Council_Mark_POS_RGB

16 February 2022

 

Dear Councillor,

In pursuance of the provisions of the Local Government Act, 1993 and the Regulations thereunder, notice is hereby given that an ORDINARY MEETING of Penrith City Council is to be held in the Council Chambers, Civic Centre, 601 High Street, Penrith and held online on Monday 21 February 2022 at 7:00PM.

Attention is directed to the statement accompanying this notice of the business proposed to be transacted at the meeting.

Yours faithfully

 

Warwick Winn

General Manager

 

BUSINESS

 

1.           LEAVE OF ABSENCE

 

2.           APOLOGIES

 

3.           CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES

Ordinary Meeting - 10 January 2022.

 

4.           DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

Pecuniary Interest (The Act requires Councillors who declare a pecuniary interest in an item to leave the meeting during discussion of that item)

Non-Pecuniary Conflict of Interest – Significant and Less than Significant (The Code of Conduct requires Councillors who declare a significant non-pecuniary conflict of interest in an item to leave the meeting during discussion of that item)

 

5.           ADDRESSING COUNCIL

 

6.           MAYORAL MINUTES

 

7.           NOTICES OF MOTION TO RESCIND A RESOLUTION

 

8.           NOTICES OF MOTION AND QUESTIONS ON NOTICE

 

9.           ADOPTION OF REPORTS AND RECOMMENDATION OF COMMITTEES

Penrith Community Safety Partnership Meeting - 27 October 2021.

Local Traffic Committee Meeting - 7 February 2022.

 

10.         DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

11.         URGENT BUSINESS

 

12.         COMMITTEE OF THE WHOLE


ORDINARY MEETING

 

Monday 21 February 2022

 

table of contents

 

 

 

 

ADVANCE AUSTRALIA FAIR

 

 

WEBCASTING NOTICE

 

 

STATEMENT OF RECOGNITION OF PENRITH CITY’S ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER CULTURAL HERITAGE

 

 

PRAYER

 

 

COUNCIL CHAMBER seating arrangements

 

 

meeting calendar

 

 

confirmation of minutes

 

 

PROCEDURE FOR ADDRESSING COUNCIL MEETING

 

 

MAYORAL MINUTES

 

 

report and recommendations of committees

 

 

DELIVERY program reports


 

 

 

 

ADVANCE AUSTRALIA FAIR

 

 

Australians all let us rejoice,

For we are one and free;

We’ve golden soil and wealth for toil;

Our home is girt by sea;

Our land abounds in nature’s gifts

Of beauty rich and rare;

In history’s page, let every stage

Advance Australia Fair.

 

In joyful strains then let us sing,

Advance Australia Fair.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

 

 

 

 

 

WEBCASTING NOTICE

 

Please note that tonight’s meeting other than the

confidential sessions are being recorded and will be

placed on Council’s website. All in attendance should

refrain from making defamatory statements. Council

takes all care when maintaining privacy, however

members of the public gallery and those addressing

Council should be aware that you may be recorded.

 


Statement of Recognition of

Penrith City’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cultural Heritage

 

 

Council values the unique status of Aboriginal people as the original owners and custodians of lands and waters, including the land and waters of Penrith City.

 

Council values the unique status of Torres Strait Islander people as the original owners and custodians of the Torres Strait Islands and surrounding waters.

 

We work together for a united Australia and City that respects this land of ours, that values the diversity of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural heritage, and provides justice and equity for all.

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

PRAYER

 

 

 

“Sovereign God, tonight as we gather together as a Council we affirm that you are the giver and sustainer of life.  We come together as representatives of our community to make decisions that will benefit this city and the people within it. 

 

We come not in a spirit of competition, not as adversaries, but as colleagues.  Help us to treat each other with respect, with dignity, with interest and with honesty.  Help us not just to hear the words we say, but also to hear each others hearts.  We seek to be wise in all that we say and do.

 

As we meet, our concern is for this city.  Grant us wisdom, courage and strength.

 

Lord, help us.  We pray this in the name of Jesus Christ our Lord.  Amen.”

 

 

 

 

 


Council Chambers

Seating Arrangements


For members of the public addressing the meeting


 

 

 

Lectern


 

 

     Directors


 

 

 

General Manager
Warwick Winn

Her Worship the Mayor
Councillor Tricia Hitchen 



Governance Coordinator Adam Beggs






Minute Clerk

Media

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Public Gallery

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Managers

 

 

Directors


 


Oath of Office

 

I swear that I will undertake the duties of the office of Councillor in the best interests of the people of Penrith and the Penrith City Council and that I will faithfully and impartially carry out the functions, powers, authorities and discretions vested in me under the Local Government Act 1993 or any other Act to the best of my ability and judgment.

 

 

Affirmation of Office

 

I solemnly and sincerely declare and affirm that I will undertake the duties of the office of Councillor in the best interests of the people of Penrith and the Penrith City Council and that I will faithfully and impartially carry out the functions, powers, authorities and discretions vested in me under the Local Government Act 1993 or any other Act to the best of my ability and judgment.

 

 

 

 

 

Local Government Act 1993, Section 233A

 


Council_Mark_POS_RGB2022 MEETING CALENDAR

January 2022 - December 2022

(Adopted by Council – 10 January 2022)

 

 

 

TIME

JAN

FEB

MAR

APRIL

MAY

JUNE

JULY

AUG

SEPT

OCT

NOV

DEC

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

 

Ordinary Council Meeting

7.00pm

 

 

 

 

 

2v

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10^

 

 

21@

 

28

 

30#

27*

25

22@

26^

31ü

28#+

12

Policy Review Committee

7.00pm

 

 

 

 

14

 

9

 

11

 

12

 

14

 

 

 v

Meeting at which the draft corporate planning documents (Delivery Program and Operational Plan) are endorsed for exhibition

 *

Meeting at which the draft corporate planning documents (Delivery Program and Operational Plan) are adopted

 #

Meetings at which the Operational Plan quarterly reviews (March and September) are presented

 @

Meetings at which the Delivery Program progress reports (including the Operational Plan quarterly reviews for December and June) are presented

 ^

Election of Mayor and/or Deputy Mayor

 ü

Meeting at which the 2021-22 Annual Statements are presented

 

Meeting at which any comments on the 2021-22 Annual Statements are adopted 

 +

Meeting at which the Annual Report is presented

Briefing to consider Budget, draft fees & charges and corporate document

-            Extraordinary Meetings are held as required.

-            Members of the public are invited to observe meetings of the Council (Ordinary and Policy Review Committee).

Should you wish to address Council, please contact Governance Coordinator, Adam Beggs on 4732 7597.

 

 

 


UNCONFIRMED MINUTES

 OF THE ORDINARY MEETING OF PENRITH CITY COUNCIL HELD REMOTELY USING AUDIO VISUAL LINKS, AUDIO STREAMED ON THE COUNCIL WEBSITE AND IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBERS ON MONDAY 10 JANUARY 2022 AT 7:00PM

 

NATIONAL ANTHEM 

The meeting opened with the National Anthem.

PRAYER

The Council Prayer was read by Rev Christine Bayliss-Kelly.

PRESENT

Councillors Jim Aitken OAM, Bernard Bratusa, Todd Carney, Robin Cook, Kevin Crameri OAM, Mark Davies, Sue Day, Ross Fowler OAM, Glenn Gardiner, Tricia Hitchen, Karen McKeown OAM, Jonathan Pullen, Mark Rusev, Marlene Shipley and John Thain.

 

 

OATH AND AFFIRMATION

 

The General Manager conducted the Oath and Affirmation of Office.

 

The following Councillors undertook the Oath of Office:

Councillors Jim Aitken OAM, Bernard Bratusa, Robin Cook, Kevin Crameri OAM, Mark Davies, Ross Fowler OAM, Glenn Gardiner, Tricia Hitchen, Jonathan Pullen, Mark Rusev, Marlene Shipley and John Thain.

 

The following Councillor undertook the Affirmation of Office:

Councillors Karen McKeown, Todd Carney and Sue Day.

 

Procedural Motion    

The General Manager called for a Chairperson to be elected from Councillors.

1  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Ross Fowler OAM seconded Councillor Todd Carney that Councillor Karen McKeown OAM be elected to undertake the functions of Chairperson. 

Councillor Karen McKeown OAM then took the Chair.

 

WEBCASTING STATEMENT

Councillor Karen McKeown OAM read a statement advising that Council Meetings are recorded and webcast.

 

STATEMENT OF RECOGNITION

Councillor Karen McKeown OAM read a statement of recognition of Penrith City’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cultural Heritage.

 

.

 

APOLOGIES

There were no apologies.

 

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES - Ordinary Meeting - 22 November 2021

2  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Ross Fowler OAM seconded Councillor John Thain that the minutes of the Ordinary Meeting of 22 November 2021 be confirmed.

 

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

There were no declarations of interest.

 

 

DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Procedural Motion    

3  RESOLVED on the MOTION on Councillor Ross Fowler OAM seconded Councillor John Thain that Item 2 – Election of Mayor now be brought forward for consideration.

 

Outcome 7 - We have confidence in our Council

 

2        Election of Mayor                                                                                        

4  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor John Thain seconded Councillor Ross Fowler OAM

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Election of Mayor be received

2.     In the event of more than one Councillor being nominated, Council determine open voting by way of show of hands as the method of election for the Office of Mayor.

 

The Chairperson, Councillor Karen McKeown OAM, handed over to the Returning Officer, (General Manager) Warwick Winn, to conduct the election of the Mayor.

 

The Returning Officer indicated that he had received one (1) nomination for the position of Mayor and asked whether there were any other nominations. No other nominations were forthcoming.

 

The Returning Officer declared Councillor Tricia Hitchen duly elected unopposed as Mayor until September 2023.

 

The Chairperson, Councillor Karen McKeown OAM, placed the Mayoral Chains on Councillor Tricia Hitchen and Councillor Tricia Hitchen took the chair, the time being 7:10 pm.

 

Her Worship the Mayor, Councillor Tricia Hitchen, thanked her colleagues for their support.

 

Councillors Karen McKeown OAM, John Thain, Ross Fowler OAM, Jim Aitken OAM and Robin Cook congratulated the Mayor on her election.

 

Procedural Motion    

5  RESOLVED on the MOTION on Councillor Karen McKeown OAM seconded Ross Fowler OAM that Item 3 – Election of Deputy Mayor now be brought forward for consideration.

 

3        Election of Deputy Mayor                                                                          

6  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Karen McKeown OAM seconded Councillor Ross Fowler OAM

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Election of Deputy Mayor be received

2.     Council consider the Election of a Deputy Mayor.

3.     In the event of more than one Councillor being nominated, Council determine open voting by way of show of hands as the method of election for the Office of Deputy Mayor.

4.     In accordance with Section 231 (2) of the Local Government Act 1993, the term of Office of the Deputy Mayor be determined to be until September 2022 and then yearly thereafter.

 

Her Worship the Mayor, Councillor Tricia Hitchen, handed over to the Returning Officer, (General Manager) Warwick Winn, to conduct the election of the Deputy Mayor.

 

The Returning Officer indicated that he had received one (1) nomination for the position of Deputy Mayor and asked whether there were any other nominations. No other nominations were forthcoming.

 

The Returning Officer declared Councillor John Thain duly elected unopposed as Deputy Mayor until September 2022.

 

 

 

Outcome 5 - We care about our environment

 

1        Waste contracts                                                                                          

7  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor John Thain seconded Councillor Ross Fowler OAM

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Waste contracts be received

2.     Council resolve to consent to the change of control of Council’s waste collection services contractor (as provided in Contract no. 17/18-07 dated 24 August 2018) and delegates authority to the General Manager to finalise details of that consent and to execute documents in relation to that consent, as deemed appropriate by Council’s Legal Services Manager

3.     Council resolve to novate the waste disposal contract with SUEZ (Contract 17/18-08 Part A Garbage, effective from 1 July 2019), substituting Cleanaway Pty Ltd (ACN 79 000 164 938) as the contractor and delegates authority to the General Manager to finalise details of that novation and to execute documents in relation to that novation, as deemed appropriate by Council’s Legal Services Manager.

 

 

Outcome 7 - We have confidence in our Council

 

4        Councillor Fees                                                                                           

8  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Ross Fowler OAM seconded Councillor Bernard Bratusa

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Councillor Fees be received.

2.     Mayor, Deputy Mayor and Councillors fees be set at the maximum level as outlined in this report.

 

5        Councillor Forums and Representations on Working Parties              

9  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Ross Fowler OAM seconded Councillor John Thain

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Councillor Forums and Representations on Working Parties be received

2.     The Council resolve to disband the following working parties:

a.   Advertising/Communications Working Party

b.   Finance and Economic Opportunities Working Party

3.     The Council nominate the following representatives to the eight working parties:

a.   Domestic Waste Service Working Party – Councillors Ross Fowler OAM, John Thain, Tricia Hitchen, Mark Davies and Glenn Gardiner

 

b.   Floodplain Management Working Party – Councillors Glenn Gardiner, Kevin Crameri OAM and Jim Aitken OAM

 

c.   Library Services Working Party – Councillors Mark Rusev and Robin Cook

 

d.   Multicultural Working Party – Councillors Mark Rusev, Karen McKeown OAM, Robin Cook and Jonathan Pullen

 

e.   Recreation Working Party – Councillors Marlene Shipley, Mark Rusev, John Thain, Jonathan Pullen and Ross Fowler OAM

 

f.    Recruitment and Performance Review Panel – The Mayor, Deputy Mayor and Councillors Mark Davies, Ross Fowler OAM and one Councillor to be nominated by the General Manager

 

g.   Sustainability and Resilience Champions – Councillors Mark Rusev and Karen McKeown OAM

 

h.   Major Projects Working Party – Councillors Ross Fowler OAM, Tricia Hitchen, Mark Davies, John Thain, Karen McKeown OAM and Jim Aitken OAM

 

for the term in which the Councillors hold public Office.

 

 

6        Councillor Representation on Controlled Entities, Internal and External Committees and External Organisations                                 

10  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Ross Fowler OAM seconded Councillor John Thain

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Councillor Representation on Controlled Entities, Internal and External Committees and External Organisations be received

2.     The information on the Ordinary Council Meeting be noted.

3.     The information on the Policy Review Committee Meeting be noted.

4.     The information on Councillor Briefings be noted.

5.     Council appoint Councillors Tricia Hitchen, Todd Carney and Robin Cook to the Access Committee.

6.     Council appoint the Mayor and Councillor Ross Fowler OAM to the Audit, Risk and Improvement Committee.

7.     Council appoint Councillors Mark Rusev and Ross Fowler OAM to the Heritage Advisory Committee.

8.     The information on the Penrith International Friendship Committee be noted.

9.     All Councillors be invited to attend the Penrith Community Safety Partnership.

10.   Council appoint Councillors Jim Aitken OAM, Glenn Gardiner, Marlene Shipley and Kevin Crameri OAM to the Floodplain Risk Management Committee.

11.   Council appoint Councillors Mark Rusev, Sue Day, Karen McKeown OAM and Robin Cook to the Resilience Committee.

12.   Council appoint Councillors Ross Fowler OAM, Tricia Hitchen and Karen McKeown OAM to represent Council as Directors on the Board of Penrith Performing and Visual Arts Limited.

13.   Council appoint Councillors Tricia Hitchen, Ross Fowler OAM and John Thain to represent Council as Directors on the Board Penrith Aquatic and Leisure Ltd.

14.   Council appoint Councillors Ross Fowler OAM, Marlene Shipley, Glenn Gardiner and John Thain to represent as Directors on the Board of Penrith Whitewater Stadium Limited.

15.   Council appoint Councillor Sue Day to represent Council as a Director on the Board of The Penrith City Children’s Services Co-operative.

16.   Council’s Security and Emergency Management Coordinator/ Local Emergency Management Officer be appointed to the Bush Fire Management Committee

17.   Council appoint Councillor Glenn Gardiner, and Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM as an alternate, to the Cumberland Rural Fire Service Zone Liaison Committee.

18.   Council appoint Councillor Karen McKeown OAM and appoint the Director – Development and Regulatory Services as an alternate delegate to the Local Traffic Committee. All Councillors are invited to attend the committee.

19.   Council appoint Councillor Bernard Bratusa as the representative and Councillor Todd Carney as an alternate to the Penrith Valley Sports Foundation.

20.   Council appoint the Mayor to the Leadership Group

21.   Council appoint the Mayor to the Mayoral Forum

22.   Council appoint Councillors Jim Aitken OAM, Glenn Gardiner and Kevin Crameri OAM to Floodplain Management Australia.

23.   Council appoint Councillor Ross Fowler OAM, and Councillor Tricia Hitchen as an alternate, to the Sydney Western City Planning Panel.

24.   Council appoint Councillor John Thain to represent Council as a Director on the Board of Penrith Valley Regional Sports Centre Limited.  

25.   Council appoint Councillor Mark Rusev as its representative to the Penrith CBD Corporation Board.

26.   Council appoint Councillor Bernard Bratusa as its representative to the St Marys Town Centre Corporation Board.

27.   Council appoint Councillor Ross Fowler OAM as its Member Representative of Civic Risk Mutual Limited and the General Manager or his/her nominee.

28.   Council appoint Councillor Bernard Bratusa as its representative and Councillor Todd Carney as alternate representative to the Western Sydney Academy of Sport Advisory Forum

29.   The General Manager be granted delegation to appoint/ reappoint staff representatives to the Sydney Western City Planning Panel as previously resolved.

 


 

 

6        Councillor Representation on Controlled Entities, Internal and External Committees and External Organisations - Hawkesbury River County Council        

11 RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Ross Fowler OAM seconded Councillor John Thain that  Council appoint two (2) Councillors to represent Council on the Hawkesbury River County Council.

 

Her Worship the Mayor, Councillor Tricia Hitchen, handed over to the Returning Officer, (General Manager) Warwick Winn, to conduct a preferential ballot to determine Council’s representation on Hawkesbury River County Council.

 

The Returning Officer indicated that he had received three (3) nominations for the (2) positions of representative on Hawkesbury River County Council, as follows:

 

Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM

Councillor Karen McKeown OAM

Councillor Marlene Shipley

 

A preferential ballot then took place ballot to determine Council’s representation on Hawkesbury River County Council.

 

The Returning Officer declared Councillors Marlene Shipley and Karen McKeown OAM elected as Council’s representatives on Hawkesbury River County Council.

 

 

7        Local Government NSW Annual Conference 2021                                 

12  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Ross Fowler OAM seconded Councillor John Thain

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Local Government NSW Annual Conference 2021 be received

2.     Council nominate Councillors Todd Carney, Karen McKeown OAM, John Thain, Kevin Crameri OAM, Jim Aitken OAM, Mark Rusev, Tricia Hitchen, Sue Day and Jonathan Pullen, as its voting delegates, and Councillor Glenn Gardiner as an observer, for the LGNSW Special Conference.

 

 

8        Local Government Remuneration Tribunal - Annual Review for 2022 

13  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Ross Fowler OAM seconded Councillor Todd Carney

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Local Government Remuneration Tribunal - Annual Review for 2022 be received.

2.     Council endorse the attached ‘Penrith City Council Submission to the Local Government Remuneration Tribunal – 2022’.

 

 

9        2022 Proposed Meeting Calendar                                                             

14  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Karen McKeown OAM seconded Councillor John Thain

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on 2022 Proposed Meeting Calendar be received

2.     The draft Council Meeting Calendar for 2022 be adopted.

 

 

10      Optional Countback Election to fill a Casual Vacancy                           

15  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor John Thain seconded Councillor Bernard Bratusa

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Optional Countback Election to fill a Casual Vacancy be received

2.     Council use the countback election provisions of the Local Government Act to fill a casual vacancy.

 

 

11      RFT21/22-12 Soper Place Project - Project Management Services      

16  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Ross Fowler OAM seconded Councillor Todd Carney

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on RFT21/22-12 Soper Place Project - Project Management Services be received

2.     The recommended tender from Root Partnership Pty Ltd be accepted for RFT21/22-12 Soper Place Project – Project Management Services for the value of $678,893 excluding GST

3.     The General Manager (or their delegate) be authorised to sign all necessary legal documents in relation to this matter.

 

12      Summary of Investment & Banking for the Period 1 November 2021 to 30 November 2021                                                                                  

17  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Ross Fowler OAM seconded Councillor Bernard Bratusa

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Summary of Investment & Banking for the Period 1 November 2021 to 30 November 2021 be received

2.     The certificate of the Responsible Accounting Officer and Summary of Investments and Performance for the period 1 November 2021 to 30 November 2021 be noted and accepted.

3.     The graphical Investment Analysis as at 30 November 2021 be noted.

 

 

REQUESTS FOR REPORTS AND MEMORANDUMS

 

 

RR 1           Council Election - 4 December 2021   

Councillor Bernard Bratusa requested a briefing covering the conduct of the Council Election held on 4 December 2021, the briefing to include an opportunity for Councillor feedback.

 

RR 2           Dunheved Road Project     

Councillor Bernard Bratusa requested a memo reply providing an update on the timing of the Federal Government funded component of the Dunheved Road project.

 

RR 3           Motions to Local Government NSW Annual Conference 2021        

Councillor Bernard Bratusa requested a memo to be provided prior to the LGNSW Annual Conference in 2022 regarding funding by State Government for the City Deal.

 

RR 4           Optional Countback Election to fill a Casual Vacancy  

Councillor Bernard Bratusa requested a memo reply detailing how the optional countback election to fill a casual vacancy works.

 

 

Committee of the Whole

 

18  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor John Thain seconded Councillor Todd Carney                 that the meeting adjourn to the Committee of the Whole to deal with the following matters, the time being 7:52pm

 

1        Presence of the Public

 

CW1 RESOLVED on the motion of Councillor John Thain seconded Councillor Todd Carney  that the press and public be excluded from Committee of the Whole to deal with the following matters:

 

 

Outcome 6

 

2        RFT21/22-17 Refurbishment Works at Ripples Leisure Centre St Marys                   

 

This item has been referred to Committee of the Whole as the report refers to commercial information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed (i) prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied it; or (ii) confer a commercial advantage on a competitor of the Council; or (iii) reveal a trade secret and discussion of the matter in open meeting would be, on balance, contrary to the public interest.


 

 

Outcome 4

 

3        DPIE Festival of Place Programs and Investment NSW CBD Revitalisation Funding                                                                                                                                             

 

This item has been referred to Committee of the Whole as the report refers to commercial information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed (i) prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied it; or (ii) confer a commercial advantage on a competitor of the Council; or (iii) reveal a trade secret and discussion of the matter in open meeting would be, on balance, contrary to the public interest.

 

 

The meeting resumed at 8:04pm and the General Manager reported that the Committee of the Whole met at 7:52pm on 10 January 2022, the following being present

 

 

Her Worship the Mayor, Councillor Tricia Hitchen, Deputy Mayor Councillor John Thain, and Councillors Jim Aitken OAM, Bernard Bratusa, Todd Carney, Robin Cook, Kevin Crameri OAM, Mark Davies, Sue Day, Ross Fowler OAM, Glenn Gardiner, Karen McKeown OAM,  Jonathan Pullen, Mark Rusev and Marlene Shipley.

 

and the Committee of the Whole excluded the press and public from the meeting for the reasons set out in CW1 and that the Committee of the Whole submitted the following recommendations to Council.

 

CONFIDENTIAL BUSINESS

 

2        RFT21/22-17 Refurbishment Works at Ripples Leisure Centre St Marys                   

 A MOTION was moved by Councillor Bernard Bratusa

That:

1.   The information contained in the report on RFT21/22-17 Refurbishment Works at Ripples Leisure Centre St Marys be received.

2.   Council reject all tendered, accepted and resolved offers; and does not engage the market for fresh applications due to suitable applications already having been received.

3.   The General Manager (or their delegate) be authorised to negotiate with the most suitably qualified tenderer including Trinity Quality Interiors Pty Ltd. and Lloyd Group Pty Ltd. who have submitted qualifying tenders.

4.   The outcome of negotiations be reported to Council at the earliest possible time, after which Councillors will make a decision on the determination of the General Manager (or their delegate)

There being no seconder the MOTION LAPSED.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDED on the MOTION of Councillor Mark Davies seconded Councillor Ross Fowler OAM

CW2 That:

1.   The information contained in the report on RFT21/22-17 Refurbishment Works at Ripples Leisure Centre St Marys be received.

2.   Council reject all tendered, accepted and resolved offers; and does not engage the market for fresh applications due to suitable applications already having been received.

3.   The General Manager (or their delegate) be authorised to negotiate with the most suitably qualified tenderer including Trinity Quality Interiors Pty Ltd. and Lloyd Group Pty Ltd. who have submitted qualifying tenders.

4.   The General Manager (or their delegate) be authorised to sign all necessary legal documents in relation to this matter.

5.   The outcome of the negotiations be reported to Council at the February 2022 Ordinary Meeting.

 

 

3        DPIE Festival of Place Programs and Investment NSW CBD Revitalisation Funding                                                                                                                                             

RECOMMENDED on the MOTION of Councillor Karen McKeown OAM seconded Councillor Todd Carney

CW3 That:

1.     The information contained in the report on DPIE Festival of Place Programs and Investment NSW CBD Revitalisation Funding be received.

2.     Council endorse the acceptance of $15,000 from DPIE through the Summer Nights Fund for the delivery of an event in Penrith City Centre and $500,000 from DPIE for Open Streets programming to be delivered in St Marys Town Centre and Penrith City Centre.

 

3.     Council endorse the application for funding under the CBD Revitalisation Program and accept funds should the application be successful.

 

 

ADOPTION OF Committee of the Whole

 

19  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor John Thain seconded Councillor Mark Rusev          that the recommendations contained in the Committee of the Whole and shown as CW1, CW2 and CW3 be adopted.

 

 

There being no further business the Chairperson declared the meeting closed the time being 8:05pm.

 



PENRITH CITY COUNCIL

 

Procedure for Addressing Meetings

 

Anyone can request permission to address a meeting, providing that the number of speakers is limited to three in support of any proposal and three against.

 

Any request about an issue or matter on the Agenda for the meeting can be lodged with the General Manager or Public Officer up until 12 noon on the day of the meeting.

 

Prior to the meeting the person who has requested permission to address the meeting will need to provide the Public Officer with a written statement of the points to be covered during the address in sufficient detail so as to inform the Councillors of the substance of the address and a written copy of any questions to be asked of the Council in order that responses to those questions can be provided in due course.

 

In addition, prior to addressing the meeting a person addressing Council or Committee will be informed that they do not enjoy any privilege and that permission to speak may be withdrawn should they make inappropriate comments.

 

It should be noted that persons who wish to address the Council are addressing a formal part of the Council Meeting. All persons addressing the Meeting should give consideration to their dress attire. Smart casual is a minimum that is thought to be appropriate when addressing such a forum.

 

It should be noted that speakers at meetings of the Council or Committee do not have absolute privilege (parliamentary privilege).  A speaker who makes any potentially offensive or defamatory remarks about any other person may render themselves open to legal action.

 

Prior to addressing the meeting the person will be required to sign the following statement:

 

“I (name) understand that the meeting I intend to address on (date) is a public meeting.  I also understand that should I say or present any material that is inappropriate, I may be subject to legal action.  I also acknowledge that I have been informed to obtain my own legal advice about the appropriateness of the material that I intend to present at the above mentioned meeting”.

 

Should a person fail to sign the above statement then permission to address either the Council or Committee will not be granted.

 

The Public Officer or Minute Clerk will speak to those people who have requested permission to address the meeting, prior to the meeting at 6.45pm.

 

It is up to the Council or Committee to decide if the request to address the meeting will be granted.

 

Where permission is to be granted the Council or Committee, at the appropriate time, will suspend only so much of the Standing Orders to allow the address to occur.

 

The Chairperson will then call the person up to the lectern or speaking area.

 

The person addressing the meeting needs to clearly indicate:

 

·    Their name;

 

·    Organisation or group they are representing (if applicable);

 

·  Details of the issue to be addressed and the item number of the report in the Business Paper;

 

·  Whether they are opposing or supporting the issue or matter (if applicable) and the action they would like the meeting to take;

 

·         The interest of the speaker (e.g. affected person, neighbour, applicant,    applicants spokesperson, interested citizen etc).

 

Each person then has five minutes to make their address.  Those addressing Council will be required to speak to the written statement they have submitted.  Permission to address Council is not to be taken as an opportunity to refute or otherwise the points made by previous speakers on the same issue. 

 

The Council or Committee can extend this time if they consider if appropriate, however, everyone needs to work on the basis that the address will be for five minutes only.

 

Councillors may have questions about the address so people are asked to remain at the lectern or in the speaking area until the Chairperson has thanked them.

 

When this occurs, they should then return to their seat.

 

Glenn McCarthy

Public Officer

02 4732 7649                                               

   


Mayoral Minutes

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

1        Australia Day Honours and Awards 2022                                                                          1

 

 

 



Ordinary Meeting                                                                                            21 February 2022

 

Mayoral Minute

Australia Day Honours and Awards 2022

           

 

I would like to take this opportunity to congratulate recipients of the Order of Australia medal. This year three local residents were acknowledged in the Australia Day Honours list, Dr Harald Alexander Pope, Barry Edward Roots and Major Kenneth John McKay.

 

Dr Harald Alexander Pope was awarded a Medal of the Order of Australia (OAM) for service to medicine through a range of roles. Dr Pope has played a pivotal role in raising standard of general practice; he has represented veterans and their health needs, managed large Western Sydney Medical Centres, and also taught as a Medical Educator at Western Sydney University as well as being a family doctor to generations of local families.  

 

Barry Edward Roots has been awarded an OAM for his service to secondary education. Mr Roots was a foundation Headmaster at Penrith Anglican College, and a foundation Deputy Headmaster at St Paul’s Grammar School. He served as chairman for the New Anglican Schools Association and the Australasian Association of International Baccalaureate Schools. Mr Roots is also featured on Penrith City Council’s wall of achievement, recognised in 2009 for his contributions to the community. 

 

Major Kenneth John McKay of Cambridge Park has been awarded an OAM for his service to veterans, and to history preservation. Major McKay served as both Secretary and Treasurer of the Army Museum of NSW Foundation, Honorary Secretary and Treasurer of the University of NSW Regiment Association. Major McKay was a Platoon Commander in the Australian Army Reserve in the 1980s and served 30 years in the Army Reserve at the UNSW regiment in Kensington. After retiring from the Army Reserve, Major McKay spent several years preserving and publishing their Regimental Reserve.

 

I would like to congratulate each of these individuals on this well-deserved recognition and thank them for their outstanding contributions to Penrith City and our community.

 

We look forward to celebrating our local Australia Day Honours recipients at our Local Celebrations Awards dinner later this year.

 

 

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Councillor Tricia Hitchen

Mayor

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the Mayoral Minute on Australia Day Honours and Awards 2022 be received.

 

 

 

 

 

  


Notices of Motion

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

1        Redland City Council - 2032 Friendship Agreement                                                         1

 

 

 



Ordinary Meeting                                                                                            21 February 2022

Notice of Motion

1          Redland City Council - 2032 Friendship Agreement            

 

 

Councillor Ross Fowler OAM TO MOVE:

 

1.   The General Manager write to Redland City Council offering our support and assistance through a friendship or similar formal arrangement in the development of their Whitewater facility and preparation for the 2032 Olympics.

 

2.   A report be brought back to Council on the outcome of any discussions.

 

Background

 

Brisbane has been chosen as the venue for the 2032 Olympic Games and Redland City Council will be hosting the Canoe Slalom Events at a purpose built facility called Redland Whitewater Centre. The proposed facility is part of an extensive community precinct on land acquired from the Commonwealth Government.

