognition of

Penrith City’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cultural Heritage

 

 

Council values the unique status of Aboriginal people as the original owners and custodians of lands and waters, including the land and waters of Penrith City.

 

Council values the unique status of Torres Strait Islander people as the original owners and custodians of the Torres Strait Islands and surrounding waters.

 

We work together for a united Australia and City that respects this land of ours, that values the diversity of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural heritage, and provides justice and equity for all.

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

PRAYER

 

 

 

“Sovereign God, tonight as we gather together as a Council we affirm that you are the giver and sustainer of life.  We come together as representatives of our community to make decisions that will benefit this city and the people within it. 

 

We come not in a spirit of competition, not as adversaries, but as colleagues.  Help us to treat each other with respect, with dignity, with interest and with honesty.  Help us not just to hear the words we say, but also to hear each others hearts.  We seek to be wise in all that we say and do.

 

As we meet, our concern is for this city.  Grant us wisdom, courage and strength.

 

Lord, help us.  We pray this in the name of Jesus Christ our Lord.  Amen.”

 

 

 

 



Oath of Office

 

I swear that I will undertake the duties of the office of Councillor in the best interests of the people of Penrith and the Penrith City Council and that I will faithfully and impartially carry out the functions, powers, authorities and discretions vested in me under the Local Government Act 1993 or any other Act to the best of my ability and judgment.

 

 

Affirmation of Office

 

I solemnly and sincerely declare and affirm that I will undertake the duties of the office of Councillor in the best interests of the people of Penrith and the Penrith City Council and that I will faithfully and impartially carry out the functions, powers, authorities and discretions vested in me under the Local Government Act 1993 or any other Act to the best of my ability and judgment.

 

 

2016 General Election – taken/made at the Ordinary Meeting of Council on 26 September 2016, Minute Number 272

 

2018 By-Election – taken/made by Councillor Brian Cartwright on 17 May 2018 and Councillor Robin Cook on 21 May 2018 before the Chief Governance Officer, Stephen Britten, an Australian Legal Practitioner

 

 

Local Government Act 1993, Section 233A

 


Council_Mark_POS_RGB2020 MEETING CALENDAR

January 2020 - December 2020

(adopted by Council - 25 November 2019 & amended - 25 March 2020 & 3 June 2020)

 

 

 

TIME

JAN

FEB

MAR

APRIL

MAY

JUNE

JULY

AUG

SEPT

OCT

NOV

DEC

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

 

Ordinary Council Meeting

7.00pm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

24@

23

27v

25#

22*

27

24@

  28^ü

26

23#+

14

Policy Review Committee

7.00pm

 

10

 

 

 

 

 

10

 

 

9

7

 

 

 v

Meeting at which the draft corporate planning documents (Delivery Program and Operational Plan) are endorsed for exhibition

 *

Meeting at which the draft corporate planning documents (Delivery Program and Operational Plan) are adopted

 #

Meetings at which the Operational Plan quarterly reviews (March and September) are presented

 @

Meetings at which the Delivery Program progress reports (including the Operational Plan quarterly reviews for December and June) are presented

 ^

Election of Mayor/Deputy Mayor

 ü

Meeting at which the 2019- 2020 Annual Statements are presented

 

Meeting at which any comments on the 2019-2020 Annual Statements are adopted

 +

Meeting at which the Annual Report is presented

Briefing to consider Budget, draft fees & charges and corporate documents

-            Extraordinary Meetings are held as required;

-            Members of the public are invited to observe meetings of the Council (Ordinary and Policy Review Committee).

Should you wish to address Council, please contact Governance Coordinator, Adam Beggs on 4732 7597.

 


UNCONFIRMED MINUTES

 OF THE ORDINARY MEETING OF PENRITH CITY COUNCIL HELD REMOTELY USING AUDIO VISUAL LINKS AND AUDIO STREAMED ON THE COUNCIL WEBSITE ON MONDAY 24 AUGUST 2020 AT 7:00PM

 

WEBCASTING STATEMENT

His Worship the Mayor, Councillor Ross Fowler OAM read a statement advising that Council Meetings are recorded and webcast.      

STATEMENT OF RECOGNITION

His Worship the Mayor, Councillor Ross Fowler OAM read a statement of recognition of Penrith City’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cultural Heritage.

 

PRAYER

The Council Prayer was read by His Worship the Mayor, Councillor Ross Fowler OAM.

PRESENT

His Worship the Mayor, Councillor Ross Fowler OAM, Deputy Mayor, Councillor Karen McKeown OAM, and Councillors Jim Aitken OAM, Todd Carney, Brian Cartwright, Robin Cook, Marcus Cornish, Kevin Crameri OAM, Greg Davies, Mark Davies, Aaron Duke, Tricia Hitchen, Kath Presdee and John Thain.

 

APOLOGIES

171  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Brian Cartwright seconded Councillor Mark Davies that an apology be received for Councillor Bernard Bratusa.

 

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES - Ordinary Meeting - 27 July 2020

172  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM seconded Councillor John Thain that the minutes of the Ordinary Meeting of 27 July 2020 be confirmed.

  

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

Councillor Marcus Cornish declared a Pecuniary Conflict of Interest – Significant in Item 7 – Amendments to the Model Code of Conduct for Local Councils in NSW and Procedures as he current has a legal case pending which has some relationship with this matter.

 

Mayoral Minutes

 

1        City of Penrith RSL sub-Branch 100th Anniversary                               

173  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Ross Fowler OAM seconded Councillor Karen McKeown OAM that the Mayoral Minute on City of Penrith RSL sub-Branch 100th Anniversary be received.

 


 

 

2        Helen Brownlee AM retires from Penrith Whitewater Stadium Board  

174  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Ross Fowler OAM seconded Councillor Karen McKeown OAM that the Mayoral Minute on Helen Brownlee AM retires from Penrith Whitewater Stadium Board be received.

 

Reports of Committees

 

1        Report and Recommendations of the Local Traffic Committee Meeting held on 3 August 2020                                                                 

175  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Kath Presdee seconded Councillor Marcus Cornish that the recommendations contained in the Report and Recommendations of the Local Traffic Committee meeting held on 3 August, 2020 be adopted.

 

 

2        Report and Recommendations of the Resilience Committee Meeting held on 5 August 2020                                                                                

176  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Kath Presdee seconded Councillor Robin Cook that the recommendations contained in the Report and Recommendations of the Resilience Committee meeting held on 5 August, 2020 be adopted.

 

 

3        Report and Recommendations of the Policy Review Committee Meeting held on 10 August 2020                                                               

177  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor John Thain seconded Councillor Todd Carney that the recommendations contained in the Report and Recommendations of the Policy Review Committee meeting held on 10 August, 2020 be adopted.

 

 

DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Outcome 2 - We plan for our future growth

 

1        Penrith Development Control Plan 2014 Housekeeping Amendment  

178  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Aaron Duke seconded Councillor Greg Davies

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Penrith Development Control Plan 2014 Housekeeping Amendment be received

2.     Matters raised in the post-exhibition addendum to the submission lodged by Mecone were considered in determining whether to adopt proposed Housekeeping Amendments to Penrith Development Control Plan 2014 in the Policy Review Committee Meeting of 10 August 2020.

 

 


 

 

Outcome 5 - We care about our environment

 

2        Supporting Sustainable Choices Scheme                                               

179  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Karen McKeown OAM seconded Councillor Kath Presdee

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Supporting Sustainable Choices Scheme be received

2.     Council endorse financial assistance of up to $20,000 to support the trial reusable nappy and sanitary item rebate in accordance with section 356(1) of the Local Government Act 1993.

3.   At the end of a trial a report be provided back to Council detailing the full outcomes and results of the trial.

 

3        Hawkesbury River County Council (HRCC) - Targeted Weeds Removal Program within Roadside Reserves                                         

180  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM seconded Councillor Marcus Cornish

          That:

1.    The information contained in the report on Hawkesbury River County Council (HRCC) - Targeted Weeds Removal Program within Roadside Reserves be received.

2.    Council thank the Hawkesbury River County Council (HRCC) for the great work that has occured and their recommendations for potential follow up work that may need to occur.

 

 

Outcome 6 - We are healthy and share strong community spirit

 

4        NSW Boating Now Round 3 - Acceptance of grant funding                  

181  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on NSW Boating Now Round 3 - Acceptance of grant funding be received

2.     Council accept the Transport for NSW grant of $250,000 offered under the NSW Boating Now program and confirm the allocation of $250,000 matching funding as detailed in the report.

3.     Letters of thanks be sent to the Minister for Transport and Roads and local members

4.     Council enter into a funding agreement with the NSW Government from the NSW Government’s Boating Now Round 3 program.

 

Outcome 7 - We have confidence in our Council

 

5        Organisational Performance and Financial Review - June 2020          

182  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Tricia Hitchen seconded Councillor Mark Davies

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Organisational Performance and Financial Review - June 2020 be received.

2.     The Organisational Performance and Financial Review - June 2020 as at 30 June 2020, including the revised estimates outlined in this report, and detailed in the Organisational Performance Report- June 2020, be adopted.

3.     Council revote the works as detailed in the Recommended Revoted Works Lists, detailed in the Organisational Performance Report June 2020 for inclusion in the 2020-21 Operational Plan.

 

6        Advertising on Council Bus Shelter Policy                                             

183  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Brian Cartwright seconded Councillor Todd Carney

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Advertising on Council Bus Shelter Policy be received

2.     Council adopt the Draft Advertising on Bus Shelters Policy.

 

 

Councillor Marcus Cornish left the meeting, the time being 7:57pm.

 

7        Amendments to the Model Code of Conduct for Local Councils in NSW and Procedures                                                                                 

184  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Greg Davies seconded Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Amendments to the Model Code of Conduct for Local Councils in NSW and Procedures be received

2.     Council adopt the Model Code of Conduct for NSW Councils as its Code of Conduct

3.     Council adopt the Procedures for the Administration of the Model Code of Conduct for Local Councils in NSW as its Procedures.

 

 

Councillor Marcus Cornish returned to the meeting, the time being 8:10pm.


 

 

8        Summary of Investment & Banking for the Period 1 July 2020 to 31 July 2020                                                                                                      

185  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Marcus Cornish seconded Councillor Karen McKeown OAM

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Summary of Investment & Banking for the Period 1 July 2020 to 31 July 2020 be received.

2.     The certificate of the Responsible Accounting Officer and Summary of Investments and Performance for the Period 1 July 2020 to 31 July 2020 be noted and accepted.

3.     The graphical Investment Analysis as at 31 July 2020 be noted.

 

 

REQUESTS FOR REPORTS AND MEMORANDUMS

 

RR 1           City Park  

Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM requested a memo regarding how many car parking spaces will be lost to City Park, how many were lost in High Street to the dining spaces, how much have we paid for the buildings we are going to demolish and how much revenue will be lost from these demolishing.

 

RR 2           Reinstating of Give Way Sign on Ninth Avenue and Second Avenue, Llandilo                  

Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM requested the reinstating of the give way sign where Ninth Avenue East joins Second Avenue, Llandilo because of the large volumes of cars using Second Avenue and Ninth Avenue.

 

RR 3           83 McNaughton Street, Jamisontown 

Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM requested an urgent full report to Council on 83 McNaughton Street. The report is to include the total letter and photographs emailed to councillors and comments on all points raised by the lady when the DCP was discussed.

 

RR 4           Sport Fields at Claremont Meadows   

Councillor Tricia Hitchen requested that Council Officers attend to the sports fields at Claremont Meadows that were damaged on the weekend by vehicles driving through the fields and consider fencing the parks to stop further vehicles damaging the field.

 

RR 5           Parking on Phillip Street, St Marys     

Councillor John Thain requested that Council’s Local Traffic Committee consider incorporating timed parking near the new building works on Phillip Street, St Marys to allow parking for residents and local businesses.

 


 

 

RR 6           Disabled Parking at Westfield Penrith

Councillor John Thain Councillor requested that Council’s Local Traffic Committee clarify if the new car wash located in Westfield Penrith carpark has taken up disabled carparking spaces and if correct, reinstate disabled parking spaces elsewhere.

 

RR 7           Changed Traffic Conditions on Mamre Road and Banks Drive, St Clair 

Councillor Greg Davies requested that the Changed Traffic Conditions sign be removed from Mamre Road and Banks Drive St Clair, given that the changed traffic conditions occurred 5-6 years ago.

 

RR 8           Reduction of Warragamba Dam Water Levels      

Councillor Marcus Cornish requested an urgent report to Council regarding the possible reduction of water levels in Warragamba Dam by 5-10% to allow for further rain and safeguard Penrith and the Hawkesbury from flooding.

 

There being no further business the Chairperson declared the meeting closed the time being 8:32pm.

 

 

 

I certify that 6 pages are the Confirmed Minutes of the Ordinary Meeting of Penrith City Council held on 24 August 2020.

 

 

                                       ____________________                ______________

                                                Chairperson                                     Date

 

 

 

 

 

 


PENRITH CITY COUNCIL

 

Procedure for Addressing Meetings

 

Anyone can request permission to address a meeting, providing that the number of speakers is limited to three in support of any proposal and three against.

 

Any request about an issue or matter on the Agenda for the meeting can be lodged with the General Manager or Public Officer up until 12 noon on the day of the meeting.

 

Prior to the meeting the person who has requested permission to address the meeting will need to provide the Public Officer with a written statement of the points to be covered during the address in sufficient detail so as to inform the Councillors of the substance of the address and a written copy of any questions to be asked of the Council in order that responses to those questions can be provided in due course.

 

In addition, prior to addressing the meeting a person addressing Council or Committee will be informed that they do not enjoy any privilege and that permission to speak may be withdrawn should they make inappropriate comments.

 

It should be noted that persons who wish to address the Council are addressing a formal part of the Council Meeting. All persons addressing the Meeting should give consideration to their dress attire. Smart casual is a minimum that is thought to be appropriate when addressing such a forum.

 

It should be noted that speakers at meetings of the Council or Committee do not have absolute privilege (parliamentary privilege).  A speaker who makes any potentially offensive or defamatory remarks about any other person may render themselves open to legal action.

 

Prior to addressing the meeting the person will be required to sign the following statement:

 

“I (name) understand that the meeting I intend to address on (date) is a public meeting.  I also understand that should I say or present any material that is inappropriate, I may be subject to legal action.  I also acknowledge that I have been informed to obtain my own legal advice about the appropriateness of the material that I intend to present at the above mentioned meeting”.

 

Should a person fail to sign the above statement then permission to address either the Council or Committee will not be granted.

 

The Public Officer or Minute Clerk will speak to those people who have requested permission to address the meeting, prior to the meeting at 6.45pm.

 

It is up to the Council or Committee to decide if the request to address the meeting will be granted.

 

Where permission is to be granted the Council or Committee, at the appropriate time, will suspend only so much of the Standing Orders to allow the address to occur.

 

The Chairperson will then call the person up to the lectern or speaking area.

 

The person addressing the meeting needs to clearly indicate:

 

·    Their name;

 

·    Organisation or group they are representing (if applicable);

 

·  Details of the issue to be addressed and the item number of the report in the Business Paper;

 

·  Whether they are opposing or supporting the issue or matter (if applicable) and the action they would like the meeting to take;

 

·         The interest of the speaker (e.g. affected person, neighbour, applicant,    applicants spokesperson, interested citizen etc).

 

Each person then has five minutes to make their address.  Those addressing Council will be required to speak to the written statement they have submitted.  Permission to address Council is not to be taken as an opportunity to refute or otherwise the points made by previous speakers on the same issue. 

 

The Council or Committee can extend this time if they consider if appropriate, however, everyone needs to work on the basis that the address will be for five minutes only.

 

Councillors may have questions about the address so people are asked to remain at the lectern or in the speaking area until the Chairperson has thanked them.

 

When this occurs, they should then return to their seat.

 

Glenn McCarthy

Public Officer

02 4732 7649                                                         

   


Mayoral Minutes

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

1        Mayoral Retrospective                                                                                                       1

 

 

 



Ordinary Meeting                                                                                        28 September 2020

 

Mayoral Minute

Mayoral Retrospective

           

 

 

As my two-year Mayoral term comes to an end, I would like to look back on what has been an extraordinary period in Penrith’s history.

 

I am extremely proud that as a Council we have achieved many great outcomes for our community despite many external challenges.

 

I would like to start by looking back to the early days of the beginning of the Mayoral term when funding for the $150 million Liveability Program was announced. The fund included $24 million to enhance Regatta Park, with $15 million in Government funding and $9 million contributed by Council.

 

We also celebrated the announcement of $5.5 billion to complete the first stage of the North South Rail Link – a vital piece of infrastructure that Council has been advocating for, for many years.

 

On the back of these announcements, we launched The Edge of Tomorrow initiative in November 2018 to showcase the limitless opportunity in Penrith and attract investment across a range of sectors.

 

The Penrith Community Profile was also launched in November arming us to better service our residents and work more effectively with other levels of government, community organisations and businesses.

 

In the 2018-2019 term we completed a major upgrade of Penrith’s High Street, partnered with Legacy Property to reconstruct O’Connell Street in Caddens and celebrated the opening of the Yandhai Nepean Crossing Bridge.

 

We worked with our community on place making projects like the Magnetic Places Art in the Park initiative and redesigned Cook Park Playground with St Marys Public School.

  

In that pre-pandemic term, we hosted a whole range of events, including Council’s own Real Festival, the Sydney International Whitewater Festival, Rowing NSW State Championships and the ever-popular Penrith Working Truck Show. We supported the Ballet Under the Stars program and the International Friendly match between the Matilda’s and Chile’s national side – boosting our local economy and turning a spotlight on our City.

 

I mentioned external challenges earlier, and by September last year, those challenges had started to come to the fore. This time last year, out-of-control bushfires were burning in NSW. These blazes started well ahead of the official fire season and were a harbinger of the devastating conditions and extreme heat events that were to come. You may remember that on the 4th of January, Penrith was reported as the hottest place on earth with a temperature of 48.9 degrees celsius.

 

If the fires were well ahead of time, so was Penrith Council’s thinking. Last year we planned and promoted our Cooling the City Masterclass and the sold-out event was held at the Joan Sutherland Performing Arts Centre in February. The event was attended by a broad range of organisations from across the state. It provided a forum for national and international experts to share ideas on how government and industry can improve our built environment. We continue to share information from the masterclass with decision-makers around the country.

 

Over the summer and in line with the Masterclass, Council also partnered with Western Sydney University to run a heat sensor program, tracking temperature data across Penrith to support and inform our Cooling the City Strategy.

 

Stepping back to 2019, Council hosted a Volunteer Expo in September to connect service organisations to those looking for ways to give back. Our work in this area is ongoing, particularly in light of the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

The first weekend in November 2019 brought the spectacular Real Festival back to Penrith. We also worked with community organisations, both this year and last, to host events for Refugee Week, International Women’s Day and a Day of Peace.

 

I had the pleasure of hosting Penrith’s Mayoral Skills Summit in November. The well-attended and, in view of the pandemic, prescient event brought together government, business and the education sector to identify ways to keep jobs, create new opportunities and tailor skills programs to target jobs of the future.

 

In the new year, and after extensive consultation with sporting groups and the community, we released Council’s $125 million Sports and Recreation Strategy, a 15-year plan to deliver 82 projects, including improving shade in 90 local playgrounds, build a multi-use synthetic sport facility at Jamison Park and a new sports and recreation precinct in Gipps Street, Claremont Meadows.

 

We have started work on a $3.7 million multi-use synthetic sports facility in Jamison Park and five new sports amenity buildings. We have also completed the $2.3 million renovation of St Clair Leisure Centre and renewed five playgrounds – including the playspace at Brian King Park which was upgraded through the Penrith Mayoral Challenge program.

 

During this Mayoral term, Council continued to demonstrate its commitment to plan with not for our community. We consulted with the community on our plans to enhance Regatta Park and create a landmark City Park. We also sought feedback on our Local Strategic Planning Statement (a 20-year vision for land priorities), Floodplain Management Plans and Council’s Youth Action Plan.

 

A new quarterly community newsletter, Our Place, was also launched in 2020 to better inform residents about our programs, services and events and celebrate the unique qualities that make Penrith a great place to live, work and play.

 

Our advocacy on behalf of Penrith also remains strong. Over the past 12 months, we continued to work with all levels of government to realise the City Deal and, as long-term advocates for the Sydney Metro – Western Sydney Airport we have helped connect our residents to employment opportunity and fostered the creation of the 30-minute city.

 

This year, in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic, we have also been very focused on grass roots advocacy – working with local businesses and community organisations to protect our economy and social structures.

 

In May, Council formed two taskforces made up of the City’s key partners to develop and collaborate on responses to COVID-19 impacts on our City and accelerate a sustainable post-pandemic recovery.

 

I am founding chair of the Economic Recovery Taskforce and Deputy Mayor Karen McKeown OAM is Chair of the Social Recovery Taskforce. Together, taskforce members have been working to prepare the Penrith Rising Strong Recovery Plan to support and leverage the resilience shown by local businesses and community organisations..

 

I am proud to say Council itself has “risen strong” through the pandemic. Since late March, most of our staff have been working remotely with great success and minimal disruption to service delivery. Following the outbreak of COVID-19, our assessment of Development Applications did not slow down, our Children’s Services remained open and responsive to change, and our City Presentation teams continued to work safely to maintain our parks, roads and buildings.

 

We have also found new ways to connect with our community. This includes our Library’s range of virtual events and the Thursday Night Live Lockdown Series, which streamed performances from local musicians on our Facebook page and has attracted 50,000 views. And, just this month, we held our first COVID-safe Citizenship Ceremony. The recipients were thrilled to take part and it was a great success.

 

At the beginning of the pandemic, Council’s Neighbourly Isolation cards encouraged residents to connect with and help one another, and we partnered with local services to provide free flu vaccines to vulnerable residents and deliver ‘essentials packages’ to those in need.

 

We also provided over half a million dollars in immediate relief to local businesses impacted by the pandemic through the waiving of fees and commercial rents.

 

To ensure we capture these extraordinary times, Council launched Penrith Stories, a platform for community members to share stories of strength, resilience and perseverance.

 

As I end this Mayoral term, I would like to praise our community for supporting one another through this difficult year and adapting with us as we journey into the new normal. I would also like to acknowledge the Council workforce and how they have adapted and continued, despite COVID, to deliver the services which our community expect.

 

It has been a privilege to lead the City through these unprecedented times. Id I would like to thank Cr Greg Davies for his support as Deputy Mayor during the first year of my term and Cr McKeown for her support as Deputy Mayor during the last year, and my fellow Councillors, and Council staff for working with us to create a sustainable, healthy and vibrant future for Penrith.

 

 

Councillor Ross Fowler OAM

Mayor

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the Mayoral Minute on Mayoral Retrospective be received.

  


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


Reports of Committees

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

1        Report and Recommendations of the Access Committee Meeting held on 12 August 2020                                                                                                                                              1

 

2        Report and Recommendations of the Local Traffic Committee Meeting held on 7 September 2020                                                                                                                                    5

 

 

 

 



Ordinary Meeting                                                                                        28 September 2020

 

REPORT AND RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE
 Access Committee MEETING

HELD ON 12 August, 2020

 

 

 

PRESENT

Councillor Tricia Hitchen (Chair), Councillor Todd Carney, Councillor Robin Cook, Carole Grayson, Allan Windley, Matt Roger, Farah Madon.

IN ATTENDANCE

Jeni Pollard – City Activation Community and Place Manager, Claire Galvin – Disability Inclusion Officer, Melissa McSeveny – Social Planning Coordinator, Hans Meijer – City Services Manager, Graham Howe – Building Assets Coordinator, Kathryn Sprang – Development Assessment Planner.

 

APOLOGIES

An apology was accepted from Anthony Mulholland.

 

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES - Access Committee Meeting - 12 February 2020

The minutes of the Access Committee Meeting of 12 February 2020 were confirmed.

 

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

 

Nil.

 

DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Outcome 2 - We plan for our future growth

 

1        Development Applications Referred to Access Committee                    

          DA20/0081   16 Chapman Street, Werrington – Embellishment of Open Space Areas and Stormwater Bio-retention Basin

Kathryn Sprang spoke to the development application which is for two parks and conservation areas within the South Werrington Urban Village, south of the train station and above Cobham Juvenile Justice Centre, next door to the Western Sydney University.

 

The smaller of the parks, Eastern Basin Park, includes open space, passive seating, pedestrian footpaths and less formal engagement.

 

Central Park, the larger of the two, includes storm water drainage, formal recreation space with basketball courts, children’s play equipment, a bike track, Cumberland Plain woodland, barbeque picnic areas and pedestrian access paths including a link to Werrington Train Station.

 

Kathryn Sprang advised that the applicant tried to be inclusive and cater for all abilities.  Most of the park is at grade and there are ramps and paths.  There is access into some of the basins which double up as green space when they don’t have water in them. The E2 Environmental Conservation area will be untouched.

 

Issues discussed by the Committee included:

 

·    The number of swings and play equipment for children with disabilities

·    Accessible parking spaces

·    Accessible pathways to the parks

·    Toilet facilities

·    Access to water for park users.

 

Claire Galvin suggested referring the applicant to the Everyone Can Play Guidelines.

 

Kathryn Sprang advised that even though the WELL Precinct Strategy 2004 for this area and the DCP do not indicate that there would be amenities for this DA she would speak to the applicant regarding parking, toilets and provision of water.

 

Councillor Hitchen thanked Kathryn Sprang for her presentation.

 

RECOMMENDED

That the information contained in the report on Development Applications Referred to Access Committee be received.

 

GENERAL BUSINESS

 

GB 1           Nepean Hospital Redevelopment Committee       

Matt Roger referred to the informal Access Committee meeting held on 10 June 2020 when Belinda Berryman made a presentation regarding the Nepean Hospital Redevelopment.  Matt Roger received feedback from Access Committee members after the meeting which he forwarded to Belinda Berryman at the Nepean Hospital Redevelopment Consumer Committee meeting on 23 July 2020.  This information included the contact details for Bindi maps and two other providers – Blind Square (GPS app) and Navilens as provided by Carole Grayson. Belinda Berryman will pass this information to the Wayfinding Strategy Team.

 

GB 2           NeuroMoves Gym      

Matt Roger advised that he had received an email regarding the NeuroMoves Gym expanding and taking more space from the real estate building.  The builders were starting work during August.  Matt Roger also commented on Craig Squires following up regarding the mobility parking spaces for the NeuroMoves Gym, with the expansion of the gym driving the need for additional accessible parking spaces.  Craig Squires has previously raised the accessible parking issue with the property managers.

 

GB 3           Adult Change Facilities      

Matt Roger advised that the recommendations regarding adult change facilities to the DCP Housekeeping Amendment report at the Policy Review Committee on 10 August 2020 were passed unanimously.

 

Councillor Hitchen advised that Penrith Council is a leader in disability – any large commercial building is now required to have an adult change facility.

 

GB 4           Bus Stop DDA Program     

Hans Meijer advised that Council has applied through the Federal Government Local Roads and Community Program for $200,000 funding. Bus boarding point upgrades to date have focused on Opal card usage for sites. 

 

Hans Meijer requested Access Committee members advise Claire Galvin of sites for accessible drop-off and pick-ups that could help inform sites for consideration in the prioritised upgrade of bus boarding points.

 

GB 5           Bus Stop on Corner of Evan Street and Derby Street Penrith

Allan Windley advised of an issue with the bus stop on the corner of Evan and Derby Streets Penrith.  A map and photo of the bus stop was shared for the meeting to view.  When the bus stops it does not always line up at the concrete step and also getting up the step can be difficult with a dog and shopping.

 

Hans Meijer advised that one of his staff had inspected the bus stop and there are Telstra services under the concrete path.  There is also a tree close to the bus stop.  It may be possible to lower the path in that location.  The other option is to relocate the bus stop.

 

Councillor Hitchen asked Hans Meijer to report back to the next Access Committee meeting regarding this issue.

 

GB 6           Congratulations to Councillor Hitchen

Councillor Carney congratulated Councillor Hitchen for driving the issue of the adult change facilities.  Councillor Cook also added her congratulations to Councillor Hitchen.

 

Matt Roger advised that Councillor Hitchen was also acknowledged at the Policy Review Committee meeting on 10 August 2020.

 

Councillor Hitchen responded that Council has always supported accessibility and that the Access Committee initiated it six years ago.  An adult change room was built in Penrith and then one in St Marys and it continued on from there.

 

GB 7           Number of Access Bus Stops in Penrith     

Farah Madon asked Hans Meijer how many accessible bus stops there are in Penrith.  Hans Meijer replied that he doesn’t have the exact numbers, but 130 bus stops have been upgraded in the last two years.  There are 1,200 bus stops altogether and another 100 will be upgraded this year.

 

Farah Madon asked how this complies with Penrith City Council’s obligations under the DDA – DSAPT (Disability Standards for Accessible Public Transport) which requires 90% of the bus stops to be accessible by the end of 2017 and 100% of the bus stops to be accessible by the end of 2022.  Hans Meijer replied that the target has not been reached but there is a plan.  It is not possible to reach 100% in the current budget as this also covers accessible paths.

 

Farah Madon suggested that other councils be contacted to see if they are on track with these obligations and if there were action plans in place.  Hans Meijer undertook to phone and see what other councils are doing.

 

Claire Galvin commented that some councils have the upgrading of bus stops as an action in their Disability Inclusion Action Plan.

 


 

GB 8           Penrith Development Control Plan (DCP) Update

Farah Madon enquired regarding the progress of the DCP Review update.

 

Councillor Hitchen asked which Council department looks after the DCP and Melissa McSeveny advised that the City Planning Department and the Development Services Department are working on the DCP Review.  Jeni Pollard asked that this be clarified and information be brought back to the next Access Committee meeting.

 

Matt Roger advised that at the Policy Review Committee meeting on 10 August 2020 the DCP Housekeeping Amendment was received regarding adult change facilities.

 

GB 9           Alternative Funding for Bus Stops      

Councillor Carney referred to an alternative funding source for accessible bus stops. Hans Meijer advised that there is an application to the Federal Government for $200,000 to further upgrade bus boarding points in 2020/21 and another opportunity to upgrade existing bus boarding points, which will be reported to the August Ordinary Council meeting.

