Council_Mark_POS_RGB

23 March 2022

 

Dear Councillor,

In pursuance of the provisions of the Local Government Act, 1993 and the Regulations thereunder, notice is hereby given that an ORDINARY MEETING of Penrith City Council Council is to be held remotely using audio visual links, audio streamed and in the Council Chambers, Civic Centre, 601 High Street, Penrith on Monday 28 March 2022 at 7:00PM.

Attention is directed to the statement accompanying this notice of the business proposed to be transacted at the meeting.

Yours faithfully

 

Warwick Winn

General Manager

 

BUSINESS

 

1.           LEAVE OF ABSENCE

 

2.           APOLOGIES

 

3.           CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES

Ordinary Meeting - 21 February 2022.

 

4.           DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

Pecuniary Interest (The Act requires Councillors who declare a pecuniary interest in an item to leave the meeting during discussion of that item)

Non-Pecuniary Conflict of Interest – Significant and Less than Significant (The Code of Conduct requires Councillors who declare a significant non-pecuniary conflict of interest in an item to leave the meeting during discussion of that item)

 

5.           ADDRESSING COUNCIL

 

6.           MAYORAL MINUTES

 

7.           NOTICES OF MOTION TO RESCIND A RESOLUTION

 

8.           NOTICES OF MOTION AND QUESTIONS ON NOTICE

 

9.           ADOPTION OF REPORTS AND RECOMMENDATION OF COMMITTEES

Heritage Advisory Committee Meeting - 2 March 2022.

Local Traffic Committee Meeting - 7 March 2022.

Policy Review Committee Meeting - 14 March 2022.

 

10.         DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

11.         REQUESTS FOR REPORTS AND MEMORANDUMS

12.         URGENT BUSINESS

13.         COMMITTEE OF THE WHOLE


ORDINARY MEETING

 

Monday 28 March 2022

 

table of contents

 

 

 

 

ADVANCE AUSTRALIA FAIR

 

 

WEBCASTING NOTICE

 

 

STATEMENT OF RECOGNITION OF PENRITH CITY’S ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER CULTURAL HERITAGE

 

 

PRAYER

 

 

COUNCIL CHAMBER seating arrangements

 

 

meeting calendar

 

 

confirmation of minutes

 

 

PROCEDURE FOR ADDRESSING COUNCIL MEETING

 

 

MAYORAL MINUTES

 

 

report and recommendations of committees

 

 

DELIVERY program reports


 

 

 

 

ADVANCE AUSTRALIA FAIR

 

 

Australians all let us rejoice,

For we are one and free;

We’ve golden soil and wealth for toil;

Our home is girt by sea;

Our land abounds in nature’s gifts

Of beauty rich and rare;

In history’s page, let every stage

Advance Australia Fair.

 

In joyful strains then let us sing,

Advance Australia Fair.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

 

 

 

 

 

WEBCASTING NOTICE

 

Please note that tonight’s meeting other than the

confidential sessions are being recorded and will be

placed on Council’s website. All in attendance should

refrain from making defamatory statements. Council

takes all care when maintaining privacy, however

members of the public gallery and those addressing

Council should be aware that you may be recorded.

 


Statement of Recognition of

Penrith City’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cultural Heritage

 

 

Council values the unique status of Aboriginal people as the original owners and custodians of lands and waters, including the land and waters of Penrith City.

 

Council values the unique status of Torres Strait Islander people as the original owners and custodians of the Torres Strait Islands and surrounding waters.

 

We work together for a united Australia and City that respects this land of ours, that values the diversity of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural heritage, and provides justice and equity for all.

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

PRAYER

 

 

 

“Sovereign God, tonight as we gather together as a Council we affirm that you are the giver and sustainer of life.  We come together as representatives of our community to make decisions that will benefit this city and the people within it. 

 

We come not in a spirit of competition, not as adversaries, but as colleagues.  Help us to treat each other with respect, with dignity, with interest and with honesty.  Help us not just to hear the words we say, but also to hear each others hearts.  We seek to be wise in all that we say and do.

 

As we meet, our concern is for this city.  Grant us wisdom, courage and strength.

 

Lord, help us.  We pray this in the name of Jesus Christ our Lord.  Amen.”

 

 

 

 

 


Council Chambers

Seating Arrangements


For members of the public addressing the meeting


 

 

 

Lectern


 

 

     Directors


 

 

 

General Manager
Warwick Winn

Her Worship the Mayor
Councillor Tricia Hitchen 



Governance Coordinator Adam Beggs






Minute Clerk

Media

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Public Gallery

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Managers

 

 

Directors


 


Oath of Office

 

I swear that I will undertake the duties of the office of Councillor in the best interests of the people of Penrith and the Penrith City Council and that I will faithfully and impartially carry out the functions, powers, authorities and discretions vested in me under the Local Government Act 1993 or any other Act to the best of my ability and judgment.

 

 

Affirmation of Office

 

I solemnly and sincerely declare and affirm that I will undertake the duties of the office of Councillor in the best interests of the people of Penrith and the Penrith City Council and that I will faithfully and impartially carry out the functions, powers, authorities and discretions vested in me under the Local Government Act 1993 or any other Act to the best of my ability and judgment.

 

 

 

 

 

Local Government Act 1993, Section 233A

 


Council_Mark_POS_RGB2022 MEETING CALENDAR

January 2022 - December 2022

(Adopted by Council – 10 January 2022)

 

 

 

TIME

JAN

FEB

MAR

APRIL

MAY

JUNE

JULY

AUG

SEPT

OCT

NOV

DEC

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

 

Ordinary Council Meeting

7.00pm

 

 

 

 

 

2v

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10^

 

 

21@

 

28

 

30#

27*

25

22@

26^

31ü

28#+

12

Policy Review Committee

7.00pm

 

 

 

 

14

 

9

 

11

 

12

 

14

 

 

 v

Meeting at which the draft corporate planning documents (Delivery Program and Operational Plan) are endorsed for exhibition

 *

Meeting at which the draft corporate planning documents (Delivery Program and Operational Plan) are adopted

 #

Meetings at which the Operational Plan quarterly reviews (March and September) are presented

 @

Meetings at which the Delivery Program progress reports (including the Operational Plan quarterly reviews for December and June) are presented

 ^

Election of Mayor and/or Deputy Mayor

 ü

Meeting at which the 2021-22 Annual Statements are presented

 

Meeting at which any comments on the 2021-22 Annual Statements are adopted 

 +

Meeting at which the Annual Report is presented

Briefing to consider Budget, draft fees & charges and corporate document

-            Extraordinary Meetings are held as required.

-            Members of the public are invited to observe meetings of the Council (Ordinary and Policy Review Committee).

Should you wish to address Council, please contact Governance Coordinator, Adam Beggs on 4732 7597.

 

 

 


UNCONFIRMED MINUTES

 OF THE ORDINARY MEETING OF PENRITH CITY COUNCIL HELD REMOTELY USING AUDIO VISUAL LINKS, AUDIO STREAMED ON THE COUNCIL WEBSITE AND IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBERS ON MONDAY 21 FEBRUARY 2022 AT 7:02PM

 

NATIONAL ANTHEM 

The meeting opened with the National Anthem.

 

WEBCASTING STATEMENT

Her Worship the Mayor, Councillor Tricia Hitchen read a statement advising that Council Meetings are recorded and webcast.

 

STATEMENT OF RECOGNITION

Her Worship the Mayor, Councillor Tricia Hitchen read a statement of recognition of Penrith City’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cultural Heritage.

 

PRAYER

The Council Prayer was read by Rev Christine Bayliss Kelly.

PRESENT

Her Worship the Mayor, Councillor Tricia Hitchen, Deputy Mayor Councillor John Thain, and Councillors Jim Aitken OAM, Bernard Bratusa, Todd Carney, Robin Cook, Kevin Crameri OAM, Mark Davies, Sue Day, Ross Fowler OAM, Glenn Gardiner, Karen McKeown OAM,  Mark Rusev and Marlene Shipley.

 

APOLOGIES

20  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor John Thain seconded Councillor Todd Carney that an apology from Councillor Jonathan Pullen be received.

 

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES - Ordinary Meeting - 10 January 2022

21  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Jim Aitken OAM seconded Councillor Marlene Shipley that the minutes of the Ordinary Meeting of 10 January 2022 be confirmed.

 

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

 

Councillor Sue Day declared a Non-Pecuniary Conflict of Interest – Less than Significant in Item 28 - RFT21/22-16 for the Provision of Catering Supplies and Consumable Products, as the awarded tenderer is a customer of her employer. Councillor Sue Day stated that she would remain in the meeting but not participate in the debate or voting on these matters.

 

Councillor Bernard Bratusa declared a Non-Pecuniary Conflict of Interest – Less than Significant in Item 19 - Acceptance of Grant Funding - Sport and Recreation Infrastructure, and Item 21 - Grant Funding Application - Multi-Sport Community Facility Fund, as he is a former employee of the Minister for Sport. Councillor Bernard Bratusa also declared a Non-Pecuniary Conflict of Interest – Less than Significant in Item 28 - RFT21/22-16 for the Provision of Catering Supplies and Consumable Products, as he is a former employee of the awarded tenderer. Councillor Bernard Bratusa did not take part in debate or voting on these matters and left the meeting for the consideration of these items.

 

Councillor Tricia Hitchen declared a Non-Pecuniary Conflict of Interest – Less than Significant in Item 18 - Request from Fusion Western Sydney to Support Local Young People, as she is a regular donor to Fusion Western Sydney. Councillor Tricia Hitchen stated that she would remain in the meeting as the chair but not participate in the debate or voting on these matters.

 

Mayoral Minutes

 

1        Australia Day Honours and Awards 2022                                                

22  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Tricia Hitchen seconded Councillor John Thain that the Mayoral Minute on Australia Day Honours and Awards 2022 be received.

 

Notices of Motion

 

1        Redland City Council - 2032 Friendship Agreement                              

23  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Ross Fowler OAM seconded Councillor John Thain

 

That:

 

1.    The General Manager write to Redland City Council offering our support and assistance through a friendship or similar formal arrangement in the development of their Whitewater facility and preparation for the 2032 Olympics.

 

2.    A report be brought back to Council on the outcome of any discussions.

 

 

Reports of Committees

 

1        Report and Recommendations of the Penrith Community Safety Partnership Meeting held on 27 October 2021                                        

24  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Karen McKeown OAM seconded Councillor Sue Day that the recommendations contained in the Report and Recommendations of the Penrith Community Safety Partnership meeting held on 27 October, 2021 be adopted.

 

2        Report and Recommendations of Local Traffic Committee held on 7 February 2022                                                                                              

25  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Karen McKeown OAM seconded Councillor Robin Cook that the recommendations contained in the Report and Recommendations of the Local Traffic Committee meeting held on 7 February, 2022 be adopted, with Item 13 to now read:

 

“13           Old Bathurst Road, Emu Heights – Proposed ‘Winding Road’ Signage

 

Raymond Tran – Transport for NSW (TfNSW) queried the positioning of the proposed signage location and that the compliance with these type of signs can be difficult to manage. He recommended that the placement of the sign should be established prior to any curves, preferably east. Councillor Karen McKeown OAM questioned the use of the flashing lights in residential areas but also requested to have this further investigated.

 

David Drozd – Traffic Engineering Coordinator advised that the signage attempts to achieve its purpose of turning trucks around before they hit the bends however, proposed the idea of deferring this matter for further investigations to be made. Adam Wilkinson – Engineering Services Manager (Chair) agreed with all the points raised and advised that the item be deferred for review and discussion. 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

1.         The information contained in the report on Old Bathurst Road, Emu Heights – Proposed ‘Winding Road’ Signage be received.

 

2.         The matter be deferred subject to further review and discussion”

 

Note:  With reference to  ‘Confirmation of Minutes – Local Traffic Committee Meeting held on 1 November 2021’, please refer to the Confirmed Minutes of the Local Traffic Committee Meeting of 1 November 2021 for amendment to those in attendance.

 

 

DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Outcome 1 - We can work close to home

 

1        Cooperative Marketing Opportunities with Destination NSW               

26  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor John Thain seconded Councillor Ross Fowler OAM

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Cooperative Marketing Opportunities with Destination NSW be received

2.     Council endorse the Expressions of Interest to Destination NSW for the purpose of cooperative marketing activities as outlined in this report

 

 

Outcome 2 - We plan for our future growth

 

2        Submission to the Fernhill Estate Draft Landscape Masterplan          

27  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Ross Fowler OAM seconded Councillor Marlene Shipley

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Submission to the Fernhill Estate Draft Landscape Masterplan be received.

2.     Council endorse the submission to the Fernhill Estate Draft Landscape Masterplan provided at Attachment 3 and forward a copy to Greater Sydney Parklands by 28 February 2022.

 

 

 

3        Submission to Local and State Infrastructure Contributions Reforms

28  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor John Thain seconded Councillor Bernard Bratusa

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Submission to Local and State Infrastructure Contributions Reforms    be received.

2.     Council endorses the submission to the contributions reforms as provided as Attachment 2 of this report, to be provided to the Department of Planning, Industry and Environment for consideration.

3.     Council endorses the submission to the IPART review provided as Attachment 3 of this report, to be provided to IPART to reconfirm Council’s endorsed position.

 

4        Submission to "A New Approach Rezoning Discussion Paper"          

29  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Ross Fowler OAM seconded Councillor John Thain

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Submission to "A New Approach Rezoning Discussion Paper" be received

2.     Council endorse the submission on the “A New Approach to Rezoning Discussion Paper, provided as Attachment 1 to this report, to be provided to the Department of Planning, Industry and Environment for their consideration

 

5        Submission to the Design and Place SEPP                                             

30  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor John Thain seconded Councillor Bernard Bratusa

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on the Submission to the Design and Place SEPP and surrounding policy framework be received

2.     Council endorse the submission on the draft DP SEPP and surrounding policy framework, provided as Attachment 1 to this report, to be provided to the Department of Planning and Environment for their consideration

 

 


 

 

Outcome 3 - We can get around the City

 

7        Acceptance of Grant Funding - Local Road and Community Infrastructure Program - Extension of Program (Phase 3)                    

31  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor John Thain seconded Councillor Bernard Bratusa

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Acceptance of Grant Funding - Local Road and Community Infrastructure Program - Extension of Program (Phase 3) be received

2.     Council accept the grant funding of $3,044,550

3.     Council endorse the Work schedules as listed in the report

4.     Council write to The Hon Michael McCormack MP, Deputy Prime Minister - Minister for Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Development and The Hon Mark Coulton MP - Minister for Regional Health, Regional Communications and Local Government and Melissa McIntosh, Federal MP for Lindsay, thanking them for the funding.