 

Redland City is a separate LGA in South East Queensland bordering Moreton Bay and is part of the Brisbane metropolitan area. Redland City Council has been a partner in the Brisbane 2032 proposal, starting in 2015 when the Council of Mayors (SEQ) agreed to investigate the opportunity as part of their long-term infrastructure planning.

 

Penrith is hosting the 2025 Slalom World Championships which may be provide a valuable opportunity for Redland City Council. This along with Penrith’s experience and involvement in the development of a Whitewater facility and the subsequent successful operation and management for over 20 years makes it appropriate that Council contact Redland Council as suggested in the Notice of Motion.

 

It is also noted that Penrith is hosting 2025 Slalom World Championships which may be provide.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.  


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


Reports of Committees

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

1        Report and Recommendations of the Penrith Community Safety Partnership Meeting held on 27 October 2021                                                                                                            1

 

2        Report and Recommendations of Local Traffic Committee held on 7 Feburary 2022      5

 

 

 

 



Ordinary Meeting                                                                                            21 February 2022

 

REPORT AND RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE
 Penrith Community Safety Partnership MEETING

HELD ON 27 October, 2021

 

 

 

PRESENT

Her Worship the Mayor, Councillor Karen McKeown OAM, Olivia Kidon, Penrith City Council; Allison Kyriakakis, Penrith City Council; Jeni Pollard, Penrith City Council (Chair); Erin Davidson, Penrith City Council; Lila Kennelly, Penrith City Council; Julie Graham, Nepean Police Area Command; Jacob Player, Nepean Police Area Command. 

 

APOLOGIES

Gai Hawthorn, Penrith City Centre Association; Craig Busby, Nepean Police Area Command.

 

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES - Penrith Community Safety Partnership Meeting - 16 June 2021

The  minutes of the Penrith Community Safety Partnership Meeting of 16 June 2021 were confirmed.

 

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

 

NIL

 

 

DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Outcome 4 - We have safe, vibrant places

 

1        Update on the delivery of Community Safety Projects

Good Neighbour Project

Olivia Kidon advised that Council received funding from the Office of Local Government in conjunction with Multicultural NSW to support local Councils with COVID-19 recovery efforts.

$60,000 of the grant funding was allocated to expand the Good Neighbour program to support isolated or vulnerable residents. A mobile support service offered a check in, delivery of care kits, and referral information and resources.

Eighty (80) referrals have been received to date seeking support for older people, vulnerable families, people with disabilities and culturally and linguistically diverse residents.

 

Warner Graffiti Education Program

Olivia advised that program delivery has been significantly impacted by the COVID-19 lockdowns, home-based learning and restriction of visitors within schools as the program facilitators are based in Victoria.

An online learning module was offered to schools during the year with only a small take up.

 

Face-to-face delivery of the program will recommence in 2022, with uptake from schools already for term one and two.

 

Re-establishment of Alcohol Free Zones and Alcohol Prohibited Areas

Olivia provided an update on the establishment of Alcohol Free Public Spaces across the LGA.  The consultation period concluded in June, proposing to re-establish existing Alcohol Free Zones and Alcohol Prohibited Areas for an additional four (4) year period from 1 July 2021 to 30 June 2025 . This was endorsed by Council at its Ordinary Meeting in July 2021.

Existing signage is currently being updated at each location. New signs, with updated branding will be installed in the Penrith, St Marys and Kingswood city centre areas.

 

Domestic and Family Violence Campaign – 16 Days of Action Against Gender-Based Violence

Erin Davidson advised that due to ongoing COVID-19 impacts and extensive construction work along the Great River Walk, this year the Community Safety team is delivering an online campaign in place of the annual river walk event. ‘16 Days of Action Against Gender Based Violence’ is part of a worldwide campaign running from 25 November to 10 December calling for an end to violence against women and girls through gender equality.

The campaign invites residents to follow council’s social media, where we will be sharing a simple action each day to raise awareness, increase understanding around gender equality and how individuals, communities and organisations can work together to end violence against women and girls.

The campaign will commence on 25 November with an online launch via Zoom. Council will also be offering a free 2-hour, online community training module built on the Our Watch “Change the Story” framework on 9 December.

 

Illegal Trail Bike Working Group

Allison Kyriakakis advised that illegal trail bike activity has become an ongoing challenge for both Council and Nepean Police Area Command.

The Community Safety team has been working closely with Nepean Police Area Command and other stakeholders to address community concerns. A working group has been established to provide a coordinated approach and provide a consistent, effective response to the issue.

Key Council-led actions include installation of physical treatments to deter access such as bollards, sandstone blocks and fencing in public spaces where suitable; and distribution of community education resources across hot spot locations encouraging residents to report illegal activity.

Julie Graham advised that illegal trail bike riding is an issue and discussed across many of the online community Facebook pages. Julie also asked if the information contained in education resources around penalties had been updated, as these change each year.

 

Federal Community development Grant Funded Projects

·    CCTV Project for Werrington and St Marys - $150,000

The installation of CCTV cameras at Victoria Street, Werrington has been completed and these are now operational.

 

The installation of additional cameras within the St Marys Town Centre will commence soon and is on track to be completed by the end of the year.

·    CCTV project for Kingswood Shopping Strip - $100,000

Cameras will be installed along Bringelly Road shopping strip, Kingswood, due for completion by July 2022.

Both CCTV projects will be managed in accordance with Council’s Public Spaces CCTV Program Code of Practice with footage accessible only to police for criminal investigations.

·    Great River Walk Safety Upgrade Project - $1 million

Pedestrian lighting will be installed along the tree-lined section of footpath between Nepean Avenue and Jamison Road to support safe night-time use.

A tender process has been undertaken and a contractor has been selected with works anticipated to commence in early 2022.

These projects have been funded by the Federal Government’s Community Development Grants Program.

 

Women’s Co-Design Workshop

In September 2021, the Community Safety Team worked with Council’s City Renewal and Design and Projects teams to host an online co-design workshop with nine local women from the local community of Kingswood. The workshop aimed to encourage input on the design, sense of safety, cultural significance and design inclusiveness of planned public space projects at Wainwright Park and nearby sections of Bringelly Road, Kingswood.

The workshop was a pilot and aligns with Council’s membership to the Women’s Safety Charter and the premise that spaces that are safer for women are safer for everyone.

 

RECOMMENDED

That the information contained in the report on Update on the delivery of Community Safety Projects be received.

 

POLICE UPDATE

 

Julie Graham provided a brief update on trends from Nepean Police Area Command.

 

Reporting and police attendance has increased during COVID-19 for domestic and family violence related incidents. In the last quarter there has been an increase in calls for assistance.

 

Retail theft has been consistent across the region and online scams continue to be a concern, especially for older people.

 

There has been a spike in stealing of delivered parcels from doorsteps, likely due to the increase in online shopping during lockdowns and the upcoming Christmas period.

 

Nepean Police Area Command have been pushing community safety messages through their Facebook page and will continue to do so over the Christmas period.

 

 

 

GENERAL BUSINESS

 

GB1            Saturday 4 December Elections – Councillor Karen McKeown OAM, Mayor             of Penrith

 

Partnership members were reminded that the Local Government elections will be held on Saturday 4 December. The returning office is in St Marys and there are many more pre-polling locations this year for early voting.

 

 

GB2            Local Events – Julie Graham

 

A street parade is being held in the Penrith city centre on Saturday 20 November to celebrate the Penrith Panthers’ 2021 NRL grand final win. Police officers from NSW Traffic and Highway Patrol will be involved, and no roads will be closed.

 

Councillor McKeown added that the stadium will be opened to replay the game and this will be a ticketed event.

 

 

There being no further business the Chairperson declared the meeting closed the time being 2.05pm.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the recommendations contained in the Report and Recommendations of the Penrith Community Safety Partnership meeting held on 27 October, 2021 be adopted.

 


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                            21 February 2022

 

REPORT AND RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE
 Local Traffic Committee MEETING

HELD ON 7 February, 2022

(Note: due to prevailing public health crisis, and related COVID-19 protocols, the Local Traffic Committee Business Paper and reports were referred to members and a formal meeting held via on-line Zoom platform).

PRESENT

Councillor Karen McKeown OAM (Representative for the Member for Penrith), Councillor Robin Cook (Representative for the Member for Londonderry), Sergeant Matthew Shirvington – Nepean Police Area Command (PAC), Raymond Tran - Transport for NSW (TfNSW).

IN ATTENDANCE

Adam Wilkinson - Engineering Services Manager (Chair), David Drozd - Traffic Engineering Coordinator, Lalaine Malaluan - Transport Engineer, Wendy Read - Road Safety Officer, Mia Ecob - Acting Engineering Services Secretary, Tiana Dickson - Business Administration Trainee, Steve Grady – Busways, Paul Bottomley - CDC Bus.

 

APOLOGIES

Mayor, Councillor Tricia Hitchen (Representative – Stuart Ayres, Member for Penrith), Andrew Jackson - Director Development and Regulatory Services, Kylie Thornley - Traffic Administration Officer, Daniel Davidson – Senior Traffic Engineer, Graham Green - Senior Traffic Engineer, Kablan Mowad - Senior Traffic Engineer, Anthony Baradhy - Traffic Engineering Officer.

 

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES - Local Traffic Committee Meeting - 1 November 2021

LTC 1 that the minutes of the Local Traffic Committee Meeting of 1 November 2021 be confirmed.

 

(Note: Clr Karen McKeown OAM raised the issue of the attendance list, noting her incorrect title of Deputy Mayor)

 

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

 

Nil.

 

DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Outcome 3 - We can get around the City

 

1        Troy Street, Emu Plains - Adjustments to parking restrictions including the designated 'No Parking' student drop off and pick up zone at Our Lady of the Way Catholic Primary School

Councillor Karen McKeown OAM raised the issue of the signs along Forbes Street, Emu Plains. Wendy Read – Road Safety Officer advised she will double check the signs on her next site inspection.

RECOMMENDATION

LTC 2 That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Troy Street, Emu Plains - Adjustments to parking restrictions including the designated 'No Parking' student drop off and pick up zone at Our Lady of the Way Catholic Primary School be received.

2.     The signage and linemarking plan TS0095 dated 3 February 2022 regarding the adjustments of the part-time ‘No Parking’ zone and other regulatory signage on Troy Street, Emu Plains as shown in Appendix 1 be endorsed for installation.

3.     The School Principal be advised of Council’s resolution and be requested to provide additional road safety resources to families to encourage the continued use of ‘park and walk’ initiative where possible, and for families to comply with the NSW Road Rules, including when using the drop off/pick up zone.

4.     Council’s Asset Management Supervisor and Signs & Lines Marking Supervisor be advised of the Council’s resolution and include the signage adjustment to the future program of works.

5.     Council’s Ranger Services department and The Nepean Police Area Command be advised of Council’s resolution.

 

2        Oxford Street, Cambridge Park - Adjustments to parking restrictions including the designated 'No Parking' student drop off and pick up at Cambridge Park Public School                                                                     

RECOMMENDATION

LTC 3 That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Oxford Street, Cambridge Park - Adjustments to parking restrictions including the designated 'No Parking' student drop off and pick up at Cambridge Park Public School be received.

2.     The signage and linemarking plan numbered TS0096 and dated 3 February 2022 as shown in Appendix 1 be endorsed for installation.

3.     The School Principal be advised of Council’s resolution and be requested to provide additional road safety resources to families to encourage the continued use of ‘park and walk’ initiative where possible, and for families to comply with the NSW Road Rules, including when using the drop off/pick up zone.

4.     Council’s Asset Management Supervisor and Signs & Lines Marking Supervisor be advised of Council’s resolution and include the pedestrian crossing refurbishment and signage to the future program of works.

5.     Council’s Ranger Services department and The Nepean Police Area Command be advised of Council’s resolution.

 

3        Blair Avenue, St Marys - Provision of 'No Parking - Waste Collection and Removalist Vehicles Excepted' Zone                                                   

RECOMMENDATION

LTC 4 That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Blair Avenue, St Marys - Provision of 'No Parking - Waste Collection and Removalist Vehicles Excepted' Zone be received.

2.     The signage plan by Baini Design, Reference No. 21NL048, dated 07/12/21, Issue A, Sheet 3 (Option 2) for the installation of ‘No Parking – Waste Collection and Removalist Vehicles Excepted’ signage on Blair Avenue be endorsed for installation as shown in Appendix 1.

3.     All works associated with the implementation of the signposting shall be undertaken by the applicant in accordance with Section 8 of Council’s Engineering Construction Specification for Civil Works and Council standard drawings SD1006/1 and SD1006/2 and be at no cost to Council.

4.     Council’s Asset Section be notified for inclusion of the amended signs in Council’s asset management records and processes.

5.     The applicant and Council’s Rangers be advised of Council’s resolution.

 

4        Transport for NSW and Penrith City Council: Digital Smart Kerbs Pilot project 2022

Councillor Karen McKeown OAM was interested in how the areas were chosen for the Transport for NSW project and what methodologies were used to collect this data. Wendy Read – Road Safety Officer advised that the City Strategy Team were in consultation with Transport for NSW (TfNSW) regarding the locations and where the opportunity sites would be determined. The sensors would use a diverse range of technologies for the pilot study which could be rolled out throughout other areas of the Penrith LTC. Adam Wilkinson – Engineering Services Manager (Chair) additionally advised that the technology will look at all facets of movement. Councillor Karen McKeown OAM stated that it was a fantastic idea and initiative and that it could has the potential if successful to be applied in the St Mary’s and Penrith CBD’s in the future.

RECOMMENDATION

LTC 5 That

1.   The information contained in the report on Transport for NSW and Penrith City Council: Digital Smart Kerbs Pilot project 2022 be received.

 

5        Penrose Crescent, South Penrith – Proposed ‘No Stopping’ Restrictions                                                                                                     

RECOMMENDATION

LTC 6 That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Penrose Crescent, South Penrith – Proposed ‘No Stopping’ Restrictions be received.

2.     Consultation be undertaken with affected properties regarding the proposed ‘No Stopping’ restrictions on Penrose Crescent, South Penrith as illustrated in Appendix 1. 

3.     Subject to no substantial objections being received, the proposed ‘No Stopping’ signs on Penrose Crescent, South Penrith be installed as shown in Appendix 1.

4.     Council’s Rangers and the resident who reported the matter be advised of Council’s resolution.

 

6        Acacia Avenue and Floribunda Avenue, Glenmore Park - Proposed Bus Zone and No Stopping Restrictions

Steve Grady – Busways advised that it will clear up the intersection and make it safer for drivers on both sides of the road; he thanked Councils staff for the report and recommendations. Adam Wilkinson – Engineering Services Manager (Chair) thanked Steve for his support with this matter.                                                         

RECOMMENDATION

LTC 7 That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Acacia Avenue and Floribunda Avenue, Glenmore Park - Proposed Bus Zone and No Stopping Restrictions be received.

2.     ‘Bus Zone’ and ‘No Stopping’ signs and linemarking be installed on Acacia Avenue and Floribunda Avenue, Glenmore Park as shown in Appendix 1.

3.     Mr Steve Grady of Busways and the affected residents be advised of Council’s resolution.

 

7        Charles Street, St Marys – Proposed ‘No Stopping’ Restrictions

Adam Wilkinson – Engineering Services Manager (Chair) advised the Committee that Option 1 is the preferred option as it provides support for two-way traffic flow Councillor Karen McKeown OAM questioned the loss of 26 on street carparking spaces and questioned whether potentially widening the road could assist with the parking. She also highlighted whether there are storage containers onsite, preventing customers and staff parking inside the premise. David Drozd – Traffic Engineering Coordinator advised that they are systematically checked and there is a regime in place for compliance with this matter.                                                

RECOMMENDATION

LTC 8 That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Charles Street, St Marys – Proposed ‘No Stopping’ Restrictions be received.

2.     Consultation be undertaken with affected properties regarding the proposed installation of ‘No Stopping’ restrictions on Charles Street and Appin Place, St Marys as shown in Appendix 1 (Preferred Option 1) and Appendix 2 (Option 2).

3.     Subject to no substantial objections being received, ‘No Parking’ restrictions be installed on Charles Street, St Marys as shown in Appendix 1 (Preferred Option 1).

4.     Council’s Ranger Services Department and the customers who raised the matter be advised of Council’s resolution.

 

 

8        Gibson Avenue and Irwin Street, Werrington – Proposed Signage, Linemarking and Change to Intersection Priority

Councillor Karen McKeown OAM questioned the length of time the VMS boards would be visible to advise drivers of the changed conditions. Lalaine Malaluan – Transport Engineer advised it will be placed two weeks prior to the changes and then four weeks post the works.                                                                                

RECOMMENDATION

LTC 9 That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Gibson Avenue and Irwin Street, Werrington – Proposed Signage, Linemarking and Change to Intersection Priority be received.

2.     Consultation be undertaken with affected properties regarding the proposed changes in priority at Gibson Avenue and Irwin Street intersection.

3.     Subject to no substantial objections being received, the proposed signage, linemarking and change to intersection priority on Gibson Avenue and Irwin Street, Werrington be implemented as shown in Appendix 1.

4.     A VMS board be installed for a period of four weeks post the changed priorities in order to advise motorists of changes.

5.     The resident who reported the matter be advised of Council’s resolution.

 

9        Woodriff Street Car Park – Proposed ‘No Parking’ Signs                         

RECOMMENDATION

LTC 10 That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Woodriff Street Car Park – Proposed ‘No Parking’ Signs be received.

2.     Consultation be undertaken with the Penrith Bowling Club in relation to the proposed changes.

3.     Subject to no substantial objections, the proposed signage be installed as shown in Appendix 1.

4.     Councillor Ross Fowler OAM be advised of Council’s resolution.

 

10      Lord Sheffield Circuit, Thornton - Proposed Give Way and Line Marking Treatment at Multiple Intersections                                              

RECOMMENDATION

LTC 11 That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Lord Sheffield Circuit, Thornton - Proposed Give Way and Line Marking Treatment at Multiple Intersections be received.

2.     The proposed ‘Give Way’ signs, holding lines, and 10m of double barrier line marking on approach to the intersections be installed, as shown in Appendix 1.

3.     The resident who reported the matter, and the residents adjacent to the intersections be informed.

 

11      Victoria Street, Werrington - Endorsement of Design Plan AV39, AV40 and AV41

Raymond Tran – Transport for NSW (TfNSW) raised the question of whether the MIST met the Australian Standards. David Drozd – Traffic Engineering Coordinator advised that the width of the median island is under the standard as it a balancing act with this location. However, it does address the corner cutting issues. Raymond Tran – Transport for NSW (TfNSW) said that this can be discussed offline to ensure it meets the objective of the standard requirements.    

RECOMMENDATION

LTC 12 That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Victoria Street, Werrington - Endorsement of Design Plan AV39, AV40 and AV41 be received.

2.     Consultation be undertaken with all affected residents and businesses.

3.     Subject to no substantial objections, Design Plans AV39, AV40 and AV41 be endorsed for construction, with funding provided from National Blackspot & Safe Road program 2021/22.

4.     A street lighting assessment be conducted in accordance with Council’s Public Domain Lighting Policy (August 2004) to ensure compliance with the relevant lighting category

 

12      Memorial Avenue, Penrith – Endorsement of Signage and Linemarking Plan                                                                                                                  

RECOMMENDATION

LTC 13 That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Memorial Avenue, Penrith – Endorsement of Signage and Linemarking Plan be received.

2.     The signage and linemarking plan prepared by Epicentre Consulting Engineers (reference 21863-001, issue TK, dated 31/01/22) associated with the approved Development Application DA20/0208 and Engineering Approvals (Section 138 Roads Act) EA21/0004 for the Log Cabin Hotel development be endorsed for installation, as shown in Appendix 1.

3.     All works associated with the implementation of the signposting and/or linemarking shall be undertaken by the applicant.

4.     Council’s Asset Section be notified for inclusion of the amended signs in Council’s asset management records and processes.

5.     The applicant and Council’s Rangers be advised of Council’s resolution.

 

13      Old Bathurst Road, Emu Heights – Proposed ‘Winding Road’ Signage

Raymond Tran – Transport for NSW (TfNSW) queried the positioning of the proposed signage location and that the compliance with these type of signs can be difficult to manage. He recommended that the placement of the sign should be established prior to any curves, preferably east. Councillor Karen McKeown OAM questioned the use of the flashing lights in residential areas but also requested to have this further investigated.

David Drozd – Traffic Engineering Coordinator advised that the signage attempts to achieve its purpose of turning trucks around before they hit the bends however, proposed the idea of deferring this matter for further investigations to be made. Adam Wilkinson – Engineering Services Manager (Chair) agreed with all the points raised and advised that the item be deferred for review and discussion.      

RECOMMENDATION

LTC 14 That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Old Bathurst Road, Emu Heights – Proposed ‘Winding Road’ Signage be received.

2.     Consultation be undertaken with affected properties regarding the proposed ‘Winding Road’ signage along Old Bathurst Road, Emu Heights.

3.     Subject to no substantial objections being received, the proposed signage along Old Bathurst Road, Emu Heights be installed as shown in Appendix 1. The flashing lights will be installed in accordance to AS1742.2:2009 and AS2144 requirements.

4.     The customer who reported the matter be advised of Council’s resolution.

 

14      Kings Central Estate, Werrington - Endorsement of Signage and Linemarking Plans                                                                                         

RECOMMENDATION

LTC 15 That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Kings Central Estate, Werrington - Endorsement of Signage and Linemarking Plans be received.

2.     Signage and linemarking plans CV-CARDNO-S01-1751 to CV-CARDNO-S01-1754, Revision 4, dated March 2021, be endorsed for installation by the developer and at no cost to Council.

3.     The developer be advised of Council’s decision.

4.     Council’s Asset Section be advised for inclusion in Council’s asset register.

5.     Council’s Ranger Services be advised.

 

 

GENERAL BUSINESS

 

GB 1           Charles Hackett Drive and Great Western Highway, St Marys Intersection Update on Request for Right-Hand Green Arrow 

Councillor Karen McKeown OAM requested an update on the status of the intersection of Charles Hackett Drive and Great Western Highway, St Marys. Raymond Tran – Transport for NSW (TfNSW) advised that he has referred the matter to the Network Operations Team as it is under their responsibility to review and access the request. He advised that he will follow up the request.

 

 RECOMMENDATION

LTC 16 That:

1.     The information contained in General Business Item 1, Charles Hackett Drive and Great Western Highway, St Marys Intersection Update on Request for Right-Hand Green Arrow be received.

2.     Transport for NSW to follow up with the Networks Operations Team and write to Council with an update on the status.

 

GB 2           Ridgetop Drive, Glenmore Park – Speeding and Excessive Noise

Councillor Karen McKeown OAM had received several emails from resident’s in this area advising of the speeding and excessive noise coming from drivers. Adam Wilkinson – Engineering Services Manager (Chair) advised that Council has responded to a resident that has sent through their concerns. He stated that speed counts were being arranged and the correspondence regarding their request was being addressed. Councillor Karen McKeown OAM also advised that it fronts a school. Sergeant Matthew Shirvington – Nepean Police Area Command (PAC) advised that there was a crash the previous night along this street (located near house number 11) and had received an email from Wendy Read, requesting for further information. Sergeant Matthew Shirvington – Nepean Police Area Command (PAC) advised that he will make some inquiries about the crash and report back to Council. 

 

RECOMMENDATION

LTC 17 That:

1.     The information contained in General Business Item 2, Ridgetop Drive, Glenmore Park – Speeding and Excessive Noise be received.

2.     Council’s Road Safety Officer and Traffic Engineers to work with Nepean PAC regarding the investigations. 

 

GB 3           Peppermint Crescent, Kingswood – Concerns for Proposed Traffic Calming Devices Implementation     

Councillor Karen McKeown OAM advised she has received several emails from residents in Peppermint Crescent, Kingswood who are not pleased with the proposed traffic calming devices that will be implemented in front of their property. Adam Wilkinson – Engineering Services Manager (Chair) advised that this matter will be reported back to the Local Traffic Committee in March, due to substantial objection to the proposed plans. Councillor Robin Cook also raised this matter as the residents advised that work was currently underway at their property.

 

RECOMMENDATION

LTC 18 That:

1.     The information contained in General Business Item 3, Peppermint Crescent, Kingswood – Concerns for Proposed Traffic Calming Devices Implementation be received.

2.     Council’s Traffic Engineers finalise investigations and report back to a future Committee meeting.

 

GB 4           Crane Australia, Dunheved Circuit, St Marys – Request for Protection Barrier Installation        

Councillor Robin Cook received a request from the manager of Crane Australia requesting for the installation of a protection barrier out the front of his business. Mia Ecob – Acting Engineering Services Secretary advised that this request has been received and correspondence was being prepared.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

LTC 19 That:

1.     The information contained in General Business Item 4, Crane Australia, Dunheved Circuit, St Marys – Request for Protection Barrier Installation be received.

2.     Council’s Traffic Engineers report back to the customer and Councillors regarding the outcome of the request.

 

GB 5           Canberra Street, Oxley Park – Request for Speed Humps     

Adam Wilkinson – Engineering Services Manager (Chair) raised the matter on behalf of Mayor, Councillor Tricia Hitchen regarding the concerns from a resident for speeding along Canberra Street and the request for speed humps/speed counts to be undertaken and investigated.

 

RECOMMENDATION

LTC 20 That:

1.     The information contained in General Business Item 5, Canberra Street, Oxley Park – Request for Speed Humps be received.

2.     Council’s Traffic Engineers report back to Councillors regarding the outcome of the request.

 

GB 6           Muru Drive, Glenmore Park – Recent Car Accident      

Adam Wilkinson – Engineering Services Manager (Chair) wished to make note of the accident that occurred on Friday 29 January 2022 along Muru Drive where a speeding car crashed into a house, causing significant damage to the property. While driver behaviour and substances were the allege cause of the accident, the request to work with the Nepean Police Area Command (PAC) Team to review the accident report and environmental factors would be welcomed by all parties. Sergeant Matthew Shirvington – Nepean Police Area Command (PAC) agreed and will respond to the outcome of driver behaviour.

 

RECOMMENDATION

LTC 21 That:

1.     The information contained in General Business Item 6, Muru Drive, Glenmore Park – Recent Car Accident be received.

2.     Council’s Road Safety Officer and Traffic Engineers to work with Nepean PAC regarding the investigations. 

 

There being no further business the Chairperson declared the meeting closed the time being 10:27am.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the recommendations contained in the Report and Recommendations of the Local Traffic Committee meeting held on 7 February, 2022 be adopted.

  


DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

 

Outcome 1 - We can work close to home

 

1        Cooperative Marketing Opportunities with Destination NSW                                            1

 

Outcome 2 - We plan for our future growth

 

2        Submission to the Fernhill Estate Draft Landscape Masterplan                                       7

 

3        Submission to Local and State Infrastructure Contributions Reforms                            67

 

4        Submission to "A New Approach Rezoning Discussion Paper"                                    108

 

5        Submission to the Design and Place SEPP                                                                  136

 

 

 

 

Outcome 3 - We can get around the City

 

6        Review of Environmental Factors (REF) for New Richmond Bridge and Traffic Improvements-Stage 1The Driftway                                                                              161

 

7        Acceptance of Grant Funding - Local Road and Community Infrastructure Program - Extension of Program (Phase 3)                                                                                    166

 

8        Pedestrian Safety Program Funding (High Pedestrian Activity Area) 2021/22             170

 

9        Factory Road and Loftus Street Footpaths                                                                    172

 

 

 

 

Outcome 4 - We have safe, vibrant places

 

10      Streetlights Ahead Program - Converting Streetlights to LEDs                                     177

 

11      RFT 21/22-15 Public Domain Cleaning Services                                                          180

 

12      RFT21/22-17 Refurbishment Works at Ripples Leisure Centre St Marys                    185

 

 

 

Outcome 5 - We care about our environment

 

13      Little Creek Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan                        189

 

14      College, Orth and Werrington Creeks Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan                                                                                                                                 205

 

 

Outcome 6 - We are healthy and share strong community spirit

 

15      Access Committee - Appointment of Community Members 2022-26                           221

 

16      Paddle Australia - Event Sponsorship Proposals                                                          225

 

17      Digital Literacy Mentoring Program for Isolated Seniors - Successful Grant Submission 230

 

18      Request from Fusion Western Sydney to Support Local Young People                      233

 

19      Acceptance of Grant Funding - Sport and Recreation Infrastructure                            235

 

20      Grant Funding Application - Destination NSW Regional Event Fund                           244

 

21      Grant Funding Application - Multi-Sport Community Facility Fund                               246

 

22      COVID Recovery – Special Purposes Grant                                                                 250

 

23      RFT 21/22-04 Doug Rennie Amenities Redevelopment                                               253

 

24      RFT 21/22-05 Ched Towns Amenities Redevelopment                                                257

 

25      RFT21/22-07 Gipps Street Recreation Precinct - Landscape Construction                 261

 

26      RFT21/22-14 Hickeys Lane Amenities Building Construction                                       265

 

27      RFT21/22-22 Bill Ball Amenities                                                                                    269

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Outcome 7 - We have confidence in our Council

 

28      RFT21/22-16 for the Provision of Catering Supplies and Consumable Products         276

 

29      2022 Australian Local Government Association (ALGA) National General Assembly (NGA)                                                                                                                                         282

 

30      Licence of 688 High Street Penrith                                                                                298

 

31      Easement for electrical substation Allen Place Penrith Lot 1 DP1263787                   304

 

32      Organisational Performance and Financial Review - December 2021                         312

 

33      Summary of Investment & Banking for the Period 1 December 2021 to 31 December 2021                                                                                                                                         424

 

34      Summary of Investment & Banking for the Period 1 January

 2022 to 31 January 2022                                                                                              432

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


Outcome 1 - We can work close to home

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

1        Cooperative Marketing Opportunities with Destination NSW                                            1

 

 

 



Ordinary Meeting                                                                                            21 February 2022

 

 

 

1

Cooperative Marketing Opportunities with Destination NSW   

 

Compiled by:               Stacey Rossetto, City Marketing Coordinator

Rebekah Elliott, City Economic and Marketing Manager

Authorised by:            Jeni Pollard, Manager - City Resilience

Kylie Powell, Director - City Futures  

 

Outcome

We can work close to home

Strategy

Attract investment to grow the economy and increase the range of businesses operating in the region

Service Activity

Promote Penrith as a place to live and work in through marketing

      

 

Executive Summary

This report provides information to Council on recent funding opportunities from Destination NSW (DNSW) to deliver cooperative marketing activities.

 

DNSW invited Expressions of Interests (EOIs) in early December across three categories to support cooperative marketing opportunities in 2022 with an aim to drive visitation across NSW following the easing of restrictions and to boost the tourism and visitor economy post COVID.  A memo detailing the EOIs was provided to Councillors on 1 December 2021.

 

The three cooperative marketing opportunities focus on attracting new visitors to Penrith during non-peak periods with weekly offers on social media, raising destination awareness and intention to visit through online editorial and social media marketing and increased awareness and bookings in preferred domestic markets with a customised advertising plan.

 

This report recommends that Council endorse the Expressions of Interest for funding to Destination NSW for the purpose of cooperative marketing activities as outlined in this report. 

Background

Penrith City Council has a strong history of leading programs and initiatives that promote Penrith as a place to live, visit and work. These projects build on Council’s approach of marketing our city to visitors and to building the relationships with our local tourism operators.

 

Penrith Council has proven success working with Destination NSW to deliver cooperative marketing initiatives, including the ‘Not Your Usual’ Penrith campaign and the ‘Wake Up’ campaign delivered with Blue Mountains and Hawkesbury Councils. Council continues to look for opportunities to leverage our partnership and to work collaboratively with Destination NSW to grow the visitor economy in Penrith.  