 

GB 7           River Walk

Carole Grayson enquired about a plan for the River Walk and Nepean Avenue up to where the Log Cabin will be.

 

Councillor Hitchen advised that this is a work in progress, the speed limit has been lowered and there will be traffic cushions.  It has gone to the Traffic Committee and will be reported to the next Ordinary Council meeting for approval. 

 

The footpath on the River Road side of the river has been started this week.  Hans Meijer advised that it will be a 1.5m wide asphalt footpath from the M4 to 183 River Road along the east side at this stage.  The final location of a 1.5m wide path from 183 River Road to Parklands Avenue is currently being finalised.

 

 

There being no further business the Chairperson declared the meeting closed the time being 5.38pm.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the recommendations contained in the Report and Recommendations of the Access Committee meeting held on 12 August, 2020 be adopted.

 


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                        28 September 2020

 

REPORT AND RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE
 Local Traffic Committee MEETING

HELD ON 7 September, 2020

 

 

 

(Note: due to prevailing public health crisis, and related COVID-19 protocols, the Local Traffic Committee Business Paper and reports were referred to members and a formal meeting held via on-line Zoom platform). 

PRESENT

Deputy Mayor, Councillor Karen McKeown OAM (Council Representative), Councillor Tricia Hitchen (Representative for the Member for Penrith), Wayne Mitchell - Director Development and Regulatory Services (Chair), Mario Dizon - Transport for NSW (TfNSW), Brana Ravichelvan - Transport for NSW (TfNSW). 

IN ATTENDANCE

Councillor Marcus Cornish, Steve Grady - Busways, Paul Bottomley – CDC Bus NSW, Adam Wilkinson – Engineering Services Manager, David Drozd – Traffic Engineering Coordinator, Graham Green – Senior Traffic Engineer, Daniel Davidson – Senior Traffic Engineer, Kablan Mowad – Senior Traffic Engineer, Anthony Baradhy – Traffic Engineering Officer, Wendy Read – Road Safety Officer, Isaac Mann - Trainee Engineer, Bernie Meier – Signs and Lines Marking Supervisor. Kristy Johnson – Secretary, Engineering Services, Jasmin Toro – Traffic Administration Officer.   

 

APOLOGIES

Councillor Robin Cook (Representative for the Member for Londonderry), Sergeant Matthew Shirvington - Nepean Police Area Command (PAC).

 

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES - Local Traffic Committee Meeting - 3 August 2020

The minutes of the Local Traffic Committee Meeting of 3 August 2020 were confirmed.

 

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

 

Councillor Marcus Cornish declared an interest in Item 3 - The Crescent, Penrith - Endorsement of Design Plan AC2, as he owns a property in one of the nearby streets.

 

DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Outcome 3 - We can get around the City

 

1        Combewood Avenue and Lord Sheffield Circuit, Penrith - Installation of STOP Control                                                                                            

Councillor Marcus Cornish enquired about whether there are other similar intersections in Thornton Estate that should also be investigated for a similar treatment.

David Drozd – Traffic Engineering Coordinator advised that Council’s Traffic Engineers will investigate other intersections in Thornton Estate and review the appropriateness of proposing a similar treatment. If other intersections require a similar treatment, they will be brought before the Committee at a future meeting for consideration.

 

RECOMMENDED

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Combewood Avenue and Lord Sheffield Circuit, Penrith - Installation of STOP Control be received.

2.     The intersection of Combewood Avenue and Lord Sheffield Circuit, Penrith be upgraded to a STOP control as illustrated in Appendix 1.

3.     The resident that raised the concerns be advised of Council’s resolution.

 

2        Maxwell Street and Samuel Foster Drive, South Penrith – Endorsement of Design Plan AM192 (Dated July 2020)                           

Councillor Marcus Cornish enquired about the design of the proposed roundabout at the intersection of Maxwell Street and Samuel Foster Drive, South Penrith, particularly if the roundabout would be mountable for vehicles.

David Drozd – Traffic Engineering Coordinator advised that the proposed roundabout will be fully mountable for vehicles, which will aid turning movements for longer vehicles that traverse the roundabout.

Steve Grady of Busways advised the Committee that there are existing bus stops on Maxwell Street, Penrith near the intersection with Samuel Foster Drive. There is a bus stop on the northern side of Maxwell Street, Penrith fronting 75 Maxwell Street and also on the southern side of Maxwell Street (opposite 77 Maxwell Street), adjacent to the reserve. Steve Grady enquired about whether the bus stops will be relocated and if consultation has or will be undertaken with the affected properties regarding the two bus stop relocations.

David Drozd – Traffic Engineering Coordinator advised that Design Plan AM192 (dated July 2020) indicates that the two bus stops on the northern and southern side of Maxwell Street will be relocated west. David Drozd also advised that consultation with the affected properties will be undertaken in conjunction with the proposed installation of the roundabout.

Mario Dizon of Transport for NSW enquired about the length of the ‘No Stopping’ zone on the northern side of Maxwell Street, Penrith (western leg) at the approach to the proposed roundabout. Mario Dizon also enquired about whether there will be ‘No Stopping’ zones on installed on Samuel Foster Drive at the approach and departure of the roundabout, and indicated that ‘No Stopping’ zones should be installed for a length of 20 metres.

David Drozd – Traffic Engineering Coordinator advised that the ‘No Stopping’ zone on the northern side Maxwell Street, Penrith (western leg) will be installed 15 metres prior to the splitter island of the roundabout, which is the minimum standard for the splitter islands.  David Drozd also advised that Council Traffic Officers will investigate sight lines on Samuel Foster Drive and will liaise with Council’s Design Officers about updating the plan to include a ‘No Stopping’ zones on both sides of Samuel Foster Drive.

RECOMMENDED

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Maxwell Street and Samuel Foster Drive, South Penrith – Endorsement of Design Plan AM192 (Dated July 2020) be received.

2.     Consultation be undertaken with affected properties and businesses regarding the proposed roundabout at the intersection of Maxwell Street and Samuel Foster Drive, South Penrith as shown in Design Plan AM192 dated July 2020 (Appendix 1 & 2).

3.     Subject to no substantial objections being received, Council’s Design Plan AM192 dated July 2020 (Appendix 1 & 2) be finalised and endorsed for construction and be funded under the Safer Roads and Blackspot Program.

4.     A street lighting assessment be conducted in accordance with Council’s Public Domain Lighting Policy (August 2004) to ensure compliance with the relevant lighting category.

 

3        The Crescent, Penrith - Endorsement of Design Plan AC286                 

Councillor Marcus Cornish previously declared an interest in relation to this item. 

RECOMMENDED

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on The Crescent, Penrith - Endorsement of Design Plan AC286 be received.

2.     Consultation be undertaken with affected properties and businesses regarding the proposed pedestrian refuge facilities shown in Design Plan AC286 dated June 2020 (Appendix 1).

3.     Subject to no substantial objections being received, Council’s Design Plan AC286 dated June 2020 (Appendix 1) be finalised and endorsed for construction and be funded under the 2020/21 Major and Urgent Traffic Facilities Program.

4.     A street lighting assessment be conducted in accordance with Council’s Public Domain Lighting Policy (August 2004) to ensure compliance with the relevant lighting category.

 

4        Nepean Avenue, Penrith - Endorsement of Signage and Line Marking Plans for Pedestrian Safety Improvements                                               

Paul Bottomley of CDC Bus NSW raised concerns about the proposed yellow edge line marking (‘No Stopping’) on the western side of Nepean Avenue, Penrith potentially displacing motorists to park their vehicles on Ladbury Avenue, Penrith. Paul Bottomley advised that when vehicles park on each side of Ladbury Avenue, this can make it tight for buses to be able to pass through between parked cars.

Adam Wilkinson – Engineering Services Manager advised that traffic surveys were undertaken on Nepean Avenue, Penrith which revealed a relatively low number of vehicles park on the western side of Nepean Avenue and ample off-street parking is provided for these properties. Adam Wilkinson also advised that removing parking on the western side of Nepean Avenue will support bus operations as the unimpeded section of road will prevent pedestrians having to walk around parked vehicles and vehicles including buses having to dodge the pedestrians. 

Deputy Mayor, Councillor Karen McKeown OAM (Council Representative) advised the Committee that parking will still be permitted on the eastern side of Nepean Avenue, Penrith.

Councillor Marcus Cornish enquired about how long the temporary pedestrian safety improvements on Nepean Avenue, Penrith will be in place for.

Wayne Mitchell - Director Development and Regulatory Services (Chair) advised that Council is continuing its investigation into funding and grant opportunities that can fund the permanent pedestrian safety improvement (footpath) option on the western side of Nepean Avenue.

Councillor Marcus Cornish enquired about whether the Peachtree Creek path and landscaping option has been ruled out.

Wayne Mitchell - Director Development and Regulatory Services (Chair) advised that the Peachtree Creek path and landscaping option has been ruled out as a temporary pedestrian safety improvement option as it is highly likely that majority of pedestrians will continue to use Nepean Avenue as the main walking route as it is the main pedestrian desire line.

Deputy Mayor, Councillor Karen McKeown OAM (Council Representative) enquired about whether Sergeant Matthew Shirvington of Nepean Police Area Command had any comments on the temporary pedestrian safety improvements on Nepean Avenue.

David Drozd – Traffic Engineering Coordinator advised that Sergeant Matthew Shirvington of Nepean Police Area Command had stated in an email to Council that he had no objections to the temporary pedestrian safety improvements on Nepean Avenue.

Councillor Tricia Hitchen (Representative for the Member for Penrith) expressed thanks to Council’s Officers for producing a much better proposal (removing the option of the temporary flexible barrier) on Nepean Avenue, Penrith and for putting together and presenting this newly proposed temporary safety improvements option on Nepean Avenue, Penrith. Councillor Tricia Hitchen advised that this new temporary option will be more acceptable to residents.

Councillor Marcus Cornish advised the Committee that in 2016, Council originally consulted with properties on Nepean Avenue, Penrith regarding the permanent pedestrian safety improvement (footpath) option on the western side of Nepean Avenue which was rejected by majority of the residents at the time. Councillor Marcus Cornish advised that he does not agree with the permanent pedestrian safety improvement (footpath) option on the western side of Nepean Avenue.

Wayne Mitchell - Director Development and Regulatory Services (Chair) advised the detailed design plan for the permanent pedestrian safety improvement (footpath) option on the western side of Nepean Avenue will be presented to a future Local Traffic Committee meeting and consultation with properties will be conducted. The Council has requested that these plans be given a high priority so that the costs can be better understood with a view to constructing the path as soon as possible.

The proposed temporary measures were supported by Members of the Committee, and the proposed permanent solution concept was equally supported.

RECOMMENDED

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Nepean Avenue, Penrith - Endorsement of Signage and Line Marking Plans for Pedestrian Safety Improvements be received.

2.     Community consultation be undertaken for the proposed alternate set of pedestrian safety measures on Nepean Avenue, Penrith as shown in the signage and line marking plan TS0030, revision B, dated 06/08/20 as shown in Appendix 1.

3.     Following consultation, the signage and line marking plan TS0030, revision B, dated 06/08/20 as shown in Appendix 1 be endorsed for installation.

4.     Council’s Rangers Services department and the Nepean Police Area Command be advised of Council’s resolution following consultation.

 


 

5        Evan Street and Trent Street, South Penrith - Improvements to the '10km/hr Shared Zone’ within the Eileen Cammack Reserve Car Park and other Minor Traffic Works                                                                     

Councillor Marcus Cornish enquired about the number of parking spaces to be removed on Evan Street and Trent Street, South Penrith.

David Drozd – Traffic Engineering Coordinator advised that that no parking spaces will be lost on Trent Street as Council is proposing to formalise the parking availability on Trent Street, South Penrith by providing edge line marking. This will instead displace vehicles to the painted parking areas on Trent Street which will improve pedestrian and traffic safety. 

Isaac Mann – Trainee Engineer advised that the yellow edge line marking proposed on the eastern side of Evan Street, South Penrith within the Eileen Cammack Reserve car park will only reinforce the existing ‘No Stopping’ restrictions at this location.

Brana Ravichelvan of Transport for NSW requested Council to forward him a copy of the speed count data collected in Eileen Cammack Reserve car park.

Deputy Mayor, Councillor Karen McKeown OAM (Council Representative) enquired about the purpose of the concrete island on Trent Street, South Penrith.

David Drozd – Traffic Engineering Coordinator advised that historically, the concrete median island may have been used as a layover area for buses in the past.

Steve Grady of Busways advised that it is only charter buses that stop there for sporting or weekend events.

David Drozd – Traffic Engineering Coordinator advised that Council Officers can continue to monitor driver behaviour and traffic movements on Trent Street, South Penrith and review the appropriateness of providing bus zone signage on the southern side of Trent Street for charter buses if deemed appropriate.

Deputy Mayor, Councillor Karen McKeown OAM (Council Representative) supported the signage and line marking work on Evan Street and Trent Street, South Penrith and requested that Council advise the resident(s) who raised the matter that Council Officers will continue to monitor driver behaviour and traffic movements on Evan Street and Trent Street, South Penrith.

Steve Grady of Busways enquired about the reason that ‘90 Degree Angle Parking – Front to Kerb’ signage is proposed to be installed at the southern car park at the end of Evan Street, South Penrith.

Wendy Read – Road Safety Officer advised that Jamison High School and York Public School have a number of visually impaired students that are independent and often walk in this vicinity. Vehicles parking front to kerb will reduce vehicles from overhanging into the walking route and becoming an obstruction for the visually impaired students navigating behind the parked vehicles.

RECOMMENDED

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Evan Street and Trent Street, South Penrith - Improvements to the '10km/hr Shared Zone’ within the Eileen Cammack Reserve Car Park and other Minor Traffic Works be received.

2.     Consultation be undertaken with affected properties, businesses and schools regarding the proposed pedestrian and traffic safety improvements within the Eileen Cammack Reserve car park on Evan Street and on Trent Street, South Penrith as shown in Appendix 1.

3.     Subject to no substantial objections being received, the Design Plan TS0042 dated August 2020 (Appendix 1) be finalised and endorsed for installation.

4.     Speed humps to be listed on Council’s Traffic Facilities Prioritisation Program and be ranked against other listed and awaiting sites.

5.    Transport for NSW representative receive a copy of the speed count data collected in Eileen Cammack Reserve car park.

6.     When the project receives priority against other listed sites on Council’s Traffic Facilities Prioritisation Program and funding becomes available, Council’s Design Coordinator will be requested to prepare a detailed design for the facilities, with a further report submitted to the Local Traffic Committee for design plan finalisation and endorsement.

7.     Council’s Asset Management department be notified for inclusion of the continuous footpath treatment at the entry/exit of the Eileen Cammack Reserve car park on Evan Street, South Penrith and list a new footpath connection on Trent Street (south side, approximately 150m) in Council’s Asset Management records and processes.

 8.   The resident(s) who reported the matter be advised of Council’s resolution and be advised that Council Officers will continue to monitor driver behaviour and traffic movements on Evan Street and Trent Street, South Penrith.

 

 

GENERAL BUSINESS

 

GB 1      Nepean Triathlon - Sunday, 25 October 2020 - Sydney International Regatta Centre 

Executive Summary

The purpose of this report is to consider the Traffic Management Plan (TMP) for the Nepean Triathlon on Sunday, 25 October 2020. The report recommends that the TMP for the event be endorsed, subject to the relevant conditions of a Class 2 Event.

Current Situation

Council has received a Traffic Management Plan from the Nepean Triathlon Committee (NTC) for the Triathlon on Sunday, 25 October 2020 between 6.30am and 10.00am, or earlier as cyclists finish the course. The event is based at the Sydney International Regatta Centre

(SIRC) and has proven to be a major National event in previous years. It is notable that this event has been running for 39 years, 24 events held at SIRC with no serious incidents recorded.

The event is considered as a Class 2 Event under the “Guide to Traffic and Transport Management for Special Events” and requires a TMP and a Risk Management Plan to be prepared and submitted to the TRANSPORT FOR NSW for approval prior to the event.  

As part of the Triathlon, competitors will partake in a 1km swim, 30km cycle and 10km run.  20km of the cycle leg is held on-road as an ‘out and back’ course. This year the event will be smaller due to restrictions as part of the current Covid-19 pandemic and only Old Castlereagh Road needs to be closed to motorists from west of Leland Street, unlike previous years where the majority of the industrial roads were closed west of Castlereagh Road from Jack Williams Drive to Old Castlereagh Rd. This year there will only be approximately 440 competitors down from the usual 800-1000 anticipated to compete in the event. Ample parking is available at SIRC for competitors and spectators.

As shown in Appendix 1, temporary road closures in Castlereagh and Penrith are requested between 6.30am – 10.00am for the on-road component of the cycle leg on Old Castlereagh Road west of Leland Street.

The Nepean Triathlon Committee proposes to advertise the traffic management arrangements in the Sydney Morning Herald and Penrith local papers two weeks prior to the event, with a letterbox drop to residents and businesses prior to the event. VMS signage will also be used to notify drivers of the event for two weeks prior.

The course minimises the impact to non-event personnel, and businesses/residences that are directly affected. 

As in previous years, the event is over a few hours on a Sunday morning, and it is expected that there will be minimal adverse impact to traffic.

_________________________________________________________________________

Sergeant Matthew Shirvington of Nepean Police Area Command advised via email to Council that he had discussed the new course with the event organiser of Nepean Triathlon and there are no issues with what is proposed.

RECOMMENDED

That:

1.   The information contained in the report on Nepean Triathlon - Sunday, 25 October 2020 - Sydney International Regatta Centre be received.

 

2.   The event applicant be advised that this is a Class 2 Event under the “Guide to Traffic and Transport Management for Special Events”, and that all conditions and requirements specified must be complied with prior to the event.

 

3.   Approval be given for the temporary closure of Old Castlereagh Road west of Leland Street from 6.30am to 10.00am on Sunday, 25 October 2020.

 

4.   The Traffic Management Plan for the Nepean Triathlon on 25 October 2020 be endorsed, subject to the following conditions:

 

(a)  A Traffic Management Plan including a Risk Management Plan be lodged by the event applicant with the Transport for NSW for approval, prior to the event. A copy of the Transport for NSW approval must be submitted to Council prior to the event.

 

(b)  The event applicant liaise with NSW Police and obtain any approvals if required.

 

(c)  The applicant delivers an information letterbox drop and personal communication to all business proprietors, property owners/residents/tenants in the affected streets four weeks prior to the event.  Arrangements are to be made for residents who require essential access to/from their properties during the event.

(d)   The event applicant submits to Council a copy of Public Liability Insurance (usually a Certificate of Currency) of minimum $20 million, 30 days prior to the event. In addition, the event applicant indemnify Council in writing against all claims for damage and injury which may result from the proposed event.

(e)   A detailed Traffic Control Plan be prepared by a qualified and certified professional and submitted to Council, Transport for NSW and NSW Police prior to the event. The Traffic Control Plan shall detail how a minimum 4.0m emergency lane is maintained at all times during the event.

(f)   The event applicant arranges to place barricades and provide Transport for NSW accredited Traffic Controllers where required by the approved Traffic Management Plan. Where the Traffic Management and Traffic Control Plans indicate Traffic Controllers are to be used, all Traffic Controllers must have current Transport for NSW certification.

(g)   The event applicant provide advice to Council prior to the event that the event complies with the Work Health and Safety Act 2011 and the Work Health and Safety Regulation 2017.

(h)   The event applicant advertises the proposed temporary road closures in local newspapers a minimum of two weeks prior to the event, and provide variable message signs (VMS) in appropriate locations a minimum of two weeks prior to the event, with the locations of the VMS boards submitted to Council for endorsement prior to their erection.  VMS boards should be located in accordance with the Transport for NSW Technical Direction TDT2002/11c.

(i)    The event organiser notify Ambulance (Ambulance Service of NSW) and Fire Brigade (Fire & Rescue NSW and Rural Fire Service) and State Emergency Services of the proposed event and submit a copy of the notification to Council prior to the event.

(j)    The event applicant notify private bus companies of the proposed event and submit a copy of the notification to Council prior to the event. Bus companies shall be requested to advertise the changed route for affected buses at least one week prior to, and during, the event.

(k)   Should the consultation process resolve to temporarily relocate bus stops or bus routes that were not indicated in the original Traffic Management Plan, a further report be required to be submitted to the next available Local Traffic Committee meeting.

(l)    The event applicant ensure that noise control measures are in place as required by the Protection of the Environment Operations (Noise Control) Regulation 2000.

(m) The event applicant ensure that competitors are advised to obey road rules and Police directions during the event.

 

5.   Any proposed speed limit reductions are subject to the separate approval of the Transport for NSW.

 

6.   All works as part of this approval be conducted at no cost to Council.

 

7.   As a requirement of the “Guide to Traffic and Transport Management for Special Events” this approval endorsing the Traffic Management Plan is to be considered as Council’s authorisation to regulate traffic on Council’s roads.

 

8.   The applicant be advised of Council’s resolution.

 


 

 

GB 2      Glenmore Parkway, Glenmore Park – Proposed Two Week Road Closure 

Executive Summary

The purpose of this report is to consider the detour routes as part of the Traffic Management Plan (TMP) for the construction of the roundabout on Glenmore Parkway, Glenmore Park which requires a two-week closure of Glenmore Parkway from 25 September 2020 until 12 October 2020. The report recommends that no objections be raised to the proposed road closure.

Current Situation

Council has received a traffic control plan from Lendlease as part of The Northern Road 3 project for the two-week closure of Glenmore Parkway to construct a roundabout. The construction of the roundabout was a requirement of Council as part of The Northern Road 3 project. Due to the constraints along Glenmore Parkway the only way to construct the roundabout in a timely fashion is for a two-week road closure with detours in place. Traffic is proposed to be detoured via Bradley Street/Glengarry Drive and Garswood Road/St Andrews Drive.

This closure has been previously put in place as part of works on The Northern Road with no major problems occurring. Lendlease will be arranging for the communication strategy for nearby residents including VMS and letterbox drops. It is recommended that no objections be raised to the proposed closure of Glenmore Parkway, Glenmore Park to allow for the construction of this roundabout.

_________________________________________________________________________

Danny El Salim - Manager of The Northern Road Upgrade Stage 3 of Transport for NSW discussed this matter during the Zoom meeting.

Steve Grady of Busways advised that Busways has previously been advised of the two week road closure and he support the road closure occurring during the school holiday period. Busways will be implementing a diversion for the affected 794 routes to and from Glenmore Park. The diversions will be the same as on previous occasions and all buses will travel via The Northern Road, turn right at Bradley Street and then resume the route from Bradley Street and Glengarry Drive. The return route to Penrith will be in the reverse.

RECOMMENDED

That:

1.   The information contained in the report on Glenmore Parkway, Glenmore Park – Proposed Two Week Road Closure be received.

 

2.   The proposed road closure of Glenmore Parkway, Glenmore Park over the school holidays between 25 September 2020 until 12 October 2020 be supported.

 

 

GB 3      Cranebrook Road at Church Lane, Cranebrook - Request to Investigate Passing Opportunities for Motorists   

Councillor Marcus Cornish advised the Committee that when southbound motorists on Cranebrook Road, Cranebrook are waiting to turn right at the intersection into Church Lane, approaching southbound motorists often have to drive onto the dirt shoulder to pass waiting vehicles.

Councillor Marcus Cornish requested that Council Officers investigate passing opportunities for southbound motorists on Cranebrook Road such as providing bitumen on the eastern side of Cranebrook Road (adjacent to the southbound lane). This will assist southbound motorists on Cranebrook Road with passing motorists waiting to turn right into Church Lane.

RECOMMENDED

That:

1.   Council’s Traffic Engineers investigate the traffic movements at the intersection of Cranebrook Road and Church Lane, Cranebrook, particularly southbound motorists on Cranebrook Road turning right into Church Lane.

 

2.   Council’s Traffic Engineers liaise with Council’s Asset Management Officers about the potential of providing bitumen on the eastern side of Cranebrook Road (adjacent to the southbound lane) in order to assist southbound motorists on Cranebrook Road with passing motorists waiting to turn right into Church Lane.

 

3.   Councillor Marcus Cornish be advised of the outcome.

 

 

Sergeant Matthew Shirvington of Nepean Police Area Command advised via an email to Council that he does not have any objections to any of the LTC items.

 

There being no further business the Chairperson declared the meeting closed the time being 10:20am.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the recommendations contained in the Report and Recommendations of the Local Traffic Committee meeting held on 7 September, 2020 be adopted.

  


DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

 

Outcome 2 - We plan for our future growth

 

1        Castlereagh Connection Advocacy Update                                                                       1

 

2        Submission to NSW Productivity Commission Review into Infrastructure Contributions 4

 

3        Submission to exhibition of Draft Housing Diversity State Environmental Planning Policy                                                                                                                                             9

 

4        Winter Sporting Facility proposed DCP and VPA

Procedural note: Section 375A of the Local Government Act 1993 requires that a division be called in relation to this matter.                                                                18

 

 

 

 

Outcome 3 - We can get around the City

 

5        Transport for NSW  (TfNSW) Regional Road 2020/21 REPAIR Program (Rehabilitation) Funding Grants                                                                                                                 25

 

6        Acceptance of Funding under the NSW Government's Local Government Road Safety Behavioural Program                                                                                                       27

 

7        Australian Government Blackspot Program and NSW Safer Roads Program 2021/22 Nominations                                                                                                                      30

 

 

 

Outcome 4 - We have safe, vibrant places

 

8        RFT20/21-01 Civic Centre Ground Floor Refurbishment - Stage 1                                37

 

9        Penrith Rising Strong - COVID-19 Recovery Plan                                                          42

 

 

Outcome 6 - We are healthy and share strong community spirit

 

10      Youth Action Plan 2020-2025                                                                                          51

 

11      ReAnimate Penrith 2020                                                                                                  62

 

12      Great River Walk, Nepean Ave Shared Path                                                                  68

 

 

 

Outcome 7 - We have confidence in our Council

 

13      Election of Mayor                                                                                                              75

 

14      Election of Deputy Mayor                                                                                                 79

 

15      Local Government NSW Annual Conference 2020 and Updating Council Meeting Calendar 2020                                                                                                                                  81

 

16      RFT2021-05 Digitisation of Council Application Records                                                86

 

17      Lot Consolidation of Colyton Neighbourhood Centre - 30 Jensen Street, Colyton (Amendment)                                                                                                                    94

 

18      2020-21 Financial Assistance Grant                                                                                99

 

19      2019-20 Draft Financial Statements                                                                              103

 

20      Summary of Investment & Banking for the Period 1 August 2020 to 31 August 2020 111

 

 

 

 

URGENT

 

21      Penrith Valley Regional Sports Centre - Request for funding                                       121

 

 

 


 

 

Outcome 1 - We can work close to home

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


Outcome 2 - We plan for our future growth

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

1        Castlereagh Connection Advocacy Update                                                                       1

 

2        Submission to NSW Productivity Commission Review into Infrastructure Contributions 4

 

3        Submission to exhibition of Draft Housing Diversity State Environmental Planning Policy                                                                                                                                             9

 

4        Winter Sporting Facility proposed DCP and VPA

Procedural note: Section 375A of the Local Government Act 1993 requires that a division be called in relation to this matter.                                                                18

 

 

 

 

 

 



Ordinary Meeting                                                                                        28 September 2020

 

 

 

1

Castlereagh Connection Advocacy Update   

 

Compiled by:               Rachel Pagitz, Advocacy and Government Relations Officer

Authorised by:            Nathan Burbridge, Economic Initiatives Manager

Kylie Powell, Director - City Futures  

 

Outcome

We plan for our future growth

Strategy

Ensure services, facilities and infrastructure meet the changing needs of our City

Service Activity

Represent the changing needs of our growing community to other levels of government

      

 

Executive Summary

The purpose of this report is to update Council on continuing efforts to advocate for investment in the Castlereagh Connection.

 

Penrith has long been recognised as a metropolitan centre with an essential current and future role in the emerging Western Parkland City. As a river city, Penrith offers amenity to its communities and visitors, however being a river city brings a flooding risk. As we continue to grow, Council has properly planned to meet the risks of a 1 in 100-year flood (plus freeboard) being the long-held standard. Multiple communities rely on a regional network of common roads as their means of evacuation. These evacuation routes are not fit for purpose.

 

The NSW Government’s Resilient Valley, Resilient Communities – Hawkesbury-Nepean Valley Flood Risk Management Strategy identifies the Hawkesbury-Nepean Valley as one of the highest risk areas for flood in Australia. There is an immediate need for an evacuation solution for Penrith as part of the Hawkesbury-Nepean Valley that addresses the current flood and safety risks to communities living in the catchment and to facilitate responsible development.

 

In April 2018 Council adopted an Advocacy Strategy. The strategy identified several infrastructure projects that would unlock the economic opportunities and improve connectivity in Penrith. One of these projects was the construction of the Castlereagh Connection.

 

While the need for additional road capacity to service future growth in Penrith is accepted; the Castlereagh Connection is considered by state and national governments as a longer term project. Notwithstanding, Council has consistently advocated this piece of infrastructure is significant not only for how it can support current and future populations and the metropolitan road network, but also to address shortcomings in flood evacuation. 

Over the last year, Council officers have conducted their own research on the project in order to advance the case for it. This research, including a high-level cost benefit analysis if the Castlereagh Connection was constructed, is presented in a strategic issues paper attached to this report. (Attachment 1).

 

To further enhance this existing evidence, a joint research project with Blacktown City Council would highlight even greater benefits for the Corridor within both LGAs. The objective of this joint research would be to further highlight the significant strategic benefits Castlereagh Connection would have on the metropolitan and regional road network.

 

Background

A corridor for the Castlereagh Connection (also formerly referred to as the Castlereagh Freeway) has been designated since 1951 and was part of consultation in 2018 by Transport for NSW.

 

In 2018 Transport for NSW (TfNSW) confirmed the original 1951 corridor for the Castlereagh Connection, however, despite consistent advocacy by Council, does not consider construction or delivery of this infrastructure a short-term initiative in its network planning. 