 

8        Pedestrian Safety Program Funding (High Pedestrian Activity Area) 2021/22                                                                                                         

32  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor John Thain seconded Councillor Bernard Bratusa

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Pedestrian Safety Program Funding (High Pedestrian Activity Area) 2021/22 be received.

2.     Council accept grant funding of $50,000 offered for the Safe Speeds in High Pedestrian Activity and Local Areas Project shown in Table 1 for the 2021-22 financial year.

3.     Council write to the relevant State Member thanking them for their continued support of road safety improvements.

 

 

9        Factory Road and Loftus Street Footpaths                                             

33  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor John Thain seconded Councillor Bernard Bratusa that the information contained in the report on Factory Road and Loftus Street Footpaths be received.

 


 

 

6        Review of Environmental Factors (REF) for New Richmond Bridge and Traffic Improvements-Stage 1The Driftway                                     

34  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM seconded Councillor Glenn Gardiner

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Review of Environmental Factors (REF) for New Richmond Bridge and Traffic Improvements-Stage 1The Driftway be received.

2.     Council’s Engineering Services Manager be authorised to finalise a submission, based on this report and attachments, to Transport for NSW (TfNSW) by 4 March 2022.

 

 

Outcome 4 - We have safe, vibrant places

 

10      Streetlights Ahead Program - Converting Streetlights to LEDs           

35  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Karen McKeown OAM seconded Councillor John Thain

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Streetlights Ahead Program - Converting Streetlights to LEDs be received

2.     Council endorse the proposal to enter into an agreement with Endeavour Energy over the upgrade of Endeavour’s public lighting infrastructure through the replacement of existing street lighting assets with LED-based luminaires.

 

11      RFT 21/22-15 Public Domain Cleaning Services                                     

36  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Karen McKeown OAM seconded Councillor John Thain

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on RFT 21/22-15 Public Domain Cleaning Services be received

2.     The tender from V.D.G Pty Ltd trading as VDG Services Australia, in the amount of $369,148.26 per annum (excluding GST) be accepted for Public Domain Cleaning Services.

3.     The General Manager (or their delegate) be authorised to sign all necessary legal documents in relation to this matter.

 

12      RFT21/22-17 Refurbishment Works at Ripples Leisure Centre St Marys                                                                                                            

37  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Bernard Bratusa seconded Councillor Ross Fowler OAM that the information contained in the report on RFT21/22-17 Refurbishment Works at Ripples Leisure Centre St Marys be received.

 

Outcome 5 - We care about our environment

 

13      Little Creek Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan

38  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM seconded Councillor Jim Aitken OAM

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Little Creek Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan be received.

2.     The Little Creek Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan Final Report dated October 2021 be adopted.

3.     The Little Creek Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan Final Report dated October 2021 be published and made available on Council’s website.

4.     Council further consider the recommended mitigation works in the Little Creek Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan for inclusion by Council in future Capital Works Programs and for grant funding applications.

5.     Council consider the flood planning recommendations listed in the Little Creek Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan Final Report dated October 2021 when reviewing its Development Control Plan 2014, and the Local Environmental Plan 2010.

6.     Council write to those who made submissions advising of Council’s resolution.

7.     Council write to relevant State and Federal Members of Parliament advising them of the adoption of the Little Creek Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan and thanking them for their continued support of Council’s Floodplain Management program.

 

 

14      College, Orth and Werrington Creeks Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan                                                                     

39  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM seconded Councillor Jim Aitken OAM

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on College, Orth and Werrington Creeks Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan be received.

2.     The College, Orth and Werrington Creeks Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan Final Report October 2021 be adopted.

3.     The College, Orth and Werrington Creeks Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan Final Report October 2021 be published and made available on Council’s website.

4.     Council further consider the recommended mitigation works in the College, Orth and Werrington Creeks Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan for inclusion by Council in future Capital Works Programs and for grant funding applications.

5.     Council consider the flood planning recommendations listed in the College, Orth and Werrington Creeks Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan Final Report October 2021 when reviewing its Development Control Plan 2014, and the Local Environmental Plan 2010.

6.     Council write to those who made submissions advising of Council’s resolution.

7.     Council write to relevant State and Federal Members of Parliament advising them of the adoption of the College, Orth and Werrington Creeks Catchment Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan and thanking them for their continued support of Council’s Floodplain Management program.

 

Councillor Bernard Bratusa left the meeting, the time being 7:40pm.

 

Outcome 6 - We are healthy and share strong community spirit

 

15      Access Committee - Appointment of Community Members 2022-26               

40  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Ross Fowler OAM seconded Councillor John Thain

That:

1.   The information contained in the report on Access Committee - Appointment of Community Members 2022-26 be received.

2.   Council endorse the appointment of the six (6) community members outlined in this report to a four-year term of the Access Committee from 2022-25.

3.   Council write to the unsuccessful applicants who expressed an interest in joining the Access Committee to thank them.

 

16    Paddle Australia - Event Sponsorship Proposals           

41  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Ross Fowler OAM seconded Councillor John Thain

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Paddle Australia Sponsorship Proposals be received.

2.     Council endorse $20,000 sponsorship in support of the 2022 ICF World Ranking Australian Open – Canoe Slalom and Canoe Freestyle Championships.

3.     Council endorse $20,000 sponsorship in support of the 2022 Paddle Australia Canoe Sprint Championships and Oceania Championships.

 


 

 

18      Request from Fusion Western Sydney to Support Local Young People                                                                                                          

42  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Ross Fowler OAM seconded Councillor John Thain

That:

1.   The information contained in the report on the request for financial support from Fusion Western Sydney be received,

2.     Council endorse Fusion Western Sydney’s request for $1,880 (excluding GST) to assist 16 local young people to participate in activities at Penrith Whitewater Stadium as part of a day program, and that the funds be taken from the Voted Works Reserve.

 

 

19      Acceptance of Grant Funding - Sport and Recreation Infrastructure  

43  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Ross Fowler OAM seconded Councillor John Thain

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Acceptance of Grant Funding - Sport and Recreation Infrastructure be received

2.     Council endorse both the $1,549,495 funding offered from the NSW Government and Cricket Australia Funds and, signing funding agreements for the projects at:

NSW Government Everyone Can Play

§ Trinity Drive Reserve, Cambridge Gardens; New Mixed Recreation and Junior Playspace - $198,860

§ Nindi Crescent, Glenmore Park; Playspace Upgrade - $75,000

§ Wilson Park, Llandilo Playspace Upgrade - $75,000

 

NSW Government Greater Cities Sport Facility Fund

§ Gipps Street Recreation Precinct, Claremont Meadows; Amenity construction $1,000,000

 

NSW Government Community Building Partnership 2021 Round

§ Boronia Park, North St Marys; Dog Park - $40,000

§ Cook Park, St Marys; Playspace Enhancement - $40,000

§ Wilson Park, Llandilo; Playspace Upgrade - $15,000

§ Surveyors Creek Softball Facility, Glenmore Park; Field Upgrade - $30,000

§ Illawong Ave Reserve; Kingswood Park; Community Playspace Upgrade - $50,000

 

Australian Cricket Infrastructure Fund

§ Patterson Oval, Cambridge Park; Cricket Practice Facility - $13,000

§ Cook and Banks Reserve, St Clair; Cricket Practice Facility - $12,635

3.     Council write to the relevant State Members, Ministers, Cricket NSW, Cricket Australia and Nepean District Cricket Association thanking them for their funding support towards delivering improved sport and recreation facilities

 

 

20      Grant Funding Application - Destination NSW Regional Event Fund  

44  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Ross Fowler OAM seconded Councillor John Thain

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Grant Funding Application - Destination NSW Regional Event Fund be received.

2.     Council endorse the application for grant funding from Destination NSW’s Regional Event Fund.

 

 

21      Grant Funding Application - Multi-Sport Community Facility Fund     

45  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Ross Fowler OAM seconded Councillor John Thain

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Grant Funding Application - Multi-Sport Community Facility Fund be received

2.     Council endorse the applications be prepared and submitted for GCSFF;

-     Gipps Street Recreation Precinct, Claremont Meadows – Construction of new multi-sport playing fields, floodlighting, irrigation and training infrastructure.

-     The Kingsway North (Oz tag, Touch Football, Cricket), Werrington – Amenity building redevelopment ensuring full accessibility and including, storage, showers and toilets, administration, and canteen facilities.

 

3.     Council endorse the funding allocations from existing budgets allocated to the projects as contributions to be included in the grant application:

-     Gipps Street Recreation Precinct, Claremont Meadows – $2,500,000.

 

-     The Kingsway North (Oz tag, Touch Football, Cricket), Werrington – $850,000. 

 

Councillor Bernard Bratusa returned to the meeting, the time being 7:41pm.


 

 

22      COVID Recovery – Special Purposes Grant                                            

46  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Ross Fowler OAM seconded Councillor John Thain

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on COVID Recovery – Special Purposes Grant be received.

2.     Council endorse a COVID Recovery – Special Purposes Grant to be advertised, and funds distributed to eligible local groups.

3.     Funds from the Voted Works Reserve split evenly between all three wards up to $60,000 are allocated to the COVID Recovery – Special Purposes Grant.

 

 

24      RFT 21/22-05 Ched Towns Amenities Redevelopment                          

47  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Ross Fowler OAM seconded Councillor John Thain

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on RFT 21/22-05 Ched Towns Amenities Redevelopment be received

2.     The proposal and lump sum price from Alpall Pty Limited for the amount of $1,365,500.00 (excluding GST) be accepted for the Ched Towns Amenities Redevelopment.

3.     The General Manager (or their delegate) be authorised to sign all necessary legal documents in relation to this matter.

 

25      RFT21/22-07 Gipps Street Recreation Precinct - Landscape Construction                                                                                                

48  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Ross Fowler OAM seconded Councillor John Thain

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on RFT21/22-07 Gipps Street Recreation Precinct - Landscape Construction be received

2.     Council decline to accept any tenders received

3.     Council resolve not to call fresh tenders for the reason that pricing options within the submitted responses could be considered in negotiations with the companies that submitted responses and, as tenders have already been received from qualified and experienced contractors, fresh tenders are not likely to present a more advantageous result to Council

4.     The General Manager (or their delegate) be authorised to negotiate with Glascott Landscape and Civil Pty Ltd, Lloyd Group Pty Ltd and Statewide Civil Pty Ltd

5.     A recommendation on the outcome of the negotiations be reported to Council for award of the tender.

 


 

 

17      Digital Literacy Mentoring Program for Isolated Seniors - Successful Grant Submission                                                                                       

49  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Bernard Bratusa seconded Councillor Karen McKeown OAM

That:

1.   The information contained in the report on the NSW Department of Communities and Justice (DCJ) Reducing Social Isolation for Seniors Grant Program be received.

2.   Council accepts a Reducing Social Isolation for Seniors Grant for $40,000 from the Department of Communities and Justice to deliver a Digital Literacy Mentoring Program for Isolated Seniors Program in 2022, in partnership with LEEP.

 

 

23      RFT 21/22-04 Doug Rennie Amenities Redevelopment                         

50  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Bernard Bratusa seconded Councillor Sue Day

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on RFT 21/22-04 Doug Rennie Amenities Redevelopment be received

2.     The proposal and lump sum price from Coverit Building Group for the amount of $1,057,364.14 (excluding GST) be accepted for the Doug Rennie amenities redevelopment.

3.     The General Manager (or their delegate) be authorised to sign all necessary legal documents in relation to this matter.

 

26      RFT21/22-14 Hickeys Lane Amenities Building Construction              

51  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Bernard Bratusa seconded Councillor Sue Day

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on RFT21/22-14 Hickeys Lane Amenities Building Construction be received.

2.     The tender from CoverIt Building Group Pty Ltd for the amount of $1,280,200.91 (excluding GST) be accepted for Hickeys Lane Amenities Building Construction.

3.     The General Manager (or their delegate) be authorised to sign all necessary legal documents in relation to this matter.

 

 


 

 

27      RFT21/22-22 Bill Ball Amenities                                                                

52  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Bernard Bratusa seconded Councillor Sue Day

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on RFT21/22-22 Bill Ball Amenities be received

2.     The tender from Coverit Building Group Pty Ltd, for the amount of $1,108,635.00 (excluding GST) be accepted for Bill Ball Amenities, St Marys.

3.     The General Manager (or their delegate) be authorised to sign all necessary legal documents in relation to this matter.

 

Outcome 7 - We have confidence in our Council

 

29      2022 Australian Local Government Association (ALGA) National General Assembly (NGA)                                                                           

53  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor John Thain seconded Councillor Karen McKeown OAM

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on 2022 Australian Local Government Association (ALGA) National General Assembly (NGA) be received

2.     Council put forward suggestions to develop motions by staff to be submitted to the National General Assembly and delegate authority to the General Manager to submit prior to the deadline.

3.     Council nominate Her Worship the Mayor, Councillor Tricia Hitchen as its voting delegate for the 2022 National General Assembly of Local Government.

4.     Council nominate Councillors Karen McKeown OAM, Ross Fowler OAM, Jim Aitken OAM and John Thain as observers at the 2022 National General Assembly of Local Government.

5.     Leave of absence be granted to all Councillors attending the 2022 National General Assembly of Local Government to be held in Canberra from 19 – 22 June 2022.

 

 

28      RFT21/22-16 for the Provision of Catering Supplies and Consumable Products                                                                                                       

54  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM seconded Councillor John Thain

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on RFT21/22-16 for the Provision of Catering Supplies and Consumable Products be received.

2.     ABCOE Distributors Pty Ltd be awarded the contract subject to the execution of a formal agreement for Council Catering Supplies and Consumable Products upon a satisfactory financial assessment.

3.     The General Manager (or their delegate) be authorised to sign all necessary legal documents in relation to this matter.

 

 

30      Licence of 688 High Street Penrith                                                           

55  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM seconded Councillor Ross Fowler OAM

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Licence of 688 High Street Penrith be received.