 

In December 2021, DNSW invited Councils and Regional Tourism Organisations (RTOs) to buy into cooperative marketing opportunities in 2022 to drive visitation across NSW following the easing of restrictions and to boost the tourism and visitor economy post COVID. As the economy recovers from the pandemic, all sectors, especially tourism, are investing in their marketing budgets.

 

EOIs were open from 2-9 December 2021 and advice was they were to be awarded on a first come first served basis. Council staff submitted the EOIs on 2 December 2021. Given the short timeframe for EOIs, it was not possible to report to Council prior to the application’s submission. Should the EOIs be successful, Council will enter a negotiation period with Destination NSW. Should negotiation be successful, formal agreements will be drawn up and signed by both parties.

About Cooperative Marketing

The cooperative marketing campaigns are designed to encourage collaboration between Council, DNSW and industry. The primary objectives are to:

·    Deliver positive and measurable economic outcomes for the NSW Tourism industry

·    Support collaboration between industry and all levels of Government

·    Support new products and experience development

·    Provide increased investment in high quality marketing campaigns promoting destinations in NSW

EOI Categories and proposed activities

Submissions were made to the three available categories for funding through the DNSW Cooperative Marketing Program. Further details on each category are outlined below.

 

High Impact, Intrastate and Interstate Marketing Campaign

A Council commitment of $200,000 (ex GST) toward a tailored marketing campaign to increase awareness and bookings with a customised advertising plan that will include social media, digital ads and high impact media such as TV and outdoor billboards.  The campaign spend will be matched 120% by DNSW, being $240,000 (ex GST).

 

The submission identifies that the $200,000 Council contribution will be made possible through funding from the Australian Government Black Summer Grants Program. Council’s submission to the Black Summer Grants Program was reported at the Ordinary Council Meeting of 27 September 2021. Council is currently awaiting notification of the outcome of the submission. The EOI submitted to Destination NSW will be amended pending the results of the Black Summer Grants program.

 

Destination-specific Content Marketing

A Council commitment of $40,000 (ex GST) towards raising destination awareness and intention to visit through online editorial and social media marketing. DNSW will provide matched funding of 120%.

 

Council has allocated $40,000 (ex GST) from its existing City Economy and Marketing budget. If successful, DNSW would match the campaign spend by 120%, being $48,000 (ex GST). 

 

Weekly Offers Promotion
Council engaged eight local tourism operators to participate in the Weekly Offers Promotion which requires $4,000 (ex GST) from industry funds, $500 per operator, to contribute to a weekly offers promotion to be advertised on social media. Local operators could not submit an EOI directly to DNSW. Submissions to this category were through a Local Council or Regional Tourism Organisation.  

Timing

Successful Expressions of Interest are expected to be announced early this year. The proposed campaign activity will be delivered in 2022.

 

Financial Implications

The EOI identifies up to $240,000 of Council funding toward cooperative marketing activities. Funding of $40,000 has been identified from within the existing City Economy and Marketing budget and possible funding of $200,000 from the Australian Government Black Summer Grants Program. The EOI will be amended pending the results of Council’s submission to the Black Summer Grants program.

Risk Implications

There are no significant risks for Council associated with this report. All project risks will be managed by Council staff through risk management procedures.

Conclusion

Partnering with DNSW will significantly increase Penrith’s marketing spend enabling better cut-through for Penrith in the tourism advertising space.  The Expressions of Interest will provide increased funding toward marketing the city as an ideal place to visit and support the local economy by driving new visitors to Penrith.

 

The program also supports further collaboration between industry, Council and Destination NSW that encourages new product and experience development, further delivering on the Penrith Economic Development Strategy and Penrith Destination Management Plan. 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Cooperative Marketing Opportunities with Destination NSW be received

2.     Council endorse the Expressions of Interest to Destination NSW for the purpose of cooperative marketing activities as outlined in this report

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.  


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


Outcome 2 - We plan for our future growth

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

2        Submission to the Fernhill Estate Draft Landscape Masterplan                                       7

 

3        Submission to Local and State Infrastructure Contributions Reforms                            67

 

4        Submission to "A New Approach Rezoning Discussion Paper"                                    108

 

5        Submission to the Design and Place SEPP                                                                  136

 

 

 

 

 

 



Ordinary Meeting                                                                                            21 February 2022

 

 

 

2

Submission to the Fernhill Estate Draft Landscape Masterplan   

 

Compiled by:               Fiona McDermott, Urban Strategist

Renata Ferreira, City Design Lead

Authorised by:            Carlie Ryan, City Strategy Manager

Kylie Powell, Director - City Futures  

 

Outcome

We plan for our future growth

Strategy

Facilitate development in the City that considers the current and future needs of our community

Service Activity

Support and influence tri-government strategic planning in the Western Parkland City by responding to the City Deal commitments

    

 

Executive Summary

The purpose of this report is to seek Council’s endorsement of a submission to the Fernhill Estate Draft Landscape Masterplan (the Submission), to be forwarded to Greater Sydney Parklands (GSP).

 

The Draft Fernhill Estate Landscape Masterplan (Draft Landscape Masterplan) has been prepared by the GSP and was released on public exhibition from 30 November 2021 to 14 February 2022. To allow for a submission to be considered at an Ordinary Meeting, the GSP has agreed to receive a submission from Council by 28 February 2022.

 

Councillors have been updated in relation to planning for Fernhill Estate by Council staff and the NSW Government on several occasions as set out below:

 

·    Ordinary Meeting – 23 March 2020: submission to the Fernhill Estate Options Paper and draft Conservation Management Plan (endorsed)

·    23 December 2020: Councillor Memorandum

·    19 February 2021: Councillor Memorandum

·    Ordinary Meeting – 22 February 2021: submission to the draft Plan of Management (endorsed)

·    4 and 5 March 2021: Councillor Memorandums

·    Councillor Briefing – 20 September 2021: Presentation by the Greater Sydney Parklands Chief Executive on the draft Landscape Masterplan

·    14 October 2021: Councillor Memorandum

·    Ordinary Meeting – 25 October 2021: Submission to the draft Greater Sydney Parklands Trust Bill 2021 (endorsed)

·    30 November 2021: Councillor Memorandum

Councillor Briefing – 7 February 2022: Draft Submission to the Fernhill Estate Draft Landscape Masterplan 

 

The Draft Landscape Masterplan supports Council’s vision and aspirations for the site. It aligns with the Foundation Plan of Management which considered the different precincts of the Estate, their significance, land use opportunities and management priorities at a high level. The exhibited Landscape Masterplan Brochure is however light on detail, presenting only an outline of possible uses and activities under each key design move. Council staff will continue to work closely with the GSP as the various proposals related to community use of the site and the Mulgoa Scenic Road – Strategic Concept Design are refined and progressed.

 

It is recommended that Council endorse the Submission to the Draft Landscape Masterplan and forward a copy to the GSP by 28 February 2022.

Background

Fernhill Estate was acquired by the NSW Government in 2018. Planning for the Estate has been progressed by the Department of Planning, Industry and Environment (DPIE) and more recently the Greater Sydney Parklands (GSP).

 

Council has long held a vision that Fernhill Estate’s unique offering be preserved and celebrated through appropriate activation that allows greater public access without jeopardising its iconic attributes and idyllic rural setting. Council’s submissions to previous publicly exhibited documents for Fernhill Estate reflect this vision.

 

In late 2019, the DPIE prepared a Draft Future Use Options Paper (Options Paper) outlining potential future public uses of the Estate. A Draft Conservation Management Plan was placed on exhibition at the same time. At the 23 March 2020 Ordinary Meeting, Council endorsed a submission in response to the Options Paper and Draft Conservation Management Plan (Attachment 1).

 

In December 2020, the newly established the GSP agency placed the Draft Fernhill Estate Plan of Management on public exhibition. The Draft Plan of Management considered the different precincts of the Estate, their significance, land use opportunities and management priorities at a high level. Council endorsed a submission to the draft Plan of Management at the Ordinary Meeting of 22 February 2021 (Attachment 2).

 

The Foundation Plan of Management (Foundation PoM) to 2026 for Fernhill Estate was adopted on 19 October 2021. The Foundation PoM establishes the custodianship and stewardship for opening up and taking care of the Estate. It is the first PoM for the Estate.

 

The GSP is now starting to implement the actions set out in the Foundation PoM to continue to take care of the Estate and open it up further for the community to visit and enjoy. The Draft Landscape Masterplan is the first key step in this process. The GSP will also look to update the Draft Conservation Management Plan to include an assessment and response to the significant cultural landscapes of the Estate along with the Aboriginal history of the Estate. The revised Conservation Management Plan will be a companion document to the PoM and will directly inform the opening up and taking care of the Estate by GSP over the coming years. Councillors will be kept informed of progress.

Current Situation

The GSP has prepared the Draft Landscape Masterplan, which brings to life the key moves for the Estate outlined in the Fernhill Estate Foundation Plan of Management to 2026. One of the main actions identified in the PoM was to develop a landscape masterplan for the Estate.

 

Significantly, the Draft Landscape Masterplan identifies ten key design moves to help achieve the vision for Fernhill Estate and deliver on the Foundation PoM to 2026. These two important plans set out a series of actions to bring Fernhill Estate to life over the next five years, contributing to this important attraction in Mulgoa Valley and Greater Sydney. The ten key design moves build on feedback received from the community and stakeholders during early consultation in May 2021. They are:

 

1.   Northern Drive – creating space for recreation

2.   Fernhill House and Gardens – enhancing the parkland’s natural beauty

3.   ‘Ngunyul’ The Big Arc – restoring indigenous landscape

4.   Mulgoa Scenic Road – enhancing access to the park

5.   Moving around Fernhill – enhancing connections to open space

6.   Hayshed and Orchard – offering opportunities for play, leisure and movement in one place

7.   Northern Dam – incorporating diverse cultural and recreational activities

8.   Native Farm Gate – offering a place to experience and celebrate food production

9.   Fernhill Drive – providing safe access and scenic views

10. Wetland Discovery – greening the dams.

Comments on the Draft Landscape Masterplan

The Submission is broadly in support of the Draft Landscape Masterplan as it supports Council’s vision and aspirations for the site, as identified in Council’s Local Strategic Planning Statement and Green Grid Strategy and aligns with the Sports and Recreation Strategy, which supports a regional scale open space facility offering a variety of active and passive recreation opportunities. The Draft Landscape Masterplan also appears to broadly accommodate the community's desire for connected, multi-use, inclusive participation opportunities for different recreation types, while linking recreational, cultural, heritage, and natural values to the site’s first nations and colonial history. It is broadly in line with Council’s vision for the site.

 

The Draft Landscape Masterplan is also supported in so far as it demonstrates commitment to:

·    opening the Estate to the public for recreation activities.

·    opening the House to a range of events.

·    promoting the Estate as a major attraction for Mulgoa Valley and Greater Sydney.

·    providing a regional scale open space facility.

·    acknowledging and elevating the role of the site’s first nations and colonial history.

·    restoring, refurbishing and adaptively re-using Fernhill House and making good the Estate.

·    focusing on good and safe access and experience for the visitors.

In summary, the submission (Attachment 3):

·    Broadly supports the Draft Landscape Masterplan as it aligns with Council’s long held vision and aspirations for the site.

·    Provides general comments regarding:

Community interest in Fernhill Estate

Heritage

Water management

Traffic

Biodiversity

·    Details more specific comments and recommendations on each of the ten key design moves.

·    Identifies an opportunity to strengthen the key design moves to ensure the overarching vision and objectives for the site are carried through over time.

·    Seeks to ensure ongoing engagement with key stakeholder groups, local Aboriginal groups and Council to provide clarity and avoid any misinterpretation and/or misconceptions around planning for the site.

·    Supports Council’s continued involvement in the development of future detailed designs for activation and identification of potential commercial opportunities.

·    Continues to assert

·    Notes that Council will provide further detailed comments regarding traffic and access arrangements for the site (road design, entry points, speed limits etc.) and specifically the Mulgoa Scenic Road Strategic Concept Plan through collaboration with the GSP and Transport for NSW (TfNSW).

·    Reiterates comments made in Council’s submissions to previous publicly exhibited documents for Fernhill Estate that remain relevant to the Draft Landscape Masterplan, including in particular:

the importance of the viewshed from Fernhill House to St Thomas Church from a heritage perspective and the need to ensure it is preserved in future.

the need for an appropriate mechanism to ensure the ongoing upkeep of Fernhill House and associated heritage elements, such as establishing a fund to return income from activities on the Estate towards maintenance over time.  

·    Continues to seek clarity regarding the existing equestrian areas on the site and potential future specialist sports activities.

Fernhill Estate – Mulgoa Scenic Road – Strategic Concept Plan

Traffic and access arrangements on Mulgoa Road are important issues for both the future activation of Fernhill Estate and the broader Mulgoa community. To this end, Council Officers are collaborating with GSP and TfNSW to develop a Strategic Concept Plan for Mulgoa Road from Mayfair Road to Winbourne Road in Mulgoa Village. The project seeks to further integrate the village, Fernhill Estate and Mulgoa Road to strengthen this special scenic and village corridor as part of the community.

 

The scope of works for the Strategic Concept Plan Report includes the preparation of road, urban and landscape designs to create a “road in a park” environment. While Council Officers support the project intent, at this stage we do not have sufficient detail to determine a definitive position on traffic, access and/or design elements for the relevant section of Mulgoa Road.

 

The Mulgoa Scenic Road project continues to evolve with TfNSW who is partnering with GSP to design and deliver the project. It is understood that further work has been commissioned to inform a Draft Strategic Concept Plan in early-mid 2022. Council Officers will continue to work closely with TfNSW and GSP and provide input to the draft plan to ensure it delivers the best outcomes for our community.

 

Financial Implications

 

There are no financial implications for Council associated with this report.

 

The Mulgoa Scenic Road – Strategic Concept Plan is being co-sponsored by GSP and TfNSW. Any future upgrade works for Mulgoa Road would be funded by TfNSW as a classified (state) road.

Risk Implications

If Council does not provide a submission to the Draft Landscape Masterplan, the risk is that Council’s concerns and comments will not be fully understood and considered in finalising the Landscape Masterplan and will not be incorporated into future proposals related to community use of the site.

 

Importantly, the submission also highlights the significance of Mulgoa Road to the local community and flags Council’s intent to provide further detailed comments on traffic, access and/or design elements as the Mulgoa Scenic Road – Strategic Concept Design is refined and progressed. The risk otherwise is that an assumption could be made that Council has considered these arrangements as part of the ‘Mulgoa Scenic Road’ key design element of the Fernhill Estate Draft Landscape Masterplan.

Conclusion

The Fernhill Estate is a significant asset in our LGA and of special interest to the community. The Draft Landscape Masterplan describes how the Estate will open to the public for recreation activities, and over time become a major attraction for Mulgoa Valley and Greater Sydney.

 

The Draft Landscape Masterplan supports Council’s vision and aspirations for the site and is broadly supported in this regard. Council staff will continue to work closely with GSP as the various proposals related to community use of the site are refined and progressed.

 

Council staff will also continue to collaborate with GSP and TfNSW on the development of the Fernhill Estate Mulgoa Scenic Road Strategic Concept Plan to ensure that traffic and access arrangements on Mulgoa Road are appropriate to serve both Fernhill Estate and the broader Mulgoa community.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Submission to the Fernhill Estate Draft Landscape Masterplan be received.

2.     Council endorse the submission to the Fernhill Estate Draft Landscape Masterplan provided at Attachment 3 and forward a copy to Greater Sydney Parklands by 28 February 2022.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

PCC Submission to Future Use Options Paper for Fernhill Estate

12 Pages

Appendix

2.

PCC Submission to Fernhill Estate Draft Plan of Management 2030

5 Pages

Appendix

3.

PCC Submission to the Fernhill Estate Draft Landscape Masterplan

10 Pages

Appendix

 

 


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                         21 February 2022

Appendix 1 - PCC Submission to Future Use Options Paper for Fernhill Estate

 

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Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                         21 February 2022

Appendix 2 - PCC Submission to Fernhill Estate Draft Plan of Management 2030

 

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Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                         21 February 2022

Appendix 3 - PCC Submission to the Fernhill Estate Draft Landscape Masterplan

 

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Ordinary Meeting                                                                                            21 February 2022

 

 

 

3

Submission to Local and State Infrastructure Contributions Reforms       

 

Compiled by:               Natalie Stanowski, Principal Planner

Authorised by:            Natasha Borgia, City Planning Manager

Kylie Powell, Director - City Futures  

 

Outcome

We plan for our future growth

Strategy

Ensure services, facilities and infrastructure meet the changing needs of our City

Service Activity

Ensure services, facilitates and infrastructure meet the needs of a growing population through the contributions framework

 

Previous Items:           3- Submission to the Productivity Commission Review on Infrastructure Contributions- Councillor Briefing- 07 Sep 2020 7:00PM

                                      2- Submission to NSW Productivity Commission Review into Infrastructure Contributions- Ordinary Meeting- 28 Sep 2020 7:00PM

                                      1- Submission to Local and State Infrastructure Contributions Reforms- Councillor Briefing- 07 Feb 2022 7:00PM    

 

Executive Summary

This report informs Councillors of reforms to local and state infrastructure contributions, exhibited by both the Department of Planning and Environment (DPE) and the Independent Pricing and Regulatory Tribunal (IPART) in late 2021. The reforms include changes to Local Contributions, Land Use Planning and Regional Contributions (DPE) and a review of the Essential Works list, nexus, efficient design, and benchmarking (IPART). Councillors have received the following memorandums over the past year regarding the reforms:

·    11 March 21 - DPE accept recommendations from productivity commission review.

·    18 March 21 - Development Infrastructure Contributions update.

·    15 July 21 - Enquiry held by the NSW Legislative Council into the Environmental Planning and Assessment Amendment (Infrastructure Contributions) Bill 2021.

·    8 September 21 - Enquiry into the Infrastructure Contributions Bill.

·    24 September 21 - Update on the impending Development Contributions Reforms

·    22 October 21- Information on Infrastructure contributions reforms. 

·    26 October 21 - Advising of and attaching a Mayoral response to Minister Stokes on the Contributions Reform and letter received from The Hon. Mark Latham MLC advising that he does not support the NSW Government’s Environmental Planning and Assessment Amendment (Infrastructure Contributions) Bill 2021. 

·    29 October 21 - Informing Councillors about the exhibition of the reforms.

·    4 November 2021 - Informing Councillors of the release of the IPART review.

·    30 November 2021- Media release changes agreed by the Minister and LGNSW.

Infrastructure contributions is a complex and critical area of planning. The commencement of reforms in this area is welcomed. The reforms seek to deliver substantial changes to a range of matters, but most significantly they propose the collection of contributions for land, levy-based contributions plans (s7.12 plans), and regional contributions.

Due to the Council elections, additional time was given to councils to provide a Council endorsed submission to the exhibition. However, DPE requested that a technical submission be made prior to Council’s consideration of the matter. A ‘staff technical’ submission was therefore submitted to the exhibition on 23 December 2021. Whilst we requested an extension to the IPART review to enable an endorsed Council submission, this was refused by IPART on 24 November 2021, therefore a staff submission was provided on 14 December 2021, on the basis that a Council endorsed submission was to be forwarded to IPART.

The purpose of this report is to seek Council’s endorsement of a final submission to both exhibition packages.

Background

In April 2020, the NSW Productivity Commission was requested to review infrastructure funding in NSW. An issues paper was released for comment in July 2020. Councillors were briefed on the matter at the Councillor briefing of 7 September 2020 and endorsed a submission to the paper at the Ordinary meeting of 28 September 2020.

A final report was released in December 2020. Following the final report, a letter was prepared to the Commission providing feedback to the recommendations. Our letter flagged the importance of implementing all recommendations and offered our assistance in this process. DPE announced on 5 March 2021 that all 29 recommendations from the final report were accepted, and that the implementation of these recommendations was commencing.

Proposed Amendments to Environmental Planning and Assessment Act

The Environmental Planning and Assessment (Infrastructure Contributions) Bill 2021 was introduced into parliament in June 2021, seeking to implement recommendations of the Productivity Commissioner review into the NSW Infrastructure Contributions System. The Bill provides the framework to establish a range of significant changes to the infrastructure contributions system.

An enquiry was held into the Bill in July 2021 and as a result, it was recommended that the Bill not proceed until the draft regulations have been developed and released for consultation and the reviews into the rate pegging system, benchmarking and the essential works list have been published by IPART.

Rate pegging amendments

IPART released its final report into the rate peg to include population growth in September 2021. The report has confirmed that the population growth factor would be included in the rate peg calculation from 2022/23. The new factor will apply to all Councils, including Penrith. The new factor will act as a top-up for population growth.

This matter was a recommendation from the Productivity Commission and is designed to assist Councils to maintain the upkeep of infrastructure for population growth. A consultant was engaged by Council to review the impacts of the rate peg reforms on Council’s rate and contributions income. This review will be discussed further in this report.

Exhibition Details

The following exhibitions commenced in relation to infrastructure contributions reforms:

·    Planning Reforms: Draft regulations, ministerial directions, practice notes and guidelines, commenced exhibition from 28 October 2021 and was extended to conclude on 24 December 2021. A staff technical submission was submitted to the exhibition as requested by DPE.

·    IPART Review: Essential Works list, nexus, efficient design and benchmarking. A draft report was released for comment on 29 October 2021, with a further report released on 12 November and a public hearing, consistent with IPART processes was held on 10 December. The exhibition was extended to 14 December 2021. A staff technical submission was submitted to the exhibition.

 

Deferral of certain changes

Councillors were informed by a memorandum on 30 November 2021 regarding several changes to the package of planning reforms were made by the Minister for Planning and Public Spaces during the exhibition in response to concerns raised by Councils.

The Minister committed to:

•        Undertake further modelling and consultation with stakeholders including councils and the public.

•        Provide a guarantee that councils and their communities are not left worse off as a result of these reforms.

•        Embed the details in the Act rather than rely on the Regulations, to ensure Parliamentary oversight of any future proposed changes.

•        Progress the population growth rate reforms independently from any reforms to the infrastructure contributions system.

The agreement led to the following modifications that are consistent with the reform package:

•        Allowing councils that are currently able to do so, to continue to fund community infrastructure from developer contributions.

•        Ensuring that state contributions are spent in the region where they are collected.

•        Re-setting the blanket rate councils can charge, known as s7.12 plans.

•        Increasing the maximum amount councils can charge for infrastructure associated with solar and wind farms.

The Minister will also seek financial assistance for councils that can demonstrate cash flow problems as a result of directions about the timing of local contributions plans.

One of the critical changes announced is the postponement of the application of the essential works list to all Section 7.11 contributions plans (s7.11), with it being reviewed in three years. For the Penrith Local Government Area, this may impact contributions plans under preparation for our new release areas as it is unclear what the essential works list will look like at that time.

Current Situation

Planning reforms

The reforms were split into three different categories: local contributions, land-use Planning and Regional Infrastructure Contributions. An overview of the reforms is provided below. A detailed review of the reforms is provided in Attachment 1. 

Local Contributions

Contributions Plans to be in place before rezoning

For land that is to be rezoned, contributions plans are to be approved before the determination of development applications. This will be time-limited to six months.

Concurrent exhibition processes.

Voluntary Planning Agreements (VPAs) are to be exhibited at the same time and in the same way as the associated development application or planning proposal.

Local Contribution Exemptions

Consolidation and standardisation of exemptions from local infrastructure contributions.

Standardised indexation

The standardisation of type and timing of indexation for the cost of works and land in contributions plans. This will include the application of the Land Value Index (LVI) for land and the Producer Price Index (road and bridge construction (NSW)) (PPI) for works. 

Land Value Contribution

The introduction of a Land Value Contribution (LVC), as an alternative for Councils to assist with the early acquisition of land for infrastructure. The LVC will be separate from a contributions plan and will require the payment of a levy when land in a rezoning area is sold or proposed for development.

This is an alternate mechanism to collect contributions and Councils can choose to use this mechanism or not. It can’t apply to land that is already rezoned.

Changes to s7.12 rates

Amend the rates that development may be charged under s7.12 (to be renamed local levy), to be set by development type and regional location. Contributions are to be charged at a flat rate, rather than the existing percentage. For residential development, this cost is equivalent to 3% capital Investment Value (CIV) (an increase from the current 1%). Non-residential development remains at the equivalent of 1% CIV.

Review of contributions plans

A standardisation of timeframes to review a contributions plan is proposed to be every four years. Minor changes to contributions plans will be permitted without the need for a public exhibition.

Forward funding and borrowing between plans

Enable forward funding and borrowing between plans, with interest costs associated with borrowing to be recouped through contributions plans.

Practice note review

A review and update of the infrastructure contributions practice note. Council must consider practice notes when they are preparing planning agreements and contributions plans. The practice note has not been updated since July 2005.

Planning certificates changes

A Planning certificate is to specify if a SEPP imposes a Regional Infrastructure Contribution on a property.

Register for affordable housing contributions

Where Councils collect contributions for affordable housing under SEPP 70 and VPAs, Councils will be required to keep a register on the contributions and report on the expenditure, consistent with other contributions plans

Land Use Planning

Ministerial direction for the consideration of contributions plans

Councils will be required to consider if a contributions plan is needed to deliver development

Ministerial direction for efficient use of land

Councils will be required to consider the dual and shared use of open space and public facilities and demonstrate efficient use of land for public open space, drainage purposes or public facilities.

Planning Proposals and Contributions Plan processes

A benchmark process has been prepared to guide how contributions plans are to be prepared with planning proposals.

Regional Contributions

Regional infrastructure contributions

The replacement of Special Infrastructure Contributions (SIC) and the introduction of Regional Infrastructure Contributions (RIC), to apply to all new development across Greater Sydney, the Hunter and Wollongong.

 

IPART Review

IPART’s review was set by specific terms of reference provided by the Minister for Planning and Public Spaces and considered the essential works list, nexus, efficient design, and benchmarking. An overview of the review is provided below. A detailed assessment of the review is provided in Attachment 1.

Essential Works list

-     The retention of the existing essential works list with minor changes.

Nexus

-     Requirement of costs in a plan should relate to the provision of development contingent local infrastructure.

Efficient Design

-     Costs should reflect base level, efficient location infrastructure required to meet the identified demand.

Benchmarking

-     IPART is to prepare base costs for certain items within contributions plans.

-     The benchmark cost for plan administration should be set at 1.5%.

-     IPART should update benchmark costs annually.

-     IPART should review benchmarks every four years.

-     IPART should work with DPE and councils to establish a mechanism for obtaining actual project costs.

-     Councils provide appropriate justification when using cost estimates instead of benchmarks.

Plan Updates

-     All development contributions plans above threshold amounts are to be reviewed every four years.

Overall Summary of Council’s submission to planning reforms and IPART review

At DPE request an officer technical submission was provided to both exhibitions. A Council endorsed submission is proposed to be provided to both DPE and IPART on the reforms, and the draft submissions are provided as Attachment 2 and 3. A summary of these submissions is provided below:

Planning Reforms:

·    Concerns that the proposed method of indexing land costs has the potential to leave Councils with a shortfall in contributions.

·    The process for Land Value Contributions (LVC) is difficult to interpret and would be challenging for the broader community to understand. The LVC does not appear fully resolved and officers are very concerned with Councils future ability to have sufficient funding to purchase land at market rate. Given this is an opt-in mechanism to collect infrastructure contributions, more information is needed to assess whether this is a suitable mechanism to opt-in for our community. In addition, detailed engagement would be needed with the community on this matter. The LVC should be deferred until this is better understood.

·    Raised concerns with the potential impacts of the proposed Regional Infrastructure Contribution (RIC), particularly on existing infill areas.

·    There are administrative implications for submitting contributions plans for gateway determination. This has a direct relationship with the rezoning review currently underway.

·    Concerns with the continued exclusion of community & cultural facilities from the essential works list.

IPART Review:

·    Concerns with the continued exclusion of community & cultural facilities from the essential works list.

·    Support the need to determine efficient design and infrastructure, however, the proposed process is long, complex and it is recommended that IPART provide more guidance to Councils. Further scope is needed in reconciling base level embellishment and community expectations and aligning this with developer expectations. Additionally, more guidance is requested from IPART for the process of reconciling lower ongoing maintenance costs, and developers seeking low upfront costs.

·    Broadly supportive of the notion of benchmarks as a starting point for costing infrastructure, where they represent the true costs to Council and respond to market conditions and unique circumstances. Where the proposed benchmarks do not fit the specific circumstances, Council will choose to use alternative approaches to the benchmarking.

Impact Assessment of Contributions and Rate Pegging Changes 

Councillors were informed in a memorandum dated 24 September 2021 that consultants had been engaged to assist with establishing the projected impact of the proposed development contributions reforms and amendments to rate pegging on Council.

The review concluded that:

-     The rates reforms as proposed, will provide Council with an additional rates income of approximately $5 million in the first five years.

-     There will be a negative impact on contributions income, where 7.11 Plans need to comply with the essential works list, of up to $8 million in the first five years.

-     The combined impact on the reforms depends on the extent of the s7.11 cost reduction impacts, which could be significant with IPART’s benchmarks and other cost requirements.

-     Additional negative impacts may also result from the s7.12 reforms and the changes to the charges for non-residential development.

-     Some impacts may be negated through utilising the s7.12 reforms, to supplement current s7.11 contributions plans. An example would be to introduce a s7.12 for residential development in infill areas, to capture additional population growth with dwelling density increases. 

The proposed increases to rates pegging are unlikely to be substantial enough to cover a shortfall in development contributions, where Council is unable to maintain its existing contributions rates.

In conclusion, the additional rates income that Council is forecast to receive through the population growth factor will take some years to offset the negative contributions income scenarios that were reviewed. The ability to reach a positive net income position largely depends on the extent of any cost reduction impacts due to the s7.11 item and cost requirements in plans. However, the maximum s7.12 rates proposed in the reforms provide an opportunity for Council to generate more revenue from residential development in infill areas only, if it implements a s7.12 rather than a s7.11 approach to meet its growth infrastructure needs.

 

 

Financial Implications

The financial implications to Council are that some or a combination of the proposed reforms may impact development contributions income and Council’s ability to deliver infrastructure to support new and growing communities.

The Impact Assessment of Contributions and Rate Pegging Changes Review concluded with the current proposed reforms, the increased additional rates would not be sufficient to offset the negative impact on contributions income, s7.11 cost reduction impacts could be significant and there will be additional negative impacts as a result of the s7.12 reforms.

There is also ongoing concern that the continued exclusion of community and cultural facilities from the essential works list, may limit Council’s ability to deliver on community needs and expectations related to growth.

Ongoing liaison with DPE will be required to ensure that the reforms will not impact Council’s development contributions income.

Risk Implications

The proposed reforms may negatively impact Council’s ability to deliver infrastructure to support new and growing communities. This could affect the type, timing and delivery of necessary infrastructure to support population growth needs.

Conclusion

Significant reforms for infrastructure contributions are proposed by DPE and IPART. This will impact Council’s contributions framework, including the preparation and content of future development contributions plans. Reforms within infrastructure contributions are welcome, where the impacts do not leave Councils any worse off than currently experienced. A number of the proposed reforms have the ability to impact Council’s contribution income and Council’s ability to deliver infrastructure for growing populations.

Council officers provided submissions to both reform exhibitions. A Council endorsed submission on the DPE reforms is to be provided to DPE within a week of Council’s meeting. The IPART submission was not granted an extension, however a submission will still be sent to IPART to reconfirm Council’s endorsed position.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Submission to Local and State Infrastructure Contributions Reforms    be received.

2.     Council endorses the submission to the contributions reforms as provided as Attachment 2 of this report, to be provided to the Department of Planning, Industry and Environment for consideration.