Investigating the benefits of the Castlereagh Connection and its potential to support flood evacuation is listed as an “immediate action” (Action 20.2) in Council’s Local Strategic Planning Statement and directs Council to continue to advocate for delivery of Stage 1 of the Castlereagh Connection between the M7 and The Northern Road (action 20.8).

 

In 2019, Council commissioned preliminary research into the cost benefits of delivering the Castlereagh Connection between Castlereagh Road and the M7. The outcomes of this research were presented to Councillors at a briefing in September 2019. The research presented a compelling rationale for investment. It demonstrated clear potential for flood evacuation capacity, reduced congestion and travel times, better connectivity and improved access to employment areas, particularly in the North West Growth Centre as well as broader economic benefits via improved connection to the Central West.

 

As a result, this research confirms there is merit in the NSW government progressing their investigations of Castlereagh Connection into a formal business case, suggesting significant benefits between Castlereagh Road and the M7. The 2019 research suggested high cost benefit would be achieved via an initial stage of M7 to The Northern Road. A second stage, from The Northern Road to Castlereagh Road provides additional benefits, particularly in improved flood evacuation.

 

Future research opportunity 

Council continues to advocate for the acceleration of planning and delivery of the Castlereagh Connection.

 

One of the key issues that strengthens the case for the Castlereagh Connection is population growth and the significant growth in Blacktown LGA, including residential and employment lands in the North West Growth Sector, which has created further congestion on the local road network and major arterials. Despite upgrades to Richmond Road, connecting roads are heavily congested resulting in slow travel times and extensive queuing.

Working collaboratively to demonstrate the numerous benefits of delivery of Castlereagh Connection between Castlereagh Road and the M7 in the Blacktown and Penrith LGAs may demonstrate a stronger return on investment in this infrastructure. Council officers intend to commission further technical analysis and research to support this proposition and advocacy.

 

The research scope includes:

·    adequacy of the road network for current and future populations

·    suitability of the evacuation network

·    impacts of increased development in North West growth sector including significant employment lands

·    the role Castlereagh Connection can play in the road network now and into the future, particularly noting proposed north south connections including Sydney Metro and the Outer Sydney Orbital, and

·    accessibility for residents in adjacent areas to the arterial road and Motorway network.

 

Financial Implications

Council' contribution to this research will come from within the existing Advocacy project funds available in the Operational and Delivery Program for 2020-2021.

 

Conclusion

It is becoming increasingly apparent that Castlereagh Connection needs to be accelerated to: 

·    Provide safe and efficient flood evacuation 

·    Service the current and planned population in Penrith and Blacktown LGAs

·    Improve access to employment and education, particularly for residents in areas of high social disadvantage

·    Connect residents to the Motorway network and future infrastructure including North South Rail.

 

The opportunity to work alongside our neighbours to advocate jointly will assist in capturing the broadest benefits and rationale.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the information contained in the report on Castlereagh Connection Advocacy Update be received.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

Castlereagh Connection Strategic Discussion paper

12 Pages

Attachments Included

  


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                        28 September 2020

 

 

 

2

Submission to NSW Productivity Commission Review into Infrastructure Contributions   

 

Compiled by:               Natalie Stanowski, Principal Planner

Abdul Cheema, City Planning Co-ordinator

Authorised by:            Natasha Borgia, City Planning Manager

Kylie Powell, Director - City Futures  

 

Outcome

We plan for our future growth

Strategy

Ensure services, facilities and infrastructure meet the changing needs of our City

Service Activity

Ensure our policies, strategies and plans provide for the services and infrastructure our City needs

      

 

Executive Summary

The NSW infrastructure contribution system is being reviewed via two separate but concurrent processes:

 

1.   NSW Department of Planning, Industry, and Environment to which Council at its Ordinary Meeting of 22 June 2020 endorsed a submission.

 

2.   NSW Productivity Commissioner appointed by the Minister for Planning and Public Spaces to undertake a comprehensive review of the infrastructure contributions system in New South Wales. The Commissioner has released an Issues Paper that is a broad summary of key issues with the existing system. It is designed to support community feedback on how they can best address these issues and ask questions that will inform broad reform directions.

 

The Issues Paper was open for public feedback until 5 August 2020. Council officers have sought an extension which was subject to a draft submission which has been provided to the Commissioner before the exhibition closing date of 5 August. A final submission will be forwarded to the Commissioner following consideration by Council tonight.

 

It is recommended that Council endorse the submission provided as Attachment 2 to be forwarded to NSW Productivity Commission for their consideration.

Background

The NSW infrastructure contribution system is being reviewed via two separate but concurrent processes.

 

The first process is to identify and make improvements to the NSW infrastructure contributions system that will make it more transparent and easier to use. This process is being undertaken by the Department of Planning, Industry and Environment (DPIE). Council at its Ordinary Meeting of 22 June 2020 endorsed a submission to this process which was forwarded to NSW Department of Planning, Industry, and Environment for its consideration.

 

The second process is being conducted by the NSW Productivity Commissioner. The NSW Productivity Commissioner has released an Issues Paper that aims to open up the conversation into how infrastructure is currently funded in New South Wales, focusing on the role of infrastructure contributions and the key issues and challenges encountered in its application.  Submissions are encouraged to respond to the discussion questions outlined in the Issues Paper. The Issues Paper is provided as Attachment 1 to this report. This feedback will be used to inform the direction and consideration of potential reform options recommended by the Commissioner.

 

The Issues Paper was open for public feedback until 5 August 2020. Council officers have sought an extension which was subject to a draft submission which has been provided to the Commissioner before the exhibition closing date of 5 August. A final submission will be forwarded to the Commissioner following consideration by Council tonight.

Current Situation

In the past year Council has been involved in a range of significant projects involving infrastructure planning and development contributions, including:

·    A comprehensive review of Councils development contributions framework, in order to implement a best practice contributions system, which will ensure streamlined and transparent processes, provide innovative solutions and importantly, deliver the required infrastructure for growth. Council has undertaken significant work in respect to growth needs assessments, preparation of new and updated contributions plans, facilitating infrastructure delivery and framework implementation. Through this work, we are making considerable investments to ensure we are well placed to effectively deliver local infrastructure into the future.

·    Penrith City Council participates with eight other Councils within the Western Sydney Planning Partnership (PPO). As a group, we have been working towards establishing our priorities for infrastructure contribution reform and have also provided input into a submission on the issues paper written by the PPO.

·    Council is working collaboratively with Liverpool City Council, to prepare a development contributions plan for local infrastructure within the Western Sydney Aerotropolis.

Following are some of the key issues raised in our submission for Council’s consideration. A copy of the full submission is provided as Attachment 2 to this report.

 

·    Contributions system is currently based on ‘user pays’ principles. Any shift to a general rate across entire population is generally not supported.

·    Developers make a profit from development that creates the need for infrastructure. The developer should be responsible for the cost of this infrastructure and not to other users. Developer contributions are only charged based on the needs for the incoming population, and it would be unreasonable to charge the existing community for these needs. However, it is noted that the existing population can use some of these new facilities. We would be concerned about the ability for suitable funds to be generated from our rates base to pay for such infrastructure.

·    Current processes, such as IPART, limit Councils ability to be flexible and respond to changes where needed. There needs to be a balance between the flexibility of infrastructure contributions and the need for suitable probity.

·    The ability of Councils to be able to review their plans more often, through reducing the complexity of processes, such as IPART reviews would assist in accounting for property acquisition costs which can change significantly from when a plan is made.

·    Planning agreements are used in part due to the inflexibility of Contributions Plans to be adaptive to specific needs. They can be innovative and provide items that a Contribution Plan is unable to provide under the legislation.

·    All planning agreements (whether State or Local) should be subject to the same rules and regulations. This will provide certainty and clarity to the community and industry.

·    While planning agreements can be resource intensive from a Council perspective, the benefits of the delivery of infrastructure in a timely manner are significant and important in creating communities.

·    Currently there is no policy framework around value capture. A policy needs to be developed for value capture that applies to both state and local governments. Value capture, in addition to development contributions, can be an appropriate tool to use, however there needs to be appropriate LEP clauses and policies that have been exhibited to show how Councils will implement such an outcome. There needs to be strong probity and transparency where government seeks to use this mechanism.

·    There should be one rule for all levels of government and an integrated system. State Government should not limit Councils from Value capture, but then proceed to do it themselves. We would support a common methodology and process in public policy with respect to this matter.

·    Introduction of ‘caps’ and the essential works list have only increased the complexity of a plan and further deviated plans from being able to provide the right infrastructure that the community needs. This has led to more developers seeking out the use of planning agreements, where the appropriateness of works and nexus can be negotiated.

·    There should be no threshold. This will enable Councils to provide for the required infrastructure that has been identified and needed to facilitate growth and development outcomes without having to go through the lengthy IPART review process and being left with a further shortfall and without essential infrastructure.

·    Community has increasing expectations of what infrastructure is essential (i.e. water play, gym equipment etc). The essential works list has not addressed this and therefore should be amended to reflect community expectations.

·    Any changes such as the recent Ministerial Direction for delayed contribution payments in response to COVID19 has a number of implications for Councils, particularly that the delivery of infrastructure works under a contributions plan may be delayed and more resources will be required to monitor the payment of contributions to ensure developers and certifiers are complying with their payment obligations.

·    We do not support maintaining the s7.12 maximum rate at 1%. This rate has not been reviewed since 2005 and may have been based on a different cost ratio between land price and cost of works. The standard maximum percentage should be reviewed and increased.

·    The feasibility testing of a SIC should be carried out considering both State and Local contributions. The feasibility testing of a SIC contribution does not look at what the end user needs, but instead looks at what the feasibility is. If the levy is deemed to be unfeasible, then alternate funding mechanism needs to be explored and formed.

·    Corridor protection is an important planning mechanism; however it can lead to speculation. This is also the case when releasing broader strategy documents that establish a plan for future development such as that recently experienced in the Western Sydney Aerotropolis. A clear direction on infrastructure delivery is needed at the time of any release of strategy documents to clearly set expectations to future developers of what infrastructure is necessary.

·    The cumulative impacts of development levies by the three level of government needs to be considered and applied upfront. All levels of governments need a coordinated approach in preparation and release of land for rezoning and in determining an appropriate funding framework for the infrastructure required.

·    Councils should have the ability to set specific rates of open space, appropriate for their local government area. Significant work is undertaken by Councils on understanding the demand for open space facilities and further understanding the nexus and apportionment to new development. Infrastructure contributions is an appropriate mechanism for Councils to use to fund new open space infrastructure, where a nexus can be established to new growth.

·    The inherent complexity of infrastructure contributions and the necessary skills needed to operate within the sector can act as a deterrent for skilled professionals to enter. Reducing the complexity of the infrastructure contributions processes and normalising the early planning of infrastructure early in the land use planning process are some steps that could assist with attracting more skilled workers to the sector.

·    Works in Kind can be a beneficial tool for Councils and can accelerate the delivery of infrastructure. However, Council does not currently facilitate the trading of credits and has no plans to facilitate this in the short term. Accruing and trading credits between developers would add additional complexity to our current processes. Suitable tracking systems would need to be available to Councils to enable this to occur in a transparent manner.

Financial Implications

There are no immediate financial implications resulting from the submission to the NSW Productivity Commissioner for the review of the NSW infrastructure contribution system. However, there may be financial implications in the longer term due to funding shortfall for infrastructure in future contribution plans.

Risk Implications

There is no risk implication.

Conclusion

In response to infrastructure funding challenges, in April 2020, the Minister for Planning and Public Spaces requested the NSW Productivity Commissioner to conduct a comprehensive review of the infrastructure contributions system. The Commissioner has released an Issues Paper that is a broad summary of key issues with the existing system.

 

The Issues Paper was open for public feedback until 5 August 2020. Council officers have sought an extension which has been provided to the Commissioner before the exhibition closing date of 5 August. A final submission will be forwarded to the Commission following consideration by Council tonight.

 

We are encouraged by the current focus on reviewing the infrastructure contributions system and support the implementation of effective methods to deliver social, cultural and physical infrastructure for the Penrith community.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Submission to NSW Productivity Commission Review into Infrastructure Contributions be received

2.     Council endorse the Submission provided as Attachment 2 to be forwarded to NSW Productivity Commission for their consideration.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

Issues Paper - Review of Infrastructure Contributions in New South Wales

73 Pages

Attachments Included

2.

Submission to NSW Productivity Commission

16 Pages

Attachments Included

  


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                        28 September 2020

 

 

 

3

Submission to exhibition of Draft Housing Diversity State Environmental Planning Policy   

 

Compiled by:               Natalie Stanowski, Principal Planner

Authorised by:            Natasha Borgia, City Planning Manager

Kylie Powell, Director - City Futures  

 

Outcome

We plan for our future growth

Strategy

Ensure services, facilities and infrastructure meet the changing needs of our City

Service Activity

Ensure our policies, strategies and plans provide for the services and infrastructure our City needs

      

 

Executive Summary

The purpose of the report is to discuss the proposed new Housing Diversity State Environmental Planning Policy (Housing Diversity SEPP) that has been prepared by Department of Planning, Industry and Environment (DPIE) and to discuss Council’s submission to the exhibition of its Explanation of Intended Effects (EIE).

 

The EIE seeks to consolidate a number of existing housing related SEPPs and make several amendments to the existing development controls of these SEPPs. The amendments relate to a number of ‘affordable’ housing types such as Boarding Houses. The SEPP seeks to provide separate requirements for certain housing delivered by private developers and those for community housing providers and NSW Land and Housing Corporation.

 

Council has strongly advocated on behalf of the Penrith community for amendments to boarding house development. The draft SEPP makes substantial changes to the permissibility of boarding houses in certain zones and delineates boarding houses from those that are affordable and managed by a community housing provider.

 

The Draft SEPP was exhibited between 29 July 2020 and 9 September 2020. Due to the short timeframe to provide a response, a preliminary submission was provided to DPIE on the basis that Council has the opportunity to provide a final submission, supplemented with any other matters it sees fit, as a result of this report.

Background

Currently there are three State Environmental Planning Policies (SEPPs) that relate to the delivery of ‘diverse’ and affordable housing types. These include:

 

·    State Environmental Planning Policy (Housing for Seniors and People with a Disability) 2004 (Seniors SEPP),

·    State Environmental Planning Policy (Affordable Rental Housing) 2009 (ARHSEPP), and

·    State Environmental Planning Policy No 70 – Affordable Housing (Revised Schemes) (SEPP 70).

 

All these SEPPs are applicable to Penrith Local Government Area.

 

In recent times, Penrith has experienced a large number of development applications (DAs) and Complying Development Certificates (CDC’s) resulting from the ARHSEPP, particularly Boarding Houses and some Group Homes. We have received extensive objections from our community to boarding house proposals on the basis of impacts to neighbourhood amenity and character. Council has strongly advocated to the NSW Government for changes to be made to the ARHSEPP to ensure better planning outcomes than are currently occurring from these developments.

 

Our representations have raised the following issues with respect to boarding houses and group homes:

·    Unsuitability of boarding houses in low density zones.

·    Clustering of boarding houses and group homes in inappropriate locations.

·    Affordability of boarding housing is not guaranteed.

·    Limited social impact assessment of boarding house developments.

·    Inadequate parking requirements for boarding house developments.

·    No ongoing monitoring of impacts.

 

In 2019 Council was invited to participate in the Council Boarding House Working Group with DPIE to discuss the above concerns. The feedback from the Working Group has been used to inform the SEPP amendment.

 

Proposed SEPP amendment

 

DPIE are now seeking to consolidate these three SEPPs into one and make a number of changes to the existing controls. The new SEPP will be known as the ‘Housing Diversity SEPP”. The SEPP is proposed to include three new land use definitions, changes to boarding house controls and amendments to other controls.

 

The draft SEPP has been introduced by DPIE as part of the NSW Government response to COVID-19, to accelerate projects that support employment and economic development. DPIE has indicated that ‘as NSW recovers from COVID -19 it will be important to ensure that the planning policies that support construction jobs, including for housing construction jobs are fit for purpose’. The proposed SEPP amendments have also been drafted in consideration of the recommendations of the Boarding House Working Group that Council participated in 2019.

 

The draft Housing Diversity SEPP was on exhibition from 29 July 2020 to 9 September 2020. A copy of the EIE of the draft SEPP is provided as Attachment 1. Council has been granted an extension to this submission date to enable the Council to endorse a formal submission at its Ordinary meeting, however DPIE has requested that a draft submission is provided before the closing date, which has been submitted.

 

Below is a summary of the changes proposed and our comments in relation to these.

 

Amendments to Boarding House Controls

 

Substantial amendments are proposed to the existing boarding house controls. The amendments generally respond to Councils previous advocacy in response to locational requirements. The most substantial changes include boarding houses being split into two types of land use definitions that includes a “Boarding House” if they are operated by a community housing provider or “Co-Living” if privately run. The other change includes the removal of boarding houses as a mandated permissible use in the R2 zone which has been a strong position of Council.

 

Whilst it is acknowledged that the EIE does to some level address some of the representations previously made by Council, it does not go far enough to ensure suitable planning outcomes for our community.

 

There is specific concern regarding the lack of proposed controls relating to the clustering of boarding houses. We recommend that the Department provide further consideration of this issue, particularly for boarding houses within R3 Zones. Further provisions ensuring the suitability of development with respect to density and locational requirements should be addressed, to ensure the intended future character of developments is consistent with Councils local plan making. Consideration of ensuring boarding houses are affordable in perpetuity would also be supported.

 

The amendments are summarised below with our comments:

 

Change

Consistent with Council position

Comments

‘Boarding Houses’ now must be managed by a Community Housing Provider (CHP)

Yes

Support. We recommend specific controls to ensure the ongoing management of these developments by CHP’s.

We would further support this by requiring boarding houses to remain affordable in perpetuity.

Boarding Houses will not be mandated in R2 Zones

Yes

Support, with changes. Boarding Houses will no longer be able to be approved in the R2 zone.

 

Clustering of boarding houses in other zones is less likely because boarding houses need to be managed by a CHP, however, the proposed controls still do not adequately address the potential for the clustering of boarding houses particularly in R3 zones, where the density and impacts of boarding houses are not compatible with the existing or intended future character of this zone.

 

We advocate for strengthened locational requirements to avoid any potential clustering and We seek the ability to provide appropriate density and design controls for compatibility with local character. 

 

We propose a dwelling limit is also applied to development in R3 zones where RFBs are not permitted

 

Land and Housing Corporation (LAHC) permitted to construct boarding houses in R2 zone on government owned land

No

Neutral. The controls would need to ensure that the that clustering of boarding houses would occur through development by LAHC. We advocate for strengthened locational requirements to avoid potential clustering.

A 12-room limit will operate in R2 zone. We recommend a dwelling limit also applies in the R3 zone.

 

The draft SEPP definition requires boarding houses to be delivered by CHP. It will need to be clarified if LAHC are considered a CHP.

Bonus 20% FSR if in a zone where RFBs are permitted

N/A

Support. Council currently does not have an FSR for R4 zones, however we support a small floor space bonus where this delivers affordable housing, in appropriate locations and has limited impacts on amenity outcomes.

Boarding houses must be rented at affordable rates for a minimum of 10 years

No

Not Support. Boarding Houses under this provision should remain affordable in perpetuity.

Privately owned boarding houses are now separately defined as ‘Co-living’ developments

N/A

Support. This provides clarification between ‘affordable’ boarding houses and those for private market rent. Unlike boarding houses, Co-Living will require shared facilities and on site management. At least 10 private rooms are required within a development.

Co-living only mandatory where RFB’s are permitted

Yes

Support. RFBs are permitted in R1, R4 and B4 zones in Penrith LGA.

Co-Living needs to comply with Council LEP for height and FSR

Yes

Support.

Co living Parking is 0.5 spaces per room

No

Not Support. The parking rate for boarding houses and Co-Living has not been reviewed and Councils previous position is that this parking rate is too low.

Design guidelines may be developed for Co living’

N/A

Support, with changes Councils need to be able to set their own criteria depending on the character of the locality.

 

Other Amendments

 

A range of other amendments are proposed in the draft Housing Diversity SEPP. These include two new land use definitions for build to rent and student housing. Other amendments include changes to group homes, seniors housing and developments that LAHC propose.

 

 

 

Proposed Change

Comments

Build to Rent (New definition)

·    Compulsory in R4, B4 and B3

·    LEP height & FSR apply

·    Parking rates lower than DCP

·    Limitation on strata subdivision

·    SEPP 65 may be applicable

 

 

 

·    Investment model definition, not a planning definition.

·    Permissibility in B3 zone not consistent with zone objectives or strategic vision.

·    Occurring already in Penrith under existing development controls - no need for planning incentives.

·    No control over the affordability of developments- at market rate.

·    Potential impacts on the delivery of privately owned apartments.

·    Proposed parking rates are too low.

·    Less amenity for occupants compared with privately owned apartments.

·    Concern that the social outcomes may not be consistent with an integrated and connected community.

·    Concern with the limited applicability of SEPP 65.

Student Housing (New definition)

·    Not compulsory in any zone

·    LEP height & FSR apply

·    No carparking required

·    Limited landscaping and communal areas

·    Regulation of occupants difficult (i.e. students vs non-students)

·    Draft controls are not compatible with the current suburban nature of our university campuses and surrounding areas.

·    Potential to consider as a land use near the campus of Western Sydney University Kingswood and more broadly to consider along the East-West Corridor between St Marys and Penrith.

Group Homes

·    Allow a complying development pathway for conversion of existing dwellings to a group home

·    While the amendment is generally supported, there are existing provisions of the SEPP that we seek amendments to including:

·    Only support group homes to be constructed for and operated by CHP, LAHC or disability care services through the NDIS.

·    We oppose CDC’s for group homes being issued to private developers however support CDC’s for those associated with LAHC, a CHP or disability care services provider through the NDIS as these have a stringent accreditation process (other than an R2 zone).

·    A private group home warrants a consideration of social impact that cannot be undertaken through the CDC process.

·    Consideration of CDC’s is not appropriate in R2 zones as a detailed assessment should be undertaken addressing amenity and character.

·    Controls need to be provided for the operation and ongoing management of group homes. The definition of group home lends itself to the need for increased requirements for ongoing management.

·    Seek tighter conditions of consent for how the group home will be compliant with the management and operation requirements.

·    Group homes are generally not supported in rural areas, unless delivered by CHP’s

Part 3 ARHSEPP

·    Adjustments to ensure councils can levy monetary contributions to offset the loss of low rental dwellings

·    Developer has the onus to prove buildings to be redeveloped and not of low rental value.

·    While unlikely to impact Penrith LGA in the short term, we support the clarification for establishing if existing affordable housing is being lost and the ability to offset this.

Secondary Dwellings (rural zones)

·    Councils will have the discretion to set a maximum size for secondary dwellings in rural zones.

·    Support this amendment. Currently the maximum size is 60m2. We will continue to review if this size is suitable to meet our strategic land use planning objectives in our rural zones.

Seniors Housing

·    Tightening of accessibility requirements.

·    Site compatibility certificates (SCC) to be valid for 5 years, where a DA is lodged within 12 months.

·    If SCC is proposed at a registered club- the club must be registered.

·    LEP standards will prevail over SEPP.

·    Strongly support changes that restrict the use of taxis etc to meet accessibility requirements.

·    Acknowledge the changes to the SCC’s, but we do not believe that site compatibility certificates are required or add value to the process. Local Planning Panels review the development applications, SCC’s are unnecessary. Permissibility in zones should be relied upon.

·    Support the requirement of a club needing to be registered for a SCC to be issued.

·    Support the SEPP relying on Council LEP development standards.

Social Housing (ARHSEPP)

·    Self-assessment of up to 60 dwellings (from 20)

·    Existing density bonus to be extended to all other residential types where permitted in an EPI.

·    LAHC to self-assess all residential development, including social, affordable and private housing components, proposed to be undertaken by or on behalf of LAHC, on any land owned by the State Government.

·    Proposal to increase the numbers of dwellings able to be self-assessed by LAHC from 20 to 60 is not supported. There are conflicts of independence between preparing development plans and self-assessment of them.

Social Housing (Seniors)

·    Reduced parking rates to apply to the private dwelling component of a seniors housing development carried out by or on behalf of LAHC on government-owned land.

·    lift access exemption applies to all seniors housing delivered by or on behalf of LAHC, including any dwellings that are not proposed to be used for the purpose of social housing.

·    State Significant Development if developed on or behalf or LAHC and $100m or more

·    Support the increase in threshold for a development to be considered state significant development.

·    We do not support different standards between private developments and developments on LAHC land including:

·    lowering of parking rates for private dwellings.

·    Any lift exemptions that result in inadequate accessibility to all housing in the community.

 

 

 

Recent changes to Senior SEPP in relation to the Metropolitan Rural Area

 

An amendment to the Seniors SEPP came into force on Wednesday 29 July 2020, with the purpose of excluding land in the metropolitan rural area (MRA) from the application of the SEPP. This impacts rural land within Penrith Local Government Area (LGA) as well as Blue Mountains, Wollondilly, Liverpool, Fairfield, Hawkesbury, Blacktown, The Hills Shire, Hornsby and Northern Beaches LGA’s. Councils were not consulted regarding this amendment.

 

As a result of the amendment, the SEPP will no longer be applicable to land identified as MRA under the SEPP. Seniors Housing remains a permissible land use under a number of zones in Penrith Local Environmental Plan 2010 (Penrith LEP 2010) including the RU5 Rural Village. Further work will be undertaken to consider the local context of Penrith’s rural areas in respect to seniors housing. Where appropriate, we may seek to introduce suitable amendments to the Penrith LEP 2010 and Penrith Development Control Plan 2014 should Council wish to offer further permissibility or incentives for seniors housing in these areas.

 

As part of our submission to the draft Housing diversity SEPP, we will include our objection to the making of such a significant SEPP amendment without consulting Council.

 

Future Amendments to Council Planning Policies

 

A number of the proposed changes, if implemented, may require Council to review a number of its planning policies to ensure consistency and the achievement of good planning outcomes. These are detailed below:

 

·    Some of the proposed new land uses may be included under the group term definition ‘Residential Accommodation’. Many of these land uses may not be suitable in zones were this group term is used in Penrith, such as R4 and B4 zones. This will require an LEP review to ensure appropriate land use outcomes.

·    Enable the development of student accommodation in appropriate locations.

·    Any new land uses may need to be incorporated into development contributions plans to ensure developments are appropriately levied for future population growth.

·    An LEP review may be required to determine if the maximum size of secondary dwellings in rural areas needs to be amended.

 

In our submission, we will seek to obtain savings and transition provisions in order to be able to prepare amended planning documents in response to these changes.

 

Strategic implications of the SEPP to Council

 

While the SEPP addresses a number of Councils concerns relating to boarding houses, as a policy it does introduce other strategic implications that should be addressed including:

 

·    Complexity - The SEPP has introduced a number of new land use definitions, creating a total of 16 definitions under the current group term Residential Accommodation. This is making an already complex land use system further complicated.

·    Resource implications – the SEPP is complex and requires Council resources to implement, monitor and assess the strategic impacts.

·    Preceding the District Affordable Housing Strategy – Council, as part of the City Deal Councils, prepare a District Affordable Housing Strategy. We recommend that this SEPP should consider the outcomes of this work prior to being introduced.

·    Standards and Local Context – Councils should have the ability to provide development standards and controls to consider the local context of our cities.

·    Necessary as a SEPP – We believe much of the development proposed under the SEPP could be dealt with through Councils local planning controls, particularly where Councils LEP controls will override the SEPP controls, such as seniors housing. The need for housing a SEPP at all is questioned.

 

Consultation with other Councils

 

Council has consulted with a number of other Councils in relation to the proposed SEPP, particularly the Western City Deal Planners Group and other Sydney Councils with B3 zones. The matters raised by Council are consistent with other Councils concerns.

 

Local Government NSW (LGNSW) are advocating for Councils regarding this SEPP and the matters raised by Council are generally consistent. It is recommended that Council forward our final submission to LGNSW.

 

Financial Implications

 

There are no financial implications for Council associated with this report.

Risk Implications

If the draft SEPP is made as proposed, development applications received for the purposes of Boarding Houses and Group Homes may not be consistent with the desired future character of our City.

Conclusion

The draft Housing Diversity SEPP has recently been on exhibition. The proposed SEPP seeks to consolidate a number of housing related SEPPs and make a range of amendments to the existing controls. In particular, significant amendments have been proposed to the permissibility and development controls for boarding houses. The proposed amendments somewhat address Councils previous advocacy on boarding houses, including changes to mandating them in R2 zones and ensuring CHPs manage them to reduce clustering, however it is our view that the draft SEPP does not go far enough to ensure suitable planning outcomes for our community.

 

A final submission will be prepared on the draft SEPP including Councillor feedback received on this report. A final endorsed submission will be prepared and sent to DPIE following this report

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Submission to exhibition of Draft Housing Diversity State Environmental Planning Policy be received

2.     The information contained within this report form the basis of the final submission to the Department of Planning, Industry and Environment in relation to the draft Proposed Housing Diversity State Environmental Planning Policy.

3.     The final submission is forwarded to Local Government NSW for further advocacy.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

Explanation of Intended Effects- Draft Housing Diversity SEPP

30 Pages

Attachments Included

  


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                        28 September 2020

 

 

 

4

Winter Sporting Facility proposed DCP and VPA   

 

Compiled by:               Joel Carson, Senior Planner

Authorised by:            Natasha Borgia, City Planning Manager

Kylie Powell, Director - City Futures  

 

Outcome

We plan for our future growth

Strategy

Facilitate development in the City that considers the current and future needs  of our community

Service Activity

Plan for and facilitate development in the City

     

Procedural note: Section 375A of the Local Government Act 1993 requires that a division be called in relation to this matter.

 

Executive Summary

At its meeting of 26 November 2018 Council endorsed a Planning Proposal which seeks an amendment to Penrith Local Environmental Plan 2010 (LEP 2010) to enable development of 2 Tench Avenue, Jamisontown for a Winter Sporting Facility. One of the resolutions of Council requires that a site-specific Development Control Plan (DCP) be prepared for the subject site, and that the draft DCP be publicly exhibited concurrently with the public exhibition of the endorsed Planning Proposal.