2.     Council approve the proposed new licence agreements under the terms and conditions listed within the report.

3.     The common seal of the Council of the City of Penrith be affixed to all documents as required, and the General Manager (or their delegate) be authorised to sign all necessary legal documents in relation to this matter.

 

31      Easement for electrical substation Allen Place Penrith Lot 1 DP1263787                                                                                                   

56  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM seconded Councillor Ross Fowler OAM

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Easement for electrical substation Allen Place Penrith Lot 1 DP1263787 be received

2.     Council grant an easement over current Lot 1 DP1263787, inclusive of a future consolidated lot benefiting Epsilon Distribution Ministerial Holding Corporation (Endeavour Energy) for the purposes detailed within this report.

3.     The common seal be affixed to all documents as required, and the General Manager (or their delegate) be authorised to sign all necessary legal documents in relation to this matter.

 

 

32      Organisational Performance and Financial Review - December 2021 

57  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Bernard Bratusa seconded Councillor Glenn Gardiner

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Organisational Performance and Financial Review - December 2021 be received

2.     The Organisational Performance and Financial Review - December 2021 as at 31 December 2021, including the revised estimates outlined in this report and detailed in the Organisational Report - December 2021, be adopted.

3.     Council revote the works as detailed in the Recommended Revoted Works Lists, detailed in the Organisational Report - December 2021 for inclusion in the 2022-23 Operational Plan.

 

33      Summary of Investment & Banking for the Period 1 December 2021 to 31 December 2021                                                                                  

58  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Bernard Bratusa seconded Councillor Glenn Gardiner

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Summary of Investment & Banking for the Period 1 December 2021 to 31 December 2021 be

received.

2.     The certificate of the Responsible Accounting Officer and Summary of Investments and Performance for the period 1 December 2021 to 31 December 2021 be noted and accepted.

3.     The graphical Investment Analysis as at 31 December 2021 be noted.

 

34      Summary of Investment & Banking for the Period 1 January
2022 to 31 January 2022                                                                            

59  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Bernard Bratusa seconded Councillor Glenn Gardiner

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Summary of Investment & Banking for the Period 1 January
2022 to 31 January 2022 be received.

2.     The certificate of the Responsible Accounting Officer and Summary of Investments and Performance for the period 1 January 2022 to 31 January 2022 be noted and accepted.

3.     The graphical Investment Analysis as at 31 January 2022 be noted.

 

 

Committee of the Whole

 

60 RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Karen McKeown OAM seconded Councillor Robin Cook that the meeting adjourn to the Committee of the Whole to deal with the following matters, the time being 7:51pm.

 

1        Presence of the Public

 

CW1 RESOLVED on the motion of Councillor Karen McKeown OAM seconded Councillor Robin Cook that the press and public be excluded from Committee of the Whole to deal with the following matters:

 


 

 

Outcome 7

 

2        Unsolicited Request to Purchase Council Owned Land Located at 1 Littlefields Road Mulgoa                                                                                                                                

 

This item has been referred to Committee of the Whole as the report refers to commercial information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed (i) prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied it; or (ii) confer a commercial advantage on a competitor of the Council; or (iii) reveal a trade secret and discussion of the matter in open meeting would be, on balance, contrary to the public interest.

 

 

 

The meeting resumed at 7:53pm and the General Manager reported that the Committee of the Whole met at 7:51pm on Monday, 21 February 2022, the following being present

 

Her Worship the Mayor, Councillor Tricia Hitchen, Deputy Mayor Councillor John Thain, and Councillors Jim Aitken OAM, Bernard Bratusa, Todd Carney, Robin Cook, Kevin Crameri OAM, Mark Davies, Sue Day, Ross Fowler OAM, Glenn Gardiner, Karen McKeown OAM, Mark Rusev and Marlene Shipley.

 

and the Committee of the Whole excluded the press and public from the meeting for the reasons set out in CW1 and that the Committee of the Whole submitted the following recommendations to Council.

 

CONFIDENTIAL BUSINESS

 

2        Unsolicited Request to Purchase Council Owned Land Located at 1 Littlefields Road Mulgoa                                                                                                                      

RECOMMENDED on the MOTION of Councillor Ross Fowler OAM seconded Councillor Robin Cook         

CW2 That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Unsolicited Request to Purchase Council Owned Land Located at 1 Littlefields Road Mulgoa be received.

2.     Council provides its support to enter into direct negotiations with the proponent for the divestment of Lot 1 DP 852709, as per the recommendation provided by the Property Development Management Group in accordance with an updated valuation, and

3.     The negotiations and subsequent outcome are presented back to Council for its consideration.

 

 

 

ADOPTION OF Committee of the Whole

 

61  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Todd Carney seconded Councillor John Thain that the recommendations contained in the Committee of the Whole and shown as CW1 and CW2 be adopted.

 

 

 

There being no further business the Chairperson declared the meeting closed the time being 7:53pm.

 



PENRITH CITY COUNCIL

 

Procedure for Addressing Meetings

 

Anyone can request permission to address a meeting, providing that the number of speakers is limited to three in support of any proposal and three against.

 

Any request about an issue or matter on the Agenda for the meeting can be lodged with the General Manager or Public Officer up until 12 noon on the day of the meeting.

 

Prior to the meeting the person who has requested permission to address the meeting will need to provide the Public Officer with a written statement of the points to be covered during the address in sufficient detail so as to inform the Councillors of the substance of the address and a written copy of any questions to be asked of the Council in order that responses to those questions can be provided in due course.

 

In addition, prior to addressing the meeting a person addressing Council or Committee will be informed that they do not enjoy any privilege and that permission to speak may be withdrawn should they make inappropriate comments.

 

It should be noted that persons who wish to address the Council are addressing a formal part of the Council Meeting. All persons addressing the Meeting should give consideration to their dress attire. Smart casual is a minimum that is thought to be appropriate when addressing such a forum.

 

It should be noted that speakers at meetings of the Council or Committee do not have absolute privilege (parliamentary privilege).  A speaker who makes any potentially offensive or defamatory remarks about any other person may render themselves open to legal action.

 

Prior to addressing the meeting the person will be required to sign the following statement:

 

“I (name) understand that the meeting I intend to address on (date) is a public meeting.  I also understand that should I say or present any material that is inappropriate, I may be subject to legal action.  I also acknowledge that I have been informed to obtain my own legal advice about the appropriateness of the material that I intend to present at the above mentioned meeting”.

 

Should a person fail to sign the above statement then permission to address either the Council or Committee will not be granted.

 

The Public Officer or Minute Clerk will speak to those people who have requested permission to address the meeting, prior to the meeting at 6.45pm.

 

It is up to the Council or Committee to decide if the request to address the meeting will be granted.

 

Where permission is to be granted the Council or Committee, at the appropriate time, will suspend only so much of the Standing Orders to allow the address to occur.

 

The Chairperson will then call the person up to the lectern or speaking area.

 

The person addressing the meeting needs to clearly indicate:

 

·       Their name;

 

·       Organisation or group they are representing (if applicable);

 

·       Details of the issue to be addressed and the item number of the report in the Business Paper;

 

·       Whether they are opposing or supporting the issue or matter (if applicable) and the action they would like the meeting to take;

 

·         The interest of the speaker (e.g. affected person, neighbour, applicant,    applicants spokesperson, interested citizen etc).

 

Each person then has five minutes to make their address.  Those addressing Council will be required to speak to the written statement they have submitted.  Permission to address Council is not to be taken as an opportunity to refute or otherwise the points made by previous speakers on the same issue. 

 

The Council or Committee can extend this time if they consider if appropriate, however, everyone needs to work on the basis that the address will be for five minutes only.

 

Councillors may have questions about the address so people are asked to remain at the lectern or in the speaking area until the Chairperson has thanked them.

 

When this occurs, they should then return to their seat.

 

Glenn McCarthy

Public Officer

02 4732 7649                                               

   


Mayoral Minutes

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

1        Flood emergency and recovery                                                                                         1

 

2        Staff awarded Louise Petchell Learning for Sustainability Scholarship                            3

 

 

 

 



Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                28 March 2022

 

Mayoral Minute

Flood emergency and recovery

           

 

Over the past few weeks, Penrith was battered by an extreme weather event that resulted in significant flash floods and flooding across the LGA. The prolonged intensity of the rain meant that the Nepean River peaked twice, almost a week apart, extending the emergency threat for many residents as they tried to prepare in an uncertain situation.

 

This flood emergency comes almost a year to the day from when our city experienced the worst flood since 1961. It was a nervous wait for those impacted last year, not knowing if they would be flooded again or if they would be spared.

 

Thankfully the Nepean River peaked much lower than last year, a welcomed relief for those who had just rebuilt after last year's event. For others, it still meant evacuation, displacement and the emotional journey back to their property, belongings and livestock to start another clean-up and recovery.

 

Through it all, and despite it all, our community's trademark resilience and community spirit were on display. I was impressed but not surprised to see people coming together to help, prepare and support each other.

 

On behalf of Councill, I would like to express my deep concern for those impacted by the situation, particularly those who have faced this twice in two years, and to thank them for their ongoing cooperation.

 

Council once again worked under the instruction of the SES to assist. I would like to commend and acknowledge the Council Staff who worked tirelessly for many days and nights to support the SES and other emergency services to keep our community safe.

 

During the emergency, Council Staff were on the ground to support SES sandbagging operations at Jamison Park and Londonderry Community Centre where an astounding 18,000 sandbags across nine days were dispatched. They helped with traffic control and road closures as flash flooding and road inundation isolated pockets of our city. 

 

As the flood emergency passed, the focus has shifted towards our recovery. Evacuated residents have returned to their properties, and Council has provided a recovery centre at Londonderry for people to connect and access support services, food hampers and washing facilities. Our waste team is working with affected residents to remove their damaged items, which we know can be a long, emotional and challenging journey for many.

 

I also wish to thank the many other services that have been working on the ground with the SES during the emergency and recovery phase. 

 

Our thoughts are with our neighbours in the Hawkesbury who experienced major flooding. And with the communities further up north who have and continue to suffer extreme loss as a result of the floods.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Finally, I would like to urge caution to our community as they move around the city over the coming weeks as we continue to repair and restore our assets and infrastructure. Thank you to everyone involved in keeping our community safe and informed during this extraordinary event.

 

 

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Councillor Tricia Hitchen

Mayor

  

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the Mayoral Minute on Flood emergency and recovery be received.

 


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                28 March 2022

 

Mayoral Minute

Staff awarded Louise Petchell Learning for Sustainability Scholarship

           

 

It is my pleasure to congratulate the seven Council staff who have been awarded the Louise Petchell Sustainability Scholarship for 2022. 

 

Congratulations to: 

·            Executive Planner, Paula Tomkins 

·            Bushcare Program Officer, Jess Whittick 

·            Landscape Architect, David Forward 

·            Security and Emergency Management Coordinator, Laurence Cafarella 

·            Economic Development Lead, Raquel Bloom 

·            Development Manager, Laura Watson 

·            Cultural Engagement Officer, Donita Hulme 
 

These staff were awarded the scholarship from a very competitive pool of strong applications. 

 

The scholarship will enable these staff to attend a range of sustainability focused training courses and conferences relevant to their roles, and share what they learn with other staff. Through the scholarship process we continue to build and deepen our understanding of sustainability and how we apply it in our service to the community of Penrith.  

This staff scholarship was established in 2009 in recognition of former Sustainability Unit Coordinator Louise Petchell, who passed away in April 2009.  

 

It is a lasting tribute to Louise’s dedication to the principles of sustainability and her passion for encouraging others, no matter what their role at Council, to embrace every opportunity to learn and “do things better”.  

 

Thirteen years on, Louise’s legacy continues to benefit our organisation and community. 

 

I would particularly like to acknowledge Louise’s widow Mr Bernard Proctor, who continues to support and be part of the committee that assesses the scholarship applications each year. 

 

I look forward to hearing more about the activities of these scholarship holders throughout the year and the difference they are making for Council and the community. 

 

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Councillor Tricia Hitchen

Mayor

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the Mayoral Minute on Staff awarded Louise Petchell Learning for Sustainability Scholarship be received.


Notices of Motion

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

1        Fire Resistant Bus Interiors                                                                                                1

 

2        Nepean River Precinct - Traffic Matters                                                                             2

 

3        Llandilo - Drainage                                                                                                             4

 

 

 

 

 



Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                28 March 2022

Notice of Motion

1          Fire Resistant Bus Interiors            

 

 

Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM TO MOVE:

 

That Council write to the NSW Government to ensure that any new buses have a fire-resistant interiors.

 

Note from Councillor

 

We have seen numerous bus fires where the fire has spread from the rear very quickly, not only is it highly dangerous if people are injured and cannot move, but what if it were to happen on single lane roads and cause traffic chaos.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                28 March 2022

Notice of Motion

2          Nepean River Precinct - Traffic Matters            

 

 

Council Sue Day TO MOVE:

 

 

That Council Officers undertake a high-level review of the traffic management issues associated with the Factory Road/Bellevue Road precinct due to concerns raised from local residents around the increased volume of traffic attracted to the River Precinct and provide the information back to Councillors.

 

 

Background:

With increasing usage of the Nepean River Precinct there is a growing increase in traffic volumes to surrounding areas.

 

According to the data supplied by Council, traffic volumes recorded for Tench Avenue has increased by 60% over the last five years.

 

Council advised residents these increases are consistent with growth in many other areas throughout the Penrith Local Government Area (LGA) due to a recent period of increased development.

 

There’s has been a negative impact of this increase for the neighbouring village of Regentville.

 

Council has advised that the collected data which was compared with historic data, shows an increase in average daily traffic volume in Spencer Street. The increase represents a little under ten percent (10%).

 

Factory Road has seen an increase in traffic volume of twenty percent (20%) over the past six years.

 

What also needs to be considered is the negative impact on the smaller residential streets of Regentville.

 

The residential streets of Gibbes, Loftus and Bellevue have turned into “rat runs”. Whilst increases may be consistent with growth, there should be liveability measures of the impacts of to these residential streets.

 

When an area is activated, there needs to be consideration given to the ripple effect that these activation strategies have on neighbouring suburbs.

 

Even though Council can deploy traffic counts and traffic modelling assessments, the community feedback provides a rich source of issues that they are currently facing due to the activation strategy.

 

Therefore, whilst Council looks at quantitative results (traffic counts). I believe we should also include qualitative data in our decision-making processes, as this will indicate the liveability factor that has been influenced by our activation strategies.