3.     Council endorses the submission to the IPART review provided as Attachment 3 of this report, to be provided to IPART to reconfirm Council’s endorsed position.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

Review and Recommendations - Infrastructure Contributions Reforms

12 Pages

Attachments Included

2.

Draft Council Submission DPE Infrastructure Contributions Reforms

16 Pages

Attachments Included

3.

Draft Council submission IPART Review

5 Pages

Attachments Included

  


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                            21 February 2022

 

 

 

4

Submission to "A New Approach Rezoning Discussion Paper"   

 

Compiled by:               Danielle Fox, Senior Planner

Authorised by:            Natasha Borgia, City Planning Manager

Kylie Powell, Director - City Futures  

 

Outcome

We plan for our future growth

Strategy

Facilitate development in the City that considers the current and future needs of our community

Service Activity

Maintain a contemporary planning framework of land use and statutory plans

 

Previous Items:           3- Submissions to Various State Government Planning Reform Matters on Exhibition- Councillor Briefing- 17 May 2021 7:00PM

                                      5- Submission to "A New Approach to Rezoning Discussion Paper"- Councillor Briefing- 07 Feb 2022 7:00PM    

 

Executive Summary

The purpose of this report is to provide Councillors with information on the A new approach to rezoning - Discussion paper (the Paper), that was released by the Department of Planning, Industry and Environment (DPIE) on 15 December 2021 for public exhibition until 28 February 2021. On 23 December 2021, Council requested an extension to the submission deadline until the end of March. No response has been received.

Councillors were informed and briefed on planning reform matters (that included Planning Proposal process improvements and establishing a merit appeal pathway for proponent-led rezoning) as follows:

·    14 May 2021 – memo provided on DPIE’s Planning and Public Spaces Outlook: What to expect in coming months document, that outlined the major planning reforms and other initiatives DPIE had commenced and would progress in 2021,

·    17 May 2021 – Councillors were briefed on Submissions to various State Government Planning Reform on exhibition,

·    28 January 2022 – memo provided on various items relating to state planning exhibitions released in late 2021. The Paper, that is the subject of this report, was one of these items, and

·    7 February 2022 – a report was provided at the briefing on Councils submission to the Discussion Paper.

The Paper outlines a new approach to rezoning that proposes various amendments and improvements to the current rezoning process with the objective to create a more streamlined, plan-led process for rezoning applications that aligns more closely with the development application process.

The Paper does not propose a completely new process to manage rezoning but seeks to reframe existing processes. Proposed amendments include categorising applications and assigning benchmark timeframes, new roles and responsibilities for all parties, streamlining stages in the process including pre-lodgement, exhibition and assessment, and finalisation. It also includes new options for appeal pathways and consistent fee structures for applications.

A draft submission letter has been prepared and is provided as Attachment 1. Following Council’s endorsement, the letter will be forwarded to DPIE for consideration.

Background

A new approach to rezoning – Discussion paper (the Paper) is part of the NSW Government’s Planning Reform Action Plan. A set of structural reforms to create a planning system that is transparent, faster, more certain and easier to use. The aim is for a strategic planning led system that informs all decisions about potential land use changes.

DPIE have undertaken consultation with industry, councils, and the planning profession on how to address planning proposal processing backlogs and set the direction for improvements. Council officers participated in this NSW wide consultation through surveys, workshops and meetings. This consultation was high level and not targeted to councils. This Paper is the first opportunity to see the detail of the proposed changes.

The Paper, informed by this consultation, outlines options to reframe existing processes by:

·    Simplifying the rezoning process and minimising duplication,

·    Improving transparency,

·    Improving the consultation process,

·    Reducing processing times,

·    Creating more certainty and consistency,

·    Empowering councils to make decisions on matters important to their communities (while allowing the NSW Government to deal with matters where government intervention is beneficial),

·    Giving private proponents controls and responsibility for rezoning requests, and

·    Improving the quality of planning proposals.

 

On 15 December 2021, DPIE also released Local Environmental Plan Making Guideline (LEP Guideline) without a formal exhibition period. This document has implemented some process improvement actions that emerged from this consultation including:

·    Best-practice process and procedures to assist in the timely assessment of planning proposals,

·    Targeted pre-lodgement services,

·    Clear benchmark timeframes for steps in the process,

·    Categorisation of planning proposals to inform timeframes as well as information and public exhibition requirements, and

·    Clearer roles and responsibilities throughout the process.

 

Through the processes outlined in the Paper, DPIE are looking to consolidate and expand on these actions into the future. Exhibition of the Paper seems pre-exemptive as some of the terminology to the new rezoning process are already included in the LEP Guideline document.

A local environmental plan (LEP) sets out the legislative rules on how land can be developed and used, through zoning and other development controls and standards.

Over time, zones or controls relating to land may need to be changed, this necessitates an LEP to be amended and/or a new LEP to be made. To amend an LEP a planning proposal document is prepared that sets out the justification and strategic and site-specific merit for the amendment.

An amendment to a LEP can vary in its complexity including, a major rezoning, a minor housekeeping matter, adding a permissible land use, or land use changes due to investment in new infrastructure. It is worth noting that for the purposes of this report (and the Paper) references to ‘rezoning’ encompasses changes to a zone and any other amendment made to a LEP.

Attachment 2 shows the stages of the current rezoning process and the proposed new approach to rezoning.

Key changes in Discussion Paper – A new approach to rezoning

A summary of key areas identified in the Paper to improve the rezoning process include:

·    creating a system that aligns with strategic planning,

·    aligning the rezoning process with the development application process,

·    new terminology including rezoning application (instead of Planning Proposal), and rezoning authority (instead of Local Plan Making Authority),

·    removal of the Gateway stage of the rezoning process,

·    categorisation of rezoning applications as Category 1 Basic, Category 2 Standard, Category 3 Complex and Category 4 Principal,

·    assigning timeframes for each category of application at each stage of the process, with timeframes applying to DPIE, councils and State agencies,

·    more responsibility and accountability given to councils, allowing DPIE to focus on State led planning. For example, councils given full control of basic, standard, and complex rezoning applications where there is a private proponent. DPIE would have limited or no involvement in these applications, and

·    the proponent is recognised as the applicant and is given more responsibilities, including consulting with agencies, and responding to submissions.

Attachment 3 provides further details on these proposed changes with Council comments.

 

New Steps

Following lodgement, the current rezoning process involves Council officer assessment and Council reporting. Should the rezoning application receive endorsement from the elected Council, it is forwarded to DPIE to seek a Gateway determination (or an approval to exhibit). The new approach seeks to remove assessment and reporting upfront, and the Gateway process. The proposed rezoning framework seeks to reduce timeframes and move the assessment of the rezoning application to after public exhibition. Stages of the new approach are summarised below with comments.

Scoping

The new approach proposes a mandatory pre lodgement stage for Category 2,3 and 4 rezoning applications called scoping. The LEP Guideline currently only encourages or recommends this stage.

The scoping stage brings all key stakeholders together to discuss the project and provide feedback and direction with a view to save time and costs and lead to a better-quality application.

At this stage the proponent prepares a high-level scoping report to provide an overview of the proposal, strategic and site-specific context and required studies. The stage also includes a scoping meeting (that includes all parties and agencies). The rezoning authority will provide written feedback following this meeting (that includes study requirements that are valid for 18 months).

The rezoning authority will not be able to prevent the proponent from lodging an application based on feedback on whether the application is likely to be consistent with strategic planning.

Lodgement

Following the mandatory scoping stage and written advice provided to the proponent the rezoning application can be lodged on the Planning Portal. The rezoning authority will have 7 days to conduct an adequacy assessment and confirm that study requirements have been met (this aligns with the development application process). If the application meets requirements, it will go live on the portal for exhibition to begin. If study requirements have not been met, the application will be rejected and will need to be resubmitted.

This is a significant change from the current process. Currently exhibition is determined as part of the Gateway determination, where the adequacy of the information provided and consistency with strategic planning is assessed. If found to be inadequate a proposal may not proceed.

Under the new approach, a rezoning application that lacks strategic merit can only be refused after exhibition. Council assessment of the strategic merit of the application, seeking advice from the Local Planning Panel, Council resolution, and the Department’s assessment through a Gateway determination, are processes that are removed from this stage of the rezoning process.

Comment

Support for a mandatory pre-lodgement (scoping) stage. Our Council currently has a pre lodgement process for rezoning proposals.

It is recommended that the rezoning authority should be able to reject a rezoning application at the scoping stage and/or before exhibition if it is clearly inconsistent with strategic plans.

Allowing community engagement on a rezoning proposal that does not align with local and/or State strategic plans is confusing for the community and would erode their confidence in the process. For applications that are found to have strategic merit and aligned with the Local Strategic Planning Statement (LSPS), there should be no need for community engagement. This was the original intent of the LSPS.

 

The development of our Council’s LSPS involved extensive community engagement. The LSPS sets the long-term land use vision for our Local Government Area. If the objective of the new approach to rezoning is to elevate the role of strategic planning and develop a plan led system, rezoning applications that do not align with a Council’s LSPS should not progress.

Council and the community need to have confidence in the local and State strategic planning work (including community consultation) that has already been undertaken as part of the  other strategic documents (housing strategies, rural lands strategies, employment lands strategy and city centre strategies).

A submission to Council’s periodic updates to the LSPS, would remain as a pathway option for proponents to pursue the proposals that are inconsistent with strategic plans.

Refusal to issue study requirements (as part of the written feedback) is one mechanism to refuse an application. We do not support study requirements remaining valid for 18 months as many changes to land use planning and planning legislation can occur over this time.

 

Recommend that DPIE take steps to educate the community on the rezoning process. Exhibiting the application before any assessment by Council or DPIE, and without consideration of the elected Council may erode community confidence that the application is not yet decided and may still be rejected.

More detail is requested on how councils will be able to determine if the study requirements have or have not been met without full assessment of the application.

 

The Paper states that the scoping stage will help proponents to understand the nuances of certain issues and the concerns communities may have. No detail has been provided to outline how the community is involved at this stage.

The Paper provides limited detail on how the scoping meeting (that is to include agencies) is to be facilitated.

Exhibition and Post-Exhibition

Currently there is a delay between lodgement, DPIE issuing a Gateway determination that allows exhibition, and the start of the exhibition.

The new approach removes the Gateway determination stage. Exhibition can occur as soon as possible after lodgement. The LEP Guideline assigns a standard exhibition period depending on the category of the rezoning application. The Planning Portal will automate exhibition processes.

After exhibition, the proponent is responsible for submitting to the rezoning authority:

‐      a summary of, and responses to, submissions received (including agencies), and

‐      a final version of the rezoning application that includes amendments (if any).

This submission will trigger the start of time for the rezoning authority to assess, finalise and determine the rezoning application. Proponents should resolve any outstanding agency and community concerns before submitting the final version of the rezoning application after exhibition.

Comment:

Support for the exhibition process to allow the public to scrutinise rezoning applications in an open and transparent way.

Support for automation of exhibition process through the Planning Portal. Online community engagement tools and methods with links to Council websites and social media should be considered to engage with community in a meaningful and accessible way.

Recommend that timeframes are flexible to accommodate work involved:

‐      complex applications can require many 100’s of notification letters, the proposed timeframe of one additional week to coordinate this is not realistic,

‐      to fully resolve agency and community submissions,

‐      to accommodate Councillor briefings, Council reporting and lead in times, and

‐      to enable adequate engagement with the elected Council on local matters.

 

Concern around the proponent given the role of addressing submissions and negotiating outcomes with agencies. We recommend Council involvement in resolving and responding to agency and community submissions. Council will be required to report on agency and community submissions to Council.

Concern that exhibition may be occurring too early as the exhibition information may have limited or unsatisfactory evidence base to enable informed community comments.

More detail is requested on the mechanism to officially start the clock on the assessment of the final version of the rezoning application.

Exhibition ahead of understanding the detail of studies which may deem the proposal not having site specific merit. For example, where significant transport infrastructure or connections are needed.

More clarification is requested on how the exhibition stage aligns with the reforms to the NSW infrastructure contributions system. Where a Contribution Plan and Voluntary Planning Agreement (VPA) is required, these finalised documents are informed by a full assessment of the rezoning application and need to be exhibited alongside the rezoning application.

Assessment and finalisation

All decisions made will need to be published on the Planning Portal with reasons for the decisions clearly communicated. The new approach will standardise matters of consideration as relevant to the final decision made by the rezoning authority. Matters that could be considered include:

‐      Strategic merit,

‐      Site specific merit,

‐      Provisions of any State Environmental Planning Policies or Section 9.1 Ministerial Directions,

‐      Submissions by the public and state agencies, and

‐      The public interest.

 

The Paper proposes that a Council with a conflict of interest should not assess and determine a rezoning application. Under the new approach if a conflict of interest is unavoidable (eg. Council land is included in the rezoning) the relevant local planning panel should determine the rezoning application.

Comment:

Recommend that to streamline the process further, consequences for exceeding timeframes (without justification) have consequences including refusal of application

Roadblocks that can impact process include:

‐      Proponents exceeding timeframes with no consequences

‐      State agencies changing their minds or their advice

‐      Different rezoning outcomes or effects after exhibition and when amendments have been made to the rezoning application, requiring re-exhibition

‐      Exhibition of draft state planning documents that coincides with this final stage of the process. The requirement to consider draft plans (and relevant matters not raised by agencies) may require additional information and lead to delays.

 

Public Interest should be a necessary consideration.

Support for the local planning panel determining a rezoning application where a conflict is identified. A peer review process to review a Council decision could also be used. For example, this is the process used for reclassification of Council land. Appointment of panel members should require experience, skills and knowledge of the rezoning process.

For rezoning application where there is a VPA, Council (as the signatory and often the beneficiary of the VPA) should continue to be involved in the assessment and approval of the VPA.

Rezoning applications involving the reclassification of public land require a public hearing, with notice post exhibition. More clarification is requested on whether benchmark timeframes account for these requirements.

New fee structure

Currently councils can structure and charge fees as they wish, resulting in varying fee payment structures between councils.

The Paper seeks to introduce options to set a consistent structure for fees to proponents (other than council proponents). The aim is to create certainty on the fees that would be payable and to adequately compensate councils for the cost and time of assessing and determining applications.

Comment:

Scoping fees should cover the rezoning authority’s costs. Fixed fees at the scoping stage based on the category of rezoning application is supported.

Variable assessment fees require tracking of actual costs, staff hours, meeting preparation, project management, overheads, administrative costs, and others. This is time and cost consuming. There is potential for disagreements with private proponents on how time has been utilised and actual time charged.

The fee structure currently used by Penrith Council provides:

‐      a balance of fixed assessment and pre-lodgement fees (based on the complexity of the application), and variable fees for associated costs including advertising and independent assessments, and

‐      refunds when rezoning applications are withdrawn, calculated based the work undertaken prior to or after the Local Planning Panel (LPP) / Council reporting stage.

 

This fee structure provides certainty and could be adapted to accommodate the categories and stages of the new approach. We recommend that councils continue to be given autonomy over how fees are structured.

Planning Guarantee

The Paper is considering the introduction of a planning guarantee, where a fee refund can be requested if councils take too long to assess an application. The aim is to encourage the timely progress of applications. For example, for a standard rezoning application, a refund based on benchmark finalisation timeframes can be applied for, if the application is not determined within 17 weeks.

 

Comment:

We strongly oppose the introduction of a planning guarantee system for refund requests. There is potential that this scheme can lead to poor planning outcomes if decisions are rushed.

The planning guarantee system seems punitive in nature and does not acknowledge the good outcomes councils are currently achieving. It shifts responsibility to the rezoning authority (councils), when both DPIE, the proponents and agencies have a role in enabling the timely determination of rezoning applications. Clarification on the accountability of all key stakeholders in this process is needed.

A planning guarantee system relies on quality information up front and an exhibition period informed by an assessment of the rezoning application. We recommend the new approach to rezoning incorporate the assessment of the rezoning application prior to public exhibition. This will allow Council to refer technical studies to internal teams, amendments to the rezoning application prior to exhibition if needed, agency issues to be addressed, quality information available to the community in order to provide comment.

Appeal Pathways

Currently there are two opportunities to have a decision reviewed early in the rezoning process, with no opportunity for a review or appeal at the end of the process when the final decision is made.

The new approach proposes a review opportunity for private proponents at the end of the process if the progress has been delayed or if the proponent is dissatisfied with the decision. No appeal pathway is proposed to public authorities. The Planning Delivery Unit or other pathway could be used to resolve these disputes with DPIE and public authorities.

 An appeal based on a delay would be available once set timeframes have passed.

The Paper provides options for what body would be asked to resolve any appeals or conduct any reviews, including the Land and Environment Court (LEC) and the Independent Planning Commission (IPC).

Comments:

We agree that any proposed appeals pathway would add extra pressure and time. Strategic planning could be undermined, with the increase in costs, time and speculation.

Public authorities (including councils) should have access to an appeal under strict circumstances.

Between the LEC and IPC, the IPC would be the most appropriate to deal with appeals for rezoning applications.

The use of the LEC in the appeals pathway could undermine strategic planning, with site related court decisions reshaping strategic plans. The courts involvement could compromise the separation of powers doctrine. The Land and Environment Court could be required to review its own decisions relating to Planning Proposal determinations where a planning appeal is made against a development application.

 

It will be important that benchmark timeframes are appropriate and allow some flexibility especially with more complex rezoning applications.

 

Next steps

Implementation of the new approach

Implementation of the new approach to rezoning will likely include a combination of:

‐      legislative and non-legislative provisions,

‐      ministerial directions to provide certainty in assessment considerations,

‐      delegation to empower decision-makers,

‐      amendments to the Standard Instrument to standardise common amendments, and

‐      new regulations to provide more certainty in the agency engagement process.

 

These methods would be supported with policy and guidance materials and education. We will recommend further Council and industry engagement during the implementation phase.

NSW Planning Portal improvements

The new approach will rely heavily on the capability of the NSW Planning Portal (the Portal). The Portal is currently used as part of the Development Application process. Council’s experience using the portal and feedback on ways to improve and support rezoning processes will be included in Council’s submission.

Financial Implications

There are no direct financial implications associated with this report.

It should be noted that the Paper outlines options on a new fee structure, and a Planning Guarantee mechanism for refunds.

As outlined in this report, Council’s submission letter will recommend that councils continue to be given autonomy over how they structure their fees and provide refunds.

Risk Implications

There are no risk implications for Council associated with this report.

 

Conclusion

The exhibition of the Discussion Paper ends on 28 February 2022. A draft submission letter has been prepared for Council’s consideration. The submission letter will focus on the need for decisions relating to land use to be informed by our Council’s strategic planning documents, with an aim to achieving good planning outcomes for our community.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Submission to "A New Approach Rezoning Discussion Paper" be received

2.     Council endorse the submission on the “A New Approach to Rezoning Discussion Paper, provided as Attachment 1 to this report, to be provided to the Department of Planning, Industry and Environment for their consideration

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

Draft Submission Letter

11 Pages

Attachments Included

2.

Current and proposed rezoning framework

1 Page

Attachments Included

3.

Summary of Discussion Paper and comments

6 Pages

Attachments Included

  


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                            21 February 2022

 

 

 

5

Submission to the Design and Place SEPP   

 

Compiled by:               Glen Weekley, Executive Planner

Authorised by:            Natasha Borgia, City Planning Manager

Kylie Powell, Director - City Futures  

 

Outcome

We plan for our future growth

Strategy

Protect the City’s natural areas, heritage and character

Service Activity

Influence state planning policies and legislation to ensure it responds to our land use vision and the needs of our community

 

Previous Items:           2- Proposed Design and Place State Environmental Planning Policy- Ordinary Meeting- 26 Apr 2021 7:00PM

                                      4- Submission to the Design and Place State Environmental Planning Policy- Councillor Briefing- 07 Feb 2022 7:00PM    

 

Executive Summary

This report provides an overview and discusses key issues to be included in Council’s submission to the draft Design and Place State Environmental Planning Policy 2021 (draft DP SEPP) and surrounding policy framework. The draft DP SEPP and supporting guides and documents are on public exhibition until 28 February 2022 and are being exhibited by the Department of Planning and Environment (DPE).

A memo was sent to Councillors informing them of the exhibition of the Draft DP SEPP on 11 January 2022 along with other State Planning matters that occurred during the Council election period. A further memo was sent to Councillor on 28 January 2022.  Councillors were briefed on these documents at the Councillor briefing of 7 February 2022 where Councillors were presented with Council officer’s preliminary views.

The draft DP SEPP and supporting guides are part of a broader review of all SEPPs and the draft DP SEPP aims to simplify the way that we plan for and design sustainable and resilient places in NSW. The draft DP SEPP spans places of all scales, from precincts, large developments and buildings to infrastructure and public space. The draft DP SEPP outlines a principle-based approach to encourage greater creativity and innovation and reduce complexity in the planning system.

The purpose of this report is to seek Council’s endorsement of the final submission to DPE on the draft DP SEPP and surrounding policy framework.

Background

The draft DP SEPP is the first planning instrument to implement the Minister’s Planning Principles (published in December 2021). The draft DP SEPP aims to support the Planning Principle of design and place, which in turn is intended to promote quality design for new developments, public spaces and the environment, to create ‘healthy, sustainable, prosperous and supportive design for people, the community and Country ‘.

The following documents are currently on exhibition:

·    draft DP SEPP,

·    draft Environmental Planning and Assessment Amendment (Design and Place) Regulation 2021 (Draft EPA (DP) Regulation),

·    draft Environmental Planning and Assessment (Design Principles and Considerations) Direction 2022 under section 9.1 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 (draft Direction),

·    draft Apartment Design Guide 2021 (draft ADG 2021),

·    draft Urban Design Guide (draft UDG),

·    summary of proposed changes to BASIX,

·    beta BASIX sandbox tool, and

·    draft Design Review Panel Manual for Local Government (draft DRPM).

Current Situation

The DP SEPP will apply to the whole of NSW, other than specified land use zone

exclusions, including some rural land, industrial land, environmental conservation

land and waterways.

 

The DP SEPP is also proposed to have some application to planning proposals on sites greater than 1 ha, such as land being converted to non-rural land or where built form controls are proposed to be changed. This is proposed to be achieved via a new section 9.1 Ministerial Direction.

 

Enhanced design requirements

 

The draft DP SEPP is intended to be the primary source of design principles for development on urban land.

 

In addition to incorporating the State Environmental Planning Policy No 65 - Design Quality of Residential Apartment Development 2002 (SEPP 65) and the State Environmental Planning Policy (Building Sustainability Index: BASIX) 2004 (BASIX SEPP), the types of development to which the draft DP SEPP applies has been significantly expanded and this development is outlined later in the report.

 

Development to which the draft DP SEPP will apply includes development described as ‘urban design development’ and specified non-residential development. The draft DP SEPP contain 5 design principles, each of which is supported by 2 considerations and measures to satisfy each principle, these are:

                  

Design principle        

Design considerations

 

Deliver beauty and amenity to create a sense of belonging for people.

         

·    Overall design quality, and

·    Comfortable, inclusive and healthy places.

Deliver inviting public spaces and enhanced public life to create engaged communities.

 

·    Culture, character and heritage, and

·    Public space for public life.

Promote productive and connected places to enable communities to thrive.

 

·    Vibrant and affordable neighbourhoods, and

·    Sustainable transport and walkability.

 

Deliver sustainable and greener places to ensure the well-being of people and the

environment.

·    Green infrastructure, and

·    Resource efficiency and emissions reduction.

 

Deliver resilient, diverse places for enduring communities.

 

·    Resilience and adapting to change, and

·    Optimal and diverse land use.

                    

Unlike SEPP 65, which requires the consent authority to take the design quality principles into consideration in determining a development application, the draft DP SEPP imposes a higher threshold. The consent authority must be satisfied that a proposed development is consistent with the design principles before granting consent. 

 

Design Guides

 

The draft DP SEPP gives effect to two separate guides, the draft ADG 2021, and a new urban design guide, the draft UDG.

 

Draft ADG 2021

 

The draft ADG 2021 is intended to replace the current Apartment Design Guide and will generally apply to residential buildings of 3 or more storeys and that contain at least 4 dwellings.

 

The Apartment Design Guide has been refreshed, and the objectives, design criteria and guidance have been reviewed. Key changes include providing a clear framework for the flexible application of the ADG, and the need for design verification now being against the

objectives of the ADG. The new mechanism will enable alternative solutions to those in

the ADG that may better suit the needs of the local area and the site.

 

Development consent cannot be granted for such development unless the consent authority is satisfied that development meets the objectives of the ADG 2021. This is not different to the previous assessment requirements under the current Apartment Design Guide.

 

The draft UDG

 

The draft UDG sets objectives, design criteria and design guidance for the carrying out of urban design development. Urban design development is:

 

·    development on land outside an industrial zone with a site area greater than 1 hectare, or

·    development on land in an industrial zone with a site area greater than 1 hectare that has a capital investment of $30 million or more, or

·    development in relation to which an environmental planning instruments requires a development control plan or master plan to be prepared for the land before development consent may be granted for the development, and

·    Development consent must not be granted to urban design development unless the consent authority is satisfied that the development meets the applicable design criteria set out in the draft UDG, or where it considers that an alternative solution achieves a neutral or more beneficial outcome than meeting the design criteria.

 

The application of the draft ADG 2021 and the draft UDG are not mutually exclusive. There will be development to which both guides apply.

 

Design verification

 

Presently the Environmental Planning and Assessment Regulation 2000 only requires a design verification statement for residential apartment buildings. Under the draft EPA (DP) Regulation, a design verification statement will also be required for urban design development and development involving public or common space with an area greater than 1,000 square metres. More than one verification statement may be required for the same development.

 

Registered architects preparing a design verification statement for a residential apartment buildings will need to respond to 36 objectives, grouped under the 5 SEPP principles. Design verification statements for urban design development and development involving public or common space of more than 1,000 square metres will need to be prepared by an urban designer and a landscape architect respectively, with reference to the objectives of the UDG.

 

The design verification statements must be prepared by the architect, urban designer or landscape architect who designed, or directed the design of, the development.

 

A design verification will also be required for the modification of consents for which the original application required a design verification statement.

 

Design Review Panel

 

Development under the draft DP SEPP is to be considered by a design review panel. Design review panels will continue to be constituted, and the members appointed, by the Minister, however they will need to exercise their functions in accordance with the draft DRPM and with regard to the design principles and design considerations specified in the DP SEPP.

 

Enhanced sustainability requirements and changes to BASIX

 

Sustainability standards applying to development to which BASIX applies are significantly strengthened. The proposed changes from the current BASIX SEPP include:

·    increased standards for energy and thermal performance,

·    a requirement for an assessment of the embodied carbon emissions of the material used to build each home, and

·    an alternative merit assessment pathway, which allows recognised professional to complete a sustainability assessment using other accredited modelling software, in lieu of a BASIX assessment.

 

For development other than BASIX affected development, a statement described as a ‘net zero ready’ statement must be prepared, addressing matters set out in the draft EPA (DP) Regulation, including estimated annual energy consumption and emissions and evidence that non-renewable energy will be offset.

 

The Department has also indicated that it is currently rebuilding the BASIX tool to integrate it with the NSW planning portal. The beta version of the new, integrated BASIX tool is available here.

 

Additionally, consent to development on land to be described in a public transport accessibility map cannot be granted unless the development has a ‘green travel plan‘. Such plans must, amongst other things, demonstrate how they meet the draft DP SEPP’s design considerations for sustainable transport and walkability, and how the development will achieve targets to utilise various modes of transport within 3 years of the issue of an occupation certificate. Conditions relating to the inclusion of charging facilities for electric vehicles and green travel plans will be prescribed conditions under the draft EPA (DP) Regulation.

 

Information relating to sustainability will be required at each point in the development process – consent, construction certificate stage and occupation certificate stage. Certifiers are prevented from issuing occupation certificates for certain development if they are not satisfied as to specified matters. For example, they cannot issue an occupation certificate for development requiring a green travel plan if they are not satisfied that the building is capable of achieving the energy and water use standards specified in draft DP SEPP, the building incorporates measures to achieve net zero emissions by 1 January 2035, and non-renewable energy used by the building will be offset. Nor can they issue such a certificate if they are not satisfied that the building is capable of implementing the measures and meeting the mode share targets specified in the green travel plan.

 

Strategic Planning

 

The draft Direction imposes an obligation on a planning authority to ensure that a planning proposal affecting land with an area greater than 1 hectare, and within either an existing or proposed residential, commercial, mixed use or industrial zone, or any other zone in which residential development is permitted or proposed to be permitted:

 

·    takes into account and demonstrates consistency with the design principles and design considerations under the draft DP SEPP,

·    is consistent with the objectives of the draft UDG,

·    demonstrates how it responds to Country and how it has been informed by contributions from Aboriginal stakeholders of the land, where they have been provided,

·    is referred to the relevant design review panel for advice concerning the design response, and

·    The planning proposal must also give effect to any relevant residential density, connectivity and open space criteria and guidance under the UDG.

 

Provisions of development control plans dealing with specified amenity issues cannot be inconsistent with the ADG 2021.

 

Issue raised in our previous submission on the EIE that have not been addressed

 

The following key concerns raised in our submission on the previously exhibited EIE have not been addressed:

 

·    Design Review Panels - The draft DP SEPP, through the draft DPRM is still proposing a one size fits all approach to Local design review panels. No acknowledgment is given to existing design review panels, such as Penrith’s that are successful in providing positive outcomes for both the community, Council and Developers, and that represent the local community,

·    Local Character - The ministerial direction requires planning proposals to give effect to any relevant residential density, connectivity and open space criteria and guidance as referenced in the Urban Design Guide which reduces Council ability to influence local character,

·    Sustainability - There is little consideration about urban heat management targets. The draft DP SEPP still appears to enable trade-off between thermal comfort and energy performance, which isn’t supported,

·    Assessment times and capability – No consideration appears to be given to the increased requirements for experienced practitioners to design and verify, particularly in regard to the draft UDG that will increase requirements on Council to staff and review. No consideration or concessions have been provided for the additional layer of reporting that is required for Planning Proposals, and whether Council will be able to achieve proposed mandated timeframes for the processing of Planning Proposals,

·    The draft DP SEPP still requires further work on the legal drafting to strengthen the links between the companion guidelines,

·    Greater consideration of urban heat management targets, particularly for western Sydney has not been incorporated into the proposed changes to BASIX, and

·    There is still no ability for councils to set their own sustainability targets above those set by BASIX.

 

Key issues to be raised in our submission

 

Impact on Council’s Urban Heat Planning Proposal and proposed Development Controls

 

Certain considerations within the draft DP SEPP may overlap and/or replace controls in the draft Urban Heat chapter of the Penrith DCP 2014. The draft urban heat controls may need to be reviewed post-exhibition in response to the changes outline in draft DP SEPP.

 

Requirement for Councils LEP’s and DCP to be consistent with the Draft DP SEPP

 

The requirement that Council’s LEP and DCP need to be consistent with the draft DP SEPP places an additional administrative burden and cost on Council. 

 

It appears little consideration has been given to Council’s other responsibilities, that include: 

·      Ensuring their planning controls are consistent with both the Greater Sydney Region Plan and District Plans, and

·      Processing proponent led planning proposals and DCP amendments within mandated timeframes. 

 

Importantly, the need to be continually updating our planning controls to be consistent with State Government Planning Policy, impacts on Council’s ability to focus on our own planning controls to ensure they are providing the best outcomes for our own community.  