The purpose of this report is to seek Council’s endorsement to publicly exhibit a proposed draft DCP and Voluntary Planning Agreement (VPA) offer associated with a proposed Winter Sporting Facility development at 2 Tench Avenue, Jamisontown.

The draft DCP and VPA have been prepared by the proponent, Winter Sports World, to support the Planning Proposal endorsed by Council to be publicly exhibited.

Background

At its meeting of 26 November 2018 Council endorsed a Planning Proposal which seeks an amendment to Penrith Local Environmental Plan 2010 (LEP 2010) to enable development of 2 Tench Avenue, Jamisontown for a Winter Sporting Facility. Council subsequently submitted the Planning Proposal to the Department of Planning, Industry and Environment (DPIE) to request a Gateway Determination.

 

A Gateway Determination was received on 2 May 2019 and enables the proposal to proceed to public exhibition following completion of certain matters specified in the Gateway conditions. Council officers have been working with the proponent to date to satisfy the Gateway conditions to enable public exhibition.

 

It is envisaged that the proposed Winter Sporting Facility development would consist of:

§ An indoor ski slope

§ Ice skating rink

§ Ice climbing facilities

§ Rock climbing facilities

§ Altitude training

§ Gymnasium and training facilities

§ Hotel accommodation (Approximately 170 hotel rooms plus a function centre)

§ Food and drink premises (bars, cafes and restaurants)

 

The proposed development scheme for the site is consistent with one of the key aspects of Council’s vision for that part of the Riverlink Precinct, which is to provide for tourist-oriented development and related uses that are compatible with the promotion of tourism in Penrith. The proposed development is also a unique facility which is dependent on a specific gradient and height (54 metres).

 

The proposed LEP amendment seeks to create an additional local provision under Part 7 of LEP 2010 for the subject site, allowing for a 54m high development on the site on the condition that:

§ a substantial component of the development is an indoor ski slope facility, and a Floor Space Ratio (FSR) control of 1.2:1 is not to be exceeded.

§ an FSR control above 1.2:1 (up to a maximum of 1.45:1) would be considered if justified and if the development features a hotel component.

§ the development is in accordance with a site-specific DCP prepared for the site which provides additional planning and design guidance for development.

§ The design of the structure is prepared by way of a design competition.

§ A “sunset clause” applies, where the local LEP provision will cease to exist three years after the date the LEP amendment is made. This is to enable controls specific to this proposal and ensure delivery. The sunset clause would require lodgement of a Development Application within 3 years of the LEP amendment being made. After 3 years, the additional local provision would expire.

 

The purpose of allowing for an additional FSR (from 1.2:1 to 1.45:1) is to provide incentive to the proponent to secure a hotel component in the development. The additional FSR would be allowed only if a hotel component is included in the development. There are no guarantees in place that a hotel component will be delivered as part of the development, however additional FSR will not be permitted if this is case.

 

Since the issuing of the Gateway Determination, the applicant has prepared several items of work in consultation with Council, including completion of a traffic analysis, flooding and evacuation strategy, bushfire assessment, and draft DCP controls. The NSW Rural Fire Service has also been consulted. The Gateway conditions have been sufficiently addressed and the Planning Proposal is in a position to proceed to a public exhibition.

 

Council’s resolution of 26 November 2018 requires that a DCP be prepared for the subject site, to be publicly exhibited concurrently with the Planning Proposal. It is intended that the DCP would facilitate the unique development sought on this site, provide greater certainty to development outcomes, and address potential impacts on neighbouring properties, such as overshadowing, amenity, privacy, bulk and scale, plus the desire to deliver design excellence. Given the size, location and visual prominence of the proposed development, this is a sensitive site where the achievement of an acceptable design outcome is critical.

 

The proponent has also submitted an offer to enter into a VPA with Council, where the proponent would undertake certain road improvements to address traffic issues that would arise as a result of the development.

 

Draft DCP

 

The proponent has prepared a draft DCP for the subject site in consultation with Council officers. During Council’s input into the preparation process, Council officers engaged an urban design consultant, Architectus, to review the draft documentation and provide advice on the appropriateness of the proponent’s proposed controls.

 

Council’s overall approach in the preparation of the draft DCP controls is to employ development controls that do not “lock in” a specific development scheme. Rather, principles and targets have been employed that any future development of the site would need to achieve. The detailed elements of the development proposal would be determined as part of a future Development Application (DA) process and most importantly a design competition, which will consider the DCP and LEP controls as part of that process. In line with the proposed LEP control, a design competition is essential, given the uniqueness of the development type, its potential impacts and its prominent location.

 

The draft DCP includes development controls addressing several key elements including:

§ Indicative building envelope, height limits and setbacks

§ Views and visual impact

§ Amenity impacts, such as solar impacts, privacy, acoustic

§ Building design and design excellence

§ Public domain and landscaping

§ Traffic and parking management

§ Sustainability

§ Flooding and drainage

 

A copy of the draft DCP is provided as Attachment 1.

 

VPA offer

 

The proponent seeks to undertake road improvements to the Jamison Road / Blaikie Road intersection to incorporate a channelised right-turn treatment east-bound on Jamison Road. The works are required as a result of increased traffic volumes from the proposed Winter Sporting Facility development, as identified in the traffic analysis completed to support the proposal. The improvements would ensure that the intersection operates satisfactorily. The proponent seeks to complete these works prior to the issuing of an occupation certificate for the Winter Sporting Facility.

 

It is noted that the flooding and evacuation strategy completed by the applicant concludes that the strategy of early evacuation is adequate and enables sufficient warning time for the development to be evacuated without the need to alter road levels or carry out other infrastructure upgrades in the locality. As such, there is no requirement to upgrade any roads or infrastructure due to flooding and evacuation considerations associated with the development.

 

The NSW State Emergency Service (SES) has been informally consulted by Council officers, DPIE, and the proponent during preparation of the flooding and evacuation assessments to support the Planning Proposal. The SES will be formally consulted during the public exhibition of the Planning Proposal and draft DCP.

 

A copy of the VPA offer is provided as Attachment 2.

 

Design competition

 

As noted earlier in this report, the proposed local LEP provision sought by the Planning Proposal for the subject site seeks to enable development of the site for an indoor ski slope on the condition that the design of the structure is prepared by way of a design competition.

 

The urban design consultant, Architectus, who was engaged by Council to review the proponent’s draft DCP controls provided advice to Council officers which state that, given the size and visual prominence of the proposal, Architectus considers a Design Excellence Competition to be essential.

Also, early engagement with the Government Architects Office by the proponent and advised to Council officers indicate that given the scale and potential impacts of the proposed development a design competition is supported.

 

In accordance with the requirements of the Gateway Determination, the NSW Government Architect’s Office will be formally consulted during public exhibition of the Planning Proposal and draft DCP, where advice will be sought in respect to the requirements around a design competition.

 

Next steps

 

The proposed draft DCP and VPA offer prepared by the proponent are now suitable to proceed to public exhibition. Should Council endorse the attached draft documentation, the Planning Proposal, draft DCP and VPA offer will then be publicly exhibited concurrently.

 

Following the completion of the public exhibition, the outcomes of the exhibition will be reported to Council for consideration.

 

Financial Implications

 

Through the VPA offer, the proponent seeks to deliver certain road improvements that would be required to support the proposed development scheme. These improvements would be delivered wholly by the proponent as works in kind and would be delivered prior to occupation of the development. The strategic concept design for these works that is enclosed with the VPA offer would undergo detailed design at a future stage to determine detailed design elements and any requirements to changes to existing utilities, land acquisition etc. These costs would be carried by the proponent.

Risk Implications

As per Council previous resolution, the Planning Proposal must be publicly exhibited concurrently with a draft DCP for the subject site. Should Council not endorse the recommendation of this report to proceed to public exhibition of the draft DCP and VPA offer, the exhibition of the Planning Proposal would also not proceed.

Conclusion

A Planning Proposal for a Winter Sporting Facility was endorsed by Council for exhibition with the additional resolution that the proposal was to be exhibited with an associated site specific DCP.

 

A draft DCP and VPA offer have been prepared by the proponent, Winter Sports World, to support a Planning Proposal for a Winter Sporting Facility at 2 Tench Avenue, Jamisontown. The proposed draft DCP and VPA offer prepared by the proponent are now suitable to proceed to public exhibition concurrently with the Planning Proposal.

 

A site specific DCP would facilitate the unique development sought on this site, provide greater certainty to development outcomes, and address potential impacts on neighbouring properties.

 

Given the size, location and visual prominence of the proposed development, this is a sensitive site where the achievement of an acceptable design outcome is critical. In line with the proposed LEP control, a design competition is essential, given the uniqueness of the development type, its potential impacts and its prominent location.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Winter Sporting Facility proposed DCP and VPA be received.

2.     Council endorse the draft DCP for the Winter Sporting Facility for public exhibition, as provided at Attachment 1.

3.     Council endorse the VPA offer for the Winter Sporting Facility for public exhibition, as provided at Attachment 2.

4.     Council publicly exhibit the draft DCP and VPA offer concurrently with Planning Proposal for the Winter Sporting Facility.

5.     A report be presented to Council following completion of the public exhibition of the draft DCP, VPA offer and Planning Proposal.

6.     The General Manager be granted delegation to make any necessary changes to the draft DCP and VPA offer prior to public exhibition.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

Draft DCP for Winter Sporting Facility

30 Pages

Attachments Included

2.

VPA offer 26 August 2020 for Winter Sporting Facility

4 Pages

Attachments Included

   


Outcome 3 - We can get around the City

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

5        Transport for NSW  (TfNSW) Regional Road 2020/21 REPAIR Program (Rehabilitation) Funding Grants                                                                                                                 25

 

6        Acceptance of Funding under the NSW Government's Local Government Road Safety Behavioural Program                                                                                                       27

 

7        Australian Government Blackspot Program and NSW Safer Roads Program 2021/22 Nominations                                                                                                                      30

 

 

 

 



Ordinary Meeting                                                                                        28 September 2020

 

 

 

5

Transport for NSW  (TfNSW) Regional Road 2020/21 REPAIR Program (Rehabilitation) Funding Grants   

 

Compiled by:               Hans Meijer, City Assets Manager

Authorised by:            Brian Steffen, Director - City Services  

 

Outcome

We can get around our city

Strategy

Provide a safe and efficient road and pathway network

Service Activity

Implement the Road Asset Renewal Program

      

 

Executive Summary

The purpose of this report is to advise Council of the Transport for NSW (TfNSW)) 2020/21 Regional Road REPAIR Program Funding Grant. TfNSW provides various Road Funding Grants to Councils each year, to assist with maintenance of regional roads.

 

The report recommends that Council accepts the grant of $300,000 offered toward the pavement reconstruction of Andrews Road, Cranebrook from Greygums Road to Laycock Street.

Background

TfNSW provides various Road Funding Grants to Councils each year, to assist with maintenance of regional roads.

 

Advice has been received from TfNSW of the following grant for 2020/21:

 

Regional Road (REPAIR program)

Council can access a 50% contribution for specific works on Regional roads under the REPAIR Program. Penrith City Council’s allocation under this program in recent years has been as follows:

 

2019/20:     $300,000

2018/19:     $300,000

2016/17:     $300,000

2015/16:     $300,000

 

TfNSW has advised that Council has been successful in achieving the maximum amount of $300,000 in the 2020/21 REPAIR Program. The allocation consists of $300,000 toward the pavement reconstruction works on Andrews Road, Cranebrook from Greygums Road to Laycock Street.

 

Council has the matching funds available for the program, which were adopted as part of the Operational Plan at the Ordinary meeting on 22 June 2020.

Financial Implications

A matching contribution of $300,000 (50%) has been established under the Roads Reconstruction Program as part of the 2020-21 adopted Operational Plan. The additional $300,000 from the REPAIR Grant will allow Council to deliver the full scope of works along Andrews Road in the current Financial Year.

 

 

Risk Implications

Council is required to accept the funding prior to 30 September 2020 to guarantee it receives the funding. Funding conditions are appropriate for the funding offered.

 

Conclusion

It is recommended that Council accept the grant being offered and formally thank the State Government for the grant.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Transport for NSW  (TfNSW) Regional Road 2020/21 REPAIR Program (Rehabilitation) Funding Grants be received.

2.     Council accept the grant of $300,000, offered under the 2020//21 Transport for NSW (TfNSW) Regional Road REPAIR Program, for the pavement reconstruction works on Andrews Road, Cranebrook from Greygums Road to Laycock Street.

 

3.     Council write to the State Government formally thanking them for the REPAIR Program Grant Funding.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                        28 September 2020

 

 

 

6

Acceptance of Funding under the NSW Government's Local Government Road Safety Behavioural Program   

 

Compiled by:               Wendy Read, Road Safety Officer

Authorised by:            Adam Wilkinson, Engineering Services Manager

Wayne Mitchell, Director - Development and Regulatory Services  

 

Outcome

We can get around our City

Strategy

Provide a safe and efficient road and pathway network

Service Activity

Manage programs and initiatives that improve road safety and efficiency

      

 

Executive Summary

The purpose of this report is to advise Council of the grants offered by Transport for NSW under the Local Government Road Safety Behavioural Program. 

 

The report recommends that Council accept the grants as outlined in the report.

 

Background

The goal of the Transport for NSW (TfNSW) Local Government Road Safety Behavioural Program is to reduce the incidence and severity of crashes through partnership approach that builds on the great work already being done across council and local communities.

 

Penrith City Council commenced its involvement with the NSW Local Government Program in 1994 with the employment of a full-time Road Safety Officer. Council’s Community Plan and Operational Plan include actions which are relevant to road safety. The Safer Systems approach is reflected in the way in which transport and traffic projects and programs are delivered across council and to our diverse communities.

 

Programs targeting behavioural road safety issues are developed from local priorities identified from crash data analysis by Council's Road Safety Officer, of which some are funded through the Local Government Road Safety Behavioural Program (LGRSBP).

 

Current Situation

Penrith City Council is committed to a Towards Zero goal for road safety. Better understanding of road safety issues and solutions is important in achieving our goal.

 

The five-year crash analysis continues to show an overall downward trend in crash and casualty statistics across the Penrith LGA between 2014 and 2018.

 

The amount of project funding available from the 2020-21 LGRSBP is limited to a maximum of $15,500 including three (3) key program areas:

·    Towards Zero campaign that focuses on speed; drink driving; fatigue; road rule awareness. The funding will also be used for development of road safety resources. 

·    Occupant restraints that will include the delivery of the child seat safety program

·    Young drivers that will include delivery of the supervising learner driver workshops.

 

This funding represents 100% program funding. No financial contribution is required by Council.

 

Key Area –speed; drink driving; fatigue; road rule awareness and pedestrian safety - $8,000

Local speed enforcement operations by NSW Police will be supported with speed checks by VMS, digital communications and printed materials.

 

A drink driving program supporting enforcement will again be operating within licensed premises.  Funding will be used to promote in-venue materials such as ‘Plan B’ posters and coasters. Licensed venues and the Nepean St Marys Liquor Accord are encouraged to participate.

 

National Road Safety Week will provide an opportunity to deliver a digital media campaign focusing on one core road safety issue per day. A digital media campaign will be developed, and resources provided to support key issues.

 

Key Area - Occupant Restraints: Child seat safety program - $6,000

The Child Seat Safety Program will again be conducted during 2020-21. As a result of COVID-19 the program provides residents a Voucher to have their child restraint inspected or installed by an authorised Fitter. Inspections are a free service to attendees of the checking day and the grant funding is allocated to promotion of the program through local media and printed materials. The aim of the campaign is to promote the correct use and installation of child restraints. 

 

Key Area - Young Drivers: Supervising Learner Divers Workshops - $1,500

Supervising Learner Divers Workshops will be conducted during 2020-21 for parents/supervisors of learner drivers. As a result of COVID-19, Council has moved the workshops to an online platform. The Workshops offer practical advice on supervising learner drivers, completing the Learner Driver Logbook and the benefits of driving practice.

 

Financial Implications

While the funding offered by Transport for NSW complements Councils existing recurrent funding of the road safety program and Road Safety Officer, provision of matching funds is not a condition of the grant.

 

100% Funding Offer - Penrith City Council

Value

Toward Zero – Workshop Advertising and Resources

$8,000

Child Restraint Check Days – Fitters Fees

$6,000

Supervising Learner Divers Workshops – Workshop Advertising 

$1,500

Total

$15,500

 

Risk Implications

Road crashes are a leading cause of preventable death and serious injury in the Australia and around the world.

 

Penrith City Council is proactive in its approach to reduce the incidence and severity of crashes through partnership approach that builds on the great work already being done across council and local communities.

 

Conclusion

Council’s Road Safety Program has been successfully implemented for twenty-five years, with Council’s Road Safety Officer successfully applying for annual funding and conducting in-depth analysis of annual motor accident statistics correlated to funded programs. 

 

The analysis shows a continuing downward trend in serious injuries across the Penrith LGA, which may in part be attributable to the ongoing success of Council’s Road Safety Program and partnership with the NSW Government.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Acceptance of Funding under the NSW Government's Local Government Road Safety Behavioural Program be received.

2.     Council accept the grant offered by Transport for NSW under its Local Government Road Safety Behavioural Program, totalling $15,500, as outlined in the report.

3.     Council write to Transport for NSW and Local State Members thanking them for their continued support for road safety initiatives within the Penrith Local Government Area.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                        28 September 2020

 

 

 

7

Australian Government Blackspot Program and NSW Safer Roads Program 2021/22 Nominations   

 

Compiled by:               David Drozd, Traffic Engineering Coordinator

Authorised by:            Adam Wilkinson, Engineering Services Manager

Wayne Mitchell, Director - Development and Regulatory Services  

 

Outcome

We can get around our City

Strategy

Provide a safe and efficient road and pathway network

Service Activity

Manage programs and initiatives that improve road safety and efficiency

      

 

Executive Summary

The purpose of this report is to advise Council of projects submitted under the Australian Government Blackspot Program and NSW Safer Roads Program 2021/22.

 

The report recommends that Council note the projects submitted to the NSW Black Spot Consultative Panel of the Roads and Maritime Services (RMS).

 

Background

Council has been very successful in obtaining funding for life and injury saving protection measures across its network for many years. In the past 5 years alone, Council has secured over $5,000,000 in funding for Blackspot and Safer Roads projects, which are in turn delivering community savings right across the network.

 

The RMS invited Council to identify and nominate new conforming projects for the Australian Government Blackspot Program and NSW Safer Roads Program 2021/22, and to forward its submissions to the NSW Black Spot Consultative Panel by the 7th September 2020.

 

The Black Spot Program is part of the commitment to reduce crashes on Australian roads.  Road crashes are a major cost to Australians every year.  Black Spot projects target those road locations where crashes are occurring.  By funding measures such as traffic signals and roundabouts at dangerous locations, the program reduces the risk of crashes.  Programs of this sort are very effective, saving the community many times the cost of the relatively minor road improvements that are implemented.

 

The Black Spot Program makes an important contribution in reducing the national road toll under the National Road Safety Strategy and Action Plan. The Australian Government has provided $744.5 million to the Black Spot Program from the 2013 to 2014 financial year to the 2021 to 2022 financial year, with an on-going commitment of $60 million each year following.

 

To be eligible, the project(s) will be required to meet the minimum criteria of individual program areas. Only casualty crash data will be used when calculating the safety BCR, whereas traditionally all crashes were used. Furthermore, a minimum three casualty crashes are required for a Black Spot or length under the National Program, and two casualty crashes under the Safer Roads program.

 

Current Situation

The following nine (9) projects, listed in Table 1 (below), have been submitted by Council’s Traffic Section for nomination under the Australian Government Blackspot Program and NSW Safer Roads Program 2021/22. 

 

Analysis of the accidents is based on the RMS recorded accident data available to Council for the five-year period from 1 July 2014 to 30 June 2019. Nominated projects were prioritised according to the number of injury crashes that had occurred over the five-year period, and the ability to successfully remediate the accident hazards at that location by way of an appropriate treatment.

 

Projects were shortlisted from the total list of identified locations in the Local Government Area (LGA) that met the minimum eligibility criteria for the program. The final list of projects offers the Penrith LGA the greatest yield in terms of accident savings for the nomination year and accordingly are the highest ranked against the established criteria. The following list is sorted in order of accident severity, with costing to determine final Benefit Cost Ratio calculations when lodgement is made in the TfNSW/RMS Portal.

 

TABLE 1. List of Projects to be submitted to TfNSW/RMS under the

‘Australian Government Blackspot Program and NSW Safer Roads Program 2021/22’

 

Location

Intersection / Length

Benefit Cost Ratio

Suggested Improvements

 

Cost

1

High Street, Penrith

Doonmore Street

3.28

Improvements to Roundabout Deflection

$60,000

2

Evan Street, Penrith

Derby Street

4.40

Improvements to Roundabout Deflection

$60,000

3

Evan Street, South Penrith

Smith Street

3.42

Improvements to Roundabout Deflection and Lighting

$80,000

4

McIntyre Avenue, St Clair

Feather Street

4.17

Single Lane Roundabout

$200,000

5

Endeavour Avenue, St Clair

Between Bennett Road & Botany Lane

4.52

Pedestrian Fencing and Threshold Treatments

$120,000

6

Forrester Road, St Mary’s

Length

5.23

Closure of median, provision of median island stop treatment and pedestrian safety improvements.

$420,000

7

Australia Street, St Mary’s

Adelaide Street

5.71

Median Island Stop Treatment (MIST)

$100,000

8

Victoria Street, Werrington

Length

5.68

Threshold, CHR, Lighting, and Median Island Treatments

$215,000

9

Peppermint Crescent, Kingswood

Length

5.25

Traffic Calming Devices (Slow Points)

$75,000

 

As part of the review of available accident data, consideration was given to the broader road network. So, in addition to sites on Council’s road network, it is noted that the locations under TfNSW/RMS control and management, as shown in Table 2 (below), have a high accident history resulting in multiple casualties.

 

TABLE 2.

List of Sites Under TfNSW/RMS Control & Management

 

Item


Primary Road

Intersecting Street

Total Number of Casualty Accidents (5 years)

1

MAMRE RD

M4 MOTORWAY

16

2

THE NORTHERN RD

M4 MOTORWAY

13

3

GREAT WESTERN HWY

RIVER RD

13

4

MULGOA RD

M4 MOTORWAY

13

5

MAMRE RD

GREAT WESTERN HWY

12

6

THE NORTHERN RD

ANDROMEDA DRV

11

7

PARKER ST

COPELAND ST

10

8

RUSSELL ST (GWH)

FORBES ST

8

9

GREAT WESTERN HWY

PARKER ST

8

10

GREAT WESTERN HWY

BENNETT RD

8

 

TfNSW/RMS will be advised that these locations on its Arterial Road Network should be investigated as a matter of priority due to their high casualty accident rates.

 

In consideration of the list (Table 2), it should also be noted that, the intersection of The Northern Road and Andromeda Drive (State Road intersection) has been treated with Traffic Signals and delivered under the 2017-18 Safer Roads Blackspot Program, and as such the accident trend is anticipated to reduce.

 

In addition, intersections along The Northern Road have also been prioritised for upgrade under the Federal/State Governments $3.6 Billion Western Sydney Infrastructure Plan, including a full duplication of the interchange at the M4 and The Northern Road.

 

Financial Implications

The program provides for 100% funding, hence there are no financial implications for Council associated with this report as the funding nominations, if successful, will not result in Council contribution.

 

Risk Implications

The program provides for 100% funding, hence there are limited risk implications to Council as Council has a proven track record of over 15 years now in delivery of high-quality projects under this grant.

 

 

 

Conclusion

The projects listed in Table 1 are Council’s highest priority sites and as such will be submitted to TfNSW/RMS for their consideration. Further, TfNSW/RMS will be requested to investigate traffic safety at those sites listed in Table 2.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Australian Government Blackspot Program and NSW Safer Roads Program 2021/22 Nominations be received.

2.     Council note the nine projects listed in Table 1 of this report for funding application to the Roads and Maritime Services under the Australian Government Blackspot Program and NSW Safer Roads Program 2021/22 to the value of $1,330,000.

3.     The Roads and Maritime Services be requested to investigate traffic safety on roads under its jurisdiction at locations indicated in Table 2 of this report.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.  


 

 

 

 

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Outcome 4 - We have safe, vibrant places

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

8        RFT20/21-01 Civic Centre Ground Floor Refurbishment - Stage 1                                37

 

9        Penrith Rising Strong - COVID-19 Recovery Plan                                                          42

 

 

 

 



Ordinary Meeting                                                                                        28 September 2020

 

 

 

8

RFT20/21-01 Civic Centre Ground Floor Refurbishment - Stage 1   

 

Compiled by:               Siva Sivakumar, Project Coordinator - Capital Works

Authorised by:            Michael Jackson, Design and Projects Manager

Brian Steffen, Director - City Services  

 

Outcome

We have safe, vibrant places

Strategy

Make our public places safe and attractive

Service Activity

Implement the Building Asset Renewal Program

      

 

Executive Summary

Tender reference RFT20/21-01 for Civic Centre Ground Floor Refurbishment – Stage 1 was advertised on NSW Government tender website and listed in Apet360 Portal which is an online platform to manage the tender process, including receiving all tender submissions.

 

This report advises Council of the outcome of the tender process and recommends that the tender from Hunter Mason Pty Ltd be accepted for the scope of works outlined in the RFT 20/21-01 for Civic Centre Ground Floor Refurbishment – Stage 1 for a total amount of $1,277,434.91 (excluding GST).

Background

The Civic Centre was opened in 1993 and, while the layout has been changed incrementally over time, the bulk of the original fittings, meeting rooms and offices are still in place.

 

The Ground Floor Refurbishment works have been divided into two stages in line with the design works completion timetable. This tender is for Stage 1, which includes refurbishing the existing foyer and a back of house section where Customer Experience staff will be accommodated.

 

The current front customer service counter and the relatively expansive public areas of the ground floor area provide an opportunity to dramatically improve the efficiency of the building and overall customer experience.

 

A customer journey mapping exercise was used to inform the redesign of the ground floor public area. The proposed design makes better use of the space to improve efficiency and provide an enhanced customer experience. The redesign will provide a more contemporary look and feel with formal and informal meeting areas, self-service desks and associated equipment and technology. Customers will be greeted when they enter the Civic Centre and guided to the appropriate area. There will also be a customer waiting area and sit-down café. A greener look will be achieved through the addition of live plants in a Greenwall as well as around the café, in the informal meeting areas and leading to the first floor.

Tender Evaluation Process

The Tender Evaluation Committee consisted of Project Coordinator Siva Sivakumar, Asset Coordinator Joshua Martin and was chaired by Design and Projects Manager Michael Jackson. Allyce Langton from Council’s Procurement team performed the role of tender administration and probity officer.

 

The tenders we received were assessed using the advertised evaluation criteria of:

·      Business references

·      Demonstrated ability

·      Project appreciation

·      Works method and program

·      Financials

·      Employment policies and details (direct labour and sub-contractors)

·      Support of businesses in the Penrith LGA - suppliers and contractors

·      Quality assurance systems

·      Environmental management systems

·      Value for money

Initial Tender Review

A full listing of the tenders received is detailed below in price order (ex GST).

 

Company

Tendered Price

Company Location

Directors

The Trustee for Hunter Mason Trust t/as Hunter Mason Pty Ltd

$1,277,434.91

L23/20 Bond Street
Sydney NSW 2000

Matthew Callender

Trinity Quality Interiors Pty Ltd

$1,302,937.00

Seaview Business Centre
Suite 11, 11 Forest Road
Hurstville NSW 2220

Benjamin Lloyd
Kane Lloyd

Rogers Construction Group Pty Ltd

$1,399,399.67

3/74 Edward Street
Riverstone NSW 2765

Mitchell Rogers

Odyssey Interiors (NSW) Pty Ltd

$1,430,609.00

Suite 1E, Level 1
1345 The Horsley Drive
Wetherill Park NSW 2164

Carmelo Stillisano

Reward Interiors Pty Ltd

$1,445,610.51

8 Cawarra Road
Caringbah NSW 2229

Christopher Donohue

Graphite Projects Pty Ltd

$1,558,548.00

Level 7, 80 Mount Street
North Sydney NSW 2060

Nicholas Stergiou

The Trustee for The Adaptive Trust trading as Dezign

$1,593,000.00

19 John Street
Lawson NSW 2783

Tim Pridham

Ckorp Holdings Pty Ltd

$1,606,851.55

45 Drumond Street
Belmore NSW 2192

Charbel Kairouz

Regional West Constructions Pty Ltd

$1,633,298.88

75A Corporation Avenue
Robin Hill NSW 2795

Alex Bechara

Matrix Group Co Pty Ltd

$1,656,200.00

6 Portrush Crescent
Luddenham NSW 2745

Troy Loh

Formula Interiors Pty Ltd

$1,718,142.52

Level 4, 27 Albert Avenue
Chatswood NSW 2067

Greg McDonell
Gary McDonell
Peter Hunter
Daniel Wigan

Xenia Constructions (NSW) Pty Ltd

$1,723,275.69

76 Commercial Road
Teneriffe QLD 4005

John Gough

Built Holdings Pty Ltd

$1,727,961.00

Level 7, 343 George Street
Sydney NSW 2000

Brett Mason
Mitchell Futcher

Meridian Construction Services Pty Ltd

$1,742,858.00

321 Princes Highway
Banksia NSW 2216

Mick Brady

Helix Projects Pty Ltd

$1,771,345.76

13 Haig Street
Bexley NSW 2207

Mahmoud Sabra
Mohammad Dower

Intermain Pty Ltd

$1,816,064.43

1 Gillespie Avenue
Alexandria NSW 2015

Andrew Johnson
Jason Sultana

Westbury Constructions Pty Ltd

$1,992,800.00

Suite 2.02, Level 2
33 Lexington Drive
Baulkham Hills NSW 2153

Darren Price
Shakeel Karim

Coverit Building Group Pty Ltd

$1,999,999.99

Unit 18, 37-47 Borec Rd
Penrith NSW 2749

Shane Comans

Avium Pty Ltd

$2,281,398.85

85 Wardell Road
Dulwich Hill NSW 2203

Joseph Harb
Antonio Pugliese

 

A tender received from J & J Metro-West Pty Ltd is incomplete and was deemed to be a nonconforming tender and is not included in the Table above.