 

·    Congestion resulting from “rat running”

·    Safety concerns for residents

·    The amount of increased traffic noise in the residential area

·    Increased emissions in these areas

 

Rat running increases in traffic volume on the quieter streets that are not designed for the increased volume. The noise and emissions created by the extra volume can impact the quality of life for people living in the area and there is more potential for accidents involving vehicles and pedestrians.

 

Further research should be done to work out the impact of these issues since the activation of the precinct.

 

More importantly, we need to make drivers aware they are entering residential streets and endeavour to make it less desirable as a through route

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                28 March 2022

Notice of Motion

3          Llandilo - Drainage              

 

 

 

Councillor John Thain TO MOVE:

 

That:

 

1.   Council staff prepare a report back to council on the costs and resourcing involved in conducting an audit of drainage in the suburb of Llandilo to ascertain the overall quality and issues in the suburb.

 

2.   It be noted that should Council determine to undertake an audit that a further report be prepared outlining the findings and priorities based on the audit along with options for improvements or repairs.

 

3.   It also be noted that subject to any agreed audit that Council investigate and determine a long-term funding model for any improvements and repairs staged on priorities informed by supporting documents, emails and petitions, that should be tabled at a Council meeting

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.  


Reports of Committees

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

1        Report and Recommendations of the Heritage Advisory Committee Meeting held on 2 March 2022                                                                                                                         1

 

2        Report and Recommendations of the Local Traffic Committee Meeting held on 7 March 2022                                                                                                                                    3

 

3        Report and Recommendations of the Policy Review Committee Meeting held on 14 March 2022                                                                                                                                    8

 

 

 

 

 



Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                28 March 2022

 

REPORT AND RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE
 Heritage Advisory Committee MEETING

HELD ON 2 March, 2022

 

 

 

PRESENT

Councillor Ross Fowler OAM (Chair), Councillor Mark Rusev (arrived at 5.18pm), Peter Wood (PCC), James Heathcote (PCC), Alison Veron (PCC), Phillip Doy (PCC), Richard Ward, Beth Moore and Marie Koen (attending on behalf of Norma Thorburn).

 

APOLOGIES

The apology from Jennine Leonarder Collins was accepted.

 

 ABSENT

 

 Stephen McKenzie, Ann-Maree Bonner and Wendy Herne.

 

Councillor Mark  Rusev joined the meeting at 5:18pm (apologised for being held up in another meeting).

 

 

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES - Heritage Advisory Committee Meeting - 3 November 2021

The minutes of the Heritage Advisory Committee Meeting of 3 November 2021 were confirmed.

 

 

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

 

Nil.

 

 

DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Outcome 6 - We are healthy and share strong community spirit

 

1     Penrith Heritage Walk

 

Council’s City Marketing staff presented a report on the proposed Penrith Heritage Walk and new App which is intending to increase visitation to the City. Criteria for places of interest in Penrith as well as opportunities for St Marys were discussed and clarified with Council staff to consider additional suggested items. The Chair requested a further report to the Committee be presented with the final recommended list of points of interest.

 

RECOMMENDED

That:

1.   The information contained in the report on Penrith Heritage Walk be received

 

2.   A further report be presented to the Heritage Advisory Committee once the App is further developed.

 

 

GENERAL BUSINESS

 

 

GB1  Old Post Office Emu Plains

 

Committee member requested an update on the Old Post Office Emu Plains request from minutes of the previous meeting, has the sign been erected? Development Services Manager to contact the Property Manager for a response to this request.

 

GB2  Art Society building Emu Plains

 

Committee member asked if member know if the Art Society is moving into the building at Emu Plains. The Chair mentioned they are planning on moving, not sure when. Development Services Manager to contact the Property Manager so they can provide an update.

 

GB3  Next Heritage Advisory Committee meeting (in person)

 

Development Services Manager mentioned to the Committee that Council is conscious of organising face to face meetings in Civic Centre. There will be requirements that the Committee needs to be double vaccinated. Hybrid meetings will be an option for members who are unable to attend in person.

 

GB4  Next Heritage Advisory Committee meeting

 

A full agenda for 2022 dates will be confirmed shortly, the next Heritage Advisory Committee meeting is to be arranged for Wednesday 6 April 2022. The Chair preferred these meetings to be face to face rather than hybrid.

 

Chair thanked the Committee and Council staff you for your attendance, comments and input.

 

 

There being no further business the Chairperson declared the meeting closed the time being 5:40pm.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the recommendations contained in the Report and Recommendations of the Heritage Advisory Committee meeting held on 2 March, 2022 be adopted.

 


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                28 March 2022

 

REPORT AND RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE
 Local Traffic Committee MEETING

HELD ON 7 March, 2022

 

 

(Note: due to prevailing public health crisis, and related COVID-19 protocols, the Local Traffic Committee Business Paper and reports were referred to members and a formal meeting held via on-line Microsoft Teams platform).

 

PRESENT

Mayor Tricia Hitchen (Representative for the Member of Penrith), Councillor Robin Cook (Representative for the Member of Londonderry) and Raymond Tran – Transport for NSW (TfNSW).

IN ATTENDANCE

Andrew Jackson – Director Development and Regulatory Services (Chair), Adam Wilkinson – Engineering Services Manager, Michael Alderton – Acting Traffic Engineering Coordinator, Kablan Mowad – Senior Traffic Engineer, Liam Warda – Trainee Engineer, Lalaine Malaluan – Transport Engineer, Wendy Read – Road Safety Officer, Mia Ecob – Acting Engineering Services Secretary, Kylie Thornley – Traffic Administration Officer, Tiana Dickson – Business Administration Trainee and Steve Grady - Busways

 

APOLOGIES

Councillor Karen McKeown OAM (Council Representative), Sergeant Matthew Shirvington – Nepean Police Area Command (PAC) and Senior Constable Stephen Page – Nepean Police Area Command (PAC).

 

Engineering Services Manager, Adam Wilkinson, informed the Committee of the departure from Council of three staff being David Drozd, Daniel Davidson and Anthony Baradhy. Mr Wilkinson took the opportunity to recognise the important contribution each had made to the Committee and their commitment to our safe and efficient our local road network.

 

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES - Local Traffic Committee Meeting - 7 February 2022

The “Present and in Attendance” amended for the minutes of the Local Traffic Committee Meeting of 1 November 2021 was confirmed.

 

The minutes of the Local Traffic Committee Meeting of 7 February 2022 were confirmed.

 

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

 

Nil.

 


 

 

DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Outcome 2 - We plan for our future growth

 

1        Feather Street & McIntyre Avenue, St Clair - Endorsement of Design Plan AM196 for a Single Lane Roundabout

Raymond Tran – Transport for NSW (TfNSW) requested the No Stopping be moved to be more in line with the BB lines. This was agreed.                                

RECOMMENDED

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Feather Street & McIntyre Avenue, St Clair - Endorsement of Design Plan AM196 for a Single Lane Roundabout    be received.

2.     Consultation be undertaken with affected residents and surrounding businesses regarding the proposed roundabout, traffic calming works and pedestrian facility improvements at the intersection of Feather Street and McIntyre Avenue, St Clair as shown in Appendix 1.

3.     Subject to no objections, Design Plan AM196 dated October 2021 be endorsed for construction, with funding provided from the National Blackspot and Safer Roads Program.

4.     A street lighting assessment be conducted in accordance with Council’s Public Domain Lighting Policy (August 2004) to ensure compliance with the relevant lighting category.

 

Outcome 3 - We can get around the City

 

2        Peppermint Crescent, Kingswood - Endorsement of Design Plan AP113 for a Series of Traffic Calming Facilities - Substantial Objection

Councillor Robin Cook on behalf of Councillor Karen McKeown OAM advised that the residents have advised that they feel that they aren’t being heard.

Councillor Robin Cook thinks Council Officers have done a good job. She knows there are concerns from residents about the noise and troubles reversing trailers out of their driveways but it makes sense to do it and supports it as a road safety improvement.                                                                                                            

RECOMMENDED

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Peppermint Crescent, Kingswood - Endorsement of Design Plan AP113 for a Series of Traffic Calming Facilities - Substantial Objection be received.

2.     Upon consideration of all submissions, Design Plan AP113 (dated September 2021) be endorsed for construction, with funding provided under the National Blackspot & Safer Roads program 2021/22.

3.     A street lighting assessment be conducted in accordance with Council’s Public Domain Lighting Policy (August 2004) to ensure compliance with the relevant lighting standards.

4.     Residents who made submissions be advised of Council’s resolution.

 

3        Coreen Avenue and King Street, Penrith - Proposed 'No Stopping' Restrictions

Adam Wilkinson – Engineering Services Manager noted the 27.5m is greater than the standard distance and acknowledges this will impact on-street parking in front of #No.50 and we will consult with the property owner.                              

RECOMMENDED

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Coreen Avenue and King Street, Penrith - Proposed 'No Stopping' Restrictions be received.

2.     Consultation be undertaken with the affected properties regarding the proposed ‘No Stopping’ restrictions on Coreen Avenue and King Street, Penrith as illustrated in Appendix 1.

3.     Subject to no substantial objections being received, the proposed signage and linemarking be installed on Coreen Avenue and King Street, Penrith as shown in Appendix 1.

4.     Council’s Rangers and the resident that reported the matter be advised of Council’s resolution.

 

4        Ottelia Road, Kemps Creek – Proposed Bus Stops                                  

RECOMMENDED

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Ottelia Road, Kemps Creek – Proposed Bus Stops be received.

2.     Consultation be undertaken with affected business owners and tenants, with any substantial objections to be referred back to the Local Traffic Committee for consideration.

3.     Subject to no substantial objections being received, eight (8) new bus stops, including Bus Zone signage, be installed along Ottelia Road, Kemps Creek as shown in Appendix 1.

4.     Busways and Council’s Rangers be advised of Council’s resolution.

 

5        Caddens Road and Bringelly Road, Kingswood – Proposed raised pedestrian crossing, speed cushions, pedestrian fencing and associated signage with line marking

Mayor Tricia Hitchen is concerned this may not entirely resolve the issues for Montgrove College. Wendy Read – Road Safety Officer advised that she has written to Montgrove College to ask the school to apply for a school crossing supervisor through TfNSW.

Raymond Tran – Transport for NSW (TfNSW) raised concerns that the pedestrian fencing may obscure the line of sight especially for the younger students and would like this checked.                                                                      

RECOMMENDED

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Caddens Road and Bringelly Road, Kingswood – Proposed raised pedestrian crossing, speed cushions, pedestrian fencing and associated signage with line marking be received.

2.     Consultation be undertaken with affected properties including Montgrove College Principal and Kingswood High School Principal regarding the proposed pedestrian crossing and speed cushions at the intersection of Caddens Road and Bringelly Road.

3.     Subject to no substantial objections being received, the proposed raised pedestrian crossing, speed cushion, pedestrian fencing and associated signage be endorsed for installation, with funding provided from the current or a future LTC / Urgent Traffic Facilities budget.

4.     The proposed concept design will be referred to Council’s design team for further detailed design and a future report for endorsement through the LTC.

5.     ‘No Stopping’ signage and C3 yellow line marking be installed at the intersection of Caddens Road and Quigg Place to reinforce the NSW Road Rule of no stopping within 10m of an intersection.

6.     A street lighting assessment be conducted in accordance with Council’s Public Domain Lighting Policy (August 2004) to ensure compliance with the relevant lighting category.

 

GENERAL BUSINESS

 

GB 1           Temporary Bus Interchange at St Marys Train Station 

Steve Grady – Busways advised that as at 9pm tonight, the new temporary bus interchange at St Marys Train Station will open. He wanted to thank everyone who was involved in making this happen including Council Officers. 

RECOMMENDED

That the information be noted.

 

GB 2           Great Western Highway & Charles Hackett Drive, St Marys  

Raymond Tran – Transport for NSW (TfNSW) advised that he received Council’s letter regarding the intersection of Great Western Highway and Charles Hackett Drive, St Marys, and wanted to let us know its progressing along. He has been looking at the history of the issue and is seeking further information. If it’s feasible he will seek to apply for some funding from the Safer Roads Program. Adam Wilkinson – Engineering Services Manager advised that Council Officers would be more than happy, once the investigation has been done, to do a site visit at the location. 

RECOMMENDED

That the information be noted.

 


 

 

GB 3           State Government Funded Projects    

Raymond Tran – Transport for NSW (TfNSW) advised that due to the rain there may be delays with delivery of any existing State Government Funded Projects, and extension of time for delivery is being communicated to Council.

RECOMMENDED

That the information be noted.

 

 

There being no further business the Chairperson declared the meeting closed the time being 9:41am.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the recommendations contained in the Report and Recommendations of the Local Traffic Committee meeting held on 7 March, 2022 be adopted.

 


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                28 March 2022

 

REPORT AND RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE
 Policy Review Committee MEETING

HELD ON 14 March, 2022

 

 

 

WEBCASTING STATEMENT

Her Worship the Mayor, Councillor Tricia Hitchen read a statement advising that Council Meetings are recorded and webcast.

PRESENT

Her Worship the Mayor, Councillor Tricia Hitchen, Deputy Mayor Councillor John Thain, and Councillors Bernard Bratusa, Todd Carney, Robin Cook, Kevin Crameri OAM, Mark Davies, Sue Day, Ross Fowler OAM, Glenn Gardiner, Jonathan Pullen, Mark Rusev and Marlene Shipley.

 

 

APOLOGIES

Apologies were accepted for Councillors Jim Aitken OAM and Karen McKeown OAM.

 

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES - Policy Review Committee Meeting - 8 November 2021

The minutes of the Policy Review Committee Meeting of 8 November 2021 were confirmed.

 

 

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

 

Councillor Marlene Shipley declared a Non-Pecuniary Conflict of Interest - Less than Significant in Item 1 – St Marys Town Centre Annual Report and Audited Financial Statement 2020-2021, as she is a member of the Board of the St Marys Town Centre Corporation.

 

Councillor Bernard Bratusa declared a Non-Pecuniary Conflict of Interest - Less than Significant in Item 1 – St Marys Town Centre Annual Report and Audited Financial Statement 2020-2021, as he is a member of the Board of the St Marys Town Centre Corporation.