         

Impact on existing Urban Design Review Panels (UDRP)

 

Council existing UDRP is unlikely to meet the new requirements as members need to be appointed by the Minister and Council employees and officers are not permitted to be on the UDRP, if Council is the consent authority

 

It is of great concern that no acknowledgment has been given to existing design review panels, such as Penrith’s, that are successful in providing positive outcomes for both the community, Council and Developers, and that highlight the importance of local input.

 

Reduced ability for Council to address Local Character

 

We are concerned that a standardised approach promoted by the draft DP SEPP limits Councils ability to consider and apply specific controls to protect local character as Council’s LEP and DCP cannot be inconsistent with certain design criteria of the draft ADG 2021 and draft UDG.

 

Draft DP SEPP and draft ADG 2021 reference RMS “A Guide to Traffic Generation Development

 

The RMS’s “A Guide to Traffic Generating Development” is from 2002 and over 20 years old and not reflective of contemporary requirements. Transport for NSW should be requested to update their Guide to coincide with the draft ADG 2021, if there is a suggestion that parking requirements can be derived from the Guide to then inform building footprint, access and circulation arrangements.

 

 

Requirement to refer a planning proposal to the Design Review Panel

 

We do not support the draft Direction requirement to refer a planning proposal to the Design Review Panel. This would need to take place pre-gateway as it is unlikely that DPIE would issue a Gateway Determination for a Planning Proposal that did not address the ministerial direction.

 

It is considered that referring a Planning Proposal to the Design Review Panel pre-gateway is not the appropriate time to be seeking advice from the Design Review Panel. The level of detail provided to support a planning proposal differs from the level of detail required for a development applicant and justifies the strategic merit of a proposal.

 

The Local Planning Panel already provides advice on the strategic merit of a planning proposal and would consider a planning proposals consistency with the drat DP SEPP and draft UDG. Advice from the Design Review Panel is best provided at the DA stage when there is certainty on design.

 

The proposed changes will also need to be considered in context with the Discussion Paper: A New Rezoning Approach, that is currently on exhibition.

 

However, we do not believe that it is feasible to undertake an initial assessment of a planning proposal and seek advice on a planning proposal from the Design Review Panel and the Local Planning Panel as well as seeking endorsement from Council all within 90 days of receipting a planning proposal.

 

Specific comments on draft DP SEPP and surrounding policy framework

 

Detailed comments on the DP SEPP and surrounding policy framework our contained in our submission (Attachment 1), but some key concerns are summarised as follows:

 

·    Some clauses are interpretative with no security of quality outcomes,

·    Other clauses need be deleted as they are not easily assessable at the DA stage,

·    Some requirements place an undue compliance burden on Council as a consent authority,

·    Evidence has not been included for key design criteria and standards in the draft UDG, such as density, walking catchments, block sizes and energy performance,

·    The requirements for Open Space provision of the draft UDG are based on a percentage of site area and are inconsistent with Council’s Sport and Recreation Strategy that utilises population to determine open space provision,

·    Open Space criteria in the draft UDG does not include a separate criteria for sporting space. It is unclear how the draft UDG addresses the need for sporting facilities,

·    Criteria for open space need to address that areas with high net dwelling densities need bigger parks, and

·    The draft UDG allows for Open Space assets, up to 10% to be located within the 1 in 100 year flood line, which is inconsistent with our policy for open space assets to be located within the 100 in 1 year flood line.

 

 

 

Financial Implications

There are no direct financial implications associated with this report.

The potential additional administration and staff costs to update our LEP and DCP to be consistent with the Draft DP SEPP has been raised as a key issue in Council's submission.

Risk Implications

If Council does not provide a submission to the draft DP SEPP and surrounding policy framework, the risk is that Council’s concerns and comments will not be fully understood and considered in finalising the DP SEPP.

Conclusion

DPIE has released for comment the draft DP SEPP and surrounding policy framework that aims to support the Planning Principle of design and place, which in turn is intended to promote quality design for new developments, public spaces and the environment, to create ‘healthy, sustainable, prosperous and supportive design for people, the community and Country ‘.

Whilst we are supportive of the intent of the draft DP SEPP and surrounding policy framework to facilitate and ensure a priority is place on good design, the issues raised in our submission need to be considered and addressed by DPE prior to the finalisation on the draft DP SEPP and surrounding policy framework to ensure that it can be implement by Council officers.

 

It is recommended that Council endorse the submission at Attachment 1, allowing it to be forwarded to DPIE for consideration.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on the Submission to the Design and Place SEPP and surrounding policy framework be received

2.     Council endorse the submission on the draft DP SEPP and surrounding policy framework, provided as Attachment 1 to this report, to be provided to the Department of Planning and Environment for their consideration

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

Submission to the Design and Place SEPP and supporting policy framework

14 Pages

Attachments Included

   


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


Outcome 3 - We can get around the City

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

6        Review of Environmental Factors (REF) for New Richmond Bridge and Traffic Improvements-Stage 1The Driftway                                                                              161

 

7        Acceptance of Grant Funding - Local Road and Community Infrastructure Program - Extension of Program (Phase 3)                                                                                    166

 

8        Pedestrian Safety Program Funding (High Pedestrian Activity Area) 2021/22             170

 

9        Factory Road and Loftus Street Footpaths                                                                    172

 

 

 

 

 

 



Ordinary Meeting                                                                                            21 February 2022

 

 

 

6

Review of Environmental Factors (REF) for New Richmond Bridge and Traffic Improvements-Stage 1The Driftway   

 

Compiled by:               Walter Sinnadurai, Transportation Planner

Authorised by:            Adam Wilkinson, Engineering Services Manager

Andrew Jackson, Director - Development and Regulatory Services  

 

Outcome

We can get around our City

Strategy

Improve passenger and freight transport connections in the region

Service Activity

Work with government to deliver regional transport infrastructure that meets the needs of our community

      

 

Executive Summary

The purpose of this report is to provide information to Council regarding the Review of Environmental Factors (REF) for the New Richmond Bridge and traffic improvements – Stage 1 The Driftway. This project is being designed and delivered by Transport for NSW (TfNSW).

According to TfNSW, improvements to The Driftway would form Stage 1 of the project to deliver early safety benefits to the community. The works will include upgrades to the pavement and drainage, a roundabout at the intersection of The Driftway with Londonderry Road, and the realignment and raising of the eastern section of The Driftway to form a four-leg roundabout with Blacktown Road and Racecourse Road.

Support the proposed upgrade of the Driftway (as Stage 1) is subject to TfNSW addressing several key issues. These include (1) planning for the future Castlereagh Freeway, (2) reclassification of The Driftway to be a state road, (3) minimising the adverse flood impacts, and (4) importantly, addressing all community concerns which have been raised throughout the consultation period.

The report recommends that the Engineering Services Manager be authorised to finalise Council’s submission to the REF (based on this report and attachment) and forward same to TfNSW by the closing date of 4 March 2022.

Background

In 2012, Roads and Maritime published the Richmond Bridge and Approaches Congestion Study. This study identified that, during peak periods, the operation of Richmond Bridge is adversely affected by key approach intersections on Bells Line of Road and Kurrajong Road; highlighting the need for improvements to three intersections in the short term. The study identified a preferred option to build a new bridge across the Hawkesbury River, adjacent to the existing bridge, at the 1 in 20-year flood level. The study further identified the need to provide capacity upgrades to two lanes in each direction on Kurrajong Road and Bells Line of Road through Richmond and North Richmond.

In 2019, the Australian and NSW Governments committed $250 million to deliver the New Richmond Bridge and traffic improvements. TfNSW published a community update in November 2019 showing the route options being investigated and invited community feedback. The community feedback indicated both levels of support, and concern for each of the proposed options. However, there was support from the community and key stakeholders for the route to bypass town centres.

On 5 August 2019, TfNSW made a presentation to the Councillor Briefing and provided an update on the proposed Richmond Bridge Duplication and traffic improvements, including information on project needs, options and proposed consultation.

Following feedback from the community, four options were shortlisted for further investigation and a preferred option was identified that bypassed North Richmond to the north and Richmond to the south. To deliver a bypass of both town centres, an additional $250 million was committed by the Australian and NSW Governments bringing the total budget to $500 million.

On 4 May 2020, TfNSW made a presentation to the Councillor Briefing and provided an update on the proposed Richmond Bridge Duplication in particular, the impact on traffic at The Driftway, Londonderry.

The Preferred Option was displayed for community and stakeholder feedback between June and September 2021. Common to all shortlisted options was an upgrade to The Driftway between Londonderry Road and Blacktown Road to facilitate part of the bypass of Richmond town centre and deliver early safety benefits to the community. Accordingly, the project will be delivered in two stages, with upgrades to The Driftway proposed as Stage 1 while TfNSW continues to consider feedback on the remaining preferred route.

On 15 November 2021, TfNSW made presentation to the Councillor Briefing regarding the proposed Stage 1 upgrade of The Driftway and the exhibited REF.

Current Situation

Following agency and stakeholder consultation, TfNSW has developed the concept design and REF for a 3.6km section of The Driftway between Londonderry Road and Blacktown Road – Stage 1.  TfNSW had been seeking community feedback by Friday 10 December 2021. Council has secured a time extension from TfNSW until 4 March 2022 to allow sufficient time to consider and respond to the REF; and seek Council endorsement of same.

The future Stage 2 would include a new bridge over the Hawkesbury River and associated traffic improvements around Richmond and North Richmond. Stage 2 would be subject to a future, separate environmental approval assessment and is not included in this REF.

Key features of Stage 1 of the proposal would include:

·    Upgrade of the intersection of Londonderry Road / The Driftway to a roundabout

·    Upgrade of The Driftway intersections with Luxford Road and Reynolds Road to channelised right turn T-junctions

·    Realignment of 230 metres of The Driftway at its eastern extent to create a four-leg roundabout with Blacktown Road and Racecourse Road

·    A new 24-metre-long bridge over a tributary of Rickabys Creek

·    A new 30 metre long retaining wall along the north western corner of Racecourse Road and Blacktown Road

·    Pavement improvements to 3.6 kilometres of The Driftway, including widening both shoulders to 1.5 metres

·    Modifications to driveways and property adjustment works

·    Removal of the redundant section of The Driftway and its intersection with Blacktown Road. Reshaping of this area for flood storage capacity

·    Drainage improvements along The Driftway

·    Relocation and/or adjustments to public utilities and street lighting

·    Ancillary work including safety barriers, signage, line marking and environmental protection work

·    Landscaping and rehabilitation work

·    Temporary ancillary construction facility and laydown areas.

 

Attachment 1 provides key features of the proposal and changes to intersections. Subject to the NSW Government’s determination and approval process, construction is expected to commence in 2023 and be completed in mid-2024.

 

Council’s Review of Stage 1 REF

 

Council Officers have reviewed the documentation associated with the Review of Environmental Factors (REF) for the New Richmond Bridge and traffic improvements – Stage 1 The Driftway.

 

Attachment 2 presents the proposed draft submission, which subject to endorsement from Council, will form the basis of Council’s submission to TfNSW.

 

 

Key Elements

 

Existing condition - The Driftway

 

The Driftway is a local road within the Hawkesbury LGA connecting Blacktown Road (MR537), South Windsor in the east to Castlereagh Road (MR570) and Agnes Banks in the west. The Driftway has an undivided carriageway with one travel lane in each direction (eastbound and westbound) and is generally signposted as 80 kilometre per hour (80 km/hr).

 

There are no dedicated pedestrian pathways along The Driftway, Londonderry Road or Blacktown Road in the vicinity of the proposal. There are no dedicated bicycle pathways along The Driftway or Londonderry Road. Blacktown Road currently has a bicycle lane utilising shoulders which extends north and south of the intersection with The Driftway.

 

The Driftway has a poor safety record. From August 2015 to June 2020, 29 crashes occurred on The Driftway between Londonderry Road and Blacktown Road, mainly at its intersection with these two roads.

 

Based on June 2021 data, The Driftway currently carries over 200 vehicles per hour in both directions combined during morning and afternoon peak periods and about 300 vehicles per hour in both directions combined in during the evening peak.

 

Proposed The Driftway Upgrades

 

TfNSW have undertaken traffic model for the Preferred Richmond Bridge Duplication route option with completed proposed new Richmond Bridge. Modelling existing and forecast traffic scenarios at completion (2026) and 10 years (2036) after completion of the proposal to evaluate impacts, based on two scenarios – without project and with project. The new bridge provides the network with the additional capacity to accommodate the 2026 future traffic demand. As a result, traffic flows are shown to increase along Londonderry Road and The Driftway due to the release of demand from the North Richmond area and a bypass of Richmond town centre.

 

The traffic model indicates that both Londonderry Road / The Driftway intersection and the Blacktown Road / The Driftway intersection are expected to be at capacity for future year 2026 demands with the Blacktown Road and The Driftway intersection modelled to be performing at capacity (Level of Service (LoS) - F) without improvements to the intersections.

 

The model shows improvements, during the morning peak to intersection performance at the intersection of Londonderry Road / The Driftway from LoS C (satisfactory) to LoS B (good) as a result of the proposal (ie upgrading the intersection to a roundabout). This allows traffic on The Driftway to more easily cross and enter onto Londonderry Road. The model also shows substantial improvements at the intersection of Blacktown Road / The Driftway from LoS F (unsatisfactory) to LoS C (satisfactory) as a result of upgrading the intersection to a roundabout, allowing traffic from The Driftway to turn onto Blacktown Road more easily.

 

The modelling results show upgrading these intersections with roundabout control, that The Driftway intersection improves its performance to LoS C. This will cater for future growth, improve the travel time and road safety for community.

 

The REF has acknowledged that there may be a need to upgrade the intersection of The Driftway and Blacktown Road beyond 2036, this would be dependent on other major infrastructure projects such as the Castlereagh Freeway and Outer Sydney Orbital which could redistribute traffic in the study area.

 

Currently, Londonderry Road and Blacktown Road are classified as State Roads. However, the section of The Driftway between Londonderry Road and Blacktown Road is currently classified as a local road. Council Officers request the NSW Government reclassify this eastern section of roadway to a State Road to provide consistency in future planning and maintenance.

 

Draft Submission to REF

There are several matters that Council will bring to the attention of TfNSW which are listed in the summary below. A full copy of Council’s draft submission is attached as Attachment 2. This will form the basis of Council’s submission to TfNSW.

1.   Construction Management Regional Coordination

2.   Road classification

3.   Traffic

4.   Road Cross Section

5.   Active transport and vulnerable road user safety

6.   Bus Facilities

7.   Land Acquisition

8.   Hydrology and Hydraulics Assessment

9.   Heritage & Cultural Heritage Impacts

10. Urban Design

11. Tree Management and Landscaping

12. Environmental Impacts:

13. Flora and Fauna Connectivity and Habitat

14. Community Consultation

 

Financial Implications

There are no financial implications for Council resulting from this report.

Risk Implications

There are no risks associated with the content of the report and the draft submission to TfNSW.

Conclusion

TfNSW has provided information to Council regarding the Review of Environmental Factors (REF) for New Richmond Bridge and traffic improvements – Stage 1 The Driftway. The improvements and upgrade to this critical road corridor are noted, however TfNSW must consider all matters contained within this report and associated submission.

The key issues identified within the body of this report will be included in Council’s submission to the TfNSW and Council officers will continue to work with TfNSW to ensure that the future upgrade delivers appropriate outcomes for all stakeholders.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Review of Environmental Factors (REF) for New Richmond Bridge and Traffic Improvements-Stage 1The Driftway be received.

2.     Council’s Engineering Services Manager be authorised to finalise a submission, based on this report and attachments, to Transport for NSW (TfNSW) by 4 March 2022.

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

 

1.

Key Features of the Proposal & Changes to Intersections.

 

Attachments Included

2.

Council’s Draft Submission

 

Attachments Included

 

 


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                            21 February 2022

 

 

 

7

Acceptance of Grant Funding - Local Road and Community Infrastructure Program - Extension of Program (Phase 3)   

 

Compiled by:               Nik Proufas, City Assets Manager

Authorised by:            Brian Steffen, Director - City Services  

 

Outcome

We can get around our City

Strategy

Provide a safe and efficient road and pathway network

Service Activity

Maintain the City’s roads and pathways

      

 

Executive Summary

Council Officers have received notification that a further $3,044,550 is available to Council as a continuation of the Local Roads and Community Infrastructure (LRCI) Program. The program was announced by the Federal Government on 22 May 2020 and extended as part of the 2021-22 Federal Budget on 11 May 2021 subject to signing a Phase 3 Grant Agreement and submission of eligible Work Schedules for nominated projects.

The report recommends that Council accept the nominal grant funding of $3,044,550 offered under the Local Roads and Community Infrastructure Program Phase 3 and enters into a funding agreement with the Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Communications and submits works schedules for the projects as detailed in this report.

Background

The Local Roads and Community Infrastructure (LRCI) Program was announced by the Federal Government on 22 May 2020, with funding being offered to Councils to be spent from 1 July 2020 to 30 June 2021 that meet eligibility criteria. The nominal grant funding amount offered to Penrith City Council under the initial LRCI Program was $1,522,275. Nominated projects were reported and endorsed by Council at the Ordinary Meeting on 27 July 2020. Following the announcement of the Federal budget in July, further funding was allocated to the LRCI Program (Phase 2). A further $6,613,341 was offered to Penrith City Council for projects that met the funding criteria. Nominated projects were reported and endorsed by Council at the Ordinary Meeting on 22 February 2021.  A further $3,044,550 (Phase 3) has nominally been offered to Penrith City Council for projects that meet the funding criteria.

Current Situation

The extension of the LRCI Program runs from 20 October 2021 to 31 December 2023, with projects required to be physically completed by 30 June 2023. The Program was announced as part of the Australian Government’s wider economic response to COVID-19.

The LRCI Program is a Demand Driven (eligibility based) grant program. The objective of the LRCI Program is to stimulate additional infrastructure construction activity in local communities across Australia to assist communities manage the economic impacts of COVID-19. Phase 3 of the LRCI Program continues a temporary, targeted stimulus measure responding to the economic impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic. The LRCI Program assists a community-led recovery from COVID-19 by supporting local jobs, firms, and procurement.

The funding criteria is quite specific and not intended to replace existing expenditure commitments but rather to enable further, additional expenditure as economic stimulus. Under Phase 3, Eligible Funding Recipients will be required to maintain their overall capital spending on roads and community infrastructure, funded by their own revenue, at or above their 2021-22 capital spending level. The focus on overall capital spending provides Eligible Funding Recipients with greater flexibility to set and deliver the infrastructure priorities in their communities.

Projects have been selected on the need to meet the specific selection criteria, which includes the ability to be delivered within the eligible construction time between 1 January 2022 and 30 June 2023.

The signed agreement and proposed work schedules to be approved are required to be submitted to comply with the funding conditions. As such, work schedules have been prepared for the projects listed in the report.

Proposed Projects

Community Public Space Infrastructure Projects

A range of projects are proposed that have not already been included in the adopted Operational Plan but complement other projects planned or underway that benefit the community.

The projects are summarised in the table below:

          Project Summary

Value ($)

Bennett Park, St Marys – mixed recreation space

850,000

Joan Sutherland Performing Arts Centre – Reactive Maintenance

175,000

Council buildings (various) – Unscheduled Maintenance

175,000

St Marys Community/Seniors Centre

400,000

Woodriff Gardens Clubhouse

1,174,550

David Currie/Peter Kearns – Toilets/Amenity upgrade

200,000

St Clair Ripples – CCTV Install

70,000

TOTAL

3,044,550

Table 1 – Summary of projects for proposed Works Schedules

The detail of the proposed projects are:

·    Bennett Park, St Marys – Funding Request - $850,000

Council will deliver a new mixed recreation space in Bennett Park in St Marys as part of the Penrith Sport and Recreation Strategy implementation plan. The community will be consulted on the features which could include formal and informal skate, scooter and bike riding areas; a variety of climbing and obstacle-style equipment; basketball court; enhanced play equipment; seating, picnic tables, socialising areas and relaxation space; and shade, landscaping and connections to existing infrastructure. Community consultation will commence in April 2022, and construction is programmed to commence in August 2022.The project is expected to be completed by the end of 2022.

 

·    Joan Sutherland Performing Arts CentreFunding Request - $175,000
The box office will be relocated.  The existing bar is to be upgraded to a café. A new storeroom and new sliding double doors to external seating area will be provided.

 

·    Council buildings (various) - Funding Request - $175,000

Replacement of a range of aging air conditioning infrastructure that is currently requiring ongoing maintenance and is not meeting the requirements of the facility users.

 

Three Council Childcare facilities have been identified for this work – Yoorami Childcare Centre – Werrington, Kindana Childcare Centre – St Clair and Strauss Road Childcare Centre – St Clair.

 

Further work will be undertaken to replace aging septic tank infrastructure at a number of locations.

 

·    St Marys Community Centre and Seniors Centre - Funding Request - $400,000

The St Marys Community Centre and St Marys Seniors Centre redevelopment, located at St Marys Corner, will deliver an upgraded community hub that will meet the needs of the growing St Marys community and neighbouring suburbs.

The designs for the redevelopment, which have been developed after consultation with the not-for-profit organisations and community user groups occupying the venue, will incorporate upgraded kitchens, multipurpose activity space, office and meeting space and function space.

The grant will ensure a full and enhanced scope of work can be delivered to meet community requirements, identified through the consultation, which would not be feasible within Council’s existing budget allocation of $1.4 million from the Building Asset Renewal Program and $900,000 awarded through the Federal Government’s Community Development Grant program.

   

·    Woodriff Gardens Clubhouse - Funding Request - $1,174,550

This project, identified in Council’s adopted Sport and Recreation Strategy, will realise the redevelopment of the existing clubhouse at Woodriff Gardens Tennis Complex. Allied to previous investment in upgrading the courts, it will ensure that the facility continues to host a range of community programs as well as deliver significant events. The clubhouse is used by Nepean District Tennis Association, Nepean District Table Tennis Association, and schools.

 

Consultation has been completed with the user groups, as well as Tennis NSW to ensure the facility is fit for purpose, building code compliant, and designed so that it continues to provide community benefit as well as economic value for the City through the hosting of events.

 

Total project cost is estimated at $3.1 million. The LRCIP funding of $1.2 million will enable a full and enhanced scope of works to be realised. Funding will ensure upgrades that will deliver much needed improvements to both the ground floor and the first floor, creating a fully accessible facility, including toilets, changerooms, a lift, formalised first aid/physio room, umpire room, coaches office, office administration space, new kiosk, area fire safety system. Council has committed $425,000 from its Building Asset Renewal Program with an additional $1.5 million being awarded to the project from the NSW Government’s Sport Election Commitments Program.


 

 

·    David Currie Playspace, Banks Drive, St Clair - Accessible Toilet – Funding Request - $200,000

Construction on the new David Currie Inclusive Playspace on Banks Drive has commenced. In addition to new play equipment, the upgrade includes delivery of pathway connections, car park enhancement, outdoor fitness equipment and half-court basketball court with park furniture, landscaping and a variety of accessible equipment. This project will provide an accessible toilet that will service both the playspace and the adjacent Peter Kearns Fields.

·    St Clair Ripples - Funding Request - $70,000

This project, identified in Council’s adoption of the Risk and Audit Committee’s Insurance Building audit, will deliver works associated with installing a fixed mobile CCTV system. Thereby increasing safety and security to meet the needs for the growing community usage of the recently refurbished facilities.

Financial Implications

There is no requirement for Council to provide matching funds to the grant being offered. Instead, Council is given an opportunity to realise the full scope of works for projects that would have otherwise had to make concessions to fit within original budget.

The maintenance and operational requirements of the upgraded building will be reflected in Council’s future asset maintenance budgets and asset renewal programs as per Council’s Budget Guidelines.

Risk Implications

The Community Facilities and Recreation Risk Register identifies risk associated with providing unsafe facilities and contractor performance. Controls have been established in relation to facility provision and contractor management.

Conclusion

It is recommended that Council accept the grant being offered and lodge the proposed work schedules to the Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Communications.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Acceptance of Grant Funding - Local Road and Community Infrastructure Program - Extension of Program (Phase 3) be received

2.     Council accept the grant funding of $3,044,550

3.     Council endorse the Work schedules as listed in the report

4.     Council write to The Hon Michael McCormack MP, Deputy Prime Minister - Minister for Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Development and The Hon Mark Coulton MP - Minister for Regional Health, Regional Communications and Local Government and Melissa McIntosh, Federal MP for Lindsay, thanking them for the funding.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                            21 February 2022

 

 

 

8

Pedestrian Safety Program Funding (High Pedestrian Activity Area) 2021/22   

 

Compiled by:               David Drozd, Traffic Engineering Coordinator

Authorised by:            Adam Wilkinson, Engineering Services Manager

Andrew Jackson, Director - Development and Regulatory Services  

 

Outcome

We can get around our City

Strategy

Provide a safe and efficient road and pathway network

Service Activity

Manage programs and initiatives that improve road safety and efficiency

      

 

Executive Summary

The purpose of this report is to advise Council of a funding offer obtained through the NSW Safe Speeds in High Pedestrian Activity and Local Areas for the 2021-22 financial year. The report recommends that Council accept the 100% funding offered under the program for 2021-22.

Background

The Thornton Estate has been the subject of much review in terms of transport, accessibility and road safety. In early 2021, Council officers initiated discussion with Transport for NSW (TfNSW) to commence planning for pedestrian safety improvements within the Thornton Estate precinct situated north of Penrith Station. Council subsequently applied for funding under the Safe Speeds in High Pedestrian Activity and Local Areas program.

Current Situation

The TfNSW Network Management Western Planning and Programs has now assessed Penrith City Council’s project under the NSW Safe Speeds in High Pedestrian Activity and Local Areas Program.  TfNSW has advised that the project for investigation and design only (for this current financial year) has been approved in 2021/22 to the value of $50,000 and is shown in Table 1 below.

 

Table 1:

Program

Project Number

Project Description

2021-22 Funding Offered ($)

Safe Speeds in High Pedestrian Activity and Local Areas

P.0075687

Penrith High Pedestrian Activity Area

 

Study for the installation of a High Pedestrian Activity Area in the northern precinct of Penrith Station

 

50,000

 

The funding allocation of $50,000 is 100% of the total project cost and hence there is no financial contribution required by Council for the 2021/22 financial year.  A condition of acceptance is that the investigation and design must be completed prior to 30 June 2022, as TfNSW cannot guarantee carry-over of any allocated funding not spent prior to 30 June 2022. This is a deadline which can be achieved as preliminary investigations and design are currently underway.

 

Financial Implications

This investigation and design project requires no financial contribution from council as 100% of funding is being provided by TfNSW. A condition of acceptance is that the investigation and design must be completed prior to 30 June 2022.

Risk Implications

There are minimal risks with acceptance of these funds, and undertaking the investigation and design for the High Pedestrian Activity Area Scheme for Thornton.

 

Conclusion

Funding of this program, to a total value of $50,000 for 2021-22, should be recognised as a noteworthy achievement for pedestrian safety. It is expected that the resulting treatments, identified through this investigation and design project, will ultimately result in improved levels of pedestrian safety and a reduction of accidents on local roads within the Local Government Area.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Pedestrian Safety Program Funding (High Pedestrian Activity Area) 2021/22 be received.

2.     Council accept grant funding of $50,000 offered for the Safe Speeds in High Pedestrian Activity and Local Areas Project shown in Table 1 for the 2021-22 financial year.

3.     Council write to the relevant State Member thanking them for their continued support of road safety improvements.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                            21 February 2022

 

 

 

9

Factory Road and Loftus Street Footpaths   

 

Compiled by:               Michael Jackson, Design and Projects Manager

Authorised by:            Brian Steffen, Director - City Services 

Requested By:            Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM

 

Outcome

We can get around our City

Strategy

Provide a safe and efficient road and pathway network

Service Activity

Manage the delivery of Council’s major transport infrastructure projects

      

 

Executive Summary

At the Ordinary meeting of Council held 22 November 2021 Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM requested an urgent report on the push for footpaths to be installed on Factory Road and Loftus St, Regentville.

The proposed footpaths were not included in the 2012 Penrith Accessible Trails Hierarchy Strategy (PATHS) document which is soon to be updated, but the footpaths have been included in 2021 Green Grid Strategy.

Background

With increasing usage of the Nepean River Precinct there is a growing demand for accessible paths to the river precinct from major population centres. There is currently shared path infrastructure on Mulgoa Road, Jamison Road & Tench Avenue, however the missing link in that network is from Glenmore Park to the Nepean River on a more direct route via Factory Road.  The route is approximately 1.9km to join to the existing Tench Avenue shared path network at the M4 bridge.

Current Situation

The current traffic lights at Mulgoa Road & Spencer Street will provide a safe crossing point to the riverside/western section of Regentville and a path from those lights via Gibbes or Loftus Streets and down Factory Road would meet the needs of recreational users.  While Gibbes and Loftus Streets have kerb and gutter, Factory Road is a semi-rural road with grass swales beside the asphalt road surface and are not suitable for pedestrian or bicycle access without the need to travel on the road carriageway which can be unsafe.

Financial Implications

A full engineering survey and detailed design has not been prepared however preliminary cost estimates indicate constructing the path with the required road kerb and drainage works to one side of the road is estimated to cost in the order of $3.6m. The project is not currently budgeted in the current Operational Plan and has no currently identified Council funding source.

Risk Implications

Pedestrian and Bicycle traffic on Factory Road represents a road safety risk which would be significantly reduced by the construction of a shared path.

Conclusion

The proposed footpath is identified in the adopted Green Grid Strategy as Priority Project 10.5 – Factory Road shared path linking to Tench Reserve.  Funding for the project should be sought via advocacy to State and Federal Governments.

 

RECOMMENDATION

Tha the information contained in the report on Factory Road and Loftus Street Footpaths be received.

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.  


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


Outcome 4 - We have safe, vibrant places

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

10      Streetlights Ahead Program - Converting Streetlights to LEDs                                     177

 

11      RFT 21/22-15 Public Domain Cleaning Services                                                          180

 

12      RFT21/22-17 Refurbishment Works at Ripples Leisure Centre St Marys                    185

 

 

 

 

 



Ordinary Meeting                                                                                            21 February 2022

 

 

 

10

Streetlights Ahead Program - Converting Streetlights to LEDs   

 

Compiled by:               Murray Halls, Business Development Coordinator

John Gordon, City Presentation Manager

Authorised by:            Brian Steffen, Director - City Services  

 

Outcome

We have safe, vibrant places

Strategy

Make our public places safe and attractive

Service Activity

Maintain Council’s public spaces

      

 

Executive Summary

The report recommends that Council endorse the proposal to enter into an agreement with Endeavour Energy over the upgrade of Endeavour’s public lighting infrastructure through the replacement of existing street lighting assets with LED-based luminaires.

Background

The 2015 the “Light Years Ahead (LYA)” street lighting upgrade project delivered the largest Council driven energy reduction project in Western Sydney’s history. This project, involving $5.2 million in Federal Government funding, was coordinated by the Western Sydney Regional Organisation of Councils Ltd (WSROC). It was implemented across nine western Sydney councils. Over 14,000 streetlights were replaced with LED energy efficient fittings which provided a 77% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions.

For Penrith, this resulted in 1,816 existing “old-technology” streetlights being converted to LEDs. This represented 15% of the total number of inefficient streetlights in operation across the City at the time. Annual savings of $148,000 were achieved, resulting in Council’s capital contribution of $331,000 being repaid in 2.5 years.

In 2019, Council contributed $3.33 million from internal reserves to fund Stage 2 of the LYA project. This resulted in 7,738 remaining residential streetlights across the Penrith LGA being upgraded to LEDs. Conservative estimates indicated that Council will save approximately $5.8 million over the next 20 years in reduced energy usage and service maintenance charges. Council received Energy Savings Certificates (ESCs) of approximately $640,000 which were paid directly back into the Sustainability Revolving Fund (SRF) reserve, significantly reducing the overall project payback period.