 

Tenders were evaluated using Apet360 software to provide a ranking for conformance with the evaluation criteria.

 

Evaluation of the Preferred Tender

The tenders submitted by Formula Interiors Pty Ltd, Xenia Construction (NSW) Pty Ltd, Built Holdings Pty Ltd, Meridian Construction Services Pty Ltd, Helix Projects Pty Ltd, Intermain Pty Ltd, Westbury Constructions Pty Ltd, Coverit Building Group Pty Ltd and Avium Pty Ltd were outside of the available budget and were not evaluated further.

 

Following the assessment of effectiveness, the tenders submitted by the following 7 firms scored strongly and their individual scores had only 6.5% difference between highest and lowest scores for conformance with the evaluation criteria.

 

·    Hunter Mason Pty Ltd

·    Trinity Quality Interiors Pty Ltd

·    Rogers Construction Group Pty Ltd

·    Odyssey Interiors (NSW) Pty Ltd

·    Reward Interiors Pty Ltd

·    Graphite Projects Pty Ltd

·    Matrix Group Co Pty Ltd

 

The local firm Matrix Group Co Pty Ltd scored high for effectiveness but due to its price being at the higher range of the shortlisted firms, the local preference weighting did not bring them into a comparable position to the other six (6) firms.

 

As the difference in scores for effectiveness was minimal and based on detailed analysis of pricing components, Hunter Mason Pty Ltd and Trinity Quality Interiors Pty Ltd have been given further consideration in the tender evaluation. Clarifications were sought from these two companies during the tender evaluation period and Hunter Mason Pty Ltd was considered by the Tender Evaluation Committee to provide the highest value for money and it is the lowest price tenderer. 

 

Hunter Mason Pty Ltd demonstrated more comprehensive Quality and Environmental Management Systems & have excellent relevant experience, including leading all trades in the completion of similar projects. It has also submitted a more comprehensive staging plan giving thorough consideration to Council’s operational requirements.

 

The recommended company, Hunter Mason Pty Ltd was selected based on their;

 

1)    Compliance with the tender evaluation criteria,

2)    Demonstrated ability to meet Council’s requirements; and

3)    Competitive price for the services offered along with demonstrating its overall effectiveness in the delivery of works under contract.

Tender Advisory Group Comments

The objective of the Tender Advisory Group (TAG) is to support the Council to achieve fair and equitable tender processes. The TAG, consisting of Brian Steffen - Director City Services, Glenn McCarthy - Governance Manager and Neil Farquharson – Financial Services Manager were briefed by the Design & Projects team about the background and the process followed.

 

The TAG considered the recommendations in relation to the tender for the construction of the Civic Centre Ground Floor Refurbishment, Stage 1 noting that Hunter Mason Pty Ltd demonstrated their ability to meet Council’s requirements, their proposal was the lowest cost and considered to be the most advantageous to Council. The TAG reviewed the evaluation process outlined within the report and is satisfied that the selection criteria have been correctly applied in making the recommendations.

Financial Implications

Included in the assessment of tenders was the commissioning of independent reference checks, financial analysis, and performance analysis on Hunter Mason Pty Ltd. These checks were recently completed by Equifax Australasia Credit Ratings Pty Ltd and have been reviewed by Financial Services. Based on this review, no concerns were raised as to the ability of Hunter Mason Pty Ltd to perform the works described.

 

The 2020-21 Operational Plan includes an allocation for Civic Centre Renewal Works under the Building Asset Renewal Program. There is sufficient budget within this project to fund stage 1.

 

Risk Implications

The tender process outlined in this report includes control regarding probity and ensuring value for Council, overseen by the Tender Advisory Group.  The recommended contractor utilises ISO certified quality, safety and environmental systems and has experience operating within occupied premises.

Conclusion

The Tender Evaluation Committee is in the opinion that Hunter Mason Pty Ltd provided the most advantageous tender and it is recommended that they be awarded the contract for a sum of $1,277,434.91 excluding GST.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on RFT20/21-01 Civic Centre Ground Floor Refurbishment - Stage 1 be received

2.     Hunter Mason Pty Ltd be awarded the contract subject to the execution of a formal agreement for Civic Centre Ground Floor Refurbishment – Stage 1, for an amount of $1,277,434.91 excluding GST.

3.     The Common Seal of the Council of the City of Penrith be placed on all documentation if necessary.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                        28 September 2020

 

 

 

9

Penrith Rising Strong - COVID-19 Recovery Plan   

 

Compiled by:               Rebekah Elliott, City Engagement Coordinator

Authorised by:            Jeni Pollard, City Activation, Community and Place Manager

Kylie Powell, Director - City Futures  

 

Outcome

We have safe, vibrant places

Strategy

Help make our major centres and important community places safe and attractive

Service Activity

Support the revitalisation of Penrith City Centre and St Marys Town Centre

      

 

Executive Summary

The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic has been significant for our local community and economy. Penrith City Council has an important role to play at a local level in supporting a strong economic recovery and ensuring that social and community services are meeting the changing needs of our population. It is now more important than ever to be building a sense of solidarity across our communities and as we emerge from the COVID-19 crisis, work together to ensure a resilient and effective response to recovery for our community. 

 

Penrith Rising Strong Recovery Plan (Attachment 1) is the next step we will take together over the coming 12 months to continue shaping the future of our City and the communities that live, work, invest, study and visit here. It builds on the initial support package for our communities and businesses released by Council over March and June 2020. This recovery plan continues to provide support where it is needed most.

 

This report recommends that the information contained in the Penrith Rising Strong COVID-19 Recovery Plan be received.

Background

The short-term response to COVID-19 from a government perspective has been a focus on containment, treatment, and economic survival, with the greatest impacts of the crisis being observed in some of the most vulnerable communities. Whilst restrictions have eased in NSW over some months now, the situation continues to change and the recent lockdown in Victoria has provided a stark reminder of the fragility of our situation. 

 

As we deal with these presenting concerns, we need to keep our City and community focused on the economic and social recovery, supporting local business and the most vulnerable of our community. 

 

In the longer term, we need to continue to build our resilience to be adaptive to rapid change and work as one with our community to ensure that they have the support to rebuild our local economy and community connectedness.

 

As a Council we are well placed to work with key stakeholders and our community to lead and deliver a planned response to ensure that Penrith not only recovers but rises strong.

Current Situation

The Penrith Rising Strong Recovery Plan provides a citywide approach to support recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic. This document has been developed as a living document which will be amended and updated as required, particularly given the various unknown elements of how the virus will progress and the measures that may need to be taken to respond.

 

The goals of the plan are to:

 

·    Assist in the recovery at a social, built, economic, cultural and environmental level.

·    Support the community to be informed, engaged, supported and connected.

·    Ensure the local economy is well positioned to rebound from the impacts and supported to thrive in the longer term.

·    Understand and promote the identity and opportunities that exist within Penrith.

·    Support the local sectors to respond to economic and social impacts.

·    Ensure the community has a high level of awareness of the City’s activities throughout the response and recovery phases and how it can assist.

 

The Plan has been developed based on input and feedback from members on the Social Taskforce and Economic Taskforce along with data from a survey’s undertaken with the local community sector and a survey with local businesses over the months of May and June 2020.

Social Taskforce and Economic Taskforce

Council established the Penrith Social Recovery Taskforce and the Penrith Economic Recovery Taskforce to accelerate sustainable economic, social, and environmental recovery in Penrith from the COVID-19 pandemic. The purpose of each taskforce is to bring together key representatives and partners to develop and guide local solutions to support the recovery of the City. The taskforce membership is included in the attached plan.

 

The taskforces have developed and collaborated on responses to the COVID-19 impacts on our city and were established to act as a conduit to Council, industry bodies, other organisations and government. The meetings have been held online and have focused on the role of the taskforces, sharing information on current challenges and what can be done to support Penrith’s social and economic recovery.

 

Ideas raised via the Taskforce were to promote and encourage support for local businesses, host more local events and Buy Local promotions, promote local volunteering options and the availability of local services as well as supporting strategies for face to face engagement.

30 Day and 100 Day Recovery Plan

Each taskforce has focussed on helping develop a 30 Day and 100 Day Recovery Plan to ensure a coordinated response to the recovery efforts and focused on supporting resilience in the Penrith local community. Many of the actions identified in the 30 Day Recovery Plan build toward the delivery of the 100 Day Recovery Plans.

These plans were developed with information gleaned from surveying of the local business sector as well as local community organisations.  This data, along with information brought forward from the taskforce members has helped to develop the Penrith Rising Strong Recovery Plan.  

The Social Recovery Plan focuses on the following key themes:

·    Community Capacity Building

·    Community Resilience

·    Financial Support

·    Organisational Capacity Building

·    Community Engagement

The Economic Recovery Plan focuses on the following key themes:

·    Marketing and Promotion

·    People and Movement

·    Financial Support and Incentives

·    Arts and Cultural Opportunities/Events

·    Investment Attraction

Financial Implications

Actions associated within the Recovery Plan will be delivered within the existing Operational and Delivery Program for 2020-2021. Should the need arise for any new programs or initiatives, the existing processes for requesting new funds will apply.

Risk Implications

There are no significant risks for Council associated with this report. All project risks will be managed by Council staff through risk management procedures.

 

The plan has been developed as a living document which will be amended and updated as required, particularly given the various unknown elements of how the virus will progress and the measures that may need to be taken to respond.

Conclusion

Council is proud to be working with the Social Taskforce and Economic Taskforce to lead Penrith City’s post-pandemic recovery to regain strength and build resilience into our economic and social structures. 

 

The implementation of Penrith Rising Strong and the associated 30 Day and 100 Day Recovery Plan are to be finalised by April 2021, within 12 months of the establishment of the Social Taskforce and Economic Taskforce.

 

As a Council we are well placed to work with key stakeholders and our community to lead and deliver a planned response to ensure Penrith not only recovers but rises strong.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the Penrith Rising Strong - COVID-19 Recovery Plan be received

2.     Council endorse the Penrith Rising Strong, COVID-19 Recovery Plan

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

DRAFT Penrith Rising Strong COVID-19 Recovery Plan

28 Pages

Attachments Included

   


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


 

 

Outcome 5 - We care about our environment

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

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Outcome 6 - We are healthy and share strong community spirit

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

10      Youth Action Plan 2020-2025                                                                                          51

 

11      ReAnimate Penrith 2020                                                                                                  62

 

12      Great River Walk, Nepean Ave Shared Path                                                                  68

 

 

 

 

 



Ordinary Meeting                                                                                        28 September 2020

 

 

 

10

Youth Action Plan 2020-2025   

 

Compiled by:               Katerina Tahija, Youth Development Officer

Authorised by:            Jeni Pollard, City Activation, Community and Place Manager

Kylie Powell, Director - City Futures  

 

Outcome

We are healthy and share strong community spirit

Strategy

Help build resilient, inclusive communities

Service Activity

Develop effective responses to the impacts of growth, redevelopment and change in our community

      

 

Executive Summary

The purpose of this report is to inform Council about the Youth Action Plan 2020-2025. 

 

The Youth Action Plan (YAP20-25) is informed by young people’s ideas, thoughts and priorities that were gathered from the youth needs survey in 2020. The broad survey results were reported to Council’s Ordinary meeting on 22 June 2020. Further to this, Council received information on the draft action plan at the briefing held on 21 September 2020.

 

The YAP20-25, found in Attachment 1, identifies four themes under which objectives and actions have been grouped. These themes are connection, well-being, pathways and access. Council will be the lead agency for implementation of the YAP, working in partnership with other organisations. There will be ongoing opportunities for young people to be involved in implementing the YAP.

 

The report recommends that Council receive this information.

Background

Penrith City Council is committed to engaging with all members of the community in decisions that impact their lives and their future. One group, young people aged 12 – 25 years of age, face many challenges in their day to day lives and Council has taken the opportunity to listen to, understand, and develop innovative responsive actions to meet their needs and aspirations.

 

To ensure young people’s voices are heard, Council has reached out and engaged with a diverse range of young people, representing different ages, subcultures, interests, and priorities. This engagement was undertaken via an online survey on Council’s Your Say Penrith website. The survey was distributed widely on social media, community and youth networks, local radio as well as through local services.

 

There were 280 young people who participated in the survey which was promoted using a number of online activities and platforms. Whilst some young people do not have access to online resources, for many, this is the ideal way to communicate. They are part of the most technologically literate and socially empowered generation ever and are very comfortable engaging this way.

 

The survey has identified several broad themes that are important in young people’s lives and this process has informed the development of the Youth Action Plan 2020-25. This action plan has identified and prioritised needs, thoughts, and aspirations of young people as our City changes and has developed responsive and innovative actions to address these needs.

 

The Youth Action Plan 2020-2025

 

The Youth Action Plan 2020-25 (YAP20-25) has been developed to respond to the needs of young people as identified in the youth survey.

 

The principles that are guiding this YAP 20-25 are that:

 

1.   Young people are listened to,

2.   Young people have an opportunity to fully participate in the community,

3.   Young people have the opportunity to influence planning, implementation and set direction for their future, and

4.   Access, equity and inclusion practices are utilised.

 

The themes identified fall broadly into the following four areas:

 

Theme 1 Connections

Young people have opportunities to feel connected to each other and the broader community through participation in social, cultural and environmental projects and activities.

 

This includes opportunities for young people to participate in youth focused activities and events, formal and informal sporting groups, engagement with arts and culture groups/activities and involvement in environmental and sustainability projects.

 

Research will be undertaken with young people to identify what barriers young people are experiencing that challenge participation and what further actions need to be undertaken to improve involvement.

 

Theme 2 Well-Being

Young people have opportunities to be active, safe and make lifestyle choices that support physical and mental well-being.

 

Key to this theme is for young people to be able to engage with services and activities that support well-being including sport and mental health services and to seek assistance as required.

 

Delivery of programs that encourage early intervention and prevention to reduce harm to young people will be the framework for this theme.

 

Theme 3 Pathways

Young people have meaningful pathways to what they need now and for their future.

 

Access to education, training and employment can have profound impacts on the long-term well-being of our community. This theme will seek to identify barriers that young people face regarding school retention and seeking employment and put into place appropriate resources to support positive outcomes.

 

Access to stable, safe and affordable housing now and into the future and improved pathways for young people to secure accommodation will also be explored.

 

Theme 4 Access

Young people have access to services that are appropriate, affordable and available with well trained staff and the local service sector is well coordinated.

 

This theme will explore opportunities for services to work together to increase awareness of services and programs that are locally available and promote the good work of local services.

 

Provision of up to date information on the demographic profile of young people to assist in service planning will also be addressed.

 

The YAP 20-25 identified the objectives and actions under each of the themes. The YAP also outlines timeframes, lead and supporting organisations, how implementation will be measured and tracking of the status of each actions.

 

Implementation

 

Council officers in the City Activation, Community and Place Department will work with other Council departments, community and youth organisations, and businesses to deliver outcomes with young people through the implementation of this YAP 20-25.

 

An important consideration in the development of the YAP has been ongoing measurement of outcomes. One of the first actions to be completed will be a Snapshot to profile the demographic characteristics of young people in Penrith.

The Snapshot will also include information and data relating to the YAP 20-25 key theme areas and will assist in measuring trends and the impact of the proposed actions

 

The implementation of this YAP 20-25 will be informed by research, best practice framework, innovation and ongoing engagement with young people and the service sector. There will be opportunities to build the capacity of services to meet young people’s needs through interagencies, sector support and training. There will also be ongoing opportunities for consultation with young people and the service sector to capture changing needs and service gaps.

 

Progress on the implementation of the YAP20-25 will be reported annually to Council.

 

Financial Implications

 

Projects to deliver outcomes for young people and the community will be identified through the implementation of the Youth Action Plan 20-25. Identified projects will be delivered within existing Operational and Delivery Program funding or Grant funding opportunities that may arise. Should the need arise for additional funds, the existing processes for requesting new funds will apply.

Risk Implications

There are no risk implications for Council associated with this report.

 

Conclusion

 

Penrith City Council is committed to engaging with all members of the community in decisions that impact their lives and their future. One group, young people aged 12 – 25 years of age, face many challenges in their day to day lives and Council has taken the opportunity to listen to, understand and develop innovative, responsive actions to meet their needs and aspirations.

 

This Youth Action Plan 20-25 identifies the needs, thoughts and aspirations of young people prioritized into four broad themes, with clear objectives and actions for delivery. Implementation of these actions will be delivered working in partnership with others as identified. These actions will be measured to track the status and progress of implementation.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Youth Action Plan 2020-2025 be received.

2.     Council endorse the Youth Action Plan 2020-2025.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

Youth Action Plan 2020-2025

7 Pages

Appendix

  


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                      28 September 2020

Appendix 1 - Youth Action Plan 2020-2025

 

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Ordinary Meeting                                                                                        28 September 2020

 

 

 

11

ReAnimate Penrith 2020   

 

Compiled by:               Colin Dickson, Events Team Leader

Authorised by:            Jeni Pollard, City Activation, Community and Place Manager

Kylie Powell, Director - City Futures  

 

Outcome

We are healthy and share strong community spirit

Strategy

Help build resilient, inclusive communities

Service Activity

Conduct and support events that include all members of our community

      

 

Executive Summary

The purpose of this report is to inform Council on plans for ReAnimate Penrith 2020 that is being held in the Penrith City Centre during the month of November. An update on the development of this innovative program was presented to a Councillor Briefing on 7 September.

As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, current government health advice prevents us from holding events as we have in the past, meaning Council will be unable to hold the Real Festival this year in its usual format at Tench Reserve.

As we continue to work with and adapt to changing COVID-19 restrictions our efforts have been focused on the economic and social recovery of our community, supporting local businesses and those most vulnerable in our community. One of the results of those efforts is the emergence of ReAnimate Penrith 2020, an exciting new activation that is set to transform the Penrith City Centre into an unexpected wonderland of art, exploration and fun for all ages. This unique activation that fits within the current health advice from the NSW Government will see a program come to life that activates and enhances the Penrith City Centre, providing an opportunity for community connection, local business support and the celebration of our local identity, all via a digital arts platform. A smaller program of activations is also being planned for St Marys this year in October, supported through the Magnetic Places program.

The report recommends that the information on ReAnimate Penrith 2020 be received.

Background

As a result of the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, current health advice prevents us from holding activations and events as we have in the past. However, the reasons why we hold them are still very important, now more so than ever.

Reinforcing the decision to deliver a safe community activation for our residents has come from feedback from the new Economic and Social taskforces established to guide Penrith on its road to recovery in the wake of COVID-19. It has also come from surveys undertaken with the local community and business sectors over the months of May and June 2020 to inform the work of the two taskforces. Survey results indicated the importance of activations and events to safely encourage foot traffic within the centres and to support community connection.

In light of the circumstances we find ourselves in, and rather than cancelling altogether, we have reimagined how we can deliver activations and community engagement opportunities to the people of Penrith.

This has involved investigating a range of alternative programming and audience capacity options to ensure we are able to produce the safest activation possible, as well as taking into consideration the vibrant and interactive brand that Real Festival has built over the past four years.

Over recent months, Council’s Events team have been working to plan an activation for our community that adheres to government guidelines whilst keeping everyone safe. This activation is Re-Animate Penrith 2020 and will feature program elements that can be rolled out in phases, pending current health advice, or can be postponed or rescheduled at the last moment, should further restrictions be introduced.

 

Re-Animate Penrith 2020 is set to transform the Penrith City Centre into a gallery of art, exploration, technology and fun. Visitors will be able to immerse themselves into a new animated world as the streets of the city centre come to life with augmented reality artworks, cultural experiences and whilst there, take advantage of some of Penrith’s cafes, bars and restaurants. Throughout the entire planning and development phase of this new initiative, Council has worked very closely with the Penrith CBD Corporation and local business owners both of whom have been very supportive. We are also working within the NSW Government COVID-19 health guidelines.

Residents and visitors to the city centre will be able to take an animated ARtwalk and along the way discover incredible activated artworks and see our streets come to life in colour in an outdoor created public art gallery from acclaimed artists whose works have been installed and exhibited both nationally and internationally.

The outdoor public art gallery will comprise a series of commissioned site-specific public murals that will transform key redevelopment and project sites within our city centre, providing a vision into the future of our city and forming a backdrop to the future City Park. These giant murals that will adorn our city centre not only align with a number of current major Council projects, they will also bring a vibrancy and colour that has not been seen before. They will add value to the cultural, aesthetic and economic vitality of our community at a time when it is so desperately needed.

These extraordinary times we are living through have had a significant effect on the lives of many in our community. Many people have been faced with social isolation and local businesses, performers and artists in the creative industries have seen their livelihoods almost disappear. Re-Animate Penrith 2020 provides us with the unique opportunity to engage our local community and provide them with accessible art experiences and some relief from the social isolation they have been experiencing.

The public art that will be brought to the Penrith City Centre during the month of November will contribute to our City’s identity, foster community pride and a sense of belonging while importantly enhancing the quality of life for our residents and visitors alike. Long after Re-Animate 2020 concludes these artworks will remain as a legacy for people to continue to enjoy as we recover from this health crisis.

ReAnimate Penrith 2020 Objectives

There are three objectives for ReAnimate Penrith:

1.   Community Connection

·    Provide opportunities for social engagement through collaborative and interactive art experiences,

·    Enhance the health of the community through interactive activities and experiences creating positive mental health connections in a time where many have felt isolated,

·    Enliven and enhance public spaces by creating safe, vibrant places for the community to enjoy,

·    Build local identity and pride of place to develop social capital (connections through shared experiences) and bridging capital (links between different communities),

·    Provide a platform for Council to effectively engage with our community.

 

2.   Supporting Local Businesses and Organisations

·    Promotion of local talent and businesses who are part of the culture and vibrance of our City, many who have been negatively affected by COVID-19,

·    Economic Impact Outcomes and CBD Activation Spaces - programming experiences for people to enjoy, interact with and share,

·    Activate public spaces and bring audiences into Penrith’s vibrant city centre.

 

3.   Art and Culture

·    Providing employment and much needed support for an industry sector that has been severely affected by the pandemic,

·    Providing a creative platform for local and Sydney artists to create and share their talents to diverse audiences,

·    Skill sharing and partnership opportunities,

·    Celebrate art and provide opportunities to connect, learn and share experiences.

The Program

ARtwalk

To assist in the delivery of Re-Animate Penrith, the Council Events team are working closely with Catalyst - a technology innovation company that specialises in the creation of immersive content and experiences across virtual and augmented reality (AR) and online gaming experiences to develop a bespoke user platform with augmented reality animations.

Together with the Events team, visual and digital artists, and Catalyst’s animation and development teams, 2D & 3D site specific augmented reality animations will be created which will form the Re-Animate Penrith 2020 ARtwalk.

Audiences will make their way throughout the city centre, exploring their city in a new way, discovering through their mobile devices, incredible activated artworks from local and national artists and animators.

The bespoke application can be downloaded for free from either Google Play or the AppStore and is accessible on any smart device. The downloadable AR app will incorporate Re-Animate Penrith 2020 branding assets which will also be rolled out through the event marketing campaign. The app will also have the capability to record images of the user interacting with the AR to share on social media platforms.

The AR animations where possible will be site specific, paying reference to businesses located along High Street, creating connections to the business owners, their products or services. 

Mural Installations

Bringing accessible art and colour to our city centre will be a curated outdoor public art gallery that will feature a series of site-specific public murals that have been commissioned by some of Penrith and Australia’s most prominent mural artists. All of the artists have significant experience in painting large scale artworks and each work will be new and not have been displayed in another public forum.

In total, seven mural commissions will be commenced in the days prior to the activation and then completed live on site. These site-specific public murals will transform the City Park site, providing a vision into the future of our City and form a backdrop to enjoy once the park has been completed. Some of the murals commissioned will promote current Council projects such as Cooling the City and Urban Greening and our Waste Services program featuring 10 years of the Food Organics Garden Organics (FOGO) green-lidded bin and their new waste sorting campaign.

Some selected artworks will also be included as part of the Augmented Reality ARtwalk which will see the artists collaborate with animators to brIng their artworks to life. The AR technology will provide a digital layer to the two-dimensional artworks unlocking fully immersive audience experiences that can be viewed by any smartphone or tablet.

It is intended that the murals will remain in situ for many years and will be protected with an anti-graffiti coating.

St Marys Town Centre

Leading into the delivery of ReAnimate Penrith 2020, a series of activations will take place in the St Mary’s Town Centre over the weekend of 22nd, 23rd and 24th of October. Building on the bold street art along Queen Street, there will be a series of small-scale activations and three public art installations commissioned via Council’s Magnetic Places grant program.

In light of COVID-19 related restrictions on social gatherings, the delivery of the Magnetic Places works in St Marys seeks to enable meaningful access and participation for residents during these challenging and changing times while uncovering positive narratives of their neighbourhoods through fresh and creative approaches. The program’s objectives remain the same, to amplify creativity, connection and vibrancy in older established neighbourhoods and to engage residents experiencing social isolation.  These activations and public art installations will aim to bring audiences into the St Mary’s Town Centre. 

Return on Investment (ROI)

As ReAnimate Penrith 2020 is free for the community it does not generate any sales revenue, so we are unable to calculate the ROI in terms of the activation itself as a financial generator.

In times like we have experienced this year as the world comes to grips with a global pandemic we have focussed on the consideration of ROI in terms of the benefits and support that this activation can bring to struggling local businesses from the increased foot traffic in the city centre. The social return and value generated from the increased community connection that has been lost in the current climate will also translate indirectly in the long term to a continued sustainable economic value to the community as the COVID-19 crisis eases. Additionally, and importantly, this activation can also contribute to the enhanced health of our community, who through interactive activities and shared experiences will create positive social connections at a time when so many have felt disconnected.

Financial Implications

Funds are currently available within the City Activation, Community and Place Department’s existing Operational and Delivery Program for 2020-2021. As the REAL Festival cannot take place this year due to current government health advice, funding from the REAL Festival is being reallocated to this event.

Risk Implications

The decision to hold an alternative activity in the Penrith City Centre, once it became obvious that Real Festival could not go ahead as usual was not one that was taken lightly. The health and safety of our community was, and always will remain our number one priority.

However, we also understand that the reasons why we hold these types of activations and events is now more important than ever and as the COVID-19 crisis slowly begins to ease it is most important to rebuild activation of our city centre.

Throughout the entire planning phases for ReAnimate Penrith 2020 the Events team have been working to ensure we deliver an exciting initiative for our community that will adhere to NSW Government COVID-19 guidelines, whilst keeping everyone safe.

Holding the activation in the city centre provides a greater footprint allowing audiences to experience the digital artworks whilst social distancing with an aim to bring foot traffic directly into businesses and shopping arcades along High Street.

The activation can be rolled out as totally contactless and can be experienced at any time of the day during the month of November. The AR experiences are enjoyed for a short duration, not encouraging long dwell times and feature limited contact with other patrons.

The app and animations are licensed for 12 months and can be made live, deactivated or reactivated at any time allowing for flexibility in the current everchanging landscape.

As part of the COVID-19 Safety Plan the ReAnimate app that is being developed will feature a way for people to register their contact tracing details so if required this information can be passed onto NSW Health authorities. The COVID-19 data collection platform that Council currently use for their facilities called Microsoft Customer Voice will be used for this purpose.

When people access the ARtwalk function of the app, they will be directed to the Council data collection platform which they will have to complete prior to gaining access to the AR function of the app. The details that will be collected are name and contact number.

The very nature of the way this activation has been set up will ensure it remains COVID-19 safe. For example, it takes place over one month, not a short period of time with many people congregated together at once. Also, there are different locations where the app can be activated from around the ARtwalk itself and participants can choose any time they wish to do the walk. Additionally, the bars and restaurants that participate in the program will be implementing their own COVID-19 safe plans. These will require patrons who enter their establishments to furnish them with the required information for contact tracing purposes prior to watching a unique AR animation come to life from their table whilst they are dining.

Council staff have been challenged to deliver an exciting activation that will bring people into the city centre in a way that is safe. To this end, the team has been actively working to build a program that will support local business whilst creating opportunity for the community to creatively connect with Council’s services all within safety guidelines established by NSW Government Health authorities.

Conclusion

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a significant and profound effect many local business operators and the members of our community in general.

The Real Festival as we know it is unable to go ahead this year but given the important role that activations and events play in supporting economic activity as well as social connection, the opportunity exists to deliver a number of activations in St Marys during October and in the following month to support a larger program in Penrith as restrictions ease.  

ReAnimate Penrith 2020 has been developed to give the Penrith community a brand new, safe and innovative activation that fits within the current health advice from the NSW Government during these unprecedented times. At the same time, it will support local businesses and organisations and bring our community together to once again celebrate what is special about our City.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the information contained in the report on ReAnimate Penrith 2020 be received.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                        28 September 2020

 

 

 

12

Great River Walk, Nepean Ave Shared Path   

 

Compiled by:               Michael Jackson, Design and Projects Manager

Adam Wilkinson, Engineering Services Manager

Patrick Robles, Finance Business Partner

Authorised by:            Brian Steffen, Director - City Services

Andrew Moore, Director - Corporate Services  

 

Outcome

We are healthy and share strong community spirit

Strategy

Provide opportunities for our community to be healthy and active

Service Activity

Plan and deliver Council's major capital projects for open space and recreation

      

 

Executive Summary

Nepean Avenue, Penrith forms part of the Great River Walk and serves as a crucial pedestrian link between Tench Reserve and the Yandhai Nepean Crossing. Since the opening of the Yandhai Nepean Crossing in 2018 and in light of the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic during 2020, pedestrian volumes have quickly increased with a recent survey that identified 500 pedestrian movements per hour during peak times.  In response to safety issues for walkers and other vulnerable road users including older people, families with young children and prams and people with limited mobility, the Nepean Avenue link has received support to deliver a number of temporary improvements to the road environment, and this report seeks to confirm funding of $2.5m for the implementation of the long term shared path solution which will include footpath and upgraded street lighting works.