 

 

DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Outcome 4 - We have safe, vibrant places

 

1        St Marys Town Centre Annual Report and Audited Financial Statement 2020-2021                                                                                    

RECOMMENDED

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on St Marys Town Centre Annual Report and Audited Financial Statement 2020-2021 be received.

2.     Council receives and notes the Annual Report and Audited Financial Statement for 2020 - 2021 of the St Marys Town Centre Corporation.

 

 

Outcome 7 - We have confidence in our Council

 

3        ARIC & Internal Audit Annual Reports                                                       

RECOMMENDED that the information contained in the report on ARIC & Internal Audit Annual Reports be received.

 

 

Outcome 6 - We are healthy and share strong community spirit

 

2        Request for Major Event Sponsorship - Rowing Australia                      

RECOMMENDED

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Request for Major Event Sponsorship - Rowing Australia be received

2.     Council defer consideration of this report until further notice due to the event being postponed.

 

 

 

There being no further business the Chairperson declared the meeting closed the time being 7:51PM.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the recommendations contained in the Report and Recommendations of the Policy Review Committee meeting held on 14 March, 2022 be adopted.

  



DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

 

Outcome 2 - We plan for our future growth

 

1        Public Exhibition of the draft Rural Lands Strategy                                                           1

 

2        Public Exhibition of the draft Local Housing Strategy                                                      12

 

3        Employment Zones Reform - Preliminary Zone Translation for Penrith Local Environmental Plan 2010

Procedural note: Section 375A of the Local Government Act 1993 requires that a division be called in relation to this matter.                                                                23

 

4        Submission to the Draft Western Parkland City Blueprint and Economic Development Roadmap                                                                                                                          29

 

5        Draft Mamre Precinct Development Contributions Plan                                                  40

 

 

 

Outcome 4 - We have safe, vibrant places

 

6        RFT21/22-21 City Park Landscape Construction                                                            53

 

7        RFT21/22-23 Parker Street Upper Amenities                                                                  57

 

8        RFT21/22-26 U3A Building Refurbishment                                                                     61

 

9        RFT21/22-25 Refurbishment of Yoorami Childcare Out of School Hours Care             65

 

 

 

Outcome 5 - We care about our environment

 

10      Acceptance of Grant Funding Offer - NSW Floodplain Management Program 2021/22    71

 

11      Acceptance of Grant Funding – Crown Reserves Improvement Fund 2021-2022         74

 

 

 

Outcome 6 - We are healthy and share strong community spirit

 

12      Public Exhibition Draft Disability Inclusion Action Plan 2022-2026                                 79

 

13      Multicultural Working Party Terms of Reference and Community Members                  87

 

14      Requests for Community Events Sponsorship - Cancer Council NSW & TRT Running 94

 

 

15      Grant Success - NSW Government Open Space Program - Places to Play (Pilot), Gipps Street Youth Precinct                                                                                                       97

 

16      Nepean Avenue Shared Path - Community Consultation Results                                100

 

17      RFT21/22-14 Hickeys Lane Amenities Building Construction - Amended                    106

 

 

Outcome 7 - We have confidence in our Council

 

18      2022 Australian Local Government Women's Association NSW Annual Conference    111

 

19      Permanent Road Closure of Part Allen Place Penrith and Lot Consolidation              113

 

20      Licence for Temporary Wharf Facilities - Tench Reserve Regentville                          122

 

21      Workers Insurance (Compensation) Service Review                                                    130

 

22      Regatta Park Plan of Management                                                                                134

 

23      Plans of Management                                                                                                    138

 

24      Summary of Investment & Banking for the period 1 February 2022 to 28 February 2022                                                                                                                                         141

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

Outcome 1 - We can work close to home

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


Outcome 2 - We plan for our future growth

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

1        Public Exhibition of the draft Rural Lands Strategy                                                           1

 

2        Public Exhibition of the draft Local Housing Strategy                                                      12

 

3        Employment Zones Reform - Preliminary Zone Translation for Penrith Local Environmental Plan 2010

Procedural note: Section 375A of the Local Government Act 1993 requires that a division be called in relation to this matter.                                                                23

 

4        Submission to the Draft Western Parkland City Blueprint and Economic Development Roadmap                                                                                                                          29

 

5        Draft Mamre Precinct Development Contributions Plan                                                  40

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                28 March 2022

 

 

 

1

Public Exhibition of the draft Rural Lands Strategy   

 

Compiled by:               Paula Tomkins, Executive Planner

Renata Ferreira, City Design Lead

Authorised by:            Carlie Ryan, City Strategy Manager

Kylie Powell, Director - City Futures  

 

Outcome

We plan for our future growth

Strategy

Ensure services, facilities and infrastructure meet the changing needs of our City

Service Activity

Ensure our strategic framework is contemporary and informs our land use planning and advocacy

    

 

Previous Items: Places of Penrith Strategic Framework Update – Councillor Briefing – 20 Sep 2021

                            Draft Rural Lands Strategy – Councillor Briefing – 14 Mar 2022

Executive Summary

The purpose of this report is to seek Council endorsement for the public exhibition of the draft Rural Lands Strategy (Enclosure 1). The revised draft Rural Lands Strategy has been prepared to consider recent government plans and investments for our City and provides a strategic approach to managing and protecting our rural lands. An earlier draft, named the Rural Lands and Villages Strategy, was exhibited with the Local Strategic Planning Statement (LSPS) in late 2019, but was not finalised at that time. It is proposed to exhibit the revised draft of the draft Rural Lands Strategy for community consultation from 5 April to 10 May 2022.

 

The draft Rural Lands Strategy forms one component of the Places of Penrith strategic planning framework which will establish the vision and directions for the Penrith Local Government Area (LGA). Other components of the Places of Penrith, the Employment Lands Strategy and Green Grid Strategy, were adopted in 2021. A further component, the draft Local Housing Strategy will also be considered through a separate report at this Ordinary Meeting.

 

The Local Housing Strategy and Rural Lands Strategy have been prepared concurrently as they have a complementary focus and provide a full picture of the future direction across all areas of our City, the Local Housing Strategy focussing on the urban areas and the Rural Lands Strategy focussing on the rural areas. If endorsed, the draft Rural Lands Strategy will be exhibited concurrently with the draft Local Housing Strategy. 

 

Councillors were briefed on the draft Rural Lands Strategy at a briefing on 14 March 2022. Councillors were also briefed on the progress of the draft Strategy (in the context of Places of Penrith) at a briefing on 20 September 2021.

 

Following the exhibition period, feedback on the draft Rural Lands Strategy will be considered and the document updated if necessary, before reporting back to Council for endorsement later in 2022.

 

It is recommended that Council endorse the draft Rural Lands Strategy for public exhibition.

Background

The Greater Sydney Region Plan recognises the importance of protecting and enhancing the environmental, social and economic values in rural areas. It also identifies and maps the Metropolitan Rural Area (MRA), a large part of which lies in the Penrith LGA and states that retaining the values and integrity of the MRA are of critical importance.

 

The Western City District Plan builds on this by prioritising the better management of rural areas and protecting and enhancing scenic and cultural landscapes.

 

Council’s LSPS recognises the importance of our rural lands noting that they comprise 70% of our City’s land area, with agriculture contributing $109 million to the local economy in 2015-16. Planning priority 17 identifies the need to define and protect the values and opportunities within the MRA.

 

Several documents relating to rural lands were prepared and exhibited alongside the LSPS:

·    Draft Penrith Rural Lands and Villages Study (Enclosure 2);

·    Draft Penrith Scenic and Cultural Landscapes Study (Enclosure 3); and

·    Draft Penrith Rural Lands and Villages Strategy.

 

Completion of these documents were immediate actions in the LSPS. However, a number of factors have made it difficult for Council to finalise the Strategy to date, including:

 

·    Continuing development of plans by the State Government for critical precincts within our existing rural lands such as the Western Sydney Aerotropolis and the Greater Penrith to Eastern Creek Investigation Area (GPEC).

·    The preferred alignment and locations of Sydney Metro Western Sydney Airport stations having not been announced until June 2020.

·    Lack of clarity in relation to the finalisation of the Cumberland Plain Conservation Plan and the implications it will have for the Penrith LGA.

·    Lack of clarity in relation to the ongoing planning for Penrith Lakes and the likely outcomes for the site.

 

We have now updated the previous Draft Rural Lands and Villages Strategy (2019) to produce the current draft Rural Lands Strategy. We have removed reference to the rural villages in the title. While this Strategy does make reference to the rural villages, it is intended that the rural villages will be addressed more comprehensively, including preparation of character statements, in the Corridors and Centres Strategy that is currently being prepared for public exhibition later in 2022.

 

The previous two studies prepared in 2019 (draft Scenic and Cultural Landscape Study and draft Rural Lands and Villages Strategy) continue to provide the technical basis for the current draft Rural Lands Strategy. In addition, Council commissioned the Penrith Rural Economy and Agribusiness Opportunity Study – Part 1 (Analysis) (prepared by Edge Planning, 2022, Enclosure 4) to support the rural economy aspects of the Rural Lands Strategy.

 

Councillors have been briefed on the progress of the draft Rural Lands Strategy at a briefing on 20 September 2021 (in the context of the broader Places of Penrith strategic framework).

 

The Places of Penrith strategic planning framework comprises five City-wide strategies that will establish a vision and directions for our Local Government Area (LGA). In October 2021, Council adopted the Employment Lands Strategy and Green Grid Strategy. At the 14 March 2022 briefing, Council staff presented drafts of the Local Housing Strategy and Rural Lands Strategy. Meanwhile, development of the fifth component, the Corridors and Centres Strategy, is continuing.

Current Situation

The draft Rural Lands Strategy has been established to provide direction for the ongoing protection, planning and management of the rural lands within the Penrith LGA. It provides a

framework built around five priorities, 17 associated desired outcomes and actions that will ensure implementation for our rural lands. The complete list of priorities, outcomes and actions can be found in Attachment 1. Some examples of actions are provided below.

 

Priority 1 Secure the rural edge

 

This priority is about clearly identifying the boundary between the urban and rural lands, our rural edge, to provide the basis for protecting the social, economic and environmental values of the rural lands. While the rural edge can be inferred based on land use zonings in the Local Environmental Plan, there are a number of areas where delineation is unclear, for example Twin Creeks. The draft Rural Lands Strategy clearly identifies the rural edge, explains its evolution from the Metropolitan Rural Area identified in the Greater Sydney Region Plan and its mapping in the LSPS, and clarifies discrepancies to remove land that has been identified as urban such as urban investigation areas. The strategy includes an action to map the rural edge in the LEP.

 

·    Outcome 1.1 The rural edge is included in the Local Environmental Plan

·    Outcome 1.2 That rural lands are maintained and protected

 

Example Action

·    Map the rural edge in the Local Environmental Plan.

 

Priority 2 Protect ecological health and biodiversity

 

This priority is about ensuring that we continue to protect the areas and attributes of our rural lands that have ecological significance and are high in biodiversity.

 

·    Outcome 2.1 Natural areas are protected and connected

·    Outcome 2.2 Waterways are maintained or improved

·    Outcome 2.3 Private conservation initiatives are expanded

 

Example Actions

·    Review and update planning controls to better protect and connect natural areas and improve waterways.

·    Work with landowners to support them to access conservation programs.

 

Priority 3 Preserve open space, natural beauty and cultural connections

 

This priority is about preserving the scenic and cultural landscapes, rural views and vistas and entry points to our rural lands. While these things can sometimes be difficult to articulate, the scenic value of our rural lands is what many in the community most value. The draft Rural Lands Strategy seeks to reflect the outcomes of the technical background report, the draft Scenic and Cultural Landscapes Study. The draft Rural Lands Strategy uses the information in the Scenic and Cultural Landscapes Study to identify scenic and cultural landscapes, highly visually sensitive landscapes, rural vistas and visual gateways and provides actions to reflect them and their significance in the LEP and DCP.

 

·    Outcome 3.1 Scenic and cultural landscapes are identified and protected

·    Outcome 3.2 Quality visual outcomes are achieved in highly visually sensitive landscapes

·    Outcome 3.3 Design outcomes are enhanced in visual gateways

·    Outcome 3.4 Important rural vistas are maintained

 

Example Actions

·    Map scenic and cultural landscapes and highly visually sensitive landscapes in the Local Environmental Plan and include statements of significance in the Development Control Plan.

·    Advocate for the retention of open space, green breaks and views to the Blue Mountains in the planning for Orchard Hills.

 

Priority 4 Support a diverse rural economy

 

This priority is about supporting all the different businesses and industries that are part of the rural economy, from agriculture and tourism to home businesses. Greater Sydney’s Metropolitan Rural Area (MRA) is specifically recognised as important for chicken, meat, eggs, vegetables, nurseries, cultivated turf and cut flowers. These rural industries are all notable strengths of Penrith City’s rural lands both in the north, in Londonderry and Llandilo and in the south east (noting that this land is expected to transition to urban development overtime).

 

As identified in Part C Place-Based Frameworks of the Strategy, the Rural North West precinct is recognised by its highly capable agricultural land located along the Nepean River flats west of Castlereagh Road; quality soils elsewhere that are valuable and suitable for agriculture including the areas in Londonderry; and world-renowned horse studs that complement the surrounding rural character. While soil capability in the Rural North East precinct is not as good, it is still home to some of Penrith’s major agricultural industries including poultry farms and market gardening (e.g. mushroom farming). This precinct is also home to animal keeping industries such as animal boarding. It is important that existing lot sizes are maintained to retain the viability of these rural enterprises and not compromise their ability to operate by potentially creating further land use conflict with the introduction of additional residential development. The Rural South West precinct is renowned for its natural beauty, ecological significance and heritage properties and values.

 

With an existing agricultural and food manufacturing base, proximity to agricultural production districts, Greater Sydney’s consumers and the Western Sydney Airport, Penrith is uniquely positioned to build on the existing rural economy with the growth of a thriving agribusiness sector. It is acknowledged that some of our existing rural lands in the south east of the LGA will be lost to urban development in the Western Sydney Aerotropolis. This makes protection of the remaining rural lands in our LGA more important to ensure we retain and grow our rural production capability.

 

·    Outcome 4.1 Land suitable for agriculture is identified and protected

·    Outcome 4.2 Rural tourism grows and expands

·    Outcome 4.3 Small businesses permitted in rural lands are supported and encouraged

·    Outcome 4.4 Animal boarding and training establishments are supported and regulated by the New South Wales Government

·    Outcome 4.5 Quarrying of identified resources continues and land is rehabilitated on completion of extraction

 

Example Actions

·    Establish an agriculture, food and innovation network to build capacity and explore new or niche agricultural enterprise.