Current Situation

Endeavour Energy launched its “Lighting the Future Together” program in October 2021. Highlights of the program include:

•        Follows the “Light Years Ahead” program (100,000 lights upgraded to LEDs);

•        Will replace a further 125,000 streetlights;

•        Funded by Endeavour Energy;

•        Significant savings for Councils;

•        Reducing operating expenditure for Endeavour Energy;

•        Sets the platform for Smart Cities with the potential for smart streetlights;

•        Endeavour Energy can complete over (3) three financial years;

Penrith’s current streetlight network has a total of 20,619 luminaires, consisting of 52% (10,811) LED fittings and 48% non-LED (9,808) fittings. It is expected that upgrading to a full LED network will lead to energy savings of 3,424,623 kWh/annum, equating to 2,774 tonnes of CO2.

Upgrading the entire street lighting network is expected to save Council more than $13 million over the next 20 years. Ongoing annualised savings are estimated to be achieved from:

•        Lower commodity procurement costs from Council’s energy provider due to greater efficiency;

•        Lower corresponding network charges payable to Endeavour Energy to deliver electricity to Council’s public lighting.

As a result of a complete streetlighting LED upgrade, Council will achieve an estimated $649,000 in annual savings due to:

•        Commodity savings of $512,000 per annum;

•        Network Use of System (NUOS) savings of $383,000 per annum.

These savings will be offset by an increase in annual Street Light Use of System (SLUOS) charges. Total 2021/22 SLUOS charges are projected to be $2,010,000. These charges will increase as more Endeavour Energy capital-funded LED fittings are added to the streetlight network. At the commencement of the 2025/26 financial year the SLUOS charge will have increased by $246,000 annually due to the completion of the LED upgrade program.

Council can also benefit by $1.1 million due to its eligibility for NSW Government Energy Saving Certificate (ESC) revenue as a result of the LED upgrade. There is an expected one-off fee payable to Endeavour Energy to recover residual cost of writing down the replaced luminaires (TC5).

Based on this return for the ESC scheme, the project is considered immediately cash positive:

Upfront Benefits

$ (one-off)

ESC Revenue

$1,126,711

Accredited ESC Provider Support Costs (based on a $2.00 per ESC cost)

-$87,000

TC5 Tariff Residual Recovery

-$984,357

Net Upfront Financial Benefit

$55,353

To deliver the program as efficiently and quickly as possible Endeavour Energy is applying the following principles for the program:

•        Complete each LGA as a single scope as quickly as possible;

•        Committed to assisting Councils in redeeming ESCs to avoid Councils needing to find project funding;

•        Once started, resources will be focused on that LGA to complete all work;

•        Aiming to complete the roll out of the total program before the start of the next regulatory period (1 July 2025);

•        Bulk lamp change for traditional luminaires will be scaled back to provide capacity to accelerate the upgrade;

•        Fault & emergency repairs to the streetlight network will continue as normal but likely to be undertaken as LED rather than repair of old technology luminaire.

Financial Implications

 

Council’s Finance Business Partner has confirmed that the proposed project to convert remaining non-LED streetlighting to LED is expected to result in significant savings in future electricity usage costs and network charges. While these are partially offset by increased SLUOS charges, the projected savings remain significant at over $13 million over the next 20 years.

 

It should be noted that an Accredited Certificate Provider is required to sell the ESC's generated by the project on Council’s behalf. The cost of this service along with project support is expected be $2 per certificate totalling approximately $87k and will still result in a "cash positive" project.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Streetlights Ahead Program - Converting Streetlights to LEDs be received

2.     Council endorse the proposal to enter into an agreement with Endeavour Energy over the upgrade of Endeavour’s public lighting infrastructure through the replacement of existing street lighting assets with LED-based luminaires.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                            21 February 2022

 

 

 

11

RFT 21/22-15 Public Domain Cleaning Services Penrith and St Marys City Centres

 

Compiled by:               Murray Halls, Business Development Coordinator
John Gordon, City Presentation Manager

Authorised by:            Brian Steffen, Director - City Services  

 

Outcome

We have safe, vibrant places

Strategy

Make our public places safe and attractive

Service Activity

Maintain Council’s public spaces

      

 

Executive Summary

Tender reference RFT21/22-15 Public Domain Cleaning Services was advertised online through Apet360 on 13 October 2021. The tender closed 4 November 2021.

This report advises Council of the outcome of the tender process and recommends that the tender from V.D.G Pty Ltd trading as VDG Services Australia, in the amount of $369,148.26 per annum (excluding GST) be accepted for Public Domain Cleaning Services.

Background

Tenders for the provision of Public Domain Cleaning Services for an initial three (3) year period with an option to extend for a further two (2) x one (1) year periods allowing for rise and fall provisions was advertised online through Apet360 on 13 October 2021.  The tender closed on 4 November 2021.

The scope of the works required in this tender including the following requirements:

To provide Public Domain Cleaning Services that includes mechanical sweeping and cleaning of footpaths; street furniture, cleaning including signage, minor graffiti removal from surfaces accessible from the public space, and litter removal during weekdays, weekends and public holidays within the Penrith and St Marys City Centres.

Discussions were held with representatives from the Penrith CBD Corporation and the St Marys Town Centre. Increased service frequencies, within key locations across both city centres, were included in the Scope of Requirements documentation.

It was proposed in the Tender documents that Council will select one-preferred contractor to perform all of the services specified.

Tender Evaluation Process

The Tender Evaluation Committee consisted of John Gordon – City Presentation Manager, Allan Berry – Acting Operations Coordinator Cross City Services, Murray Halls – City Presentation Business Development Coordinator.  The Tender Evaluation Committee was supported by Procurement Business Partner – Allyce Langton.

The evaluation criteria advertised and used in assessing the tenders received including the following:

·    Demonstrated Ability

·    Experience in the delivery of similar services over the past 3 years

·    Compliance to specified requirements including relevant standards

·    Unit rates including rise and fall provisions

·    Financial viability

·    Resources and personnel

·    Quality Assurance

·    Environmental management

·    Workplace Health & Safety

·    Industrial Relations

Initial Tender Review

A full listing of the tenders received is detailed below in price order (ex GST).

Company

Lump Sum Tendered Price

Company Address

Directors

MILLENNIUM HI-TECH GROUP PTY LTD

(Current service provider)

$355,592.54

Suite B15, Level 1 Parkview Business Centre 1 Maitland Place Baulkham Hills NSW 2153

Stuart Grimshaw
Royce Galea
Rohan Garnett
Darren Perry

QUAD SERVICES PTY LTD

$361,132.72

12 Carlotta Street Artarmon NSW 2064

David Norman
Sandra Norman
Andrew Yardley
Ravindra Naidoo

ROADWORX SURFACING PTY LTD

$361,666.76

8 Austool Place Ingleburn NSW 2565

Stephen Gillies

V.D.G PTY LTD t/a VDG Services Australia

$369,148.26

U22/31 Governor Macquarie Drive Chipping Norton NSW 2170

Dean Graoroski

SKG CLEANING SERVICES PTY LTD. t/a SKG CLEANING SERVICES (Contracts)

$373,698.00

Unit 22/205-213 Port Hacking Road Miranda NSW 2228

George Manoussakis

SOLO SERVICES GROUP AUSTRALIA PTY LTD

$392,773.16

33 Waterloo Road, Macquarie Park NSW 2113

Matthew Salihi (CEO)

JOSS CLEANING SERVICES (AUS) PTY LTD t/a Joss Cleaning Services (Western Sydney)

$422,658.08

Suite 301, 5 Celebration Drive Bella Vista NSW 2153

Matt Joss

The Trustee for TIM AUSTIN FAMILY TRUST t/a ICS Service Solutions

$424,349.64

27 King Street Norwood SA 5067

Tim Austin
David Pollock
Jeff Walsh
Nigel Garrard
Craig Lovett

The Trustee for N & R KHOURI FAMILY TRUST t/a Benchmark Group Solutions PTY LTD

$456,144.00

154 Marsden Street Parramatta NSW 2150

Nazih Khouri

STATEWIDE QUALITY SERVICES PTY LTD

$457,731.79

74 Railway Parade Canley Vale NSW 2166

Elias Shamoon

FAST FACILITIES SERVICES PTY LTD t/a Fast Facilities Services Pty Ltd (FAST)

$459,357.91

Suite 1A, Level 2 802 Pacific Highway Gordon NSW 2072

Mauro Carlos
Diana Rusinque

SMART CLEANING SOLUTIONS (VIC) PTY LTD

$478,032.00

Central 2, Suite 44 Level 3, 1 Ricketts Road Mount Waverley VIC 3149

Nicholas Pastras

MMS GROUP PTY LTD t/a MMS Group (Tenders)

$529,797.84

1/15 Industrial Ave, Molendinar QLD 4214 (Head Office)

Wayne Hemi

IKON SERVICES AUSTRALIA PTY LTD t/a IKON Services

$539,585.80

5/10 Brumby Street Seven Hills NSW 2147

George Tahan

ATM CLEANING MANAGEMENT PTY LTD (Cleaning Services Sales)

$621,184.20

Unit 42/8 Avenue of the Americas

Newington, NSW 2127

Chorok Jun

ADVANCED NETWORK SERVICES PTY LTD t/a Advanced Landscaping and Design

$649,828.40

30 Telford Circuit Yatala, QLD

Edward Klimowicz

PICKWICK GROUP PTY LTD t/a the Pickwick Cleaning Services Unit Trust

$830,356.80

Unit 7, 70-72 Captain Cook Drive, Caringbah NSW 2229

Inbamanay Soloman
William Malone
Deva Soloman
Selina Soloman
Helina Soloman
Emril Ali

PRINCIPAL ASSET SERVICES PTY LTD

$835,798.08

Level 3, SE43 89-97 Jones St Ultimo NSW 2007

Martin Isef

STORM INTERNATIONAL PTY LTD

     $1,271,013.12

Unit 18 55-61 Pine Rd, Yennora NSW 2161

Ismar Younan

EBCON PTY LTD

     $1,965,600.00

U10, 5-7 Malta St Fairfield NSW 2165

Elia Babi

After the initial evaluation it was determined that there was no benefit to Council in further considering the higher priced tenders from the following companies:

·    Pickwick Group Pty Ltd t/a the Pickwick Cleaning Services Unit Trust

·    Principal Asset Services Pty Ltd

·    Storm International Pty Ltd

·    Ebcon Pty Ltd

The remaining sixteen (16) tenders were then considered for initial assessment and evaluated using Apet360 software to provide a ranking against conformance with the evaluation criteria. Panel members focused on the six (6) highest ranked tenders.

Tenders submitted by Roadworx Surfacing Pty Ltd, Solo Services Group Australia Pty Ltd, Quad Services Pty Ltd, and SKG Cleaning Services Pty Ltd did not demonstrate the provision of adequate staffing hours for the level and type of service required.

Millennium Hi-Tech Group Pty Ltd secured the 3rd highest overall ranking. As the current Public Domain Cleaning contractor, they ranked below the preferred tenderer in Provider Effectiveness, Demonstrated Ability, and Work Health & Safety. They were also ranked lower than the preferred tenderer in relation to staffing levels and schedules.

VDG Pty Ltd received the highest overall tender assessment and appear to offer the best value for money outcome. They performed consistently well across all service requirements and provided a staffing roster expected to meet all service demands, with a particular focus attributed to the “morning blitz” periods as requested. They also indicated that all staff are engaged and renumerated under the Cleaning Services 2020 Award.

VDG Pty Ltd are currently providing a good quality service to other Council departments including Community Facilities & Recreation and Ripples. They have been recognised for their ability to respond quickly to necessary changes and special requests.

Tender Advisory Group Comments

The objective of the Tender Advisory Group (TAG) is to support the Council to achieve fair and equitable tender processes. The TAG, consisting of Brian Steffen - Director City Services, Glenn McCarthy - Governance Manager and Neil Farquharson – Financial Services Manager were briefed by the City Presentation team about the background and the process followed.

The TAG considered the recommendations in relation to the tender RFT21/22-15 Public Domain Cleaning Services – Penrith and St Marys City Centres, it was noted that, while the recommended proposal is not the lowest cost, the company has demonstrated their ability to meet Council’s requirements and their proposal was considered to be the most advantageous to Council overall by providing the best value. The TAG reviewed the evaluation process outlined within the report and is satisfied that the selection criteria have been correctly applied in making the recommendations

Financial Implications

Included in the assessment of tenders was the commissioning of independent reference checks, financial analysis, and performance analysis on V.D.G Pty Ltd. These checks were completed by Equifax Australasia Credit Ratings Pty Ltd. Financial Services have reviewed the financial information provided by the tenderer and have not identified any reason why the contract should not be awarded.

The cost of Public Domain Cleaning services is provided for within Public Domain Maintenance operational budgets, the value of the recommended tender represents an increase of approximately 5% above the rate currently charged under the expiring contract.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on RFT 21/22-15 Public Domain Cleaning Services be received

2.     The tender from V.D.G Pty Ltd trading as VDG Services Australia, in the amount of $369,148.26 per annum (excluding GST) be accepted for Public Domain Cleaning Services.

3.     The General Manager (or their delegate) be authorised to sign all necessary legal documents in relation to this matter.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                            21 February 2022

 

 

 

12

RFT21/22-17 Refurbishment Works at Ripples Leisure Centre St Marys   

 

Compiled by:               Michael Jackson, Design and Projects Manager

Mudassar Fayyaz, Major Projects Coordinator

Authorised by:            Brian Steffen, Director - City Services  

 

Outcome

We have safe, vibrant places

Strategy

Make our public places safe and attractive

Service Activity

Implement the Building Asset Renewal Program

 

Previous Items:           2- RFT21/22-17 Refurbishment Works at Ripples Leisure Centre St Marys- Ordinary Meeting- 10 Jan 2022 7:00PM

                                      25- RFT21/22-17 Refurbishment Works at Ripples Leisure Centre St Marys (Amended)- Ordinary Meeting- 22 Nov 2021 7:00PM     

 

Executive Summary

At the Ordinary meeting on 10 January 2022, it was resolved that the General Manager or their delegate should negotiate with the two most suitably qualified tenderers in order to award the tender. The procurement and project teams met with the shortlisted tenders to clarify the staging plans, project delivery programs as well as confirm revised prices.

A recommendation was made to the General Manager and he has awarded the tender to Trinity Quality Interiors Pty Ltd for the lump sum price of $953,081 excl GST.

Background

The tenderers recommended for negotiation are listed below with their revised offers:

Company

Lump Sum Tendered Price

Company Address

Directors

Trinity Quality Interiors Pty Ltd

$953,081.00 (revised)

Suite 11, 11 Forest Rd
Hurstville NSW 2220

Benjamin Lloyd

Lloyd Group Pty Ltd

$1,139,503.30 (revised)

14 Harvey Street Pyrmont NSW 2009

Matthew Licuria

After detail review and obtaining clarifications, it was determined that Trinity Quality Interiors Pty Ltd provided best value for money, they can meet the required grant funding completion timeline subject to weather impacts, and they were recommended for the award.

For information, the original tender submissions are listed below in price order

Company 

 

Lump Sum Tendered Price

Company Address         

Directors

Trinity Quality Interiors Pty Ltd

$683,507.00

(Non-Conforming)

Suite 11, 11 Forest Rd

Hurstville NSW 2220

Benjamin Lloyd

DesignX Group Pty Ltd

$1,072,154.00

40 Hayes Rd

Seven Hills NSW 2147

Pedro Khan

Lloyd Group Pty Ltd

$1,084,128.00

(Non-Conforming)

14 Harvey Street Pyrmont NSW 2009

Matthew Licuria

Brenic Constructions Pty Ltd

$1,560,670.00

5 Opus Place, Cranebrook NSW 2749

Dominic Begley

Rogers Construction Group Pty Ltd

$1,715,858.48

3/74 Edward Street

Riverstone NSW 2765 

Mitchell Rogers

 

 

Financial Implications

Included in the assessment of tenders was the commissioning of independent reference checks, financial analysis, and performance analysis on Trinity Quality Interiors Pty Ltd. These checks were completed by Equifax Australasia Credit Ratings Pty Ltd. Financial Services have reviewed the financial information provided by the tenderer and did not identify any reason why the contract should not be awarded.

An allocation for the refurbishment works at Ripples Leisure Centre St Marys is included in the 2021/22 Operational Plan with funding from the Australian Government’s Local Roads and Community Infrastructure Program Phase 2.

The maintenance and operational requirements of the upgraded building will be reflected in Council’s future asset maintenance budgets and asset renewal programs as per Council’s Budget Guidelines.

Risk Implications

The refurbishment works included in this project would be delivered in stages to minimise the impacts of construction on patrons and routine centre operations.

If the refurbishment work is not undertaken, the working life of the existing Ripples St Marys asset would be heavily compromised as the building currently leaks regularly causing ongoing damage to the asset.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on RFT21/22-17 Refurbishment Works at Ripples Leisure Centre St Marys be received

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.  


Outcome 5 - We care about our environment

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

13      Little Creek Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan                        189

 

14      College, Orth and Werrington Creeks Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan                                                                                                                                 205

 

 

 

 



Ordinary Meeting                                                                                            21 February 2022

 

 

 

13

Little Creek Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan   

 

Compiled by:               Elias Ishak, Senior Engineer - Floodplain Management

Mylvaganam Senthilvasan, Floodplain Engineering Coordinator

Authorised by:            Adam Wilkinson, Engineering Services Manager

Andrew Jackson, Director - Development and Regulatory Services  

 

Outcome

We care for our environment

Strategy

Minimise risks to our community from natural disasters and a changing climate

Service Activity

Manage the risk to and impact on life and property from the existing and potential future use of the floodplain

      

 

Executive Summary

In accordance with the NSW Government’s Floodplain Development Manual (April 2005), Council has undertaken a Floodplain Risk Management Study for the Little Creek Catchment and developed a Floodplain Risk Management Plan.  The Draft Little Creek Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan, May 2021 was placed on public exhibition from 29 July to 26 August 2021 for public comment.  The purpose of this report is to provide Council with the outcome of the public exhibition.

 

The report recommends that the Little Creek Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan be adopted.

Background

The NSW Government’s Flood Policy is directed at providing solutions to existing flooding issues in developed areas and ensuring that new developments are compatible with the relevant flood hazard and do not create flooding problems in other areas. Under the Policy the management of flood prone land remains the responsibility of Councils. The policy and floodplain management practices are defined in the NSW Government’s Floodplain Development Manual, April 2005. The policy sets out a staged process Council must follow, which includes data collection, a flood study, a floodplain risk management study and plan, and implementation of the plan as shown in Figure 1 below.

Figure 1


 

The State Government, under its policy, provides technical advice and in some instances financial support to Councils to manage their floodplains.  The Little Creek Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan is jointly funded by Council and grant funding from the NSW Government.

The Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan was undertaken by Engineering Consultancy firm, Catchment Simulation Solutions, on behalf of Council; with the technical guidance from the NSW Department of Planning, Industry and Environment (DPIE). The Study and Plan have been overseen by the Council’s Floodplain Risk Management Committee and supported by Technical Working Group comprising members from Council, the consultant, the DPIE and the NSW State Emergency Services (SES).

The primary objective of this Study and Plan is to develop a floodplain risk management plan for the study area that addresses the existing, future and continuing flood problems, taking into account the potential impacts of climate change, in accordance with the NSW Government Flood Policy, as detailed in the NSW Floodplain Development Manual, April 2005.

The Little Creek Catchment covers parts of the suburbs of Oxley Park, Colyton, St Marys and North St Marys and has an area of approximately 480 hectares (4.8 km2). The Study Area (Attachment 1) is located north of the M4 Motorway and drains to South Creek at St Marys.  The study area is highly urbanised with a mix of residential, commercial and industrial properties including educational institutions such as Oxley Park Public School and Colyton High School.

In 2017, Council prepared and adopted the Little Creek Overland Flow Flood Study. The next stage of the floodplain risk management process is to undertake a Floodplain Risk Management Study and develop a Floodplain Risk Management Plan for the Little Creek Catchment.

A draft study and plan was developed, and on 28 June 2021 Council resolved that: 

1.  “The information contained in the report on Little Creek Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan be received.

2.  The public exhibition draft of the Little Creek Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan, May 2021 be endorsed for public exhibition for a period of no less than 28 days.

3.  Arrangements be made for the public exhibition in July - August 2021.

4.  A further report be presented to Council on the results of the public exhibition of the draft of the Little Creek Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan, May 2021 addressing any submissions received during the exhibition period.

Public Exhibition

The draft Little Creek Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan was placed on public exhibition, commencing on 29 July 2021 and submissions closed 26 August 2021.  The exhibition process included direct consultation throughout the catchment and public notification of that exhibition period. The following were undertaken as part of the public exhibition.

·      Advertisements placed on the local newspaper inviting residents, ratepayers and business owners to review the draft study reports and make submissions;

·      Community Information Sheet (Factsheet) detailing the flood management process and the steps involved in developing a floodplain risk management plan is prepared and distributed. This is also be made available through Council’s Website;

·      Letters and Community Information Sheets were sent to all property owners (approximately 3,400 letters) within the study area informing them about the public exhibition and inviting them to review the public exhibition draft reports and make submissions;

·      Council’s website was updated to access the study documents and arrangements made for making submissions electronically; and

·      On 17 August 2021 a community meeting, through video link, was held which allowed the public to directly discuss with staff and the consultant as required.  At the community meeting, a short presentation was given outlining the purpose of the study and key recommendations. The public had the opportunity to ask questions on the relevant documents and discuss as required.

From the public exhibition Council received eight (8) written submissions of which three are from the same writer.  The submissions are summarised together with Council’s responses in the Table 1 below.

Table 1: Summary of Submissions and Responses

Submission Number

Summary of submissions

Responses to Submissions

1

The submission is from Endeavour Energy that has two substations within the study area, one at 94 Bennett Road and the other one at 3A Anne Street St Marys.

Endeavour Energy advised that maintaining road access to the substation sites during flood is important and will allow them to maintain electricity supply for longer periods. In case of failure or breakdown during floods the restoration of supply could be easily carried out if road access is available.

This submission does not raise any objections to the Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan.

 

The Floodplain Risk Management Study includes a series of flood maps that provide details of road flooding. These maps are very useful for emergency response management purposes.

The flood information within the Study is very valuable to the State Emergency Services as well as electricity companies to plan their emergency response management activities during floods.  The flood information will be made available to relevant authorities involving emergency management.

The previous submission from Endeavour Energy as part of the phase 1 community consultation is incorporated in Section 3.2.7 of the Little Creek Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study report.  The consultant has reviewed the inundation extents in the vicinity of Endeavor Energy’s two substations and confirmed that neither asset is predicted to be impacted by flooding.

Submission requires no amendments to the study documents.

2

This submission is from an owner of a property in Richard Street Colyton who states that the property is located on high ground and if the property is to be flooded then most of the Western Suburbs of Sydney would be flooded.  The writer raises concerns about the impacts that will likely occur on the sale value of the property, the insurance premium, and the ability to insure the property.  The writer asks why issues of this type have not been addressed by this study.

 

Richard Street is located on the ridge line between the Little Creek catchment and Byrnes Creek catchment.  The consultant has reviewed the flood maps that have been prepared as part of the study and confirmed that the property is not impacted by local catchment flooding.  Therefore, the study should not have an adverse flood impacts on the property value or on insurance premiums.  The writer was advised to contact the insurance company and discuss their insurance premiums. 

Submission requires no amendments to the study report.

3

This submission refers to the flood depth map (Figure 14.2) of the Probable Maximum Flood (PMF) for a property along Bent Street, St Marys.  The writer states that the southern section of the property is higher than the PMF and is not below the PMF.

The writer requests that Council re-check the PMF results and correct the maps.

The consultant has reviewed the available topographic information in the vicinity of the property.  The aerial photo and the terrain data show that there is an access road running along the southern section of the property and this road is located at a lower elevation than the surrounding terrain.  The elevation of the road typically varies between 28.7m AHD and 29.1m AHD while the elevation of the land to the south is typically located above 29.4m AHD. 

The available topographic information suggests that there is potential for water to “pond” in the access road and the associated PMF mapping supports this.  However, this ponding is only predicted to occur during the PMF event. The maps exhibited are correct and no amendments to the study report is required.

4

This submission is from the owner of a property along Forthorn Place, St Marys.  The writer raised concerns whether there will be any changes to the flood notation on the Section 10.7 planning certificate.  And also raised concern whether this will have an impact on the property sale and insurance in the future.

 

The property is within the flood planning area.  Therefore, it will be identified as property having flood related development controls on Section 10.7 planning certificate.  The main goal of this notation is to ensure that any future development is completed in a manner which will minimise the potential for flood damage during future rainfall events.

The property already has an appropriate flood notation on the s10.7 planning certificate and flood related development controls apply to this property based on Little Creek Overland Flow Flood Study that was completed and adopted in 2017.

This study will not change the flood notation for the property and, therefore, should not impact on the property value and insurance costs.  The flood affectation of this property has not changed because of this study.  The writer is advised to contact the insurance company to discuss their insurance premium.

Submission requires no amendments to the study report.

5, 6 and 7

The writer who owns a property along Forthorn Place, North St Marys, made three submissions which are grouped together. It is to be noted that two of these submissions are exactly same but submitted at different dates.

The writer states that the property has never experienced any flooding in the past 30 years including the recent flood events experienced in February 2020 and March 2021.  The writer raised question if there will be any changes to the planning certificate for this property because of this study.  Any changes to zoning and /or the property modification recommendations has enormous implications to business. 

The writer is challenging the flood modelling simulation scenarios based on the March 2021 flood event. The write claims that this rain event was classified as a 1 in 100-year but no flood occurred on the property.  The writer further claims that the creek bank did not even burst into the community car park area.

The writer also claims that the maps provided are ambiguous and non-defined, and it is very hard to locate the street or even to understand if the property is within the light blue or dark blue zone.

The writer agrees with works proposed to improve the drainage.

 

The Floodplain Risk Management Study has been prepared as per the State Government Floodplain Development Manual guidelines and the flood planning policy.  The recommended changes to the section 10.7 flood notation are intended to update the identification of properties where there is a potential risk of inundation.  This will allow any future development across potentially flood affected areas is to be completed in a way that minimises damage to property.  The study does not propose any re-zoning of land within the Little Creek catchment. 

In reference to recent significant rainfall events (e.g., March 2021 and February 2020) where Little Creek did not overtop its banks and, therefore, floodwater could not have approached the driveway of this property as the flood mapping suggests.  A review of the flood mapping produced as part of the study confirms these observations with water fully contained to the Little Creek channel during all floods up to and including the 0.2% AEP (1 in 500 year) flood.  However, it is important to recognise that there is also potential for “overland” flow flooding in the catchment.  The inundation that is predicting near the front of the property is not associated with Little Creek overtopping its banks.  It is associated with water “ponding” within the gutter of Forthorn Place when the capacity of the stormwater system in the street is exceeded.  This is only predicted to happen during relatively rare floods (greater than the 1 in 20-year ARI flood). During all floods up to and including the 0.2% AEP (1 in 500 year) flood, this water is fully contained to the kerb and gutter and does not extend onto the property.  It is only during the probable maximum flood (i.e., the biggest flood that could occur) that water is predicted to spill out of the road and extend very marginally across the property boundary.

It should be noted that the March 2021 event is unlikely to have been a 1 in 100-year ARI flood within the Little Creek catchment.  Current estimates within the broader Hawkesbury-Nepean catchment suggest a frequency of between 1 in 10 and 1 in 20 years.

In regards the flood mapping is unclear and/or ambiguous, the applicant is referring to the flood map attached to the factsheet that was mailed out along with the letter to all residents within the Little Creek catchment.  The letter and the factsheet including the flood map designed to inform the community about the public exhibition and the process to review the Study documents on Council website including details on the procedures to lodge public submission. 

The draft Floodplain Risk Management Study Volume 2 report, which is also publicly exhibited on Council website, contains a series of high-resolution flood maps for the full range of design flood events with detailed legend and explanation on the right side of each map.

Submission requires no amendments to the study report.

8

This submission is on behalf of two owners of properties along Canberra Street, St Marys.  The writer congratulates Council on the undertaking an overall review of drainage in the Little Creek Catchment. 

The Writer also support the recommended options in the Little Creek Floodplain Risk Management Plan, particularly the Option FM4 that is to upgrade stormwater drainage at Canberra Street, Sydney Street and Brisbane Street.  The writer agrees that this option aims to capture and direct a greater proportion of flow below ground, thereby reducing overland flow depths and extents.   

The writer also states that option FM4 will not only reduce insurance claims but also the flooding in Oxley Park.  The writer further states that it will facilitate increased development and lead to increased property values in the area. Given the large residential lot sizes in Oxley Park, there is an increased demand for redevelopment of theses lots, especially due to major infrastructure proposed nearby (e.g. new airport and rail upgrades).

The options recommended in the Floodplain Risk Management Plan including Option FM4 will be further considered on a priority basis against a whole Council LGA strategic implementation framework. It should be noted that the aims of these recommended options are to minimise the flood risk in the Little Creek catchment.

The submission supports the Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan.

 

In summary, eight (8) submissions were received from the public exhibition. Most of the submissions raised clarifications at local levels but generally raised no objections to the Study and Plan.  The exhibited Study and Plan report is only required to amended to reflect the public exhibition completed. The proposed amendments to the exhibited Little Creek Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan Draft Report, May 2021 are listed in the “Schedule of Amendments” included as Appendix 2.

 

Endorsement of the Floodplain Risk Management Committee

On 1 November 2021, the outcome of the public exhibition was presented to the Floodplain Risk Management Committee. The Committee resolved that:

1.    The information contained in the report on Little Creek Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan be received.

2.    The Little Creek Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan Final Report October 2021 be endorsed to go to Council for formal adoption.

3.    Arrangements be made to report to Council seeking adoption of the Little Creek Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan Final Report October 2021.”

 

Financial Implications

The Little Creek Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan contains a number of recommendations including capital works with an approximate valuer totalling $3.9m, some of which will result in ongoing maintenance costs. These recommendations may serve as a guide for future resource allocations and grant applications.

Risk Implications

Adoption of the Little Creek Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan works in part to meet our obligation and good faith provisions under the NSW Floodplain Development Manual.

Conclusion

The Little Creek Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan Exhibition Draft Report, May 2021 was exhibited for public comment from 29 July to 26 August 2021. In total eight (8) submissions were received. Summary of the submissions and responses are detailed in the body of this report. Most of the submissions raised clarifications at local levels but generally raised no objections to the exhibited Little Creek Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan.

The consultant has now addressed all issues raised. The exhibited Study and Plan report is now amended to reflect the changes undertaken. The proposed amendments to the exhibited Little Creek Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan Draft Report May 2021 are listed in the “Schedule of Amendments” included as Attachment 2.  Minor amendments are required to the study report to reflect the public exhibition completed and changing the status of the report from “Draft for Public Exhibition” to “Final Report”.   

The Little Creek Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan Final Report October 2021 is now recommended for the consideration by Council for formal adoption.

The size of the study report is very large and contains the following volumes which are therefore provided separately for the information of Councillors and are made available to the public on Council’s website.

·    Little Creek Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Plan, October 2021 (Final)

·    Little Creek Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study, October 2021 (Final) - Volume 1(Text)

·    Little Creek Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study, October 2021 (Final) - Volume 2(Maps)

·    Little Creek Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan, October 2021 (Final) - Summary Report

The Little Creek Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan Final Report October 2021 has been completed in accordance with the NSW Government’s Floodplain Development Manual. The Plan provides recommendations for the most feasible flood management solutions to assist Council to meet its floodplain management obligations. The proposed mitigation strategies will be further considered on a priority basis against a whole Council LGA strategic implementation framework. It is recommended that the Little Creek Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan Final Report October 2021 be adopted.