Background

The Nepean River Precinct is one of Penrith’s most popular recreation areas and tourist attractions. The NSW government’s vision for open space identifies the extension of the Great River Walk from Fernhill in Mulgoa to the Penrith Lakes Parklands. The Great River Walk is identified in Sydney Green Grid and Nepean Avenue is identified in the Transport for NSW “Sydney’s Cycling Future” as a Priority Cycleway, being a component of the Great River Walk and the recreational path known as the “Bridge to Bridge Loop”. The Nepean Avenue section of the Great River Walk remains a critical missing link of off-road shared path in Council’s current strategic planning work including the draft Penrith Green Grid Strategy and draft Penrith Lakes Spatial Framework currently in development in 2020-21FY.

 

The public open space on both sides of the Nepean River, between and around the Victoria and M4 bridges is vital to our City and community.  The Penrith Great River Walk is 7km in length. The popular walk connects Emu Plains and Penrith across the award winning Yandhai Nepean Crossing and M4 Bridge. As this location becomes increasingly popular for residents, workers and visitors alike, there is a need to provide additional safety improvements to accommodate the volumes of vulnerable road users, especially pedestrians.

 

During the development of the ‘Our River’ Nepean River Master Plan in 2013, community consultation revealed the desire to improve access and circulation to the Great River Walk and destinations along the route. This included an action to deliver a dedicated footpath and/or cyclepath on Nepean Avenue. In 2016, Council presented four options to the community for a dedicated path. Council was successful in obtaining NSW government grant funding of $2 million to deliver the preferred option of four designs presented to the community. This however was not supported by Council with the funding being returned to the NSW government.

 

Infrastructure Investment

Since 2016, there has been considerable infrastructure investment made by all levels of government as well as private investment that supports the growth of this important Precinct including:

 

·    $10 million by the NSW Government under its The Parks for People to expand Tench Reserve and expand recreation and tourism precinct to improve circulation and parking, reduce user conflicts and upgrade recreation facilities and car parking

·    $400,000 by the NSW Government Metropolitan Greenspace Program to prepare the Penrith Green Grid and Penrith Lakes Spatial Framework in 2020-21

·    $49 million by the NSW Government to deliver ‘The Yandhai Nepean Bridge’ crossing that opened in 2018

·    $1.2 million package from the Federal Government’s ‘Community Safety Package’ that will install lighting along the Great River Walk from Jamison Road to Nepean Avenue in 2020-21

·    $24 million upgrade (jointly funded with $15 million by the Australian and NSW Governments and $9 million by Council) will deliver the Regatta Park precinct which is due for completion in 2022

·    $6 million by the State and Federal Government to provide a new three-lane boat ramp and additional trailer parking facilities at Tench Reserve

·    $270,000 by the Community Development Grants (CDG) Program to construct an extension to the rowing pontoon at Weir Reserve

·    $370,00 by Penrith City Council for the Shared Path along Tench Avenue

·    $8 million private investment to open ‘The East Bank’ café and restaurants at Tench Reserve in 2018

·    $2.6 million private investment to revitalize Emu Hall that opened in 2019

·    Log Cabin site is preparing to submit its development application in 2020-21

 

Great River Walk – Road safety review

In applying a Safer Systems approach, it is important to consider The Great River Walk in its entirety when reviewing road safety improvements for all users. The Movement and Place Framework encourages projects to consider movement to places; within places; and though places.

 

In reviewing the crash history, sadly on 28 April 2020 a pedestrian fatality occurred on River Road, Emu Plains that reignited a push for increased of pedestrian safety around the Nepean River Precinct and Great River Walk. Residents raised safety issues with people being forced to walk on the road with prams and bikes. A petition was created by residents in response to the fatality calling for extensions to the shared path on River Road. Council is currently delivering upgrades to this area.

 

Transport for NSW (TfNSW) reviewed the existing speed limit on Nepean Avenue and surrounding roads including Ladbury Avenue, Captains Road, Fitch Avenue and Recreation Avenue, Penrith in line with the NSW Speed Zoning Guidelines. The review recognised the areas important role as part of the Great River Walk and in response to an increase in pedestrians and cyclists on these roads during the Coronavirus pandemic. Following its review, the new speed limit of 40km/h on Nepean Avenue, Penrith and surrounding roads was in effect from Monday, 10 August 2020.

 

 

Emergency COVID-19 Measures to install ‘pop-up’ pedestrian infrastructure

No formal pedestrian infrastructure currently exists on Nepean Avenue. As such, significant numbers of pedestrians are forced to walk on the road, typically meandering in and out amongst parked cars along the western side of Nepean Avenue. This can cause potential conflicts and risk with motor vehicles. This situation is a clear safety concern and needs to be addressed both immediately and in the long term. To accommodate this growing demand, it was previously proposed to install a ‘Pop-up’ footpath treatment under the Transport for NSW (TfNSW) ‘Pop-up transport’ project, including the installation of flexible traffic barriers and delineation treatments. These temporary measures aimed at providing a safe dedicated passage for pedestrians, whilst at the same time supporting the required physical distancing. This temporary emergency response had the full support of TfNSW and was recommended by Council Officers. 

 

Consultation with affected residents and Councillors

Consultation was undertaken with Nepean Avenue residents and a briefing of Council was provided on 3 August 2020 through a report titled ‘The Great River Walk - Nepean Avenue, Penrith - Emergency Pedestrian Safety Improvements’ to consider the results of a petition and written submissions in relation to the Nepean Avenue proposal. No agreement was reached to proceed with the temporary pedestrian safety measures as recommended, or any other solution.

 

As such, at the Councillor Briefing on 10 August 2020, a report titled ‘Nepean Avenue, Penrith - Proposed Alternate Temporary Emergency Pedestrian Safety Measures’ was considered, in which an alternate set of temporary measures were proposed, subject to further consultation and Local Traffic Committee and Council adoption.

 

In response to the feedback received from Councillors and residents, an alternate set of temporary pedestrian safety measures are presented and include:

 

·    The removal of parking along the entire western kerb line of Nepean Avenue 

·    The installation of a continuous C3 yellow line along the lip of kerb to signify “No Stopping” in accordance with NSW Road Rules;

·    Installation of parking restriction advisory signage;

·    Installation of ‘40 kph Local Traffic Area’ reduce speed limit signage;

·    Bicycle logos along the middle of the road pavement and;

·    Installation of speed cushions.

 

The Local Traffic Committee at its 7 September Meeting supported the recommendations that community consultation be undertaken for the proposed alternate set of pedestrian safety measures on Nepean Avenue, Penrith and following consultation, the signage and line marking plan be endorsed for installation.

 

Long Term Permanent Solution

The measures described above are temporary emergency pedestrian management measures only. It is clear that Council needs to work quickly towards a longer-term solution.  Given the continued desire line along Nepean Avenue, and the significant volume of pedestrian traffic, a permanent 2.5m wide concrete shared path along the western side of Nepean Avenue is the most suitable design as shown in below image titled “Option 2: Shared Path With Edge Planting”. Given the desire to retain the substantive trees, the concept (identified in 2016 as Option 2) includes the narrowing of the carriageway via the relocation of the kerb out from its current alignment.

 

 

The purpose of this report is to confirm funding of $2.5m for the implementation of the long-term shared path solution which will include footpath and upgraded street lighting.

 

Financial Implications

 

Council’s s7.11 District Open Space Developer Contributions Plan (“Plan”) includes funding for the Great River Walk project. The Plan has been reviewed along with previous contributions to elements of the Great River Walk and required budget of $2.5m can be allocated for this project.

 

Once completed, the capital works will be incorporated into future asset renewal programs and a provision for ongoing maintenance will also be made as part of Council’s Annual Budget process.

 

Risk Implications

With pedestrian movements of up to 500 per hour along Nepean Avenue, along with buses, bicycles and vehicles there is a significant safety risk to pedestrians and cyclists at present.  With numerous large and mature trees already on the verge, installing a footpath on the roadside verge is not possible so a delineated pedestrian zone within the road width is essential to provide a safe pedestrian environment for this busy corridor.

 

The proposed design solution of footpath built over the road surface avoids root damage to existing mature street trees which is an important factor in terms of long-term tree health and for environmental outcomes in the city.

Conclusion

Design and construction of a separated footpath solution for Nepean Avenue will provide a significantly safer environment for the large volumes of residents and visitors who walk the Great River Walk Bridge to Bridge loop each day.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Great River Walk, Nepean Ave Shared Path be received

2.     Funding of $2.5m be allocated to the delivery of the Nepean Avenue shared path and lighting upgrades from the District Open Space Contributions Plan.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.  


Outcome 7 - We have confidence in our Council

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

13      Election of Mayor                                                                                                              75

 

14      Election of Deputy Mayor                                                                                                 79

 

15      Local Government NSW Annual Conference 2020 and Updating Council Meeting Calendar 2020                                                                                                                                  81

 

16      RFT2021-05 Digitisation of Council Application Records                                                86

 

17      Lot Consolidation of Colyton Neighbourhood Centre - 30 Jensen Street, Colyton (Amendment)                                                                                                                    94

 

18      2020-21 Financial Assistance Grant                                                                                99

 

19      2019-20 Draft Financial Statements                                                                              103

 

20      Summary of Investment & Banking for the Period 1 August 2020 to 31 August 2020 111

 

 

 

 

 

URGENT

 

21      Penrith Valley Regional Sports Centre - Request for funding                                       121

 

 

 



Ordinary Meeting                                                                                        28 September 2020

 

 

 

13

Election of Mayor   

 

Compiled by:               Avanthi Fernando, Governance Officer

Adam Beggs, Governance Coordinator

Authorised by:            Glenn McCarthy, Governance Manager

Stephen Britten, Chief Governance Officer  

 

Outcome

We have confidence in our Council

Strategy

Be open and fair in our decisions and our dealings with people

Service Activity

Promote ethical behaviour through awareness and advice and manage investigations of alleged corruption, maladministration or breaches of the Code of Conduct

      

 

Executive Summary

The purpose of this report is for the Councillors to elect a Mayor.  This report details the process for the election of a Mayor and the different methods of voting that a Council can resolve to determine how the Mayor is elected.  The report recommends that Council determine the method for the election of Mayor if more than one nomination is received.

Background

Section 230 of the Local Government Act, 1993 notes that the term of office of a Mayor elected by Councillors is for a period of 2 years. The last Mayoral election for the Council was held in September 2018 and is scheduled to be held this year when the 2-year term of the current Mayor expires.

 

Section 290 of the Local Government Act, 1993 requires Council elections to be held during September if this is not the first election of a Mayor within the Council’s term of Office.

 

Due to COVID-19 pandemic, this year’s Local Government election was postponed by the Minister for Local Government and rescheduled to be held in 2021. As a result, the Mayor elected at tonight’s meeting will hold office until the Local Government elections are held in 4 September 2021.

 

Returning Officer

 

The Local Government (General) Regulation 2005 – Schedule 7 provides that the General Manager (or a person appointed by the General Manager) is the returning officer for the election of a Mayor by the Councillors.

 

Nominations for Mayor

 

The Local Government (General) Regulation 2005 (the Regulation) provides for a Councillor to be nominated without notice for election as Mayor. However, the nomination must be in writing by two or more Councillors, one of whom can be the nominee. The nomination is not valid unless the nominee has indicated consent to the nomination in writing.

 

The nomination is to be delivered or sent to the Returning Officer (General Manager).  The nomination form can be delivered or sent to the Returning Officer up until the time of the election being conducted. Nomination forms have been sent to all Councillors prior to this meeting.

 

The Returning Officer is to announce the names of the nominees at the Council meeting at which the election is to be held.

 

Term of Office of Mayor

The term of Office of the Mayor is typically for two years. However, due to COVID-19 pandemic, the OLG has advised that the Mayor will hold office for one year until the Local Government elections are held on 4 September 2021.

 

Ballot

If only one Councillor is nominated for the Office of Mayor, that Councillor is elected. If more than one Councillor is nominated, the Council is to resolve whether the election is to proceed by open voting, ordinary ballot or preferential ballot. The election is to be held at the Council meeting at which the Council resolves on the method of voting.

 

In the Regulation the term “open voting” means voting by a show of hands or similar means, and “ballot” has its normal meaning of secret ballot.  In other words, the ordinary and preferential ballots are to be secret ballots.

 

Ordinary Ballot or Open Voting

If the election proceeds by ordinary ballot, the Returning Officer is to decide the manner in which votes are to be marked on the ballot-papers. The Formality of a ballot-paper under this Part is to be determined in accordance with clause 345 of the Regulation (copy appended to the report).

 

Council has had a long standing practice of utilising the Open Voting method and it is recommended this be continued to facilitate the election being conducted electronically.

 

The Office of Local Government has issued a circular confirming that the Open Voting method is the only method that can be conducted via an electronic meeting, and that should Council determine to use any other method than a physical meeting would need to be held.

 

Count in the case of 2 candidates

 

1.  If there are only 2 candidates, the candidate with the higher number of votes is elected.

 

2.  If there are only 2 candidates and they are tied, the one elected is to be chosen by lot (more information is provided on this process later in the report).

 

Count in the case of there being 3 or more candidates

 

1.   If there are 3 or more candidates, the one with the lowest number of votes is to be excluded.

 

2.   If 3 or more candidates still remain, a further vote is to be taken of those candidates and the one with the lowest number of votes from that further vote is to be excluded.

 

3.   If, after that, 3 or more candidates still remain, the procedure set out in subclause (2) is to be repeated until only 2 candidates remain.

 

4.   A further vote is to be taken of the 2 remaining candidates.

 

5.   The candidate with the higher number of votes is elected.

 

6.   If at any stage during a count under subclause (1) or (2), two or more candidates are tied on the lowest number of votes, the one excluded is to be chosen by lot.

 

Preferential Ballot

1.   The ballot-papers are to contain the names of all the candidates. The Councillors are to mark their votes by placing the numbers “1”, “2” and so on against the various names so as to indicate the order of their preference for all the candidates.

 

2.   The formality of a ballot-paper under this Part is to be determined in accordance with clause 345 of the Regulation.

 

3.   If a candidate has an absolute majority of first preference votes, that candidate is elected.

 

4.   If not, the candidate with the lowest number of first preference votes is excluded and the votes on the unexhausted ballot-papers counted to him or her are transferred to the candidates with second preferences on those ballot-papers.

 

5.   A candidate who then has an absolute majority of votes is elected, but, if no candidate then has an absolute majority of votes, the process of excluding the candidate who has the lowest number of votes and counting each of his or her unexhausted ballot-papers to the candidates remaining in the election next in order of the voter’s preference is repeated until one candidate has received an absolute majority of votes. At that stage the Councillor is elected as Mayor.

 

6.   An "absolute majority", in relation to votes, means a number which is more than one-half of the number of unexhausted formal ballot-papers.

 

Tied Candidates

 

1.   If, on any count of votes, there are 2 candidates in, or remaining in the election and the numbers of votes cast for the 2 candidates are equal - the candidate whose name is first chosen by lot is taken to have received an absolute majority of votes and is therefore taken to be elected.

 

2.   If, on any count of votes, there are 3 or more candidates in, or remaining in, the election and the numbers of votes cast for 2 or more candidates are equal and those candidates are the ones with the lowest number of votes on the count of the votes - the candidate whose name is first chosen by lot is taken to have the lowest number of votes and is therefore excluded.

 

Choosing by Lot

To choose a candidate by lot, the names of the candidates who have equal numbers of votes are written on similar slips of paper by the Returning Officer.  The slips are folded by the Returning Officer so as to prevent the names being seen.  The slips are mixed and one is drawn at random by the Returning Officer and the candidate whose name is on the drawn slip is chosen.

 

Result

The result of the election (including the name of the candidate elected as Mayor) is:

 

1.   to be declared to the Councillors at the Council meeting at which the election is held by the Returning Officer, and

 

2.   to be delivered or sent to the Chief Executive of the Office of Local Government and to the Secretary of the Local Government and Shires Associations of New South Wales.

 

Financial Implications

 

There are no financial implications for Council associated with this report.

Risk Implications

There are no specific risks associated with the election of a Mayor.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Election of Mayor be received

2.     In the event of more than one Councillor being nominated, Council determine to use the Open Voting method of election for the Office of Mayor.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                        28 September 2020

 

 

 

14

Election of Deputy Mayor   

 

Compiled by:               Avanthi Fernando, Governance Officer

Adam Beggs, Governance Coordinator

Authorised by:            Glenn McCarthy, Governance Manager

Stephen Britten, Chief Governance Officer  

 

Outcome

We have confidence in our Council

Strategy

Be open and fair in our decisions and our dealings with people

Service Activity

Promote ethical behaviour through awareness and advice and manage investigations of alleged corruption, maladministration or breaches of the Code of Conduct

      

 

Executive Summary

The purpose of this report is to report to Council the procedure and method of the election of a Deputy Mayor by the Councillors.  The report recommends that Council consider the election of a Deputy Mayor and determine the method for the election and term of Office of the Deputy Mayor. 

Background

Section 231 of the Local Government Act 1993 (the Act) makes the following provision for the election of a Deputy Mayor:

(1)   The Councillors may elect a person from among their number to be the Deputy Mayor.

(2)   The person may be elected for the Mayoral term or a shorter term.

(3)   The Deputy Mayor may exercise any function of the Mayor at the request of the Mayor or if the Mayor is prevented by illness, absence or otherwise from exercising the function or if there is a casual vacancy in the Office of Mayor.

(4)   The Councillors may elect a person from among their number to act as Deputy Mayor if the Deputy Mayor is prevented by illness, absence or otherwise from exercising a function under this section, or if no Deputy Mayor has been elected.

 

The election of a Deputy Mayor is not required by the Act but is for each Council to determine.

The balance of this report assumes the continuation of Council’s tradition and practice of electing a Deputy Mayor.

Nominations for Deputy Mayor

The Local Government (General) Regulation 2005 (the Regulation) provides for a Councillor to be nominated without notice for election as Deputy Mayor. However, the nomination must be in writing by two or more councillors, one of whom can be the nominee. The nomination is not valid unless the nominee has indicated consent to the nomination in writing.

 

The nomination is to be delivered or sent to the Returning Officer (General Manager). The nomination form can be delivered or sent to the Returning Officer up until the time of the election being conducted. Nomination forms have been sent to all Councillors prior to this meeting.

The Returning Officer is to announce the names of the nominees at the Council meeting at which the election is to be held.

 

Term of Office of Deputy Mayor

Where a Council does elect a Deputy Mayor, the term can be for the Mayoral term (two years) or a shorter term at the Council’s discretion.

However. due to COVID-19 pandemic, this year’s Local Government election was postponed by the Minister for Local Government and rescheduled to be held in 2021. As a result, the Deputy Mayor elected at tonight’s meeting will hold office until the Local Government elections are held in 4 September 2021.

 

Method of Voting

Council could resolve to use a different method of voting for the Deputy Mayor, however it has been Council’s practice to use the same method of voting for the election of both the Mayor and Deputy Mayor and in light of the pandemic and the holding of electronic meetings the recommended method of voting is Open Voting.

The Office of Local Government has issued a circular confirming that the Open Voting method is the only method that can be conducted via an electronic meeting, and that should Council determine to use any other method than a physical meeting would need to be held.


Financial Implications

 

There are no financial implications for Council associated with this report.

Risk Implications

There are no specific risks associated with the election of the Deputy Mayor.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Election of Deputy Mayor be received

2.     Council consider the Election of a Deputy Mayor.

3.     In the event of more than one Councillor being nominated, Council determine the Open Voting method of election for the Office of Deputy Mayor.

4.     The term of Office of the Deputy Mayor be for one year up to when the Local Government elections are held on 4 September 2021.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                        28 September 2020

 

 

 

 

15

Local Government NSW Annual Conference 2020 and Updating Council Meeting Calendar 2020   

 

Compiled by:               Avanthi Fernando, Governance Officer

Adam Beggs, Governance Coordinator

Authorised by:            Stephen Britten, Chief Governance Officer

Glenn McCarthy, Governance Manager  

 

Outcome

We have confidence in our Council

Strategy

Be open and fair in our decisions and our dealings with people

Service Activity

Promote ethical behaviour through awareness and advice and manage investigations of alleged corruption, maladministration or breaches of the Code of Conduct

      

 

Executive Summary

This year the Local Government NSW (LGNSW) will present its Annual Conference in an online format. This will allow members to come together, submit motions, vote and discuss key issues while still meeting COVID–19 health and safety requirements.

 

The conference will be held on 23 November from 8.45am. Participation at the online event is vital in order to ensure LGNSW can hold a valid, quorate conference. It is also essential that nominated voting delegates continue to register for the event as the conference will include voting. Councillor registration has already been confirmed and booked by Council staff.

 

The Association has written to Council to provide information about this year’s Conference including the structure of motions and topics to consider and the nomination of voting delegates. This report provides Councillors with motions for consideration and adoption.

 

The conference was originally scheduled to be held on 12 October. However, early this year LGNSW decided to reschedule the Conference due to proximity to the 2020 local government election (since postponed) and serious concerns raised by number of Councils; thus, the conference was rescheduled to be held in November and subsequently the decision was made to hold the conference electronically. As a result of this change, the conference date clashes with the Council meeting calendar, specifically the Ordinary Meeting scheduled to be held on 23 November.

 

While the Conference is now being held online, it is considered appropriate to move the Ordinary Meeting from 23 November to the 30 November, which otherwise had no meeting scheduled. The Council meeting calendar has been updated accordingly to reflect the new dates and is attached to this report to be considered and adopted at tonight’s meeting.

Background

Local Government NSW (LGNSW) will present its Annual Conference in an online format this year and will be held on 23 November 2020.

 

Over the years, Council has been very successful at influencing the development of state-wide LGNSW policy, particularly in the areas of planning, the environment, community planning, fire and emergency services, roads and transport and rating policy.

 

Council at its Ordinary Council Meeting on 27 July 2020 resolved that:

 

1.     The information contained in the report on Local Government NSW Annual Conference 2020 be received.

2.     Councillors Kath Presdee, Greg Davies, Karen McKeown OAM, John Thain, Kevin Crameri OAM, Tricia Hitchen, Bernard Bratusa, Brian Cartwright and Ross Fowler OAM be Council’s voting delegates for motions to attend the 2020 LG NSW Conference being held at The Crowne Plaza Hunter Valley, Lovedale from 22-24 November 2020

3.     Councillor Robin Cook be nominated as an observer to attend the 2020 LGNSW Conference.

4.     Leave of absence be granted as appropriate for those Councillors attending the conference.

5.     Council sponsor up to three (3) Aboriginal observers, nominated by the Deerubbin Local Aboriginal Land Council, to attend the 2020 Local Government NSW Conference.

6.     A motion be drafted for the LGNSW Conference reviewing the roles of Councillors in their community and their authority

Current Situation

Councils have been advised that for a motion to be included in the Business Paper they must meet the following guidelines:

 

1.   Are consistent with the objects of the Association,

2.   Relate to Local Government in NSW and/or across Australia,

3.   Concern or are likely to concern Local Government as a sector,

4.   Seek to advance the Local Government Policy agenda of the Association and/or improve the governance of the Association,

5.   Have a lawful purpose,

6.   Are clearly worded and unambiguous in nature, and

7.   Do not express preference for one or several members over one or several other members.

 

It is important to note that the Board will not include motions in the Business Paper which do not advance the local government policy agenda. Therefore, a motion will not be included if it is operational, rather than strategic; not local government business; focused on a local issue only or if the motion is consistent with past policies and actions of LGNSW or the Local Government and Shire's Association.

 

Accordingly, Council’s motions should relate to issues which are causing concern to the Council and/or the community. The motions should also suggest an appropriate solution by including either a motion which could be considered by the Conference or notes which might guide delegates to an agreed position.

 

Local Government NSW has advised that the submission of Council’s motions and any accompanying notes or motions for consideration at the Conference to be completed by 28 September to allow for assessment of motions and the distribution of Business Papers. Late submission can be made for a small period of time after this date.

 

The following motion has been prepared as a result of a councillor request. Should councillors wish for any further motions to be developed prior to the deadline, sufficient detail will need to be provided at tonight’s meeting and a recommendation passed accordingly.

 

Motion 1

 

Subject:    

Motion Wording:

That LGNSW advocate to the State Government addressing the issue of diminishing powers of Councillors in local government specifically through the introduction of several new bodies created by the State Government to replace the functions of Council.

That LGNSW also specifically advocate the return of the power of determination of development applications with a dollar value of less than 5 million dollars, to Local Councils in the Sydney and Wollongong areas.

Motion Details:

Certain powers, previously executed by Councillors on matters relating to local government areas and the community have been transferred to newly established authorities such as but not limited to:

•        Greater Sydney Commission

•        Western Parkland City Authority

•        Local Planning Panels

This overlooks the expertise, experience and representation of councillors who are intrinsically linked to their community. As a result, there is an erosion of representation by Councillors when making decisions on matters relating to its local government area and the community they serve.

Penrith City Council is urging LGNSW to advocate on behalf of local councils, to review the roles of Councillors and the limitations hindering their powers to carry out their work.

 

Financial Implications

 

There are no financial implications for Council associated with this report.

Risk Implications

There are no specific risks to Council associated with adopting the recommendations within this report.

Conclusion

Council has been successful in influencing State Association policy through its involvement in past Conferences. The Delivery Program for 2017-21 identifies Council’s role in monitoring the impact of emerging policies and seeking to influence State and Federal Governments through a strong advocacy role. Council’s attendance and involvement at the Local Government NSW Conference is one of the activities that contribute to achieving these delivery actions.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Local Government NSW Annual Conference 2020 and Updating Council Meeting Calendar 2020 be received

2.     The Motion detailed in the report be submitted for inclusion in the 2020 Local Government NSW Annual Conference Business Paper.

3.     The updated Council meeting calendar be adopted.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

2020 Meeting Calendar - Proposed Changes at 28 September 2020

1 Page

Appendix

  


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                      28 September 2020

Appendix 1 - 2020 Meeting Calendar - Proposed Changes at 28 September 2020

 

PDF Creator


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                        28 September 2020

 

 

 

16

RFT2021-05 Digitisation of Council Application Records   

 

Compiled by:               Kerry Hiatt, Information Management Co-ordinator

Authorised by:            Glenn McCarthy, Governance Manager

Stephen Britten, Chief Governance Officer  

 

Outcome

We have confidence in our Council

Strategy

Be open and fair in our decisions and our dealings with people

Service Activity

Mange Council’s records responsibly

      

 

Executive Summary

An open tender, RFT 2021-05 Digitisation of Council Application Records, was advertised with the tender being closed on 26 August 2020.

 

The records to be digitised are held in two Council storage locations, off-site at the Council Archives, 207-209 Queen Street, St Marys and on-site at the Civic Centre, 601 High Street, Penrith. The Archives records collection will be digitised first.

 

The Council Archives holds hardcopy records in the Application series from 1940 to 2000 and the Civic Centre Basement holds records continuing in this series from the year 2001 to 2009.

 

The Application records series is the most used, they are requested by Council staff to research past matters, aid in decision making and enable them to respond to Councillor and / or Customer requests.

 

Digitisation of records will enable Council to increase its compliance with legislative obligations, update and streamline business processes and will be a core component in increasing efficiency in customer service across Council.

 

Council sought Tenders for the supply of digitisation services for a contract period of two (2) years. This report advises Council of the outcome of the tender process and recommends that the tender from Grace Records Management (Australia) Pty Ltd be accepted for the full scope of works outlined in the Tender RFT 2021-05 Digitisation of Council Application Records.

Background

In 2006 Council moved from a paper-based system to an electronic document records management system (EDRMS) for all future records created and captured within the organisation. The legacy hardcopy records held in Council storage areas at that time were not considered to be retrospectively digitised and included with the digital records collection within the system.

 

Since their closure and 14 years after moving from the paper-based to the electronic based system the information from these records is still used regularly by Council staff. The more these files are requested, physically retrieved, transferred, handled, deconstructed then reconstructed and returned, the greater the deterioration and the greater the on-going cost in resources to manage and maintain them.

 

 

Over the years the hardcopy records that have been physically transferred, handled and given out on loan to Council staff have become:

 

·    damaged / degraded, and

·    missing / lost during file retrieval / return process.

 

The continual deterioration of these files over time will render them incapable of being digitised in the future and the files currently missing from the collection has resulted in lost information that cannot be reconstructed and is unavailable for scrutiny to address Council business.

 

As a result of the regular handling and age of the records, they now need to be preserved so that the content is available and legible for future access by Council.  To protect and preserve this information is to digitise it, this will create efficiencies, will enable immediate access and availability to Council staff at their desktops and will eliminate any further damage and loss of vital information needed to address Customers concerns or enquiries.

Current Situation

In November 2019 Digitisation of Council records was approved for implementation within the Council.  As a result of Council moving and aligning with contemporary systems for both current and future records, consideration should now also be given to the importance of incorporating past records.

 

Digitising these records will be very well received by all Council staff, the culture of the organisation is right for this project and there will be no necessity for change management or for staff to undertake any training.

 

Council Staff are familiar with using the digital recordkeeping system to access, search and retrieve digital information to perform their work.

 

The benefits of digitising far outweigh the current issues and risks experienced in keeping the system in hardcopy format.

 

Digitisation will deliver a value for money solution compliant with the State Records Act 1998 and Council’s business requirements that will convert the hardcopy records to digital format to enable Council to: 

 

·    better manage all information in digital format in one central system

·    simplify business processes and improve business productivity (through elimination of paper)

·    provide quick and efficient access to information for current business purposes and inform decisions and improve information delivery and customer response times

·    increase security and access control capabilities

·    decrease organisational risks

·    eliminate hardcopy file requests, manual tasks and time associated with the records,

·    free up space and reduce costs to store records 

·    save on any future proposed off-site storage that may be required if current storage is no longer available

·    protect and preserve records from further deterioration through physical handling and transfer

·    eliminate any further loss of information

·    enable disposal of hardcopy records after digitisation.