·    Develop actions to foster the sustainable growth of rural tourism through the Economic Development Strategy.

 

Priority 5 Provide housing and services to meet the needs of the community

 

It is acknowledged that people choose to live in Penrith City’s rural lands due to the lifestyle benefits they provide. This is evidenced by a vast majority of our rural lands being used for rural residential. The draft Local Housing Strategy recognises that rural residential housing is a form of lifestyle/executive housing that contributes to housing diversity in our LGA.

 

This priority is about ensuring that we provide appropriate forms of housing to the existing and future community while not compromising our rural economy and noting that residential expansion or intensification is not planned in the rural lands, except in rural villages. We also want to support the community with a network of rural villages and localities meeting their needs and necessary infrastructure.

 

·    Outcome 5.1 The network of rural villages and localities is reinforced

·    Outcome 5.2 Housing diversity is provided for rural communities in rural villages

·    Outcome 5.3 Rural lands for infrastructure are identified

 

Example Actions

·    Prepare local character statements for rural centres as part of the Corridors and Centres Strategy.

·    Continue to advocate for the delivery of the Castlereagh Connection for flood evacuation.

 

Implementation Plan

 

The draft Rural Lands Strategy takes a place-based approach by identifying 4 precincts – Rural North West, Rural North East, Rural South West and South East Transition. The Strategy considers how the priorities and desired outcomes can be achieved in each of the four precincts and identifies actions to move towards the desired outcomes.

 

The priorities, outcomes and actions form the basis of the implementation plan for the Rural Lands Strategy and are summarised in Attachment 1. The implementation plan also outlines timeframes for the actions to be achieved and the role Council will play in implementing the action.

 

Many of the actions proposed by the draft Rural Lands Strategy are aligned to other Council strategies or plans (either existing or underway). For instance, the Strategy aligns to the Local Strategic Planning Statement, Employment Lands Strategy and the Green Grid Strategy to support the ongoing viability of the rural economy and the protection and enhancement of green links across the rural landscape. The Rural Lands Strategy also notes the need to develop character statements for the rural villages which will be undertaken as part of the Corridors and Centres Strategy currently in preparation. The Corridors and Centres Strategy will also consider the role and function of each rural village and will provide strategic and spatial directions to guide their future. This work will be informed by early engagement activities.

 

Response to Previous Submissions

 

The revised draft Rural Lands Strategy has largely responded to submissions received on the previous draft Rural Lands and Villages Strategy. In particular, it retains the priorities and actions that received support such as growing rural tourism, maintaining rural vistas and preparing character statements for the rural villages. A number of other submissions also called for ongoing or increased protection of the Mulgoa Valley. The protection of the Mulgoa Valley is a long-held aspiration, and the Local Environmental Plan already maps the Mulgoa Valley and includes specific planning controls protecting its values. The draft Rural Lands Strategy builds on this existing protection by mapping the rural edge and including an action that the rural edge be mapped in the LEP also. Additionally, a short-term action is included to map the Mulgoa Valley and Wallacia scenic and cultural landscape in the LEP and include a statement of significance in the Development Control Plan. Councillors were briefed on some of our responses to previous submissions at the Councillor Briefing on the 14 March 2022.

 

As the LGA evolves with the development of the Aerotropolis and associated infrastructure and the rural lands in the south east transition to urban development, the Rural Lands Strategy will likely need to be revised. The Greater Sydney Region Plan and District Plans are also currently being reviewed and updated. The draft Rural Lands Strategy provides the basis for Council to provide our view to the update of the District Plans by the Greater Sydney Commission.

 

Public Exhibition and Engagement Activities

 

The draft Rural Lands Strategy is proposed to be publicly exhibited at the same time as the draft Local Housing Strategy for a period of five weeks between 5 April and 10 May 2022. An outline of the proposed engagement program is below.

 

Advertising and Notification

 

To ensure that we reach a broad demographic range within the Penrith LGA, traditional and social media will be used to promote the exhibition of the draft Rural Lands Strategy. This will include a media release and utilisation of Council’s social media channels including Facebook and Twitter.

Council’s YourSay Webpage

A dedicated YourSay webpage will provide all materials and information related to the exhibition of the draft Rural Lands Strategy. This webpage will include a short survey on the draft Rural Lands Strategy that community members can complete, as well as instructions for making a written submission.

Drop-in Sessions

Subject to COVID-19 restrictions applicable at the time, combined drop-in sessions for the Rural Lands Strategy and Local Housing Strategy will be held across Penrith City to engage with residents who may not necessarily access our website or social media. Council staff will be available at these sessions to seek feedback and answer questions. Potential locations for the drop-in sessions include Llandilo, Mulgoa, St Marys and Penrith. Drop in sessions may be held in conjunction with Village Café, if appropriate.

 

Financial Implications

 

The costs associated with the public exhibition of the draft Rural Lands Strategy will be funded within existing budgets as part of the 2021-22 Operational Plan and Delivery Program.

Specific actions in the Rural Lands Strategy will have their own financial implications over the course of the next 15 years. It is intended that these actions will be integrated within Council’s future Operational Plans and Delivery Programs with grant funding opportunities also being investigated.

Risk Implications

The preparation of a Rural Lands Strategy reduces risk by clearly articulating the framework Council will use for the management of the rural lands.

Conclusion

The draft Rural Lands Strategy seeks to protect and maintain the rural lands in the Penrith LGA through the identification of priorities, outcomes and actions that will build on the strengths and opportunities of these areas.

The draft Rural Lands Strategy is proposed for public exhibition from 5 April to 10 May 2022 to enable wide community and stakeholder feedback. Following public exhibition, the Strategy will be further refined to reflect community and stakeholder feedback before being reported to Council again.

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Public Exhibition of the draft Rural Lands Strategy be received.

2.     Council endorse the draft Rural Lands Strategy to be publicly exhibited from 5 April to 10 May 2022.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

Draft Rural Lands Strategy - Summary of Actions

4 Pages

Appendix

  


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                              28 March 2022

Appendix 1 - Draft Rural Lands Strategy - Summary of Actions

 

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Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                28 March 2022

 

 

 

2

Public Exhibition of the draft Local Housing Strategy   

 

Compiled by:               Marianna Kucic, Urban Strategist

Renata Ferreira, City Design Lead

Authorised by:            Carlie Ryan, City Strategy Manager

Kylie Powell, Director - City Futures  

 

Outcome

We plan for our future growth

Strategy

Facilitate development in the City that considers the current and future needs of our community

Service Activity

Support and influence tri-government strategic planning in the Western Parkland City by responding to the City Deal commitments

    

 

Previous Items:           Places of Penrith Strategic Framework Update - Councillor Briefing - 20 Sep 2021

Draft Local Housing Strategy - Councillor Briefing - 14 March 2022

Executive Summary

The purpose of this report is to seek Council endorsement for the public exhibition of the draft Local Housing Strategy (Enclosure 1). A revised draft of the Local Housing Strategy has been prepared for the Penrith local government area to provide a strategic approach to managing housing and population growth over a twenty year period. An earlier draft of the Local Housing Strategy was exhibited with the Local Strategic Planning Statement (LSPS) in late 2019, however was not finalised at that time on account of revised State Government population projections, the announcement of Sydney Metro station locations, and the need to determine the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. It is proposed to exhibit the revised draft for community consultation from 5 April to 10 May 2022.

The Local Housing Strategy forms one component of the Places of Penrith strategic planning framework, which will establish the vision and directions for the Penrith Local Government Area (LGA). Other components of Places of Penrith, the Employment Lands Strategy and Green Grid Strategy, were adopted in 2021. A further component, the draft Rural Lands Strategy, will also be considered at this Ordinary Meeting.

The draft Local Housing Strategy and Rural Lands Strategy have been prepared concurrently as they have a complementary focus and provide a full picture of the future direction across all areas of our City, the Local Housing Strategy focussing on the urban areas and the Rural Lands Strategy focussing on the rural areas. If endorsed, the draft Local Housing Strategy will be exhibited concurrently with the draft Rural Lands Strategy.

Analysis in the draft Local Housing Strategy points to there being demand for around 36,000 additional dwellings by 2036. Preliminary indications are that Penrith City will have sufficient housing capacity to meet this demand under its existing controls, greenfield sites and future station precincts.

Councillors were briefed on the draft Local Housing Strategy on 14 March 2022. Councillors were also briefed on the progress of the draft Strategy (in the context of Places of Penrith) at a briefing on 20 September 2021.

Following the exhibition period, feedback on the draft Local Housing Strategy will be considered and the document updated if necessary, before reporting back to Council for endorsement later in 2022. Council staff will then prepare an Implementation and Delivery Plan for the Local Housing Strategy in late 2022.

It is recommended that Council endorse the draft Local Housing Strategy for public exhibition.

Background

The Greater Sydney Region Plan requires that all councils develop a housing strategy, being the main tool for understanding the need and planning for housing and infrastructure delivery. The Region Plan requires that housing strategies outline how housing growth is to be managed, identify the right locations for additional housing supply in each local government area, and inform updates of local environmental plans. The Western City District Plan provided further guidance on housing strategies, including the setting of initial housing targets for each council to meet. 

Council’s Community Strategic Plan (CSP) includes ‘Outcome 2’ which provides that “We plan for our future growth”. Council’s Local Strategic Planning Statement (LSPS), adopted on 23 March 2020, identified the preparation of a Local Housing Strategy as an immediate action (Action 3.1). Indeed, a draft of the Local Housing Strategy was exhibited with the LSPS in late 2019.

One commitment under the Western Sydney City Deal included funding for the fast-tracking of several councils’ housing strategies. Council secured funding for preparation of the initial draft Strategy.

A number of factors have made it difficult for Council to finalise the Strategy to date, including:

·    The locations of Sydney Metro Western Sydney Airport stations having not been announced until June 2020.

·    The release of substantially higher population projections for Penrith LGA by the State Government in December 2019.

·    The COVID-19 pandemic which has impacted dwelling completions and development, migration, and population forecasts generally.

·    Evidence based on the 2016 Census may well be unreliable and out-of-date, while the findings of the 2021 Census will not be known until late 2022.

·    Continuing development of plans by the State Government for critical precincts such as the Aerotropolis and the Greater Penrith to Eastern Creek Investigation Area (GPEC).

·    Unresolved issues around flooding and flood evacuation by the State Government.

The latter two dot-points remain largely unresolved and are topics for which the draft Local Housing Strategy lacks certainty. As such, the Local Housing Strategy will likely be an iterative document and may need to be revised a number of times as more information becomes known.

 

Councillors have been briefed on the progress of the draft Strategy at briefings on 14 March 2022 and 20 September 2021 (the latter, in the context of the broader Places of Penrith strategic framework).

 

The Places of Penrith strategic planning framework comprises five City-wide strategies that will establish a vision and directions for our Local Government Area (LGA). In 2021, Council adopted the Employment Lands Strategy and Green Grid Strategy. At this Ordinary Meeting, Council will be presented drafts of the Local Housing Strategy and Rural Lands Strategy. Meanwhile, development of the fifth component, the Corridors and Centres Strategy, is continuing.

Current Situation

Council’s Local Strategic Planning Statement (LSPS) identified the preparation of a Local Housing Strategy as an immediate action to manage housing delivery and accommodate population growth. The current draft Local Housing Strategy delivers on this action and has been prepared for public exhibition. It reflects community views expressed during the consultation for the LSPS and earlier draft Strategy, as well as input and feedback from internal Council stakeholders.

 

Response to Previous Submissions

The revised draft Local Housing Strategy has largely responded to submissions received on the previous draft Strategy. In particular, it responds to calls for quality design, environmental performance, sustainability, and local character statements. Councillors were briefed on some of our responses to previous submissions at the Councillor Briefing on the 14 March 2022.

Broad Framework

The draft Local Housing Strategy sets out a framework for housing delivery in Penrith City to guide housing change and manage population growth over a period of 20 years, from 2016 to 2036. One of the key components of the Strategy is the establishment of a Housing Vision and associated set of objectives and actions that build around four priorities:

1.   Priority 1: Housing supply delivered in the right location at the right time

2.   Priority 2: Ensuring there is a diversity of housing types and local infrastructure that caters to community need

3.   Priority 3: Supporting the provision of specialised and affordable housing

4.   Priority 4: Ensuring new housing respects local character, is of high quality, and promotes housing resilience.

The Strategy considers these four priorities around four broad themes, namely, housing location; housing diversity; housing affordability; and housing design, character and resilience. Key elements of the Strategy include:

·    Continued housing growth in and around the established centres of the East-West Economic Corridor, being Penrith, Kingswood, Werrington and St Marys.

·    The establishment of new housing in and around the emerging centres with stations on the Sydney Metro Western Sydney Airport line.

·    Planning and longer-term redevelopment of identified Urban Investigation Areas.

·    Promoting resilient, affordable, sustainable, high-quality centres and neighbourhoods that contribute to the wellbeing of our residents and are supported by infrastructure.

·    Protection of rural lands, local character, and natural landscape values.

·    Promoting a diverse mix of housing types that offer choice and cater to all segments of our community.

 

 

Population and Dwelling Projections

The State Government requires that Council propose targets within its Local Housing Strategy for the 2016-2036 period. On account of discrepancies between State Government population projections and the difficulty in predicting the future population, the revised Local Housing Strategy considers three scenarios and adopts the scenario that is believed to be the best estimate for Penrith City. This scenario is based on the latest research by Council, which anticipates a total of around 289,000 people by 2036. ​

 

To accommodate this growth, the draft Local Housing Strategy estimates a demand for 36,000 additional dwellings by 2036, of which 18,000 additional dwellings should be delivered between 2016 and 2026 and around 20,000 to 22,000 new dwellings be delivered for the 2026-2036 period.

 

Penrith City has already met the target set in the District Plan for 6,600 additional dwellings between 2016 and 2021 (delivering around 8,000 dwellings by mid-2021). Over the last five years, the average annual dwelling delivery was approximately 1,600 dwellings per year, of which 56.1% were multi-unit dwellings. To meet demand over the next five years, dwelling delivery will need to be higher at around 2,000 dwellings per year. The draft Strategy finds that Penrith City will have sufficient housing capacity to meet this demand under its existing controls, greenfield sites and future station precincts.