 

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Little Creek Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan be received.

2.     The Little Creek Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan Final Report dated October 2021 be adopted.

3.     The Little Creek Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan Final Report dated October 2021 be published and made available on Council’s website.

4.     Council further consider the recommended mitigation works in the Little Creek Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan for inclusion by Council in future Capital Works Programs and for grant funding applications.

5.     Council consider the flood planning recommendations listed in the Little Creek Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan Final Report dated October 2021 when reviewing its Development Control Plan 2014, and the Local Environmental Plan 2010.

6.     Council write to those who made submissions advising of Council’s resolution.

7.     Council write to relevant State and Federal Members of Parliament advising them of the adoption of the Little Creek Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan and thanking them for their continued support of Council’s Floodplain Management program.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

Study Area - Little Creek Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan

1 Page

Appendix

2.

Schedule of Amendments - Little Creek Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan

2 Pages

Appendix

  


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                         21 February 2022

Appendix 1 - Study Area - Little Creek Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan

 


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                         21 February 2022

Appendix 2 - Schedule of Amendments - Little Creek Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan

 

PDF Creator

PDF Creator


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                            21 February 2022

 

 

 

14

College, Orth and Werrington Creeks Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan   

 

Compiled by:               Elias Ishak, Senior Engineer - Floodplain Management

Mylvaganam Senthilvasan, Floodplain Engineering Coordinator

Authorised by:            Adam Wilkinson, Engineering Services Manager

Andrew Jackson, Director - Development and Regulatory Services  

 

Outcome

We care for our environment

Strategy

Minimise risks to our community from natural disasters and a changing climate

Service Activity

Manage the risk to and impact on life and property from the existing and potential future use of the floodplain

      

 

Executive Summary

In accordance with the NSW Government’s Floodplain Development Manual (April 2005), Council has undertaken a Floodplain Risk Management Study for the College, Orth and Werrington Creeks Catchment and developed a Floodplain Risk Management Plan.  The Draft College, Orth and Werrington Creeks Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan, May 2021 was placed on public exhibition from 29 July to 26 August 2021 for public comment.  The purpose of this report is to provide Council with the outcome of the public exhibition.

 

The report recommends that the College, Orth and Werrington Creeks Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan be adopted.

Background

The NSW Government’s Flood Policy is directed at providing solutions to existing flooding issues in developed areas and ensuring that new developments are compatible with the relevant flood hazard and do not create flooding problems in other areas. Under the Policy the management of flood prone land remains the responsibility of Councils. The policy and floodplain management practices are defined in the NSW Government’s Floodplain Development Manual, April 2005. The policy sets out a staged process Council must follow, which includes data collection, a flood study, a floodplain risk management study and plan, and implementation of the plan as shown in Figure 1 below.

Figure 1


 

The State Government, under its policy, provides technical advice and in some instances financial support to Councils to manage their floodplains.  College, Orth and Werrington Creeks Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan is jointly funded by Council and grant funding from the NSW Government.

The Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan was undertaken by Engineering Consultancy firm, Catchment Simulation Solutions, on behalf of Council, with the technical guidance from the NSW Department of Planning, Industry and Environment (DPIE). The Study and Plan have been overseen by the Council’s Floodplain Risk Management Committee and supported by Technical Working Group comprising members from Council, the consultant, the DPIE and the NSW State Emergency Services (SES).

The primary objective of this Study and Plan is to develop a floodplain risk management plan for the study area that addresses the existing, future and continuing flood problems, taking into account the potential impacts of climate change, in accordance with the NSW Government Flood Policy, as detailed in the NSW Floodplain Development Manual, April 2005.

The College, Orth and Werrington Creeks Catchment Area (Attachment 1) covers parts of Orchard Hills, Caddens, Kingswood, Cambridge Park, Werrington and Werrington County and has an area of approximately 1,200 hectares (12 km2).  The Study Area is located North of the M4 Motorway, east of Richmond Road and drains to South Creek via Werrington Creek at a point downstream of Dunheved Road and Werrington Road.

 

In 2017, Council prepared and adopted the College, Orth and Werrington Creeks Catchment Overland Flow Flood Study. The next stage of the floodplain risk management process is to undertake a Floodplain Risk Management Study and develop a Floodplain Risk Management Plan for the College, Orth and Werrington Creeks Catchment.

The Draft Study and Plan was completed and on 28 June 2021 Council resolved that:

1.       “The information contained in the report on College, Orth and Werrington Creeks Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan be received.

2.       The public exhibition draft of the College, Orth and Werrington Creeks Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan, May 2021 be endorsed for public exhibition for a period of no less than 28 days.

3.       Arrangements be made for the public exhibition in July - August 2021.

4.       A further report be presented to Council on the results of the public exhibition of the draft of the College, Orth and Werrington Creeks Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan, May 2021 addressing any submissions received during the exhibition period.”

Public Exhibition

The draft College, Orth and Werrington Creeks Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan, May 2021 was placed on public exhibition, commencing on 29 July 2021 and submissions closed 26 August 2021.  The exhibition process included direct exhibition throughout the catchment and public notification of that exhibition period. The following were undertaken as part of the public exhibition.

·      Advertisements placed on the local newspaper inviting residents, ratepayers and business owners to review the draft study reports and make submissions;

·      Community Information Sheet (Factsheet) detailing the flood management process and the steps involved in developing a floodplain risk management plan is prepared and distributed. This is also be made available through Council’s Website.

·      Letters and Community Information Sheets were sent to all property owners (approximately 8,400 letters) within the study area informing them about the public exhibition and requesting them to review the public exhibition draft reports and make submissions;

·      Council’s website updated to access the study documents and arrangements made for making submissions electronically; and

·      On 18 August 2021 a community meeting, through video link, was held which allowed the public to directly discuss with staff and the consultant as required.  At the community meeting, a short presentation was given outlining the purpose of the study and key recommendations. The session allowed the participants to ask questions on the relevant documents and to discuss matters as required.

From the public exhibition Council received three (3) written submissions. The submissions are summarised together with Council’s responses in the Table 1 below.

 

Table 1: Summary of Submissions and Responses

Submission Number

Summary of submissions

Responses to Submissions

1

This submission is from Endeavour Energy that has a substation located at 80-82 Rugby Street Werrington County within the study area.  Endeavour Energy advised that maintaining road access to the substation site during floods is important and will allow them to maintain electricity supply for longer periods. In case of failure or breakdown during floods the restoration of supply could be easily carried out if road access is available.

 

This submission does not raise any objections to the Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan.

The Floodplain Risk Management Study includes a series of flood maps that provide details of road flooding. These maps are very useful for emergency response management purposes.

 

The flood information within the Study is very valuable to the State Emergency Services as well as electricity companies to plan their emergency response management activities during floods.  The flood information will be made available to relevant authorities involving emergency management.

 

A review of the flood information related to Endeavor Energy’s Cambridge Park Zone Substation indicates that access road (Rugby Street) is affected by the Probable Maximum Flood (PMF) but the substation site itself is not affected.  Therefore, a Flood Response Plan for this site is not considered necessary.

 

Submission requires no amendments to the study documents

2

Submission raised concerns about the proposed flood modifications options for:

· FM1 Chapmans Garden Basin,

· FM4 Stafford Street Basin, and

· FM5 Jamison Road Basin.

The writer cautiously supports these proposed flood modification options on the basis that:

 

1. All basin augmentation options are implemented in such a way permitting residents to continue in accessing and using these open spaces for recreation purpose.

 

2. In addition to basin augmentation, Council to implement other complementary measures that limit the increase of additional runoff from future developments.  Council not only solely relies on detention basins but also implement other ecologically sustainable measures such as capturing and using rainwater to reduce runoff.

The Floodplain Risk Management Study investigated a range of flood modifications options including augmentation of existing detention basins at Chapmans Garden Basin (FM1), Stafford Street Basin (FM4) and Jamison Road Basin (FM5).  A detailed assessment has been undertaken for each of these flood modification options followed by multi criteria assessment before they are recommended to include in the Floodplain Risk Management Plan for further investigation and detailed design.

 

1. The augmentation designs that have been prepared as part of this Study and Plan for each of these detention basins are conceptual in nature.  The final form of the design of each basin will be developed through the subsequent detailed design investigations during the Plan implementation stage.  The detailed investigations will consider the environmental and ecological factors including maintaining these existing areas of open space for recreation purposes.

 

2. All new developments within the LGA are assessed on their merit basis and suitable flood and drainage mitigation measures are incorporated so that any adverse flood impacts (flood level and velocity) outside the development areas will be kept to minimum or negligible.  Council also has an onsite detention policy to ensure properties downstream of new developments are not adversely impacted because of increased runoff.

 

Council’s Water Sensitive Urban Design (WSUD) policy and requirements cover many of the ecologically sustainable measures suggested by the writer.  Council implement these WSUD requirements for larger development types.

Installation of rainwater tanks is a common element of all new developments as per the State Government BASIX requirements.  The primary goal is to reduce potable water demands rather than as a flood mitigation option.  Furthermore, the NSW Government’s Department of Environment and Climate Change (now the Department of Planning and Environment) developed a guideline that outlines some of the limitations associated with employing rainwater tanks as flood mitigation measures.  Based upon these limitations, the guideline ultimately recommends that “rainwater tanks should not be considered as a floodplain risk management measure to significantly reduce downstream flood flows”.  As a result, floodplain risk management studies and plans (such as this one) typically will not include rainwater tanks as a mitigation option.  However, rainwater tanks will continue to form a key element of providing for more sustainable developments into the future.

3

This submission is from a resident who owns a property in Heavey Street Werrington. The property was zoned “Residential when the resident purchased the property in 1970 however it is now zoned “Recreational”. 

 

The writer claims that since that time no flooding experienced including during the significant rainfall that was experienced in March 2021.

 

The writer states that during the March 2021 flood, the Warragamba Dam was overflowing, but the flooding from the Nepean River and associated waterways did not reach the Werrington area and the properties around Heavey Street. The writer advises the land remained completely dry. 

The writer requested that the property be no longer identified as “flood prone” land and the zoning of the land be returned to its original “Residential” rather than the current “Recreation” zone.

The writer raised no concerns regarding the accuracy of the study or proposed flood management plan.

The Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan goal is to evaluate and recommend options that could be potentially implemented to best manage the flood risk across the catchment. 

 

The Catchment has experienced several historical flood events with South and Werrington Creeks causing flooding of the areas between Victoria Street and Dunheved Road in August 1986 and April 1988. The works undertaken in the South Creek Flood Study 1990 (Department of Water Resources) determined that the April 1988 flood was approximately equivalent to the design 1%AEP flood event in South Creek and that the August 1986 flood was approximately equivalent to the design 1%AEP flood event in Ropes Creek.

 

According to the State Government Flood Policy and Floodplain Development Manual, flood prone land is the land located below the probable maximum flood (PMF) (i.e., the largest flood that could occur).  The rainfall that was experienced in March 2021 across the South Creek catchment (which includes the Werrington Creek catchment) is estimated to be 20%AEP (1 in 5-year ARI) rainfall event. Hence the rainfall experienced in March 2021 is well below the PMF rainfall.  Therefore, the fact that inundation may not have been experienced during the March 2021 event is not sufficient to demonstrate that the property is “flood free”.

 

In addition, Council adopted flood studies show that the property referred by the writer is heavily affected by the flooding from the mainstream and local catchment overland flow-path.  The flood studies include a series of flood maps for a range of design storm events including the PMF that are available on Council website.

 

Regarding the rezoning of the land, it would be necessary to address several requirements as part of any future planning proposal. This is not a matter for consideration through the Risk Management Study and Plan.

 

In summary, three (3) submissions were received from the public exhibition process. Most of the submissions raised clarifications at local levels but generally raised no objections to the Study and Plan.  The exhibited Study and Plan report is only required to amended to reflect the public exhibition completed. The proposed amendments to the exhibited College, Orth and Werrington Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan Draft Report, May 2021 are listed in the “Schedule of Amendments” included as Appendix 2.

 

Endorsement of the Floodplain Risk Management Committee

On 1 November 2021, the outcome of the public exhibition was presented to the Floodplain Risk Management Committee. The Committee resolved that (in part):

 

“1.  College, Orth and Werrington Creeks Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan Final Report October 2021 be endorsed to go to Council for formal adoption.

2.   Arrangements be made to report to Council seeking adoption of the College, Orth and Werrington Creeks Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan Final Report, October 2021.”

Financial Implications

The College, Orth and Werrington Creeks Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan Contains a number of recommendations including Capital works with an approximate value totalling $5.7m, some of which will result in ongoing maintenance costs. These recommendations may serve as a guide for future resource allocations and grant applications.

Risk Implications

Adoption of the College, Orth and Werrington Creeks Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan works in part to meet our obligation and good faith provisions under the NSW Floodplain Development Manual.

Conclusion

The College, Orth and Werrington Creeks Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan Exhibition Draft Report, May 2021 was exhibited for public comment from 29 July to 26 August 2021. Three (3) submission received. Summary of the submissions and responses to the submission are detailed in the body of this report. Most of the submissions raised clarifications at local levels but generally raised no objections to the exhibited College, Orth and Werrington Creeks Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan.

 

The consultant has now addressed all issues raised. The exhibited Draft Study and Plan report is now amended to reflect the changes undertaken. The proposed amendments to the exhibited College, Orth and Werrington Creeks Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan Draft Report May 2021 are listed in the “Schedule of Amendments”.  Minor amendments are required to the study report to reflect the public exhibition completed and changing the status of the report from “Draft for Public Exhibition” to “Final Report”.   

The College, Orth and Werrington Creeks Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan Final Report October 2021 is recommended for the consideration by Council for formal adoption.

The size of the study report is very large and contains the following volumes which are therefore provided separately for the information of Councillors and are made available to the public on Council’s website.

·    College, Orth and Werrington Creeks Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Plan, October 2021 (Final)

·    College, Orth and Werrington Creeks Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study, October 2021 (Final) - Volume 1(Text)

·    College, Orth and Werrington Creeks Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study, October 2021 (Final) - Volume 2(Maps)

·    College, Orth and Werrington Creeks Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan, October 2021 (Final) - Summary Report

The College, Orth and Werrington Creeks Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan Final Report, October 2021 has been completed in accordance with the NSW Government’s Floodplain Development Manual. The Plan provides recommendations for the most feasible flood management solutions to assist Council to meet its floodplain management obligations. It is recommended that the College, Orth and Werrington Creeks Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan Final Report, October 2021 be adopted.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on College, Orth and Werrington Creeks Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan be received.

2.     The College, Orth and Werrington Creeks Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan Final Report October 2021 be adopted.

3.     The College, Orth and Werrington Creeks Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan Final Report October 2021 be published and made available on Council’s website.

4.     Council further consider the recommended mitigation works in the College, Orth and Werrington Creeks Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan for inclusion by Council in future Capital Works Programs and for grant funding applications.

5.     Council consider the flood planning recommendations listed in the College, Orth and Werrington Creeks Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan Final Report October 2021 when reviewing its Development Control Plan 2014, and the Local Environmental Plan 2010.

6.     Council write to those who made submissions advising of Council’s resolution.

7.     Council write to relevant State and Federal Members of Parliament advising them of the adoption of the College, Orth and Werrington Creeks Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan and thanking them for their continued support of Council’s Floodplain Management program.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

Study Area - College, Orth and Werrington Creeks Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan

1 Page

Appendix

2.

Schedule of Amendments - College, Orth and Werrington Creeks Catchment Floodplain Rish Management Study and Plan

2 Pages

Appendix

  


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                         21 February 2022

Appendix 1 - Study Area - College, Orth and Werrington Creeks Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan

 


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                         21 February 2022

Appendix 2 - Schedule of Amendments - College, Orth and Werrington Creeks Catchment Floodplain Rish Management Study and Plan

 

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Outcome 6 - We are healthy and share strong community spirit

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

15      Access Committee - Appointment of Community Members 2022-26                           221

 

16      Paddle Australia - Event Sponsorship Proposals                                                          225

 

17      Digital Literacy Mentoring Program for Isolated Seniors - Successful Grant Submission 230

 

18      Request from Fusion Western Sydney to Support Local Young People                      233

 

19      Acceptance of Grant Funding - Sport and Recreation Infrastructure                            235

 

20      Grant Funding Application - Destination NSW Regional Event Fund                           244

 

21      Grant Funding Application - Multi-Sport Community Facility Fund                               246

 

22      COVID Recovery – Special Purposes Grant                                                                 250

 

23      RFT 21/22-04 Doug Rennie Amenities Redevelopment                                               253

 

24      RFT 21/22-05 Ched Towns Amenities Redevelopment                                                257

 

25      RFT21/22-07 Gipps Street Recreation Precinct - Landscape Construction                 261

 

26      RFT21/22-14 Hickeys Lane Amenities Building Construction                                       265

 

27      RFT21/22-22 Bill Ball Amenities                                                                                    269

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



Ordinary Meeting                                                                                            21 February 2022

 

 

 

15

Access Committee - Appointment of Community Members 2022-26       

 

Compiled by:               Lila Kennelly, Community Resilience Coordinator

Marcela Hart, Community Capacity Lead

Authorised by:            Megan Whittaker, City Activation, Community and Place Manager

Jeni Pollard, Manager – City Resilience

Kylie Powell, Director – City Futures

 

Outcome

We are healthy and share strong community spirit

Strategy

Provide opportunities for our community to be healthy and active

Service Activity

Deliver programs and work with government and community organisations to improve the capacity and social wellbeing of the community

      

 

Executive Summary

In October 2021 Council commenced the recruitment process to seek applications for community members for the new four-year term of the Access Committee 2022-25. There are up to eight (8) positions available for community representation.

Following a comprehensive recruitment process, six (6) community members have been proposed, who have between them a range of lived experience and expertise including access consultancy, vision, cognitive and mobility impairments. A further process is proposed to be undertaken in late 2022 to enable the new committee to help identify any gaps in lived experiences and recruit additional community members that would assist the committee.

This report recommends that the information on the appointment of community members to the Access Committee 2022-25 be received, and that Council endorse the appointment of the six (6) community members outlined in this report to a four-year term of the Access Committee from 2022-25. Further to this, the report recommends that Council write to the unsuccessful applicants who expressed an interest in joining the Access Committee to thank them for their time.

Background

The Access Committee is a formal committee of Council which advises on a range of access issues and promotes the inclusion of people with disability as part of the diversity and strength of Penrith City.

The objectives of the Access Committee are to:

·    Advise on Council policies and procedures to ensure that legislative requirements on access are considered in Council decisions and its operation,

·    Promote Inclusive Design approaches to contribute to social inclusion,

·    Provide a link between Council and people in the community with disability.

·    Help Council identify strategies to improve access and social inclusion for people with disability, and;

·    Support Council in providing leadership for the broader community to achieve social inclusion of people with disability.

The Access Committee is made up of three Councillors and up to eight community members.  Last year on 27 September 2021, Council endorsed the new Terms of Reference (ToR’s) for the Access Committee, attached to this report.

The new ToR’s expanded the membership from six (6) to eight (8) members with lived experience of disability, and/or experience caring for someone with disability, or with expertise on access and inclusion matters with the aim of increasing the diversity of lived experiences that inform Council’s disability inclusion policies and plans.

Current Situation

The previous Access Committee’s term finished in October 2021. On 27 September 2021, a memorandum was sent to all Councillors advising that recruitment for the Access Committee’s community members would commence from late October 2021.

An Expression of Interest (EOI) for community members to apply to the committee was released in late October 2021 via public notice, on Council’s website and promoted broadly via local disability and community sector networks. Previous members of the Access Committee were also contacted to invite them to reapply.

People with diverse abilities were invited to apply via a written submission, email or phone conversation with a Council officer.

Applications closed on 26 November 2021. A total of eight applications were received. An internal panel made up of Council officers with access and inclusion experience reviewed the nominations. 

Expressions of Interest – Review and Assessment

Eight applications were received in total, including five from previous Access Committee members and three applications made over the phone.

Community member applications were assessed using the selection criteria below:

·    An understanding of access issues for people with disabilities,

·    An understanding of, or willingness to learn how Council’s policies and procedures and relevant legislation aligns with principles of Inclusive Design and supports social inclusion,

·    Experience in providing advice or advocating on access issues for people with disabilities,

·    Experience of living with disability, caring for or being a friend, family and/or ally of someone living with a disability.

The assessment panel reviewed each application to assess candidate’s skills and experience (both lived and professional) and ensure a diversity of community perspectives would be represented on the Access Committee. Unfortunately, not all of the applicants met the selection criteria.

Expressions of Interest – Community Member Nominations

The assessment panel proposes that six community member positions be offered, including the reappointment of the previous Access Committee members who applied. It is proposed that a further process be undertaken for the remaining two community member positions in late 2022, which would allow the new committee to help identify any gaps in lived experiences that would assist the committee.

The community members proposed for the new term of the Access Committee 2022-25 are:

-     Mrs Farah Madon

-     Ms Carole Grayson

-     Mr Allan Windley

-     Mr Anthony Mulholland

-     Mr Matt Roger

-     Mrs Karen McIntyre

The proposed community members have between them a range of lived experience and expertise including access consultancy, vision, cognitive and mobility impairments.

A letter will be forwarded to all applicants to notify and thank them for submitting an Expression of Interest for appointment to the Access Committee.

Financial Implications

There are no financial implications for Council associated with this report.

Risk Implications

Given the ongoing concerns relating to COVID 19, the Committee will continue to meet online until able to safely return to face to face meetings in the Civic Centre. In order to accommodate all member’s needs, the Committee will move towards a hybrid meeting model to allow for virtual or face to face attendance.

Conclusion

The previous term of Council’s Access Committee finished in October 2021. In late October 2021, community members were invited to apply to join the Access Committee via an Expression of Interest. Six (6) community members have been put forward for consideration to join the Access Committee for a four-year term from 2022-25. A further process to fill the remaining two community member positions is proposed to be undertaken in late 2022 with the involvement of the new Access Committee members. 



RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.   The information contained in the report on the appointment of community members to the Access Committee 2022 – 26 be received.

2.   Council endorse the appointment of the six (6) community members outlined in this report to a four-year term of the Access Committee from 2022-25.

3.   Council write to the unsuccessful applicants who expressed an interest in joining the Access Committee to thank them.

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.

 


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                            21 February 2022

 

 

 

16

Paddle Australia - Event Sponsorship Proposals   

 

Compiled by:               Shelley Lee, Activation and Event Development Officer

Beau Reid, Place and Activation Coordinator

Authorised by:            Megan Whittaker, City Activation, Community and Place Manager

Jeni Pollard, Manager - City Resilience

Kylie Powell, Director - City Futures  

 

Outcome

We are healthy and share strong community spirit

Strategy

Help build resilient, inclusive communities

Service Activity

Conduct and support events that include all members of our community

      

 

Executive Summary

The purpose of this report is to present to Council two event sponsorship proposals received from Paddle Australia, the national peak body for paddling sports.

This report provides Council with details of the sponsorship proposals received, including the proposed sponsorship benefits and an assessment of each sponsorship proposal.

Paddle Australia has for many years held national and international sporting events at both Sydney International Regatta Centre (SIRC) and Penrith Whitewater Stadium.

Paddle Australia has submitted two proposals for sponsorship from Council for its two marquee events planned to be held in Penrith in 2022:

1.   The 2022 ICF World Ranking Australian Open – Canoe Slalom and Canoe Freestyle Championships from 25-27 February, and

2.   The 2022 Paddle Australia Canoe Sprint Championships and Oceania Championships from 13-17 April.

Paddle Australia has sought sponsorship of $20,000 for each of the two events (a total investment of $40,000). Council officers have estimated the two events combined could deliver approximately $380,000 in local economic benefit.

This report recommends that Council provides sponsorship of $20,000 for the 2022 ICF World Ranking Australia Open – Canoe Slalom and Canoe Freestyle Championships from 25-27 February and $20,000 for the 2022 Canoe Sprint Championships and Oceania Championships from 13-17 April.

Background

On 1 December 2021, Council was approached by Paddle Australia to consider sponsoring the 2022 ICF World Ranking Australia Open – Canoe Slalom and Canoe Freestyle Championships, to be held on 25-27 February 2022. On 8 December 2021, Council staff requested that Paddle Australia provide Council with a detailed sponsorship proposal and business plan to support their request for sponsorship of the event.

On 14 January 2022, Council received the additional information requested. This proposal included the additional request for Council to consider sponsorship of the 2022 Paddle Australia Canoe Sprint Championship and Oceania Championships.

Council endorsed the Events Sponsorship Policy (‘the Policy’) in June 2020. The Policy includes criteria for Major Event Sponsorship. The current Major Event Sponsorship budget is $20,000 for Financial Year 2021/22.

Council endorsed the Think Penrith, Think Events – Penrith Events Strategy 2020-2024 on 22 June 2020. The Events Strategy provides for up to $200,000 annually to support the attraction and retention of major events in the Penrith Local Government Area.

Current Situation

Both sponsorship proposals received from Paddle Australia for the 2022 ICF World Ranking Australian Open (25-27 February 2022) and the 2022 Paddle Australia Canoe Sprint Championships and Oceania Championships (13-17 April 2022) request Council funds of $20,000 for each event (total of $40,000), to assist with operating costs associated with running each event. The funding is proposed to assist with infrastructure costs associated with the venue hire.

Further details on each event are provided below:

2022 ICF Oceania Canoe Slalom Championships

The 2022 ICF Oceania Canoe Slalom Championships is the first of many events which will form a runway to the 2025 ICF Canoe Slalom World Championships that will also be hosted at Penrith Whitewater Stadium.

The Oceania Championships will kick off the 2022 ICF Canoe Slalom calendar with athletes competing for ICF ranking points and selection to the 2022 Australian Canoe Slalom Team.

The 2022 ICF World Ranking Australian Open - Canoe Slalom is an internationally ranked and recognised canoe slalom event that will run at the Penrith Whitewater Stadium.

Previously the event attracted over 250 athletes from 20+ countries. It is likely that given the current international travel restrictions due to COVID-19 the athlete numbers will reduce to 150. Those athletes that attend the event from interstate and overseas will likely take advantage of the warmer weather and the facility and will stay for between 2-4 weeks.

The Paddle Australia Canoe Freestyle Championships and National Team selections will be combined at Penrith Whitewater Stadium on the same dates as the 2022 ICF World Ranking Australian Open.

The 2022 ICF World Ranking Open is estimated to attract approximately 550 visitors to the event, including:

·    170 athletes (60 local, 20 intrastate, 80 interstate,10 international)

·    50 volunteers (20 from outside Penrith LGA)

·    330 spectators (200 from outside Penrith LGA)

The 550 visitors are anticipated to stay within the Penrith Local Government Area, some overnight during the event and Paddle Australia report that some volunteers and participants are likely to extend their stay for a duration of 5 to 7 nights.

Based on the projected event visitation, Council has estimated the economic benefit of the scheduled event to the local economy is approximately $160,000.


2022 Paddle Australia Canoe Sprint Championships

The Paddle Australia Canoe Sprint Championships and Oceania Championships is an annual event that attracts competitors from U12 through to the Masters category, and from beginner through to elite Olympic and Paralympic paddlers across a variety of classes.

The hosting rights for the Oceania Championships rotates between Australian and New Zealand. In 2022, both the events will be held together at the Sydney International Regatta Centre (SIRC). Currently the only venues in Australia with the necessary equipment and racecourse suitable to host Canoe Sprint national team selections are SIRC in Penrith and Champion Lakes in Perth.

This year the Oceania Championships will see 10 athletes from the Pacific region travel to Penrith to participate in a week long development training camp followed by competing in the event.

The Paddle Australia Canoe Sprint Championships and Oceania Championships is estimated to attract approximately 760 visitors to the event. This is broken down into the following categories;

·    210 athletes (20 local, 80 intrastate, 100 interstate, 10 international)

·    50 volunteers (20 interstate)

·    500 staff and spectators (300 interstate)

The 760 visitors are anticipated to stay within the Penrith Local Government Area, a significant percentage overnight, for a duration of up to 14 days.

Based on the projected event visitation, Council has estimated the economic benefit of the scheduled event to the local economy is approximately $223,000.


Previous Council Sponsorship Provided to Paddle Australia

Council has previously provided financial support to Paddle Australia to support events held in the Penrith Local Government Area, including:

·    $20,000 for 2014 Canoe Slalom Junior and U23 World Championships,

·    $18,000 for the 2019 Canoe Slalom Championships,

·    $22,500 for the 2020 Sydney International Whitewater Festival.

Proposed Sponsorship Benefits

Both sponsorship opportunities presented by Paddle Australia for the 2022 events would provide Council and the community of Penrith City with several benefits including:

·    Designation of Penrith City Council as a ‘Strategic Partner’ of the Event

·    Launch event to be held in conjunction with Council

·    Council’s logo to be included on all marketing, promotional and other printed collateral

·    Council advertisement in the event program

·    Opportunity to provide Council signage at the event site and official event functions

·    Council promotional content on the event’s social media accounts (i.e. Facebook and Twitter) a minimum of two times pre-event and two times during the event to promote the host destination and NSW

·    Use of the appropriate Penrith City Council social media 'usernames', 'handles' and 'hashtags' across all communications

·    Public PA announcements for Penrith City Council before, during and after the event.

·    Speaking opportunity for a Council representative at all event related functions

·    Council representative to be involved in major announcements associated with the event

·    A Council representative to be given opportunity to include quotes within event related media releases

·    A Council representative to be given the opportunity to present the awards to the winners

·    Insertion of a 30 second visual introduction showcasing Penrith at the start of each livestreaming day

·    Opportunity to distribute marketing and promotional materials at the event

·    Paddle Australia will work with Penrith City Council to explore opportunities to cross promote events being held in the city at a similar time

·    Image and Footage Rights (Royalty free, in perpetuity and for worldwide use)

·    Provision of suitable 'pre-approved' high resolution digital images and streaming quality video footage of the event to be re-produced for marketing and promotional uses as deemed appropriate by Council

 

Assessment of sponsorship proposals

Both sponsorship proposals have been assessed against Council’s Events Sponsorship Policy criteria for Major Event Sponsorship.

It is noted that Paddle Australia’s operating budget does not cover the cost of delivering the two events. If approved, Council staff will work with Paddle Australia to explore sustainability of the event into the future.

Both events encourage overnight visitation to the Penrith Local Government Area and have positive economic benefits to the local Penrith economy that exceed the total cost of running each event. Council officers have estimated the two events combined could deliver approximately $380,000 in local economic benefit.

 

Financial Implications

The current Major Event Sponsorship budget for 2021-22 of $20,000 is available to fund one event sponsorship.

Funding for the second event of $20,000 is available within the City Activation Community and Place budgets after a number of events have been cancelled and will not go ahead due to COVID. These funds will be reallocated to the Major Event Sponsorship budget for 2021-22.

The Think Penrith, Think Events – Penrith Events Strategy 2020-2024 endorsed unfunded by Council on 22 June 2020. Consideration was to be given during the development of the 2022-23 Original Budget, should capacity be identified including options to phase or stage the provision of funding.

Risk Implications

If the sponsorships are endorsed, Council will enter into a sponsorship agreement with Paddle Australia to detail the expected sponsorship benefits to be delivered to Council and the community in exchange for Council’s investment.

 

Conclusion

Two requests for sponsorship have been received from Paddle Australia. The requests seek a total of $40,000 to deliver 2 events ($20,000 per event). It is estimated that the return to the community of Penrith City from the events could be in the order of $380,000 in economic benefit. Should Council resolve to endorse either or both sponsorship proposals, Council will enter into a sponsorship agreement with Paddle Australia detailing the expected sponsorship benefits to be delivered to Council in exchange for its investment.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Paddle Australia Sponsorship Opportunities 2022 be received.