 

Tender Evaluation Process

A procurement plan detailing the tender governance, evaluation committee composition and evaluation method was prepared and approved prior to tender publication.

 

The Tender Evaluation Committee, consisted of Glenn McCarthy – Governance Manager, Kerry Hiatt – Information Management Coordinator, Michael Field – Archives Officer and Sarah Dean - Library Services Manager.

 

Laura Stott, from Council’s Supply Department performed the role of tender administration and probity for this tender.

 

In considering the best value for money, the evaluation committee assessed responses provided against the published criteria and evaluated these using a weighting method. Value for money denotes the solution that is most advantageous to Council in fit for purpose and cost.

 

The evaluation criteria advertised and used in assessing the tenders received included:

 

Criteria 

Weighting (%) 

Demonstrated Ability 

75 

Environmental Management 

5 

Quality Assurance 

5 

Local Supplier 

5 

Workplace Health and Safety 

10 

Tender Submissions

An open tender resulted in seventeen (17) companies making a submission. This tender is not a lump sum tender, the pricing submitted is based on a schedule of rates and estimated volumes to undertake the digitisation works.

Council provided tenderers with estimated volumes of files and plans held in both storage areas. To ensure that prospective Tenderers were able to view and quantify the records to be digitised, all 17 companies that made a submission attended an optional pre-tender briefing and inspection on 17 August 2020. The pre-tender briefing and inspection was recommended so that tenderers could visit both storage areas to inspect and quantify volumes to assist in estimating amount of digitisation work to be undertaken for pricing calculations.

Once pricing was received it was evident that there were a variety of unit rates and volumes used in the estimates of total cost. For example, some tenderers quoted for imaging on a per document, per file or per box basis while others used an hourly rate. Even when the same unit rate was used, the estimated costs varied widely, indicating differing assumptions as to the volume of documents to be scanned. It was necessary to apply a consistent volume for each type of unit rate in order to properly estimate the anticipated overall cost for comparison purposes. The following table shows the two-year cost of the project as estimated by the tenderer (if provided) and also on the volumes estimated by Council staff and applied across all tender pricing submissions.

A listing of the tenders received in apparent price order (tenderer estimate) is detailed below:

 

Company

Tender 2 Year Price Estimate

PCC 2 Year Price Estimate

Company Location

Owners / Directors

Australian Data Storage Pty Limited

$685,848

$1,575,248

1/5 Bon Mace Close Berkeley Vale NSW 2661 Australia

Simon Harris, Bridget O’Brien

IVE Group Australia t/a IVE

$1,014,317

$1,557,890

Building B 350 Parramatta Road Homebush NSW 2140 Australia

Geoff Bruce Selig, Paul Stephen Selig, Darren John Dunkley, Matt Aitken

Grace Records Management (Australia) Pty Ltd t/a Grace Information Management

$1,175,661

$1,307,969

4 Tucks Road Seven Hills NSW 2147

James E Thompson, Steven Brown, Warren Elsworth, Michael Hyland

The Information Management Group Pty Ltd t/a The Information Management Group Pty Ltd

$1,290,574

$2,599,606

Level 4, 210 Kings Way South Melbourne Victoria 3205 Australia

Mark Verbiest, Mark Troughear, Mark Rushworth, Kim Ellis, Peter Kean, Andrea Staines, Abby Foote

Manford Records Management Pty Ltd t/a Compu-Stor

$1,822,446

$1,549,325

11 Wheeler Street Belmont WA 6104 Australia

Peter Manford, Jeremy Manford, Robert Manford, Mark Lindsay, David Criag

State Archives and Records Authority of New South Wales t/a Government Records Repository

$2,828,741

$5,657.754

161 O’Connell Street Kingswood NSW 2747 Australia

N/A the GRR is the business unit of SARA, a NSW State Government Agency.

Corporate Cataloguing Pty Ltd

Not provided

$3,728,868

5/28-34 Roseberry Street Balgowlah NSW 2094 Australia

David Arnold Ford

Datacom Information Technologies Pty Ltd t/a  DatacomIT

Not provided

$7,613,190

94 Brighton Street Greystanes NSW 2145 Australia

Donald Beggs

Fuji Xerox Business Force Pty Limited

Not provided

$2,181,630

Level 5, 26 College Street Sydney NSW 2000 Australia

Brett Matthews, Keith William Grieves, John Anthony Eales, Hisanori Makaya, Mutsuki Tomono, Hiroki Yamamoto, Yujiro Nagasawa, Ken Sugiyama, Amane Inoue, Jin Chiew Leong

Futuristic Digital Pty Ltd t/a Futuristic Digital

Not provided

$2,559,650

7/19 Mitchell Drive East Maitland NSW 2323 Australia

Nicolas Thomas Hook

Infolink Pty Ltd

Not provided

$2,467,561

118 Stanhope Parkway Stanhope Gardens NSW 2768 Australia

Not Supplied

Iron Mountain Australia Group Pty Ltd t/a Iron Mountain   Group Pty Ltd

Not provided

$2,382,086

465 Plummer Street Port Melbourne Victoria 3207 Australia

Greg Lever, Stuart Dahlenberg

Mai-Wel Limited

Not provided

$2,725,721

PO Box 835 Maitland NSW 2320 Australia

Not Supplied

Microsystems Pty Ltd t/a Microsystems Pty Ltd

Not provided

$2,086,008

1/2 Parramatta Road Granville NSW 2142 Australia

Margaret Rose Townley, Gregory Townley, Russell Stuart Townley

Technocrat Pty Ltd

Not provided

$2,246,260

20 Woodbridge Street Marsden Park NSW 2765 Australia

Pranavkumar Patel

Techspirit Pty ltd

Not provided

$2,322,884

Unit 102 10-12 Burwood Road Burwood NSW 2134 Australia

Vishal Tapre

Zircodata Pty Ltd t/a ZircoDATA Pty Ltd

Not provided

$1,269,092

Level 4 973 Nepean Highway Bentleigh VIC 3204 Australia (NSW facilities at Campbelltown, Erskine Park and Newcastle)

Dennis Barnedt

 

The Tender Evaluation Committee thoroughly reviewed the response information provided addressing the weighted selection criteria of Demonstrated Ability, Environmental Management, Quality Assurance, Local Supplier, and Workplace Health & Safety. The emphasis at this stage of the assessment was on demonstrated ability, evidenced by examples of experience providing similar services.

 

Once evaluated, the tenders were shortlisted to the four (4) companies with the highest overall score against the selection criteria. The remaining proposals, including the apparent lowest price proposal by Zircodata Pty Ltd, were excluded as they did not demonstrate the same level of understanding of the project or did not provide examples of similar previous experience.

 

The shortlisted Tenders included:

 

· Australian Data Storage Pty Ltd

· Grace Records Management (Australia) Pty Ltd t/as Grace Information Management

· The Information Management Group Pty Ltd

· State Archives and Records Authority of NSW

 

The shortlisted Tenders were further reviewed in relation to effectiveness versus price (PCC estimate) resulting in the following overall ranking:

 

Company

Tender 2 Year Price Estimate

PCC 2 Year Price Estimate

Final Overall Ranking

Grace Records Management (Australia) Pty Ltd t/a Grace Information Management

$1,175,661

$1,307,969

1

Australian Data Storage Pty Limited

$685,848

$1,575,248

2

The Information Management Group

Not provided

$2,599,606

3

State Archives and Records Authority of NSW

$2,595,022

$5,657,754

4

 

As a result of the assessment of both the price and non-price elements of the proposals received, the Tender Evaluation Committee recommend Grace Records Management (Australia) Pty Ltd as the preferred tenderer based on their:

 

1)  Demonstrated ability to meet Council’s requirements,

2)  Competitive price for the services offered, and

3)  Overall demonstrated experience.

 

Grace Records Management (Australia) Pty Ltd was able to provide extensive answers to the tender questions and prove more advantageous to Council as a result of the evaluation of their responses, competitive pricing, past and current experience in delivering projects of the same works and services for other Councils.  This includes the digitisation of records at Canterbury Bankstown City Council and Fairfield City Council.

 

The Evaluation Committee is satisfied with their performance and reference checks have also returned positive feedback.

 

The contract proposed to be entered into with Grace Records Management (Australia) Pty Ltd is for the Digitisation of Council Application Records over a two (2) year period.

 

Grace Records Management (Australia) Pty Ltd have also offered an optional service to automatically register all output files directly into Council’s Information Management System.

 

This form of data delivery is via EzeScan Server – Nintex, this is the automatic ingestion and upload of Council’s metadata and files including metadata index fields. 

 

This option is greatly beneficial to Council as it will eliminate the need for data delivery on an external device and will significantly save on staff resources including cost and time to manually perform the capture of each scanned record into the Information Management System.

 

The pricing for this option is $37,650.

 

Financial Implications

Included in the assessment of tenders was the commissioning of independent reference checks, financial analysis, and performance analysis on Grace Records Management (Australia) Pty Ltd. These checks were completed by Equifax Australasia Credit Ratings Pty Ltd. Financial Services have reviewed the financial information provided by the tenderer and have not identified any reason why the contract should not be awarded. The report recommends acceptance of the tender by Grace Records Management (Australia) Pty Ltd.

The Tender Evaluation Committee recommend Grace Records Management at a cost of $1,175,661 to Digitize records with an optional service to automatically register all output files directly into Council’s Information Management System costing a further $37,650, Total Cost $1,213,311. 

                                                                                                                                               The 2021 Operational Plan established a budget to Digitize with an estimated cost of $1.1m noting that any additional funds required after the tender process would be drawn from Councils Reserves. As a result of the tender process an additional $113,311 will be required drawing down on reserves which represents a change to the original estimate.      

 

Tender Advisory Group (TAG) Comment

The objective of the Tender Advisory Group (TAG) is to support the Council to achieve fair and equitable tender processes. The TAG, consisting of Stephen Britten – Chief Governance Officer, Neil Farquharson – Financial Services Manager and Adam Beggs - Governance Coordinator were briefed by the Governance Manager and Information Management Coordinator about the background and the process followed.

 

The TAG considered the recommendations in relation to the tender for the digitisation of Council application records noting that Grace Records Management (Australia) Pty Ltd t/as Grace Information Management demonstrated their ability to meet Council’s requirements and their proposal was considered to be the most advantageous to Council. The TAG reviewed the evaluation process outlined within the report and is satisfied that the selection criteria have been correctly applied in making the recommendations.

Risk Implications

The digitisation of Council’s Application records will involve the packaging and transport of the records to the contractor’s premises, preparation and scanning, and uploading the scanned images to Council’s information management system. The risk of records being lost or damaged during the project will be managed through a risk management plan developed in consultation with the successful tenderer.

Conclusion

Based on the detailed evaluation of the tenders received, analysis of compliance to requirements, costs and reference checks, the Tender Evaluation Committee recommends that Council approve Grace Records Management (Australia) Pty Ltd as the preferred tenderer subject to execution of a formal agreement.

In alignment with the tender requirements the contract will be based on their Schedule of Rates pricing for a period of up to two (2) years with the option of the automatic registration of scanned records into the Information Management System.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on RFT2021-05 Digitisation of Council Application Records be received

2.     Grace Records Management (Australia) Pty Ltd be approved as the preferred tenderer to undertake the digitisation services for Council Application records based on the Schedule of Rates submitted and in accordance with this report.

3.     Approval be given to take up the optional service offered by Grace Records Management (Australia) Pty Ltd for the automatic registration of scanned records into the Information Management System.

4.     Approval be given for the Governance Manager to enter into a formal agreement with Grace Records Management (Australia) Pty Ltd subject to satisfactory agreement of terms as outlined in this report.

5.     The Common Seal of the Council of the City of Penrith be placed on relevant documentation if necessary.

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                        28 September 2020

 

 

 

17

Lot Consolidation of Colyton Neighbourhood Centre - 30 Jensen Street, Colyton (Amendment)   

 

Compiled by:               Laura Gray, Property Project Officer

Authorised by:            Nathan Ritchie, Property Development Manager

Andrew Moore, Director - Corporate Services  

 

Outcome

We have confidence in our Council

Strategy

Manage our money and our assets to be sustainable now and into the future

Service Activity

Provide property services and manage community and commercial requests for the use of Council owned or controlled land

 

Previous Items:           16- Lot Consolidation - Colyton Neighbourhood Centre - 30 Jensen St Colyton- Ordinary Meeting- 27 Jul 2020 7:00PM    

 

Executive Summary

Council at its Ordinary meeting of the 27 July 2020 approved the lot consolidation for the Colyton Neighbourhood Centre required in accordance with DA 20/0014. This report requests an amendment to the resolution to reflect the correct legal description of the subject lands.

Background

As part of the 2019 Asset Renewal Program, Colyton Neighbourhood Centre at 30 Jensen Street, Colyton, was programmed for upgrades to improve building accessibility, useability and amenity for both user groups and the wider Colyton community. A development application was lodged (DA20/0014) to undertake the works.

As the building is located across two allotments, condition 2 of the development consent required the consolidation of Lot 7 DP241128 and Lot 8 DP 244431. The proposed consolidation plan is attached as Appendix 1.

The proposed consolidation of the allotments represents no physical change to the external site boundary but provides rectification of the encroachment of the building footprint over existing internal allotment boundaries. Land Registry Services also require Council’s resolution and subsequent seal on the plan for registration purposes.

 

Financial Implications

A development application was lodged (DA20/0014) to undertake works at Colyton Neighbourhood Centre at 30 Jensen Street, Colyton, encompassing improvements to building accessibility, useability and amenity for both user groups and the wider Colyton community. A condition of the development consent requires the consolidation of Lot 7 DP 241128 and Lot 8 DP 244431 and as previously reported all costs associated with this consolidation are able to be funded from the Building Asset Renewal Program.

Risk Implications

The proposed allotments consolidation is considered to represent a low risk to Council.

 

Conclusion

It is recommended that Lot 7 DP241128 and Lot 8 DP 244431 be consolidated to meet the conditions of consent associated with DA20/0014 and enable the renewal of Colyton Community Centre.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Lot Consolidation of Colyton Neighbourhood Centre - 30 Jensen Street, Colyton (Amendment) be received

2.     Council approve the consolidation of Lot 7 DP241128 and Lot 8 DP 244431.

3.     The Common Seal of the Council of the City of Penrith be affixed to any necessary documentation.

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

Colyton Consolidation Plan

3 Pages

Appendix

  


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                      28 September 2020

Appendix 1 - Colyton Consolidation Plan

 

PDF Creator

PDF Creator



Ordinary Meeting                                                                                        28 September 2020

 

 

 

 

18

2020-21 Financial Assistance Grant   

 

Compiled by:               Ben Collins, Finance Business Partner

Authorised by:            Neil Farquharson, Financial Services Manager

Andrew Moore, Director - Corporate Services  

 

Outcome

We have confidence in our Council

Strategy

Manage our money and our assets to be sustainable now and into the future

Service Activity

Support financial sustainability through financial planning and budget management

      

 

Executive Summary

This report provides the Council with an update regarding the 2020-21 Financial Assistance Grant (FAG) from the Federal Government. The report recommends that the information be received, and the Budget be adjusted to reflect the revised FAG as part of the September 2020 Quarterly Review.

 

Council estimated a 2020-21 FAG of $10,988,008 based on the unadjusted prior year Actual FAG allocation with a conservative assumption of no increase. Advice has been received confirming Council’s 2020-21 FAG to be a total of $10,975,824. The FAG consists of two components; a General component of $8.47m, and a Roads component of $2.51m.

 

After Adjustments, this year’s grant is $36,166 below the estimate for the General component, and $23,982 above the estimate for the Roads component compared to what was included in the 2020-21 Budget.

 

It is proposed that these changes be incorporated into the September 2020 Quarterly Review to be reported to Council on 30 November 2020. Based on Council’s past practice, it is proposed this will include adjusting the Roads budget to match the actual FAG Roads component received.

Background

A significant part of Council’s annual revenue ($10.98m, (3%) in 2020-21) is derived from the FAG. Local Government FAGs are General Purpose grants that are paid to local councils under the provisions of the Commonwealth Local Government (Financial Assistance) Act 1995.

 

The allocation of the total National FAG figure to each State is determined by its projected share of the population for the General component, and a fixed allocation for the Roads component (29% allocated to NSW). The allocation within each State is then calculated utilising numerous social and economic factors to assess relative need in the local area compared to other areas of the State. In addition, an adjustment is required each year for the previous year’s grants that takes into account variations in the actual CPI and population shares compared to the estimates used to determine that year’s grants.

The calculation of the grant is a complex exercise and Council has no control over many of the factors.

 

Current Situation

In the initial stages of preparing the 2020-21 Original Budget, no increase on the 2019-20 actual grant received (excluding adjustments) was factored in for both the General component and the Roads component providing a total Original Budget of $10,988,008.

As part of a Federal Budget Initiative, an estimate of the first two quarterly payments to councils were brought forward and paid in June 2020.

Advice has now been received confirming Council’s 2020-21 FAG entitlement. The FAG allocated this year is $12,184 less than budgeted, comprised of $36,166 less for the General component, and $23,982 more for the Roads component, than estimated during the budget process.

 

The below table demonstrates the variability of Council’s allocation each year with the average change for the FAG being a 0.2% increase over the last five years. It is proposed that the Budget be adjusted as part of the September 2020 Quarterly Review to reflect the recent advice on the FAG allocation.

 

 

Financial Assistance Grant 2016-17 to 2020-21 by component

 

 

 2016-17

 2017-18

 2018-19

 2019-20

 2020-21 Actual

 2020-21 Budget

Total Financial Assistance Grant

10,422,533

10,870,772

10,979,178

10,907,962

 10,975,824

 10,988,008

General Purpose Component

  8,171,284

  8,543,844

  8,566,634

  8,442,862

   8,467,722

  8,503,888

Roads Component

  2,251,249

  2,326,928

  2,412,544

  2,465,100

   2,508,102

  2,484,120

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

% Increase / Decrease on prior year

 

 2016-17

 2017-18

 2018-19

 2019-20

 2020-21

 

Total Financial Assistance Grant

-4.09%

4.30%

1.00%

-0.65%

0.62%

 

General Purpose Component

-5.09%

4.56%

0.27%

-1.44%

0.29%

 

Roads Component

-0.27%

3.36%

3.68%

2.18%

1.74%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Financial Assistance Grant 2016-17 to 2020-21 by component

 

Future Considerations

The NSW Local Government Grants commission has been working over a number of years to refine and improve its calculations consistent with National principles and NSW policy to allocate grants, as far as possible, to councils with the greatest relative disadvantage; for example, those with small and declining populations, limited revenue raising capacity, and relative isolation. This year the commission faced challenges in redirecting funding due to the Commonwealth’s request to apply the minimum per capita grant and also due to substantially reduced CPI estimates.

 

Upper & lower variation limits for the General Purpose component are currently set at +5% and 0% respectively. The commission has previously indicated that it is looking to restore past variation limits which would see the lower limit move to -5%. Continuing implementation of the 0% floor will avoid additional uncertainty at this time.

 

The NSW Local Government Grants commission considers special submissions from councils in relation to the following years grants. The purpose of these submissions is to demonstrate the financial impact of inherent expenditure disabilities that are not recognised in the current methodology, these must relate to operational costs only and be completely beyond the control of council. Council officers have previously reviewed the calculations provided and identified that Penrith was fairly represented with respect to the factors contained within the formula. In addition, any variation to the existing factors could potentially have an adverse effect on Council’s grant.

 

Financial Implications

2020-21 Budgets are to be adjusted to reflect the revised FAG as part of the September 2020 Quarterly Review.

Risk Implications

Apart from the financial variation to the grant, there are no other direct risk implications. However, The Commission has advised councils to use caution when budgeting for the following year’s grant, especially in light of the current economic conditions which could see an extended period of reduced CPI and a need to restore pervious variation limits to retain the integrity of the funding allocation system. Should previous variation limits be restored Council could experience reductions of up to 5% to its General Purpose grant.

Conclusion

Council’s 2020-21 FAG will be $10.98m and is $12,184 below the estimate included in the 2020-21 Budget. It is proposed that the Budget be adjusted to reflect this as part of the September 2020 Quarterly Review.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on 2020-21 Financial Assistance Grant be received.

2.     The Budget be adjusted to reflect the revised Financial Assistance Grant as part of the September 2020 Quarterly Review.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

Financial Assistance Grant

15 Pages

Attachments Included

  


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                        28 September 2020

 

 

 

19

2019-20 Draft Financial Statements   

 

Compiled by:               Cheryl Freeburn, Operational Finance Coordinator

Authorised by:            Neil Farquharson, Financial Services Manager

Andrew Moore, Director - Corporate Services  

 

Outcome

We have confidence in our Council

Strategy

Manage our money and our assets to be sustainable now and into the future

Service Activity

Provide accurate information to Council and the community on council’s financial activities

      

 

Executive Summary

The draft 2019-20 Financial Statements for Council have been completed and will be presented at this Ordinary Meeting by Council’s external auditor. The Financial Statements are prepared by Council staff, using the accrual method of accounting and comply with Australian Accounting Standards and the New South Wales Local Government Code of Accounting Practice and Financial Reporting.

This report covers:

·    Addressing of the meeting by Council’s Auditor;

·    Legislative requirements;

·    Background to the Financial Policies;

·    Budget Performance; and

·    Summary of Financial Results.

Addressing of the Meeting by Council’s Auditor

Ms Karen Taylor, Director of Financial Audit Services for the Audit Office NSW, will be addressing the meeting. This is the fourth year that the Audit Office NSW has been Council’s auditor. Ms Taylor will outline the audit process and provide Council an opportunity to ask questions of the External Auditor.

Legislative Requirements

The Local Government Act requires the following steps:

 

1.   Council officers prepare the Financial Statements;

2.   Council issues a statement that the accounts are in order;

3.   Council refers the Financial Statements to its auditors for checking;

4.   The Auditor returns the Financial Statements with an audit opinion attached;

5.   The Financial Statements are placed on public display and the community may make submissions; and

6.   The Financial Statements are formally presented during a Council Ordinary Meeting.

 

Council officers have completed Step 1 by preparing the Statements and this report recommends completion of Steps 2, 3, 4 and 5 at tonight’s meeting. The auditors have received an advance copy of the Financial Statements and have now completed several weeks of their audit program. It is considered appropriate that Council issue the required statement for the 2019-20 accounts.

 

Current Situation

The Financial Statements have been prepared by Council officers, using the accrual method of accounting and comply with Australian Accounting Standards and the New South Wales Local Government Code of Accounting Practice and Financial Reporting. The Financial Statements are required to be audited by an independent auditor and lodged with the Office of Local Government (OLG) before 31 October each year. In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the OLG have extended the lodgement date for 2019-20 Financial Statements until 30 November 2020.

 

Council’s auditors commenced their audit on the 17 August 2020, with Council officers continuing to assist with the audit process. A draft copy of the Financial Statements was presented to a meeting of Council’s Audit Risk and Improvement Committee (ARIC) on 9 September 2020. At that meeting, it was resolved that:

 

“1.   The information contained in the report on the Financial Statements for year ended 30 June 2020 be received; and

2.   The Audit Committee refers the Draft 2019-20 Financial Statements to Council for signing subject to completion of the external audit and any resulting changes.”

All Controlled Entity consolidations and final audit adjustments, including the actions from ARIC, have now been processed and are included in the Financial Statements. The Draft Financial Statements are attached to this report.

Summary of Financial Results

The following figures provide a summary of the key results for 2019-20. A final copy of the Annual Financial Statements can be provided, once they have been adopted by the Council. Council’s financial performance is aligned with its continued focus on long-term financial sustainability.

 

The following figures provide a summary of the key results for 2019-20 compared to prior year:

 

Item ($’000)

2019-20

2018-19

Revenue (including capital)

281,085

294,926

Operating Expenditure

251,291

233,460

Net Surplus

29,794

61,466

Operating results before capital

3,542

11,804

Capital Grants and Contributions

26,252

49,662

Total Assets

2,501,095

2,164,312

Total Equity at 30 June

2,388,033

2,057,723

Total Borrowings

34,208

44,418

Cash and Investments

162,719

169,319

Key Indicators/Benchmark

 

 

Operating Performance Ratio/ > 0%

(0.21%)

5.81%

Own Source Operating Revenue Ratio/ > 60%

77.37%

70.76%

Unrestricted Current Ratio/ > 1.5x

2.45x

3.07x

Rates Outstanding Percentage/ < 5%

4.12%

3.37%

Debt Service Cover Ratio/ > 2

2.66x

3.3x

Cash Expense Cover Ratio/ > 3 mths

7.54

8.32

 

Council’s financial position as at 30 June 2020 reflects a solid performance by Council during the 2019-20 financial year, despite the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. Council finished the year with a surplus Operating Result before Capital Income of $3.5m compared to last year’s surplus of $11.8m, a variance of $8.3m. The majority of this variation relates to one-off expenditure of $6m for the purchase of new Domestic Waste bins in line with the commencement of a new 10 year contract, funded from the Domestic Waste reserve. Council’s overall revenue decreased by $13.8m, generally driven by the $23.4m reduction in capital revenues. Other variations included Investment properties fair values overall increasing by $5m, decreased revenue of $0.95m at Ripples due to the closure of facilities and decreases in revenues from Development Applications of $0.5m, predominantly due to the impacts of COVID-19. Employee expenditure has increased from $101m in 2018-19 to $113m in 2019-20 due to Award increases, growth in staff numbers of 29 employees in priority services such as Compliance, Waste, Planning and WH&S and a $5m increase in Employee Entitlements Provision as part of year end balancing ($3.2m relates to the increase in value of leave balances and a further $1.8m due to future rise indexation and the drop of the 10 year bond rates). Capital Grants and contributions have decreased by $23.4m, with the majority relating to subdivider dedication of assets.    

 

The Council’s outstanding loan liability has decreased to $34.2m ($44.4m in 2018-19). The Code of Accounting Update 22 for 2013-14 amended the indicators used in measuring debt servicing and introduced the Debt Service Cover Ratio. This ratio aims to measure the availability of operating cash to service debt (including interest, principal, and lease payments). The benchmark is greater than 2. For 2019-20, Council’s indicator was a favourable 2.23 (3.30 in 2018-19). Council’s revised Borrowing Strategy has also been a contributing factor by reducing the annual Infrastructure Borrowing Program from $2.2m to $1.0m in 2017-18, and in 2018-19 was reduced to be nil, two years earlier than originally planned (2020-21). Council continues to use Borrowings to fund priority Infrastructure Programs and Projects (including Council’s investment in Multi deck carparking at Soper Place), however Council’s level of debt is continually monitored to ensure it is sustainable without compromising service levels.

 

Council’s Investment policies and strategies have been effective in producing solid returns on ratepayers’ funds, however interest rates have been declining with drops in Official Cash rates. Council’s average return on investments for 2019-20 was 1.17% (2018-19 – 2.67%), which has outperformed Council’s benchmark (90 day BBSW) of 0.10%.

Detailed Key Indicators (calculations reported under Note 28a of Statements):

 

·    Operating Performance – measures Council’s achievement of containing Operating Expenditure within Operating Revenue. Capital Grants and Contributions, Fair Value adjustments, and reversal of Revaluation decrements are excluded. The benchmark is greater than 0%. In 2019-20, Council’s indicator was a deficit of 0.21% (5.81% in 2018-19) and did not achieve the Benchmark due to a decrease in operating revenue and one-off expenditure for the acquisition of new Domestic Waste bins contributing to the deficit net operating result.

 

·    Own Source Operating Revenue – is the degree of reliance on external funding sources such as Operating Grants and Contributions which can be an unreliable form of income. The benchmark is greater than 60% - a higher percentage means Council receives more of its revenue from Rates, Fees and Charges, and is less reliant on Grants and Contributions. In 2019-20, Council’s indicator was 77.37% (70.76% in 2018-19) which is better than Benchmark.

 

·    Unrestricted Current Ratio - Unrestricted Current Assets exceed Current Liabilities by a ratio of 2.45:1. This is better than the Office of Local Government’s benchmark of 1.5:1. This ratio is constrained each year by Council’s practice of forward funding s7.11 works in advance of Contributions by borrowings against Internal Reserves. For 30 June 2020, these borrowings amounted to $5.7m. Council’s adopted benchmark is 1.25:1 (including Internal Loans). Once this indicator has been adjusted for Internal Loans for Section 7.11 funding against Reserves, the adjusted Unrestricted Current Ratio increases to 2.57:1 which is again better than benchmark.

 

·    Debt Service Cover Ratio – measures the availability of Operating Cash to service our debt including Interest, Principal and Lease payments. The Benchmark for this indicator is greater than 2. For 2019-20, Council’s indicator was 2.23 (3.30 in 2018-19) which is better than Benchmark.

 

·    Rates OutstandingThe Rates Outstanding Ratio is an indicator that highlights the effectiveness of Council’s credit management practices. The ratio is 4.12% for the year ended 2019-20 versus 3.37% in 2018-19. Council continues to achieve a ratio better than the 5.0% benchmark, despite the challenges faced by the Covid-19 crisis and Councils compassionate response.

 

·    Cash Expense Cover Ratio – indicates the number of months a council can continue paying for its immediate expenses without additional cash inflow. The Benchmark is greater than 3 months. Council’s indicator for 2019-20 was 7.54 months (8.32 months in 2018-19) which is better than Benchmark.

2019-20 Budget Performance

As part of the March Quarter Review, an internal COVID-19 Impact Reserve was created. This Reserve initially resulted in a deficit balance for the Reserve as Council is only notionally funding from this Reserve against Council’s other internal unrestricted reserves.

 

Council’s June 2020 Quarter and 2019-20 Year End Review was reported to the Ordinary Meeting of Council on 24 August 2020. The COVID-19 impact has also been reviewed as part of the June Quarterly Review process with the final General Revenue impact for the year being $2.4m. As part of the June Quarterly Review, an annual Budget surplus of $550,969 was allocated to commence repayment of the internal COVID-19 Impact Reserve, resulting in the net internal COVID-19 reserve deficit being revised to $1.8m. Over the course of 2019-20, allocations have been made to various Reserves including $0.5m to the ELE Reserve and $0.5m to the Financial Management Reserve.