 

Preliminary indications are that Council is on track to meet the next target of 7,500 to 10,000 additional dwellings in the period 2021-2026. As the Sydney Metro Western Sydney Airport progresses towards the 2026 delivery date and as the housing market picks up, it is anticipated that demand for additional housing stock will grow, and approval and completion rates will increase.

 

Mix of Housing Types and Lot Sizes

 

Housing diversity is one of the priorities in the draft LHS, which is thoroughly addressed in Chapter 6. Housing diversity means the delivery of a range of housing types, housing tenure and housing and lot sizes that are flexible, adaptable, and appropriate to the changing

needs of current and future residents, and supported by the delivery of infrastructure in key growth locations, greenfield sites within existing urban investigation areas and infill sites.

 

Chapter 6 discussed diversity in terms of two broad categories. Firstly, through the provision of different housing typologies. That is, a mix of low density, medium density and high density dwellings of various housing and lot sizes and tenure types, as well as existing rural-residential lots. Secondly, diversity is reflected in the targeting of specific groups in

society with different needs such as seniors housing, student housing, boarding houses, and

lifestyle/executive housing.

 

The draft Local Housing Strategy discusses lifestyle or executive housing – being the various housing types that attract higher-income earners. This form of housing is typically characterised by high amenity, views and natural landscapes. Examples that already exist in our LGA include large houses on large lots, golf course estates, and penthouse apartments.

 

The draft Strategy proposes that suitable locations for lifestyle/executive housing are on existing urban areas on the periphery of masterplanned precincts, such as to provide a buffer or transition between dissimilar land uses. Lifestyle/executive housing can also be located in high amenity centres in the form of penthouse apartments with views, superior accessibility to jobs and services, and a vibrant, night-time economy. Rural-residential living also contributes to housing choice in our LGA, and is often chosen for “lifestyle” reasons. Rural-residential living is discussed in the Rural Lands Strategy and already permissible under existing development controls.

 

The draft Strategy proposes actions and mechanisms to promote housing diversity including:

 

·    Review planning controls to provide guidance on the delivery of different housing types as required, such as seniors living, lifestyle/executive housing, and new or emerging housing forms. The potential mechanisms to achieve this, as outlined in the draft LHS include:

Support the provision of lifestyle/executive housing on the periphery of masterplanned urban areas where there is a need to “buffer” or “transition” the interface of established land uses with new urban precincts. Ensure this form of housing is only permitted in circumstances that protect or enhance scenic, cultural and landscape values.

o Support the provision of lifestyle/executive housing in the form of penthouse apartments, particularly in Penrith City Centre, St Marys Town Centre, Sydney Science Park and the Orchard Hills station precinct in an effort to retain high-income earners that are critical to the operation of the Nepean Hospital/The Quarter, Western Sydney International Airport and Penrith’s many commercial enterprises.

·    Investigate a range of lot sizes appropriate to location and needs through strategic place-based planning such as the Corridors and Centres Strategy and planning controls.

·    Monitor housing delivery to ensure a mix of housing types are being provided and community needs are being met. Use this information to inform future housing demand and planning.

·    Support opportunities to deliver housing for specific sub-markets including seniors living, housing for people with disabilities, and multi-generational households.

Strategy Implementation

The draft Local Housing Strategy contains nine housing objectives and a series of actions and mechanisms that are linked to the four priorities mentioned above. These are summarised in Chapter 9 of the Strategy and in Attachment 1 of this report.

Many of the actions proposed by the draft Local Housing Strategy are aligned to other Council strategies or plans (either existing or underway). For instance, in achieving more affordable housing, Council is expected to consider the findings of the Draft Western Sydney Affordable Housing Strategy later in 2022, an initiative of the Western Sydney Planning Partnership. The Local Housing Strategy also aligns to the Local Strategic Planning Statement, Resilient Penrith Action Plan, Cooling the City Strategy, and the Green Grid Strategy to support the implementation of resilient, green, high-quality neighbourhoods that address issues such as urban heat and tree canopy coverage.

The Local Housing Strategy will likely be an iterative document and may need to be revised after it is finalised as more information becomes known. In particular, the findings of the 2021 Census will be released in late 2022 to give a more reliable evidence-base to population projections and housing demand forecasts. Similarly, the State Government continues to develop plans for critical precincts such as the Aerotropolis and GPEC, while Council also awaits resolution of issues around flooding and flood evacuation by the State Government.

 

Public Exhibition and Engagement Activities

The draft Local Housing Strategy is proposed to be publicly exhibited at the same time as the draft Rural Lands Strategy for a period of five weeks between 5 April and 10 May 2022. An outline of the proposed engagement program is provided below.

Advertising and Notification

To ensure that we reach a broad demographic range within the Penrith LGA, traditional and social media will be used to promote the exhibition of the draft Local Housing Strategy. This will include a media release and utilisation of Council’s social media channels including Facebook and Twitter.

Council’s YourSay Webpage

A dedicated YourSay webpage will provide all materials and information related to the exhibition of the draft Local Housing Strategy. This webpage will include a short survey on the draft Local Housing Strategy that community members can complete, as well as instructions for making a written submission.

Drop-in Sessions

Subject to COVID-19 restrictions applicable at the time, combined drop-in sessions for the Local Housing Strategy and Rural Lands Strategy will be held across Penrith City to engage with residents who may not necessarily access our website or social media. Council staff will be available at these sessions to seek feedback and answer questions. Potential locations for the drop-in sessions include Llandilo, Mulgoa, St Marys and Penrith. Drop-in sessions may be held in conjunction with Village Café, if appropriate.

Financial Implications

The costs associated with the public exhibition of the draft Local Housing Strategy will be funded within existing budgets as part of the 2021-22 Operational Plan and Delivery Program. Specific actions in the Local Housing Strategy will have their own financial implications over the course of the next 15 years. It is intended that these actions will be integrated within Council’s future Operational Plans and Delivery Programs with grant funding opportunities also being investigated.

Risk Implications

The draft Local Housing Strategy has been identified as an immediate action for Council in its LSPS and fulfils Council’s obligation to prepare a housing strategy under the Western City District Plan. The Local Housing Strategy enables Council to guide development and lead conversations to ensure a sufficient supply of residential land is available into the future. Failing to progress the Local Housing Strategy could result in reputational damage to Council.

Conclusion and Next Steps

The draft Local Housing Strategy sets out the priorities and actions for planning and managing Penrith City’s housing delivery in line with the vision of a connected, healthy, innovative and balanced city to support our growing population.

Preliminary analysis in the draft Local Housing Strategy work points to there being demand for around 36,000 additional dwellings by 2036, with around 18,000 of those dwellings being required by 2026. Preliminary indications are that Penrith City will have sufficient housing capacity to meet this demand under its existing controls, greenfield sites and future station precincts. Notwithstanding, the Local Housing Strategy is likely to be an iterative document.

The draft Local Housing Strategy is proposed for public exhibition from 5 April to 10 May 2022 to enable wide community and stakeholder feedback. Following public exhibition, the Strategy will be further refined to reflect community and stakeholder feedback before being reported to Council again. Should the Strategy be adopted by Council at that later date, the document would need to be submitted to the State Government for approval. Council staff will then be required to prepare a more detailed Implementation and Delivery Plan for the Local Housing Strategy in late 2022.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Public Exhibition of the draft Local Housing Strategy be received.

2.     Council endorse the draft Local Housing Strategy to be publicly exhibited from 5 April to 10 May 2022.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

Summary of Priorities, Outcomes and Actions

4 Pages

Appendix

  


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                              28 March 2022

Appendix 1 - Summary of Priorities, Outcomes and Actions

 

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Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                28 March 2022

 

 

 

3

Employment Zones Reform - Preliminary Zone Translation for Penrith Local Environmental Plan 2010   

 

Compiled by:               Nicole Dukinfield, Principal Planner

Brendan Murton, Senior Planner

Authorised by:            Natasha Borgia, City Planning Manager

Kylie Powell, Director - City Futures  

 

Outcome

We plan for our future growth

Strategy

Facilitate development in the City that considers the current and future needs of our community

Service Activity

Maintain a contemporary planning framework of land use and statutory plans

 

Previous Items:           Employment Zones Reform - Councillor Briefing - 12 Jul 2021

                                      Submission on Employment Zones Reform - Ordinary Meeting - 26 Jul 2021

                                      Employment Zones Reform - Preliminary Zone Translation for Penrith Local Environmental Plan 2010 - Councillor Briefing - 07 Feb 2022

Procedural note: Section 375A of the Local Government Act 1993 requires that a division be called in relation to this matter.

 

 

Executive Summary

The purpose of this report is to present to Council the zone translation for the Penrith Local Environmental Plan (LEP) 2010 in response to the NSW Department of Planning and Environment’s (DPE) Employment Zones Reform and seek endorsement of the proposed translation to allow the new zone framework to proceed to public exhibition.  

 

Councillors were informed and briefed on the Employment Zones Reform project throughout 2021 and 2022, as follows: 

 

·    5 March 2021 – memo providing an overview of the reforms 

·    17 May 2021 – Council briefing following further information from DPE on the reforms 

·    28 May 2021 – memo advising of employment reforms being exhibited for comment 

·    12 July 2021 – Council briefing seeking feedback for the submission to the reforms 

·    26 July 2021 – Council Ordinary meeting adopting an endorsed submission to the reforms 

·    3 September 2021 – memo advising Council of the public exhibition and DPE response to submissions 

·    21 November 2021 – memo advising of the zone translation provided by DPE for Council comment 

·    7 February 2022 – Council briefing advising of the officer-level preliminary zone translation  

 

The reform (being the consolidation of business and industrial zones) is a recommendation of the NSW Productivity Commission’s White Paper. The draft Employment Zones were exhibited between May and June 2021, with Council’s submission raising a number of concerns about the potential impacts and appropriateness of the new framework to Penrith. On 1 December 2021, the new Employment Zones were inserted into the Standard Instrument LEP. Minimal changes were made in response to Council’s submission.  

 

In November 2021, DPE provided Council with its draft translation of Penrith LEP 2010 employment zones for Council to review and propose changes by the end of January 2022.  

 

Council officers have assessed and reviewed the new land use tables and zoning application and identified several changes to meet Penrith’s strategic planning objectives or manage land use conflicts. The major changes in this translation were presented to Council at a briefing on 7 February 2022. There have been two changes since this briefing.

  

We have generally adopted a ‘direct translation’ approach, meaning unless in circumstances where there are likely land use conflicts arising from the translation/reform, or where an alternative zoning is preferred with strong justification, the translation does not materially change the development potential of affected land.  

 

An explanatory summary of these Council initiated changes is provided as Attachment 2 and includes:  

·    Prohibiting Restricted premises and Registered clubs from the E1 Local Centre zone 

·    For existing IN2 Light Industrial lands (except for 243 Forrester Road, North St Marys), transitioning these to the new E4 General Industrial zone and converting the permissible uses that currently apply under the IN2 Light Industrial zone to these precincts/sites so that they retain these uses 

·    Applying the secondary zone translation of E3 Productivity Support to land at 243 Forrester Road, North St Marys 

·    Applying the SP4 Enterprise zone rather than the DPE proposed E3 Productivity Support to the Western Sydney University land (Werrington North and South Campus; currently zoned B7 Business Park)   

 

A summary of proposed changes made following the 7 February Councillor briefing include:  

·    A new local objective in the LEP to mitigate amenity impacts from the increased land uses to be permissible in the E1 Local Centre zone.  

·    A new local objective in the LEP that ensures Business and Office premises in the E3 Productivity Support zone maintain Council’s intended centres hierarchy.  

 

On 28 January 2022, Council’s proposed translation of the new zoning framework was provided to DPE in the Return Translation Detail – Penrith LEP 2010, which is included as Attachment 1.  

 

This report is seeking endorsement of the Return Translation Detail of the new employment zone framework, which will allow the changes to the Penrith LEP 2010 to go on exhibition. This exhibition will include all NSW Local Government Areas, be wholly managed by DPE and scheduled to be held April - May 2022. 

   

A comprehensive review of the new employment zones framework will be undertaken as stage two of this reform. It is likely that this work will commence in late 2022. 

 

Background

In late 2020, DPE began to engage with selected Councils on their intention to refine the zoning framework for employment lands. A Councillor Memo was sent on 5 March 2021 providing an overview of this reform. Following further information provided by DPE, Councillors were briefed on 17 May 2021.  

 

The Employment Zones Reform is a translation of existing business and industrial zones to new employment zones and is not an opportunity for rezoning of individual sites. DPE explains that the reforms aim to remove widespread limitations on businesses that wish to establish, innovate or expand. Essentially, the approach aims to support the long-term economic recovery of NSW by increasing job creation and productivity, and the consolidation of business and industrial zones is a recommendation of the Productivity Commission’s White Paper.  

 

The proposed Employment Zones Framework was on public exhibition from 20 May 2021 to 30 June 2021. A Councillor Memo was sent 28 May 2021 advising of the public exhibition. A Councillor Briefing was held on 12 July 2021 to further brief Council on the reform and to seek feedback to inform the submission. At its Ordinary Meeting of 26 July 2021, Council endorsed a submission to DPE on the draft Employment Zones Framework. This submission raised concerns about the compatibility of certain mandated uses in some proposed zones due to potential amenity impacts, and the inclusion of offices and business premises in the E3 Productivity Support zone due to incompatibility of these uses and potential impacts on Penrith’s centres hierarchy. 

 

Following public exhibition, on 3 September 2021 a Councillor Memo was sent updating Councillors on the submissions report prepared by DPE. As part of DPE’s exhibition materials, it was indicated in the Implementation Plan that Councils would have 6 months to complete the review of the translation once provided by DPE. This was originally expected to be received in August 2021. However, Council received its zone translation from DPE on 10 November 2021 and was required to submit its draft confirmation of the translation to DPE by 28 January 2022. This reduced timeframe has significantly impacted Council’s ability to undertake a comprehensive review of the translation and further information on the proposed approach to the review is outlined below. This information was provided in a Councillor Memo on 12 November 2021. 