2.     Council endorses $20,000 sponsorship in support of the 2022 ICF World Ranking Australian Open – Canoe Slalom and Canoe Freestyle Championships.

3.     Council endorses $20,000 sponsorship in support of the 2022 Paddle Australia Canoe Sprint Championships and Oceania Championships.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report

 


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                            21 February 2022

 

 

 

17

Digital Literacy Mentoring Program for Isolated Seniors - Successful Grant Submission   

 

Compiled by:               Michael Laing, Community Capacity Officer

Marcela Hart, Community Capacity Lead

Lila Kennelly, Community Resilience Coordinator

Authorised by:            Megan Whittaker, City Activation, Community and Place Manager

Jeni Pollard, Manager - City Resilience

Kylie Powell, Director - City Futures  

 

Outcome

We are healthy and share strong community spirit

Strategy

Provide opportunities for our community to be healthy and active

Service Activity

Deliver programs and work with government and community organisations to improve the capacity and social wellbeing of the community

      

 

Executive Summary

Council has been successful in a recent submission to the NSW Department of Communities and Justice (DCJ) Reducing Social Isolation for Seniors Grant Program, receiving $40,000 to deliver a new Digital Literacy Mentoring Program for Isolated Seniors project in 2022.

 

The project will be delivered in partnership with community organisation LEEP, who will deliver face-to-face and online digital mentoring sessions for isolated seniors in key areas of Penrith City. LEEP is a not-for-profit group that support people experiencing disadvantage to gain skills to get online safely and confidently.

 

The project will focus on reaching older people from Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CALD) backgrounds who face additional barriers to accessing digital platforms.

 

This report recommends that Council receives the information and accepts grant funding of $40,000 from DCJ.

 

Background

In November 2021, Council published a report on the Social and Economic Impacts of COVID-19. The report ranked ‘social isolation and feeling lonely’ as the third highest challenge for Penrith residents based on data generated through local resident surveys. In addition, feedback from the Penrith Community Services Sector in 2021 also identified ‘digital access, inclusion and equity’ as one of the key challenges experienced by the community.

During recent periods of COVID-19 related lockdown, many people in the community relied heavily on digital platforms for social connection and services. However, feedback from local multifaith and multicultural leaders in forum discussions led by the Mayor at the time, indicated many vulnerable, older people in Penrith remain excluded from accessing digital devices, platforms, and services. This was further validated with data collected in Council’s Social and Economic Impacts of COVID-19 report.


This ‘digital divide’ has greatly impacted many older people across the City who found they could not connect with family and friends or access basic services like groceries online.

In response to these concerns about the ongoing vulnerability for our residents, Council worked with LEEP, a local not for profit organisation to prepare a grant submission to DCJ for a program focussing on addressing these issues.

 

In late December 2021 Council was advised that its joint submission with LEEP to the NSW Reducing Social Isolation for Seniors Grant Program was successful.

 

DCJ will provide Council with $40,000 to deliver the Digital Literacy Mentoring Program for Isolated Seniors project, adding to $36,000 of in-kind value provided to the project from LEEP and $24,000 of in-kind value provided by Council.


The Digital Literacy Mentoring Program uses an evidence-based and place-based approach to improve digital literacy and to provide access to online support services, while reducing social isolation and loneliness. The program will develop local connections between seniors and their local community service providers and neighbourhood centres to encourage participants to join other programs of interest in their area, including Council’s library services.   


Due to DCJ’s tight timeframe for funding submissions, it was not possible to provide a report to Council prior to the grant being submitted.

 

Current Situation

NSW Department of Communities and Justice through the Reducing Social Isolation for Seniors Grant Program will provide Council with $40,000 to deliver the Digital Literacy Mentoring Program for Isolated Seniors project in partnership with community organisation LEEP.

 

LEEP will contribute an estimated $36,000 of in-kind support to manage the workshops, while Council will contribute an estimated $24,000 of in-kind support to cover costs such as transport, venue hire, catering, and any other incidentals, including a digital story-telling component to promote the benefits of the program.

 

Council‘s in-kind contribution is available through existing operational budgets.

Financial Implications

NSW Department of Communities and Justice through the Reducing Social Isolation for Seniors Grant Program will provide Council with $40,000 to deliver the Digital Literacy Mentoring Program for Isolated Seniors project in partnership with community organisation LEEP.

 

LEEP will contribute an estimated $36,000 of in-kind support to manage the workshops, while Council will contribute an estimated $24,000 of in-kind support to cover costs such as transport, venue hire, catering, and any other incidentals, including a digital story-telling component to promote the benefits of the program.

 

Council‘s in-kind contribution is available through existing City Activation, Community and Place operational budgets.

 

Risk Implications

All risks associated with the Digital Literacy Mentoring Program have been considered and the program will be delivered within Council’s risk and COVID-Safe policies and procedures.

 

An alternative COVID -Safe plan for online mentoring has been prepared should face to face workshops be unable to proceed. The monthly small group workshops will be run by LEEP staff and volunteers in community centres with the assistance of Council officers. LEEP has considerable experience running these types of small group workshops and can, where required, transition to an online format for participants in line with their individual needs and/or any COVID-19 related Public Health Orders.

 

Conclusion

Through ongoing consultation and engagement with the community and sector partners during COVID, Council was made aware of the digital divide for older and culturally diverse residents in our city.

 

Council has successfully received funding of $40,000 from the NSW Department of Communities and Justice Reducing Social Isolation for Seniors Grant Program to deliver a project in partnership with LEEP responding to the issues raised and to address social isolation and increase digital connection for vulnerable older people.

 

For Council, the Digital Literacy Mentoring Program for Isolated Seniors project will pilot the benefits of building digital literacy for isolated seniors, including improving access to Council’s online services. The program, due to commence in March during Senior’s Week and run for 12 months, has been designed to respond to key issues of loneliness, isolation and to address the barriers to digital access faced by isolated older people across Penrith during recent periods of COVID-19 lockdown.


RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.   The information contained in the report on the NSW Department of Communities and Justice (DCJ) Reducing Social Isolation for Seniors Grant Program be received.

2.   Council accepts a Reducing Social Isolation for Seniors Grant for $40,000 from the Department of Communities and Justice to deliver a Digital Literacy Mentoring Program for Isolated Seniors Program in 2022, in partnership with LEEP.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                            21 February 2022

 

 

 

18

Request from Fusion Western Sydney to Support Local Young People   

 

Compiled by:               Lila Kennelly, Community Resilience Coordinator

Marcela Hart, Community Capacity Lead

Authorised by:            Megan Whittaker, City Activation, Community and Place Manager

Jeni Pollard, Manager - City Resilience

Kylie Powell, Director - City Futures 

Requested By:            Councillor Bernard Bratusa

 

Outcome

We are healthy and share strong community spirit

Strategy

Help build resilient, inclusive communities

Service Activity

Support community service organisations working in our City

      

 

Executive Summary

This report provides an overview of a request for financial assistance received from Fusion Western Sydney (Fusion), an organisation that provides programs to assist vulnerable young people and their families to build a sense of belonging and empowerment.

Due to recent COVID-19 related challenges, Fusion’s planned school holiday retreat with young people had to be re-designed and delivered as a series of local day programs. A request was made by Fusion seeking $1,880 from Council to assist 16 vulnerable local young people to participate in activities at Penrith Whitewater Stadium as part of their day program.

This report recommends that Council endorse the request for $1,880 (excluding GST) to assist 16 local young people to participate in activities at Penrith Whitewater Stadium, with the funds to be taken from the Voted Works Reserve.

Background

Fusion Western Sydney is a local community organisation that provides a range of programs and services in Penrith to support vulnerable young people and their families. The work of Fusion and other local community organisations helps to foster a safe environment for young people to develop and grow.

Each year, Fusion Western Sydney delivers youth retreats in the summer school holidays to provide opportunities for young people to take a break from their often-stressful living situations. The focus of Fusion’s work with young people and their families is on early intervention and supporting their wellbeing, sense of belonging and empowerment.

In September 2020 Council endorsed its Penrith Youth Action Plan 2020 – 25. In developing this plan Council heard from young people that access to opportunities for social connection and recreation were key priorities. Fusion Western Sydney, together with other local organisations, continue to provide important opportunities for recreation and connection for young people across the City.

Current Situation

Due to recent COVID-19 related challenges, Fusion was required to change the format of their regular school holiday retreat to a series of local day program activities for vulnerable young people connected and known to the service.

Fusion Western Sydney made a request to Council to provide $1,800 in financial support to enable 16 vulnerable young people to participate in white water rafting at the Penrith Whitewater Stadium as part of their summer school holiday day program. Funds would also be used to cover the purchase costs of Rapid Antigen Tests for the 16 young people.

Fusion youth workers reported that for many of the young people it was their first time trying white water rafting and the day program supported them to learn new skills while connecting with their peers in a positive environment. Fusion also reported that many of the participants would not usually be in a position to access the activities at the Penrith Whitewater Stadium due to financial considerations.

Financial Implications

There has also been discussion with Councillors to fund the Fusion Western Sydney activities to date relating to youth activities from the Voted Works Reserve. A Council resolution must be made at this Ordinary Meeting to allocate $1,880 (excluding GST) to Fusion Western Sydney from the Voted Works Reserve.

Conclusion

Fusion Western Sydney made a request to Council for financial assistance of $1,880 to support 16 vulnerable young people to participate in their day program at Penrith White Water Stadium.

Council’s Penrith Youth Action Plan 2020 – 2025 identifies that access to opportunities for social connection and recreation are priorities for local young people.

Fusion Western Sydney report the participants learnt new skills while connecting with their peers in a positive environment, and that for many of the participants they would not otherwise have been in a position to enjoy this experience due to financial pressures.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.   The information contained in the report on the request for financial support from Fusion Western Sydney be received,

2.     Council endorse Fusion Western Sydney’s request for $1,880 (excluding GST) to assist 16 local young people to participate in activities at Penrith Whitewater Stadium as part of a day program, and that the funds be taken from the Voted Works Reserve.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                            21 February 2022

 

 

 

19

Acceptance of Grant Funding - Sport and Recreation Infrastructure   

 

Compiled by:               Virginia Tuckerman, Community Facilities and Recreation Planning and Projects Coordinator

Navira Gunasekera, Finance Business Partner

Andrew Robinson, Community Facilities and Recreation Manager

Authorised by:            Brian Steffen, Director - City Services  

 

Outcome

We are healthy and share strong community spirit

Strategy

Provide opportunities for our community to be healthy and active

Service Activity

Plan for the provision of and facilitate the delivery of community, sport and recreation facilities

      

 

Executive Summary

Council Officers have received notice from both the NSW Government and Cricket Australia that $1,549,495 of grant funding, from four grant programs, across 10 projects has been awarded to Council for the purpose of improving sport, recreation and play facilities in the City.

Council is contributing $4,464,000 to these projects, with each being included in Council’s adopted Sport and Recreation Strategy.

The following list highlights the successful applications and the grant amount awarded:

-     NSW Government Everyone Can Play

 

$198,860 - Trinity Drive Reserve, Cambridge Gardens - New mixed recreation activity area and junior playspace.

 

Council has also been awarded $300,000 for this project from the NSW Government ClubGrant Category 3 Sport and Recreation Infrastructure grant program, endorsed by Council at its Ordinary Meeting on 22 November 2021.

 

$75,000 - Nindi Crescent, Glenmore Park - Playspace upgrade.

 

$75,000 - Wilson Park, Llandilo - Playspace upgrade.

 

-     NSW Government Greater Cities Sport Facility Fund

 

$1,000,000 - Gipps Street Recreation Precinct, Claremont Meadows - Amenity construction.

 

-     NSW Government Community Building Partnership 2021 Round

 

$40,000 - Boronia Park, North St Marys – New dog park.

$40,000 - Cook Park, St Marys - New outdoor fitness gym.

$15,000 - Wilson Park, Llandilo - Playspace upgrade.

$30,000 - Surveyors Creek, Glenmore Park Softball Facility - Upgrade player     dugouts and diamond 1 field surface improvements.

$50,000 - Illawong Ave Reserve, Kingswood Park - Playspace upgrade.

Council Officers also provided grant submission and project development support to community groups. The Nepean District Cricket Association was successful in receiving $85,000 to upgrade the Patterson Oval and Cook and Banks Reserve Cricket Practice Facilities. St Marys Band Club was successful in receiving $25,000 for new aluminium goalposts and ball fencing for Kevin Dwyer Fields, Colyton.

-     Australian Cricket Infrastructure Fund

 

$13,000 - Patterson Oval, Cambridge Park - Cricket practice facility.

$12,635 - Cook and Banks Reserve, St Clair - Cricket practice facility.

A table has been included as an attachment to this report which outlines project details, grant amount awarded, Council contribution to each project and an indication of project delivery timeframes.

The report recommends that Council endorse acceptance of the grant amounts awarded, that grant funding agreements are signed, and that letters of thanks are prepared to the relevant Ministers, State Members, the NSW Government, Cricket NSW, Cricket Australia and Nepean District Cricket Association.

Background

Council’s Sport and Recreation Strategy, adopted by Council in April 2020, provides a framework and project resource allocation that allows Council Officers to prioritise the planning and delivery of sport, recreation, play and open space projects across the City.

This framework creates opportunities for Council Officers to leverage Council resources and be proactive in seeking additional funding, through grant opportunities, to ensure the best value community outcome possible is delivered.

Current Situation

Council Officers have submitted grant applications for a number of projects during the course of the last twelve months, with announcements recently being made.

NSW Government Everyone Can Play Grant (ECP)

The NSW Government Everyone Can Play program was announced in May 2021 and applications closed on 25 June 2021.  ECP supports Councils to renew, renovate and build inclusive playspaces across NSW. The program is administered by NSW Department of Planning, Industry & Environment.

Three ECP guideline principles encourage strategic thinking around how to create more inclusive playspaces. The three ECP principles to consider when designing or improving playspaces are: Can I get there? Can I play? Can I stay? Applications are assessed on their ability to meet the ECP principles. Successful applications were announced in December 2021 and projects must be completed within 18 months of the funding agreement date.

Council Officers submitted applications for three projects and were successfully awarded funding for each.

-     Trinity Drive New Mixed Recreation and Junior Playspace, Cambridge Gardens; to deliver a mixed recreation space including skate, play, climbing equipment, shade and seating, and a junior playspace with nature play equipment suited to toddlers.

 

-     Nindi Crescent Playspace, Glenmore Park; to deliver accessible multi-play equipment, seating and accessible pathways.

 

-     Wilson Park Playspace, Llandilo; to deliver accessible pathway connections, accessible exercise equipment, signage, accessible seating, and landscaping, complimenting Council’s upgrade of the playspace at the park as part of the Mayoral Challenge program.

NSW Government Greater Cities Sport Facility Fund (GCSFF)

The NSW Government has committed $50 million to the Greater Cities Sport Facility Fund over two years, aimed at helping create spaces and facilities that enable communities to enjoy and take part in sport. The Fund will focus on assisting organisations to develop quality sport infrastructure that will meet the current and future needs of the community

Government is allocating $21 million in 2021/2022 (Round 2). The minimum grant is $100,000 and the maximum grant is $1 million. For projects costing more than $1 million, a 25 percent financial co-contribution of the grant amount requested is required. For all other projects, a financial co-contribution will be considered favourably.

Round two of the grant program opened on 30 August 2021, the closing date for applications was 8 October 2021. Successful applications were announced 21 January 2022, projects must commence construction by June 2022 and be completed no later than 30 June 2023.

Council was successful in the Greater Cities Sport Facility Fund Round 2 receiving $1,000,000 contribution towards the construction of the new district level Gipps Street Recreation Precinct, Claremont Meadows – New Sports Amenity Building. The central and accessible amenities building has been universally designed to provide 8 player changeroom, capable of being converted to 4 larger change rooms for higher levels of competition, officials change room, scorers and administration room, first aid, canteen, multipurpose clubroom, large storage spaces and inclusive toilet facilities meeting Changing Places and MLAK requirements.

NSW Government Community Building Partnership Program 2021 (CBP21)

The NSW Government’s 2021 Community Building Partnership Program (CBP21) opened for applications on 19 April 2021 and closed on 14 May 2021. The Program is designed to create more vibrant and inclusive communities by supporting projects that encourage community participation, inclusion, as well as deliver positive social and environmental, recreational outcomes. Successful applications were announced in late November 2021 and projects must be completed by 31 March 2023.

Council Officers submitted applications for 5 Council projects across all State Electorates and have supported clubs and community organisations in developing project scopes and designs, obtaining quotations, and providing letters of support for a further 3 applications submitted directly by 2 sporting clubs.

 

Council submitted and were successful in the following (5) projects:

-     Boronia Park Dog Park, North St Marys; to upgrade dog off leash park with shade, shelter and equipment.

-     Cook Park, St Marys; installation of new outdoor fitness equipment.

-     Wilson Park Playspace Upgrade, Llandilo; to upgrade accessible pathways and landscaping, complimenting Council’s upgrade of the park as part of the Penrith Mayoral Challenge Program.

-     Surveyors Creek Softball Facility, Glenmore Park; to upgrade player dugouts and diamond 1 field surface improvements.

-     Illawong Ave Reserve Playspace Upgrade, Kingswood Park; to upgrade playspace equipment.

Nepean District Cricket Association was successful in receiving $85,000 to upgrade the Patterson Oval, Cambridge Park and Cook and Banks Reserve, St Clair cricket practice facilities. St Marys Band Club was successful in receiving $25,000 for new aluminium goalposts and ball fencing for Kevin Dwyer Fields, Colyton.

Australian Cricket Infrastructure Fund (ACIF)

The Australian Cricket Infrastructure Fund provides funding for community cricket facility projects, with a focus on growing participation and promoting accessibility and inclusivity. The program is administered by both Cricket Australia and Cricket NSW.

In consultation with Cricket NSW and the local cricket associations, Council Officers submitted two ACIF applications to upgrade the cricket practice facilities at Patterson Oval, Cambridge Gardens and Cook and Banks Reserve, St Clair.

Council was successful with the ACIF grant application. Cook and Banks Reserve will receive $12,635 and Patterson Oval will receive $13,000 towards their respective projects. These grants will add to the Community Building Partnership grants realised by the Nepean District Cricket Association, as well as Council contributions from the Parks Asset Renewal program.

 

Financial Implications

 

This report outlines the successful grant funding through NSW Government Community Building Partnerships 2021, Everyone Can Play, Greater Cities Sport Facility Fund and Australian Cricket Infrastructure Fund.

 

Grant programs provide Council with the opportunity to leverage existing funding to upgrade the facilities, improve standards, access and participation in line with Council’s plans, programs and strategies.

 

Where co-contribution of funding has been identified as a part of the project budget, these will be accommodated through Council’s existing programs and reserves including Parks Asset Renewal Program, District Open Space Contributions, Local Open Space Contributions, Neighbourhood Renewal Program and Sport and Recreation Plan.

 

The maintenance and operational requirements of the upgraded facility will be reflected in Council’s future asset maintenance budgets and asset renewal programs as per Council’s Budget Guidelines.

Risk Implications

There are no significant risks for Council associated with this report. All project risks will be managed by Council staff through risk management procedures.

Conclusion

Since the adoption of the Sport and Recreation Strategy, 44 projects have been completed, with a further 12 currently under construction. Projects completed include sport and recreation facility improvements such as playspaces, amenities, floodlights, surface construction, irrigation, landscaping, tennis court resurfacing, and baseball batting cage and ancillary infrastructure, and the completion of the Jamison Park synthetic fields and new Kingsway West Fields and amenities. 

The grants awarded will ensure that 10 more projects will be delivered from the program that includes the delivery of 82 projects worth $125m between 2020-2025.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Acceptance of Grant Funding - Sport and Recreation Infrastructure be received

2.     Council endorse both the $1,549,495 funding offered from the NSW Government and Cricket Australia Funds and, signing funding agreements for the projects at:

NSW Government Everyone Can Play

§ Trinity Drive Reserve, Cambridge Gardens; New Mixed Recreation and Junior Playspace - $198,860

§ Nindi Crescent, Glenmore Park; Playspace Upgrade - $75,000

§ Wilson Park, Llandilo Playspace Upgrade - $75,000

 

NSW Government Greater Cities Sport Facility Fund

§ Gipps Street Recreation Precinct, Claremont Meadows; Amenity construction $1,000,000

 

NSW Government Community Building Partnership 2021 Round

§ Boronia Park, North St Marys; Dog Park - $40,000

§ Cook Park, St Marys; Playspace Enhancement - $40,000

§ Wilson Park, Llandilo; Playspace Upgrade - $15,000

§ Surveyors Creek Softball Facility, Glenmore Park; Field Upgrade - $30,000

§ Illawong Ave Reserve; Kingswood Park; Community Playspace Upgrade - $50,000

 

 

 

Australian Cricket Infrastructure Fund

§ Patterson Oval, Cambridge Park; Cricket Practice Facility - $13,000

§ Cook and Banks Reserve, St Clair; Cricket Practice Facility - $12,635

3.     Council write to the relevant State Members, Ministers, Cricket NSW, Cricket Australia and Nepean District Cricket Association thanking them for their funding support towards delivering improved sport and recreation facilities

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

Acceptance of Grant Funding - Sport and Recreation

3 Pages

Attachments Included

  


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                            21 February 2022

 

 

 

20

Grant Funding Application - Destination NSW Regional Event Fund   

 

Compiled by:               Beau Reid, Place and Activation Coordinator

Authorised by:            Megan Whittaker, City Activation, Community and Place Manager

Jeni Pollard, Manager - City Resilience

Kylie Powell, Director - City Futures  

 

Outcome

We are healthy and share strong community spirit

Strategy

Help build resilient, inclusive communities

Service Activity

Conduct and support events that include all members of our community

      

 

Executive Summary

Council officers lodged an application to the Destination NSW Regional Event Fund for 2022, applying for $20,000 grant funding to support the delivery of various marketing and media initiatives associated with Council’s annual flagship event, the REAL Festival.

The purpose of this report is to provide details of the grant application and seek Council’s endorsement of Council officer’s application for funding from Destination NSW’s Regional Event Fund.

Background

Destination NSW’s Regional Event Fund identifies and supports new or existing events that have the potential to act as a ‘cornerstone’ or flagship tourism event for their area by attracting overnight visitation and delivering long term benefits to their region.

The Penrith Local Government Area (LGA) is classified as a “regional event destination” and therefore Council’s application was lodged into the Regional Event Fund.

Council’s REAL Festival was established in 2016 and has developed significantly over 4 years as a flagship arts and cultural festival for the Penrith region with over 27,000 visitors in 2019. In 2020, ReAnimate took the place of the Festival and it was cancelled altogether 2021 due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Council has been successful in obtaining funding from Destination NSW’s Regional Event Fund in past years under the ‘Incubator Event Stream’ which supports new and emerging events in their early development phase.

Current Situation

As an established flagship event, the grant funding application sought $20,000 under the ‘Flagship Event Stream’ of the Regional Event Fund.

Council’s grant funding application seeks Destination NSW’s support to:

·    Develop and distribute greater levels of marketing collateral

·    Expand and optimise digital marketing reach

·    Purchase street banner and billboard advertising

·    Undertake a ‘familiarisation tour’ with local and national media partners

This funding would supplement Council’s existing REAL Festival marketing budget of $20,000. 

Council staff lodged a grant application with Destination NSW on 5 December 2021. Council staff were unable to notify Council of this grant application prior to its submission due to the 2021 Local Government elections.

Notification of the outcome of the funding round is anticipated during February 2022. 

 

Financial Implications

Should Council be successful in receiving funding from Destination NSW, up to $20,000 will be added to the existing budget for the REAL Festival.

Risk Implications

There are no risk implications for Council associated with this report.

Conclusion

Council officer’s application to the Destination NSW Regional Event Fund will support an enhanced marketing and promotional strategy for Council’s flagship event, the REAL Festival.

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Grant Funding Application - Destination NSW Regional Event Fund be received.

2.     Council endorse the application for grant funding from Destination NSW’s Regional Event Fund.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                            21 February 2022

 

 

 

21

Grant Funding Application - Multi-Sport Community Facility Fund   

 

Compiled by:               Virginia Tuckerman, Community Facilities and Recreation Planning and Projects Coordinator

Andrew Robinson, Community Facilities and Recreation Manager

Authorised by:            Brian Steffen, Director - City Services  

 

Outcome

We are healthy and share strong community spirit

Strategy

Provide opportunities for our community to be healthy and active

Service Activity

Plan for the provision of and facilitate the delivery of community, sport and recreation facilities

      

 

Executive Summary

This report provides information to Council on the opportunity for funding from NSW Government Office of Sport through the Multi-Sport Community Facility (MSCFF) grant program.

The program is open for applications from Local Government Authorities as well as State Sporting Organisations, not-for-profit community-based sports, organisations providing sport and recreation programs that benefit the community e.g. PCYC, YMCA, professional organisations competing in national or state competitions, and private enterprises (for-profit organisations.

Council Officers have considered the grant aims, objectives, criteria and project delivery timeframes for Round 1. These have been aligned to Council’s Sport and Recreation Strategy, existing Developer Contribution and Building Asset Renewal programs, as well as project readiness in determining suitable applications.

It is recommended that the information in the report be received, and the following grant applications be submitted:

·    Gipps Street Recreation Precinct, Claremont Meadows – Construction of new multi-sport playing fields, floodlighting, irrigation and training infrastructure.

·    The Kingsway North (Oz tag, Touch Football, Cricket), Werrington – Amenity building redevelopment ensuring full accessibility and including, storage, showers and toilets, administration, and canteen facilities.

The report also recommends that Council make the following financial contributions from existing budgets allocated to the delivery of the projects. 

·    Gipps Street Recreation Precinct, Claremont Meadows - $2,500,000

·    The Kingsway, Werrington - $850,000

Background

The NSW Government has committed $200 million to the Multi-Sport Community Facility Grant over two years, aimed at helping create spaces and facilities that enable communities to enjoy and take part in sport. The Fund will focus on assisting organisations to develop quality sport infrastructure that will meet the current and future needs of multiple sport users in the community. 

 

Eligible applicants are:

-     NSW based Local Government Authorities

-     NSW Office of Sport State Sporting Organisations and State Sport Organisations for People with Disability

-     Incorporated, community based, not for profit sporting organisations

-     Organisations providing sport and recreation programs that benefit the community, such as PCYCs, YMCA, and YWCA

-     NSW based professional organisations competing in a national or state competition

-     Private enterprises (for profit organisations)

Government is allocating $100 million in 2021/2022 (Round 1). The minimum grant request is $1 million and the maximum grant is $5 million. Applicants are required to provide a 50 percent financial co-contribution of the total grant request amount. Applicants can submit up to three applications, with the applicant to advise project priorities if multiple are submitted. Successful applications are likely to be advised in May 2022 with funding agreements to be finalised within three months of notification. Commencement of construction is required in 2022 and must be completed by 30 June 2025.  

Council has previously received successful funding of $9.45M for 8 projects under similar preceding grant schemes: Greater Sydney Sports Facility Fund & Greater Cities Sports Facility Fund. These projects include the Jamison Park Synthetic Sports Facility, Penrith; Mulgoa Rise Sports Amenity Extension, Glenmore Park; Mark Leece Amenity Replacement, St Clair, Ched Towns Reserve Amenity Upgrade, Glenmore Park, Doug Rennie Amenity Upgrade, Kingswood, The Kingsway Irrigation and Turf Upgrade, Werrington; Surveyors Creek Softball Facility Upgrade, Glenmore Park and the Gipps Street Amenity Upgrade, Claremont Meadows. 

Current Situation

The grant program opened on 29 November 2021, the closing date for applications is 1pm on Friday 25 February 2022. 

The following projects have been identified as potential projects for submission. These projects best align with the grant fund criteria, aims, objectives and focus areas whilst meeting Council’s established Sport and Recreation Strategy 5-year delivery program, Developer Contribution and Building Asset Renewal programs, and are at a suitable state of project readiness to meet the recommended timelines. 

Gipps Street Recreation Precinct, Claremont Meadows

The realisation of the Gipps Street Recreation Precinct, Claremont Meadows is critical to the strategic transformation of Penrith LGA. It will provide an open space asset capable of attracting Citywide visitation. It is estimated Gipps Street will sustain in excess of 400,000 visitations annually.

The construction of new playing fields of various sizes, LED floodlighting, irrigation systems and multi-sport training infrastructure will deliver new and improved facilities in the City for local, district and State Sports organisations. The new playing fields and training infrastructure at Gipps Street will increase the quality and quantity of active and passive sport and recreation for residents. All infrastructure will be constructed to meet sports specific guidelines, ensuring the existing and future demands of sport for male and female users, of varying ages and abilities, are met.  

It is proposed to submit a grant application to MSCFF for $5,000,000. Council’s contribution will be $2,500,000 from its existing 7.11 District Open Space Contributions Plan. 

The Kingsway North, Werrington  

The redevelopment of the existing amenity building is required to sustain existing use and accommodate any future growth in participation at the facility. Accessibility to the amenity building and playing fields will addressed within the project scope. The estimated project cost is $2,275,000.   

The Kingsway North is a key multi use sport and recreation precinct that services 7,500 participants on weekly basis and has an annual visitation of over 350,000 community members across local, state and school sport programs. The Kingsway North is among one of the largest Touch Football, Oz Tag and cricket facilities in NSW. Each sport has a strong focus on junior and female participation.

It is proposed to submit a grant application to MSCFF for $1,425,000. Council’s contribution will be $850,000 from its existing Building Asset Renewal Program.

Financial Implications

This report outlines 2 projects with the opportunity for funding from NSW Government Office of Sport through the Multi-Sport Community Facility Grant program. This grant will provide Council with the opportunity to leverage existing funding to construct new facilities and upgrade the existing facilities, improve standards, access and storage in line with Council’s plans, programs and strategies.

Where co-contribution of funding has been identified as part of the project budget, these will be accommodated through Council’s existing programs and reserves including Building Asset Renewal Program and District Open Space Contributions.

The estimated annual operational and maintenance cost for The Kingsway North Amenity Enhancement Project is $56,875. The future asset replacement cost is estimated at $3,064,095 based on a 20-year useful life value and an estimated LGCI of 1.5%.

The estimated annual operational and maintenance cost for Gipps Street Recreation Precinct (field sports and courts components only) is $114,350 with a future asset replacement cost estimated at $9,805,055 based on an 18-year useful life and an estimated LGCI of 1.5%. Due to the various elements that make up the Gipps Street Recreation Precinct, the final project cost is subject to change as stages of its development are adopted.

The maintenance and operational requirements of the upgraded facility will be reflected in Council’s future asset maintenance budgets and asset renewal programs as per Council’s Budget Guidelines

Risk Implications

There are no significant risks for Council associated with this report. All project risks will be managed by Council staff through risk management procedures.

Conclusion

These projects respond directly to community identified priorities recognised in the Sport and Recreation Strategy that provides our existing and future residents with contemporary community sporting infrastructure that supports and encourages active and healthy lifestyles.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Grant Funding Application - Multi-Sport Community Facility Fund be received

2.     Council endorse the applications be prepared and submitted for GCSFF;

-     Gipps Street Recreation Precinct, Claremont Meadows – Construction of new multi-sport playing fields, floodlighting, irrigation and training infrastructure.

-     The Kingsway North (Oz tag, Touch Football, Cricket), Werrington – Amenity building redevelopment ensuring full accessibility and including, storage, showers and toilets, administration, and canteen facilities.

 

3.     Council endorse the funding allocations from existing budgets allocated to the projects as contributions to be included in the grant application:

-     Gipps Street Recreation Precinct, Claremont Meadows – $2,500,000.