The June 2020 Review of the 2019-20 Operational Plan is available on Council’s website.

Key factors in the production of this year’s Financial Statements are discussed below.

Fair Value

Council concluded its move to Fair Value in the 2010-11 Financial Statements with the revaluation of Community Land. The OLG issued Circular (12-09) and confirmed the revaluation cycle of IPP&E to a maximum 5-year cycle (unless Council assesses there has been material changes to the valuations beforehand).

 

The revaluations for Roads and Drainage have been completed. The Road conditions were assessed by Infrastructure Management Services Pty Ltd and this was completed in February 2020. The assessed conditions data were uploaded into Council’s Pavement Management system (SMEC) to model the predicted future pavement and surface condition indices.  These condition indices were then used to determine the remaining life of the pavement and surface.  These indices were again then used to determine the Accumulated Depreciation, Written Down Value (fair value) from the Current Replacement Cost of the road pavement and surface. As part of the revaluation process all unit rates have been reviewed to reflect the current market rate. The new condition data collected for Roads were analysed by the SMEC consultant and the valuation reports were prepared.

 

The last Road revaluation process took place in June 2015 with an increase of $208m, drainage was a $3.6m decrease in value. The June 2020 increase is $86.8m for Roads and $218.7m for Drainage included in the 2019-20 Infrastructure, property, plant and equipment sections of the Financial Statements. The increase in value is reflected by the significant increase in the unit rates and the large amount of Roads and Drainage assets that have been dedicated to the Council by developers during the last five years.

 

The dates for the next round of valuations are listed in the table below:

 

Asset Class

Due

Community Land; Land under Roads

30 June 2021

Buildings

30 June 2022

Property, Plant and Equipment; Operational Land

30 June 2023

Roads, Bridges, Footpaths, Drainage

30 June 2025

 

Council’s Infrastructure Assets

During 2014-15 JRA was commissioned to provide a report to Council on its Infrastructure Assets. JRA provided their “Infrastructure Assessment Report” in June 2015. This report found that Council’s Infrastructure Backlog presents a manageable financial risk, with the Infrastructure Sustainability targets under Fit for the Future being achievable with a budget allocation of $75m of the forecasted $130m in asset growth directed to asset renewal over the next 10 years. Under this scenario, priority is allocated to maintenance, then high-risk renewal to optimise service and life cycle costs – as the amount of deferred renewal decreases, the amount of maintenance also reduces. This scenario and impacts are reviewed on an annual basis.

 

Under this approach, the backlog calculated is aligned with community expectations for affordable levels of service and remove upgrade / expansion amounts. Special Schedule - “Report on Infrastructure Assets” - in the Financial Statements has retained this methodology for 30 June 2020. The estimated cost to Bring to Satisfactory Standard stands at $24.2m as at 30 June 2020.

 

There are several indicators/ratios that are also shown in Special Schedule - Report on Infrastructure Assets:

 

Infrastructure Renewals Ratio – used to assess the rate at which infrastructure assets are being renewed against the rate at which they are depreciating. Council’s indicator in 2019-20 was 92.24% (71.69% in 2018-19). The Benchmark is greater than 100%. Achieving the 100% Benchmark is the long-term target for Council and includes significantly increased funds from 2019-20.

Infrastructure Backlog Ratio – shows what proportion the backlog is against the total value of Council’s infrastructure. Council’s indicator in 2019-20 was 1.51% (1.67% in 2018-19). The Benchmark is less than 2% and Councils actual result is better than the benchmark.

Asset Maintenance Ratio – compares the actual versus required annual asset maintenance. A benchmark ratio of above 1.0 indicates that the Council is investing enough funds within the year to stop the infrastructure backlog from growing. Council’s indicator for 2019-20 was 1.04, slightly above the Benchmark this year (0.94 in 2018-19).

Investment Properties

For 2019-20, Council has reassessed the investment property listing in accordance with AASB 140 Investment Property. Council purchased $10.6m worth of investment property during 2019-20. Council engaged Curtis Valuations to conduct a revaluation of its Investment Properties that resulted in a $5.058m increase to this asset class, with total Investment Properties currently standing at $39.5m.

Changes to Note Numbers and Titles

There have been several changes to note numbers and titles in Code Update 28. These changes are reflected in Councils’ 2019-20 Financial Statements.

New Accounting Standards

The AASB issued three new Accounting Standards that came into effect on 1 July 2019 and have an impact on Councils Financial Statements. The Accounting Standards are as follows:

·    AASB 1058 – Income of not-for-profit entities

·    AASB 15 – Revenue from Contracts with Customers

·    AASB 16 – Leases

 

The purpose of these new Accounting Standards is to align the AASB Standards with International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS). Compliance with the above three new standards results in compliance with IFRS. Reference to these new standards and Councils accounting policy are made in Note 1, 3,13 and 14 of Council’s Financial Statements for 2019-20.

 

Council officers have also communicated the impact of the new Accounting Standards to the Audit, Risk and Improvement Committee at the June and September 2020 Meetings.

 

Certain new accounting standards and interpretations (i.e. pronouncements) have been published by the Australian Accounting Standards Board that are not mandatory for the 30 June 2020 reporting period. Council has elected not to apply any of these pronouncements in these financial statements before their operative date, and this has been disclosed in Note 1 Basis of Preparation.

·    AASB 1059 Service Concession Arrangements: Grantors

This standard has an effective date for the 30 June 2021 reporting period.

·    AASB2014-10 Sale or Contribution of Assets between an Investor and its Associate or Joint Venture

This standard has an effective date for the 30 June 2021 reporting period.

Council does not expect any material impact to future financial statements, however further consideration into the impact of both new accounting standards will be prioritised for this financial year.

Risk Implications

The Financial Statements are prepared by Council staff, using the accrual method of accounting and comply with Australian Accounting Standards and the New South Wales Local Government Code of Accounting Practice and Financial Reporting. Internal controls are established and maintained to ensure that they are reliable, have recorded all material transactions, appropriate accounting policies have been applied, the risk of fraud and errors have been minimised.

Conclusion

The 2019-20 Draft Annual Financial Statements and external audit have been completed. Council’s Financial Position as at 30 June 2020 reflects the challenges faced by Council during the year. All significant Financial Performance Measures are in line with expectations and Council’s short-term Financial Position remains sound. After allowing for $26.2m of Capital Grants and Contributions, Council finished the year with a surplus from ordinary activities of $29.8m and surplus net operating result of $3.5m excluding Capital Grants and Contributions.

 

It is proposed the Public Exhibition period will commence on Thursday 8 October 2020, with written submissions to be received within 7 days in accordance with Section 420 of the Local Government Act 1993.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on 2019-20 Draft Financial Statements be received.

2.     Pursuant to s413(2)(c) it is the Council's opinion that:

a.   The Financial Statements and schedules have been drawn up in accordance with the Local Government Act 1993 and Regulations, the Local Government Code of Accounting Practice and Financial Reporting, the Local Government Australian Infrastructure Management Guidelines, and Australian Accounting Standards. The Statements comply with Australian Statements of Accounting Concepts.

b.   The Financial Statements present fairly the Council's financial position as at 30 June 2020 and the operating result for the year then ended.

c.   The statements are in accord with Council's accounting and other records.

3.    Pursuant to the Local Government Code of Accounting Practice and Financial Reporting and Section 215 of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005 it is the Council's opinion that:

a.   The accompanying Special Purpose Financial Report has been drawn up in accordance with the Local Government Act 1993 and Regulations, the Local Government Code of Accounting Practice and Financial Reporting and the requirements of National Competition Policy. The Code requires the inclusion of various charges and subsidies which are not actually paid or payable.

b.   The Special Purpose Financial Report is a special purpose report and is not required to comply with Australian Accounting Standards. The above legislative requirements differ from Australian Accounting Standards and hence the report does not comply with Australian Accounting Standards.

c.   The Special Purpose Financial Statements present a modelled scenario for comparative purposes. They do not report an actual result.

4.     The Statements be forwarded to Council's Auditors.

5.     The Financial Statements be placed on public exhibition.

6.     A further report be presented to Council following the public exhibition period.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

Draft Annual Financial Statements 2019-20

123 Pages

Attachments Included

  


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                        28 September 2020

 

 

 

20

Summary of Investment & Banking for the Period 1 August 2020 to 31 August 2020   

 

Compiled by:               James Legarse, Operational Project Accountant

Authorised by:            Andrew Moore, Director - Corporate Services

Neil Farquharson, Financial Services Manager  

 

Outcome

We have confidence in our Council

Strategy

Manage our money and our assets to be sustainable now and into the future

Service Activity

Provide accurate information to Council and the community on council’s financial activities

      

 

Executive Summary

This report on the Summary of Investments & Banking for August 2020 is submitted for the purpose of financial accountability and to satisfy the investment reporting requirements of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005 (clause 212), the Local Government Act 1993 (the Act) (Section 625) and the Council’s Investment Policy.

 

The report certifies that the Council investments comply with the forms of investment made by order of the Minister under section 625(2) of the Local Government Act 1993. The current Ministerial Order was issued under Council Circular 11-01 on 17 February 2011.

 

The report provides a summary of investments for the period 1 August 2020 to 31 August 2020 and a reconciliation of invested funds as at 31 August 2020.

 

The investment returns versus the benchmark as a percentage for August 2020 are:

·    Council portfolio current yield (including FRNs)                                             1.10%

·    90 day Bank Bill Swap rate (Benchmark)                                                      0.10%

·    Enhanced 90-day Bank Bill Swap Rate (Benchmark - BBSW+45bps)         0.55%

·    Original Budget estimated return                                                                   1.15%

 

The report recommends that the information contained in the report be received.

Current Situation

Attached to this report is a Summary of Investments including Economic Commentary for August 2020, Historical Investment Performance analysis tables and charts, a reconciliation of Invested Funds for August 2020 and various Investment Summary and Investment Portfolio analysis tables and charts.

Financial Implications

Adopting the recommendations of this report confirms Council’s investment returns are performing better than the Benchmark. More detailed Financial Implications are contained in the attachment to this report.

Risk Implications

The Council’s investments have been placed in accordance with Section 625 of the Local Government Act 1993, relevant regulations and the Councils adopted Investment Policy. The Councils Investment Policy has objectives to preserve capital, ensure liquidity of funds to meet cash flow requirements and achieve an acceptable rate of return having reference to the Council’s risk tolerance.

Conclusion

This report confirms that the Council’s investments have been placed in accordance with relevant legislation/regulations, the Council’s Investment Policy and highlights the Council’s investment performance for August 2020. Additionally, the report assures the Council that Council’s Cash Book and Bank Statements have been reconciled.

Certificate of Responsible Accounting Officer

I hereby certify the following:

1.   All investments have been made in accordance with Section 625 of the Local Government Act 1993, relevant regulations and Council’s Investment Policy.

2.   The Council’s Cash Book and Bank Statements have been reconciled as at 31 August 2020.

A close up of a deviceDescription automatically generated

Andrew Moore

Responsible Accounting Officer

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Summary of Investment & Banking for the Period 1 August 2020 to 31 August 2020 be received.

2.     The certificate of the Responsible Accounting Officer and Summary of Investments and Performance for the Period 1 August 2020 to 31 August 2020 be noted and accepted.

3.     The graphical Investment Analysis as at 31 August 2020 be noted.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

Investment Report as at 31 August 2020

6 Pages

Appendix

  


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                      28 September 2020

Appendix 1 - Investment Report as at 31 August 2020

 

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Urgent Reports

 

DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

CONTENTS

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

21      Penrith Valley Regional Sports Centre - Request for funding                                       121

 

 

 



Ordinary Meeting - Urgent Report                                                            28 September 2020

 

 

 

21

Penrith Valley Regional Sports Centre - Request for funding   

 

Compiled by:               Brian Steffen, Director - City Services

Andrew Moore, Director - Corporate Services

Authorised by:            Warwick Winn, General Manager  

 

Outcome

We have confidence in our Council

Strategy

Manage our money and our assets to be sustainable now and into the future

Service Activity

Provide accurate information to Council and the community on council’s financial activities

      

 

Executive Summary

The Penrith Valley Regional Sports Centre (PVRSC) has requested funding from Council in the amount of $1,092,686 plus costs of sewer compliance works to bring their site up to adequate fire safety and sewer compliance standards. The purpose of this report is to provide Council with background information prior to determining if funding should be granted. Since 1989, Council has underwritten loans, granted, or loaned PVRSC funds for a range of projects, as well as expended its own budgets, particularly on car park maintenance and improvements, and tree removal. Over the long term however, certain issues including compliance have not been appropriately addressed. A timeline of funding previously provided to PVRSC is included in this report.  

Background

Penrith Sports Stadium was initially a joint venture between Penrith and Districts Basketball Association (P&DBA), NSW Basketball, and Penrith City Council (PCC). P&DBA committed an amount to a building fund administered by NSW Basketball. PCC provided the land only on a 99-year lease which commenced on 10 October 1988 terminating on 10 October 2087.  The lease sets out roles and responsibilities for each party with all maintenance and renewal responsibilities falling to the PVRSC as lessee. 

Penrith Sports Stadium, when it opened in 1989, was a four-court basketball facility. In 1999 it was extended and became a six-court venue through a loan agreement with Westpac (with Council as guarantor) and, in 2007, its name changed to Penrith Valley Regional Sports Centre (PVRSC).

In 2007, a Building Code Audit (BCA), as well as separate Council Officer assessments and consultant reports identified that significant work was required to make the building compliant. Council subsequently ‘granted’ $850,000 to PVRSC through Council resolution at its meeting on 15 December 2008 (Resolved on the Motion of Councillor John Thain, seconded by Councillor Mark Davies) as a contribution to realising the work required.

 

Additionally, PVRSC was awarded $250,000 to replace damaged floors (courts 3 & 4) from the Federal Government. The NSW Government contributed $300,000 and a further $100,000 was awarded from a Water Sustainability Grant to capture rainwater and re-use at the Centre. PVRSC contributed $650,000.

 

The full scope of work was completed in 2014 with some of the projects undertaken to create effectiveness for future project delivery and facility upgrade (e.g. services). The work included:

·    BCA compliance

·    New sprung floor courts 3 & 4

·    Replace of skylights courts 3 & 4

·    Lighting upgrade to all courts

·    Replacement of all gutters, water catchment and reuse in Centre

·    Replacement of backboards courts 3 & 4

·    New commercial kitchen/canteen.

In September 2014, Evolve Projects were commissioned by the PVRSC Board to conduct a building condition and maintenance audit report (Attachment 1 to this paper). This report identified 3 categories of maintenance and an estimated budget for these works:

 

-      P1 items requiring immediate attention (urgent work) estimated at $530,000

-      P2 items requiring preventative maintenance (within one year) estimated at $284,000

-      P3 items requiring programmed maintenance (within five years) estimated at $1.046m.

In December 2014, the PVRSC Board commissioned Minerva Consulting to conduct a Hazard Survey report (attachment 2 to this paper) to:

 

1.   Conduct a Hazard Survey report of the PVRSC

2.   Provide a comprehensive Hazard Survey report inclusive of digital photos 

3.   Provide recommendations for site improvements to guide PVRSC towards conformance with the Work Health and Safety (WHS) Act 2011 and WHS Regulation 2011.

 

It is not known if any of the safety and maintenance matters detailed in the above two reports were implemented. A written request to PVRSC to ascertain if the work has been done was sent on 25 September 2020.

 

PVRSC has promoted plans to upgrade and expand the facilities over many years and has actively advocated for funding from both State and Federal Governments to enable it to achieve this. In May 2019, the PVRSC received a grant of $1.2m from the Federal Member for Lindsay as a contribution towards improvement works to the stadium including:

·    refurbishing of bathrooms and change rooms, specifically with a focus to being BCA and DDA compliant for disabled use

·    installing evaporative Coolers to courts 1 & 2

·    air conditioning to function room

·    painting

·    new dividing curtains to allow multiple sports to hire the halls at the same time

·    grandstand seating (deemed too costly at this stage and may require major renovations if it is to be fully compliant).

The PVRSC reserves have contributed $180,000 to these improvements and Council has provided assistance for civil/sewer investigative works of $24,750. The PVRSC has also borrowed $500,000 with Council as guarantor to complete these improvement works and to pay off a small remaining balance of the 1999 loan.

Current Situation

The PVRSC commenced the project to implement the election commitment funded scope of works on 14 March 2020. The Stadium has been closed since that time in order to complete these improvement renovations during the COVID-19 pandemic. There is an urgency for all work to be completed, including compliance maintenance issues, with PVRSC announcing a reopening date of 9 October 2020.

 

During the improvement works, a number of additional maintenance and other issues, including non-compliance issues for fire safety and sewer, have been identified. The PVRSC has provided a 2020 Refurbishment Project report to support their request for grant funding and to detail the additional works. This report has been circulated separately to Councillors.

 

In the report, the PVRSC has advised that they have identified and funded $384,000 of additional costs to rectify maintenance issues. They have suggested these issues should have been identified during the previous renovations and during ongoing maintenance inspections.

 

The PVRSC is requesting grant funding from Council of $1,091,686 to address fire safety matters, plus the costs of sewer compliance works, which are unknown at the time of writing this report. Details of the rectification works are discussed below.

 

Fire Safety

 

PVRSC has engaged a consultant project manager, GHD Pty Ltd, who have conducted investigative works and identified that water pressure at fire hydrants was found to be below the statutory requirements. Additionally, a significant leak was identified in one of the pipes to a hydrant which was found to be leaking under the concrete slab and surfacing along the western end of the building. It would appear to Council officers that this leak has been occurring for a significant amount of time. GHD has estimated that 100 litres of water is leaking every 15 minutes; 400 litres an hour, 9600 litres a day. 

 

PVRSC and GHD were working with their private certifier to develop a performance-based solution for management of fire safety compliance issues to ensure reopening can safely occur on 9 October, however this will only be an interim measure with further works required to meet the statutory requirements on a permanent basis. Works to identify the cause resulted in the leak becoming significantly worse and in order to control the leak, water has been turned off to all hydrants servicing the building. This adds to the criticality to ensure safety if the Centre is to open on 9 October, with the first major event scheduled to occur on 11 October.

 

Council officers, including Council’s Senior Environmental Health and Building Surveyor, have been providing ongoing advice and assistance regarding the fire safety issues over the last month. Council officers working with Council’s plumbing contractor have worked to identify the cause of the loss of water pressure, tracing and testing pressure at points along the connection from Sydney Water mains connection through to the hydrants around the building. 

 

If the leak is fixed and pressure can be held at the hydrants to meet the statutory requirements, then the fire safety compliance for the existing building can be achieved. PVRSC, GHD and Council officers are still working on solutions to the repair which may require the disconnection of the leaking hydrant from the water supply and installation of a new hydrant in a different location with an extension of the pipework to this location. A final solution has not been agreed upon and an update will be provided once design and costs are known. Depending on design and rectification of pressure issues, this may meet all compliance requirements in a building of this age.

 

Another option that PVRSC and GHD have discussed that meets full compliance standards for new buildings is to disconnect all current hydrants and pipes and install a brand new copper pipe ring main around the whole building and install new hydrants in appropriate locations – basically, a brand new fire safety system. The estimated cost of this option is approximately $1,091,686 plus costs of sewer compliance works.

 

Sewer

 

A component of the improvements works included upgrades to toilets, change rooms and showers. During these upgrades, the internal and external sewer and drainage plans were unable to be located on site and an extensive search of Council records could not locate the diagrams. Sydney Water has no records of the installation of the sewer and drainage works. Council’s Director City Services has met on site with the General Manager PVRSC and GHD to discuss the issues with compliance. It was found that the trade waste pit had not been registered with Sydney Water. This has now been rectified and brought up to appropriate standards. It was also found that there was an undersized pipe that drains the sewer to the Sydney Water connection and the sewer access lid had been concreted over by a road and was inaccessible.

 

Given the lack of records and potential for other non-compliance issues, Council officers engaged GHD to conduct comprehensive investigations and camera assessments of existing drainage, internal services and to produce detailed drainage diagrams as a permanent record of what is installed. GHD’s report has advised the following non-compliance issues:

 

·    there is no overflow gully on the property

·    there is no boundary trap installed prior to the connection to the sewer line

·    the existing drainage pipework is not complaint with size requirements

·    the sewer access needs to be raised through the concrete and a new access lid needs to be installed.

These works are not essential for the re-opening of the Stadium, however will need to be completed in the near future. At the time of writing this report, PVRSC and GHD have not provided an estimated approximate cost for these repairs.

 

The PVRSC Board, under cover letter dated 18 September 2020, has requested that the following points be included in the Council report and these are addressed below:

 

1.   PVRSC: The Board used the forced closure during the pandemic situation to undertake the project works to upgrade amenities to meet current accessibility standards and associated improvement to the building with the support of a Federal grant and significant contribution from PVRSC.

 

PCC response: Noted

 

2.   PVRSC: During the project, significant construction issues associated with historic poor workmanship were identified. To manage this, the Board has undertaken an additional $500,000 loan to achieve the required safe construction.

 

PCC response: During on-site meetings, poor workmanship and maintenance issues were obvious. The lease agreement entered into in 1988 for 99 years between PCC and PVRSC clearly sets out that maintenance and asset renewal responsibility falls to PVRSC. Given the two reports in 2014 for Hazard Survey and building condition and maintenance reports commissioned by the PVRSC Board, these matters should have been identified.

 

 

3.   PVRSC: The funding sought is for critical infrastructure (provision of fire safety measures and sewerage facilities) that is beyond the capacity of the Board to financially deliver and, if left unresolved, will leave the facility unable to operate.

 

PCC response: PCC acknowledges that the PVRSC Board does not have the capacity to financially deliver the required works.

 

4.   PVRSC: These critical matters highlighted in the report are unrelated to the works that were approved and are presently being completed, and have in no way been created by the current works.

 

PCC response: Noted.  

 

5.   PVRSC: Council has a held a founding and continuing Board position, and is also the regulatory authority for fire safety, and had due diligence processes been managed correctly, these historic issues would have been highlighted and addressed years ago.

 

PCC response: Given the two reports in 2014 for Hazard Survey and building condition and maintenance reports commissioned by the PVRSC Board, these matters should have been identified and addressed as per the recommendations in the reports. Additionally, these matters should have been the responsibility of the whole PVRSC Board and General Managers, not the responsibility of one Director. Council is the fire safety regulator, however responsibility for maintenance, renewal, WHS and fire safety adequacy rests with the Lessee of the land, being PVRSC.

 

6.   PVRSC: We have local junior and senior basketball competitions ready to re-commence after the long weekend. The approved project works will be ready to be completed by then. Without this solution being resolved immediately, they will have to be advised of the circumstances as to why we will not be able to open.

 

PCC response: The PVRSC publicly announced a reopening date for the Centre of 9 October prior to the issues being resolved, and this has resulted in a significantly condensed timeline to rectify matters of such criticality.

 

Grant Funding Request

 

It is clear the non-compliance, maintenance issues and the management oversight of these issues have occurred over a long period of time. The PVRSC has requested grant funding up to a total of $1,091,686 plus costs of sewer compliance works.

 

Given the significance of the expenditure of Council funds and as the actual costs of the works to ensure compliance are not known at this stage, Council may require a level of assurance to ensure value for money and appropriate expenditure of public money. Council may consider establishing a governance framework where nominated Council officers work with the General Manager and Board of PVRSC to ensure completion of works and oversight. This could be established as a project control group with final approval of payments authorised by Council’s Director Corporate Services.

 

 

 

 

Financial Implications

Council’s adopted 2020-21 Operational Plan presents a balanced budget and capacity has not been identified to fund this request. Should Council be of the mind to support the funding request from the PVRSC, Council’s existing Asset programs will need to be reprioritised, with some projects being deferred, to provide the capacity in the current year.

The Local Government Act requires that Council’s procurement policy, including the requirement to Tender all works $250,000 and above, will apply should Council funds be used for this purpose.

Risk Implications

If the fire safety compliance measures cannot be achieved the PVRSC cannot reopen, therefore affecting their financial viability.

Conclusion

It is acknowledged that issues have remained unaddressed over a long period of time. The lease is clear on the responsibility for maintenance and asset renewal, however given the Board’s financial circumstances and investment in the current works, Councillors may consider providing grant funding up to $1,091,686 plus costs of sewer compliance works. This is a maximum amount and would depend on the final design of the Fire Safety solution. If Council was to grant funding, a governance framework is to be developed with an acquittal for expenditure.

 

RECOMMENDATIONS

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Penrith Valley Regional Sports Centre - Request for funding be received.

2.     If funding is granted, up to a maximum amount of $1,091,686, Council consider implementing a governance framework.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

Evolve Projects - Building Maintenance Report dated 2 September 2014

18 Pages

Attachments Included

2.

Minerva Hazard Survey Report dated 15 December 2014

26 Pages

Attachments Included

3.

PVRSC Formal Grant Funding Request

1 Page

Attachments Included

   


Committee of the Whole

 

DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

CONTENTS

 

Pecuniary Interests

 

Other Interests

 

Monday September 28 2020

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

1        Presence of the Public                                                                                                       1

 

2        Jordan Springs East                                                                                                           2

 

 

 


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                        28 September 2020

A Leading City

 

 

1        Presence of the Public

 

Everyone is entitled to attend a meeting of the Council and those of its Committees of which all members are Councillors, except as provided by Section 10 of the Local Government Act, 1993.

A Council, or a Committee of the Council of which all the members are Councillors, may close to the public so much of its meeting as comprises:

 

(a)          the discussion of any of the matters listed below; or

(b)          the receipt or discussion of any of the information so listed.

The matters and information are the following:

 

(a)          personnel matters concerning particular individuals;

(b)          the personal hardship of any resident or ratepayers;

(c)           information that would, if disclosed, confer a commercial advantage on a person with whom the council is conducting (or proposes to conduct) business;

(d)          commercial information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed:

·         prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied it; or

 

·         confer a commercial advantage on a competitor of the Council; or

 

·         reveal a trade secret.

 

(e)          information that would, if disclosed, prejudice the maintenance of the law;

(f)            matters affecting the security of the Council, Councillors, Council staff or Council property;

(g)        advice concerning litigation, or advice that would otherwise be privileged from production in legal proceedings on the ground of legal professional privilege.

The grounds on which part of a meeting is closed must be stated in the decision to close that part of the meeting and must be recorded in the minutes of the meeting.

The grounds must specify the following:

(a)          the relevant provision of section 10A(2);

(b)          the matter that is to be discussed during the closed part of the meeting;

(c)           the reasons why the part of the meeting is being closed, including (if the matter concerned is a matter other than a personnel matter concerning particular individuals, the personal hardship of a resident or ratepayer or a trade secret) an explanation of the way in which discussion of the matter in open meeting would be, on balance, contrary to the public interest.

Members of the public may make representations at a Council or Committee Meeting as to whether a part of a meeting should be closed to the public

The process which should be followed is:

 

·         a motion, based on the recommendation below, is moved and seconded

·         the Chairperson then asks if any member/s of the public would like to make representations as to whether a part of the meeting is closed to the public

·         if a member/s of the public wish to make representations, the Chairperson invites them to speak before the Committee makes its decision on whether to close the part of the meeting or not to the public.

·         if no member/s of the public wish to make representations the Chairperson can then put the motion to close the meeting to the public.

The first action is for a motion to be moved and seconded based on the recommendation below.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That:

 

Outcome 7

 

2        Jordan Springs East 

This item has been referred to Committee of the Whole as the report refers to advice concerning litigation, or advice that would otherwise be privileged from production in legal proceedings on the ground of legal professional privilege and discussion of the matter in open meeting would be, on balance, contrary to the public interest.

 

 

 

 

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THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


 

ATTACHMENTS  

 

 

Date of Meeting:     Monday 28 September 2020

Report Title:            Castlereagh Connection Advocacy Update

Attachments:           Castlereagh Connection Strategic Discussion paper



Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                      28 September 2020

Attachment 1 - Castlereagh Connection Strategic Discussion paper

 

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ATTACHMENTS  

 

 

Date of Meeting:     Monday 28 September 2020

Report Title:            Submission to NSW Productivity Commission Review into Infrastructure Contributions

Attachments:           Issues Paper - Review of Infrastructure Contributions in New South Wales

                                Submission to NSW Productivity Commission



Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                      28 September 2020

Attachment 1 - Issues Paper - Review of Infrastructure Contributions in New South Wales

 

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Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                      28 September 2020

Attachment 2 - Submission to NSW Productivity Commission

 

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ATTACHMENTS  

 

 

Date of Meeting:     Monday 28 September 2020

Report Title:            Submission to exhibition of Draft Housing Diversity State Environmental Planning Policy

Attachments:           Explanation of Intended Effects- Draft Housing Diversity SEPP



Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                      28 September 2020

Attachment 1 - Explanation of Intended Effects- Draft Housing Diversity SEPP

 

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ATTACHMENTS  

 

 

Date of Meeting:     Monday 28 September 2020

Report Title:            Winter Sporting Facility proposed DCP and VPA

Attachments:           Draft DCP for Winter Sporting Facility

                                VPA offer 26 August 2020 for Winter Sporting Facility



Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                      28 September 2020

Attachment 1 - Draft DCP for Winter Sporting Facility

 

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Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                      28 September 2020

Attachment 2 - VPA offer 26 August 2020 for Winter Sporting Facility

 

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ATTACHMENTS  

 

 

Date of Meeting:     Monday 28 September 2020

Report Title:            Penrith Rising Strong - COVID-19 Recovery Plan

Attachments:           DRAFT Penrith Rising Strong COVID-19 Recovery Plan



Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                      28 September 2020

Attachment 1 - DRAFT Penrith Rising Strong COVID-19 Recovery Plan

 

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ATTACHMENTS  

 

 

Date of Meeting:     Monday 28 September 2020

Report Title:            2020-21 Financial Assistance Grant

Attachments:           Financial Assistance Grant



Ordinary Meeting                                                                                          &nbs