 

Employment Zones Translation 

In November 2021, the DPE released the final employment zones framework and a translation of the Penrith LEP 2010, including land uses tables. The final Standard Instrument zones and mandated objectives and land uses identified in the land use tables cannot be modified. Some minor changes including updated or new definitions and the renaming of Environmental (E) zones to Conservation (C) zones were made to the Standard Instrument on 1 December 2021 in preparation for the transition to the new zoning framework. A Councillor memo was provided on 12 November 2021 advising of these changes.  

Disappointingly, the final employment zones framework generally did not result in many amendments in response to Council's submission. Through the Western Sydney Planning Partnership, member Councils expressed their concerns (which were common) to DPE at a meeting held on 16 December 2021, including:

•        Implementation Process – insufficient timeframe for scale of the reform. 

•        E1 Local Centre – merger of B1 & B2 could create amenity impacts in current B1 land as higher impact uses are introduced.

•        E3 Productivity Support - introduction of offices and business premises could negatively affect adopted centres hierarchy. 

•        Relationship with other SEPPs – reform increase inconsistency between LEPs and SEPPs. 

The common submission points were already raised in Council's submission following the public exhibition of the draft framework in July 2021. It is not expected that there will be any further changes to the mandated objectives and land uses within the Standard Instrument following the joint Western Sydney Planning Partnership submission.

 

As part of the zone translation, Council was required to assess how the zones have been applied spatially in the direct translation from the DPE, review how existing local provisions, local objectives and non-mandated uses will be applied to the Penrith LEP 2010 and propose changes for public exhibition. The scope of this translation included: 

·    Assessing and confirming the proposed direct zone translation provided by DPE. There is scope for alternative zones to be proposed for certain locations where it aligns with endorsed Council strategies and is sufficiently justified. If a change requires additional strategic planning analysis, it can be dealt with as part of a future Planning Proposal.  

·    Reviewing local objectives from Penrith’s existing employment zones to assess their suitability in the new zoning framework. New local objectives can also be proposed to supplement the mandated zone objectives to achieve local planning outcomes.  

·    Reviewing non-mandated uses from Penrith’s existing employment zones to assess their suitability and permissibility in the new zoning framework. 

·    Reviewing existing local provisions to assess their suitability in the new zoning framework. Amended or additional local clauses can also be added that address specific local circumstances, where justified and consistent with the intent of the mandated zone objectives and permitted uses.  

·    Reviewing existing Schedule 1 Additional Permitted Uses to assess their suitability in the new zoning framework.  

 

Given the reduced timeframe Council was provided to undertake the review, it is intended to adopt a two staged approach to implementing the reforms: 

1.   Broadly adopt a ‘direct translation’ approach.  

This will therefore result in minimal policy changes to the transition from the existing to the new framework, unless in circumstances where a clear land use conflict arises from the translation of the existing zone to the new zone, or where the DPE’s secondary zone translation is more relevant than the direct zone translation based on the existing land uses or desired future vision.  Where there are clear land use conflicts or zone changes identified, these are outlined in the report below. The intention of Council officers in undertaking the review is that affected property owners maintain their development potential as a result of the translation.  

 

2.   Undertake a comprehensive review of the new employment zones framework 

This will require a separate Planning Proposal to ensure the new framework is applied appropriately throughout the Penrith Local Government Area (LGA) and is the result of detailed analysis and a strong evidence base. This will involve including any relevant direction and recommendations from the recently adopted Employment Lands Strategy and undertaking a comprehensive land use audit for our employment lands within the LGA, where necessary. The benefit of this approach is that Council will then be able to engage directly with affected property owners and the community, whilst we manage the Planning Proposal process, as well as having enough time to develop appropriate local provisions and land use tables following further strategic analysis. It is likely that this work will commence in late 2022.   

 

A summary of the proposed Council-initiated key changes to Penrith LEP 2010 as a result of the translation include:  

·    Prohibiting Restricted premises and Registered clubs from the E1 Local Centre zone 

·    For existing IN2 Light Industrial lands (except for 243 Forrester Road, North St Marys), transitioning these to the new E4 General Industrial zone and converting the permissible uses that currently apply under the IN2 Light Industrial zone to these precincts/sites so that they retain these uses 

·    Applying the secondary zone translation of E3 Productivity Support to land at 243 Forrester Road, North St Marys  

·    Applying the SP4 Enterprise zone rather than the DPE proposed E3 Productivity Support to the Western Sydney University land (Werrington North and South Campus; currently zoned B7 Business Park) 

 

As summary of proposed changes made following the 7 February Councillor briefing include:  

·    A new local objective in the LEP to mitigate amenity impacts from the increased land uses to be permissible in the E1 Local Centre zone.  

·    A new local objective in the LEP that ensures Business and Office premises in the E3 Productivity Support zone maintain Council’s intended centres hierarchy. 

 

The 7 February briefing outlined that an additional local objective or local clause was being investigated for both zones. Due to time constraints, it was considered that the best approach for both zones was to add a local objective at this stage, with a local clause to support the objective investigated further in the next phase of this project 

 

An explanatory summary of these Council-initiated changes is provided as Attachment 2.  

Implementation and next steps 

As outlined in DPE’s Implementation Plan, Council’s endorsement of the draft translation is required by the end of March 2022. This report is seeking endorsement of the Return Translation Detail – Penrith LEP 2010 provided as Attachment 1.  

  

If Council endorses the proposed translation, DPE will prepare a draft State Environmental Planning Policy (SEPP) that will include all of the amendments, and publicly exhibit the SEPP in April - May 2022. Councils are not required to prepare individual Planning Proposals to amend their LEPs. The public exhibition will be wholly managed by DPE and will occur at the same time for all LGAs in NSW. It is understood that DPE is building a web platform so that communities can identify the changes and make a submission to DPE, if desired.   

 

Following exhibition, Council expects to receive a copy of the submissions received that relate to the Penrith LGA. The Implementation Plan outlines that Councils will be responsible for making the final decision on the adopted amendments, as approved by DPE. It also identifies that this is to occur between June and October 2022 so that the LEP is updated, and the zone translation is complete by the end of November 2022. On 1 December 2022, the previous Business (B) and Industrial (IN) zones will be removed from the Standard Instrument.  

 

Financial Implications

 

There are no financial implications for Council associated with this report.

Risk Implications

There are no financial implications for Council associated with this report.

Conclusion

This report outlines the Employment Zones Reform project and the translation of the Penrith LEP 2010 as proposed by DPE. Following a review of the proposed translation, there are several Council-initiated key changes proposed to Council’s employment zones framework, as outlined in this report. Council’s proposed translation of the new zoning framework was provided to DPE in the Return Translation Detail – Penrith LEP 2010 on 28 January 2022.

 

This report is seeking endorsement of the Return Translation Detail which will allow the changes to the Penrith LEP 2010 to go on exhibition. This exhibition will include all NSW Local Government Areas, be wholly managed by DPE, and scheduled to be held April - May 2022

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Employment Zones Reform - Preliminary Zone Translation for Penrith Local Environmental Plan 2010 be received

2.     The Return Translation Detail – Penrith LEP 2010 provided in Attachment 1 be endorsed and submitted to the Department of Planning and Environment as Council’s final submission.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

Return Translation Detail – Penrith LEP 2010

59 Pages

Attachments Included

2.

Summary of Council-initiated changes

10 Pages

Attachments Included

  


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                28 March 2022

 

 

 

4

Submission to the Draft Western Parkland City Blueprint and Economic Development Roadmap   

 

Compiled by:               Anne Hurni, Coordinator - Research and Policy

Authorised by:            Carlie Ryan, City Strategy Manager

Kylie Powell, Director - City Futures  

 

Outcome

We plan for our future growth

Strategy

Facilitate development in the City that considers the current and future needs of our community

Service Activity

Support and influence tri-government strategic planning in the Western Parkland City by responding to the City Deal commitments

 

Previous Items:           WPC Draft Blueprint and Economic Development Roadmap - Councillor Briefing - 07 Mar 2022      

 

Executive Summary

The purpose of this report is to seek Council endorsement of a submission to the Western Parkland City Draft Blueprint and Economic Development Roadmap, exhibited by the Western Parkland City Authority (WPCA).  

Councillors were informed of the exhibition of the Draft Blueprint and Roadmap via Memorandum on 3 December 2021. These documents are open for public comment until 31 March 2022 and Councils have been granted an extension until 28 April 2022.

 

Councillors have been briefed on the establishment of the WPCA and their work on the Draft Blueprint and Economic Development Roadmap by council staff and representatives of WPCA on previous occasions as follows:

·    3 August 2020 Councillor Briefing - Establishment of the WPCA

·    9 August 2021 Councillor Briefing - Progress briefing for the WPCA

·    7 March 2022 Councillor Briefing - Draft Blueprint and Economic Development Roadmap and draft submission.

The Blueprint and Roadmap present an opportunity to examine and address the systemic problems in infrastructure planning, funding and delivery across the region and fully realise the potential and the vision of the Western Parkland City as a green, connected and advanced metropolitan region.

 

Council’s submission outlines key issues for Council including the role and status of the Blueprint and Roadmap, the need for greater clarity around existing gaps, the need for funding to deliver the Blueprint and Roadmap, and its implications for Council’s forward planning and collaboration.  It is recommended that Council endorse the Submission (Attachment 1) to the Draft Blueprint and Economic Development Roadmap and forward a copy to WPCA by 28 April 2022.

Current Situation

The WPCA has responsibility to facilitate the delivery of the Bradfield city centre and support the growth of the Western Parkland City. It has prepared the Draft Blueprint and Economic Roadmap to guide this work.

 

The Draft Blueprint presents a vision for the Western Parkland City as a green, connected and advanced Parkland City. It provides a series of directions and priorities for Government investment and actions that are required to deliver this vision. The draft Roadmap provides an overarching strategy for how to maximise economic growth opportunities for the Western Parkland City, focusing on key industry sectors.

 

The Draft Blueprint and Roadmap were released in December 2021 and are open for public comment until 31 March 2022. An extension for council submissions has been granted until 28 April 2022.

 

A draft submission was considered at the 7 March 2022 Councillor Briefing and subsequently amended to incorporate Councillor comments around the need for committed funding to deliver the Blueprint and Roadmap. The final submission is provided at Attachment 1.

 

The Western Parkland Councils have also agreed to make a joint submission. Penrith City Council will provide the adopted submission to inform this joint submission. 

Summary of Recommendations in submission

The WPCA is seeking feedback on key areas of the Draft Blueprint and Draft Roadmap, including the role of the Blueprint and Roadmap, Delivery priorities and additional opportunities, gaps and issues. These areas form the basis of Council’s response in the draft submission as summarised below.

 

In addition, the Western Parkland Councils will respond with a joint submission.

Council’s draft submission recommends that the WPCA:

In relation to the role of the Blueprint:

·    Detail who the Blueprint represents and advocates for,

·    Explain how it fits into the strategic planning hierarchy,

·    Detail how the Blueprint links to City Deal governance and State strategic planning and budgeting processes, and

·    Detail what funding has been committed to the delivery of the Blueprint and Roadmap.

 

In relation to an approach to collaboration:

·    Recognise local government’s significant, growing cumulative resource commitments over the last decade and their forward projections (long term financial plans), and

·    Provide clarity on how the WPCA will collaborate with the eight Western Parkland City Councils in the delivery of the Blueprint and the implications for our forward planning.

 

In relation to the strategy approach:

·    Adopt a clear, robust assessment and prioritisation methodology,

·    Focus on strategic needs and opportunities, leveraging Local Strategic Planning Statements, and

·    Align strategic themes with existing plans as much as possible, and

·    Reconsider priorities which are business-as-usual activities.

 

In relation to the delivery priorities:

·    Re-evaluate priorities for geographic balance relative to the service gaps communities are enduring and forecast to endure,

·    Clarify how the Blueprint and Roadmap priorities help the Western Parkland Councils address their priorities as set out in their respective Local Strategic Planning Statements,

·    Reflect the wording of the marquee City Deal commitment to deliver the full length of North South Rail:

“investigation of integrated transport and delivery options for a full North South Rail Link from Schofields to Macarthur and a South West Rail Link to connect Leppington to the Western Sydney Airport via an interchange at the Badgerys Creek Aerotropolis.”

·    Make the road network, service and infrastructure gaps, addressing disadvantage, precinct prioritisation and greater infrastructure funding as highest priorities, and

·    Add the need for commitment to investigate major infrastructure projects such as Castlereagh Connection and Werrington Arterial Stage 2 and the need for master planning of Penrith Lakes to the Highest Priorities.

 

In relation to the Economic Development Roadmap:

·    Develop, with councils and State agencies, a co-sponsored Regional Economic Development Strategy, accounting for both region-wide and locality-specific advantages, including consideration of geographic, demographic, natural and cultural assets, and

·    Re-evaluate other sectors in light of deeper analysis of data, endowments and specialisations and private sector consultations.

 

Financial Implications

There are no financial implications for Council associated with this report.

The Submission seeks clarification on the role of WPCA in implementing the Blueprint and Roadmap. Council will be advised of any potential financial implications about the funding of the actions in the Blueprint and Economic Development Roadmap as this information is made available.

Risk Implications

If Council does not provide a submission to the Draft Blueprint and Roadmap there is a risk that WPCA will not fully understand Council concerns and priorities that have been identified in the submission. Areas of need for the Penrith community may not be equitably addressed or adequately funded leading to adverse social, economic and environmental impacts in the longer term.

Conclusion

The Blueprint and Roadmap present an opportunity to examine and address the systemic problems in infrastructure planning, funding and delivery across the region and fully realise the potential and the vision of the Western Parkland City as a green, connected and advanced metropolitan region.

 

Council’s submission outlines key issues for Council including the role and status of the Blueprint and Roadmap, the need for greater clarity around existing gaps, the need for funding to deliver the Blueprint and Roadmap, and its implications for Council’s forward planning and collaboration. 

 

A draft submission was considered by Council at the 7 March 2022 Councillor Briefing and has been amended to reflect Councillor comments around funding. It is recommended that the Submission to the Draft Blueprint and Economic Development Roadmap be endorsed and a copy be forwarded to WPCA by 28 April 2022.

The Western Parkland Councils have also agreed to make a joint submission. Penrith City Council will provide the adopted submission to inform this joint submission. 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Submission to the Draft Western Parkland City Blueprint and Economic Development Roadmap be received.

2.     The Submission to the Draft Blueprint and Economic Development Roadmap be endorsed and a copy be forwarded to WPCA by 28 April 2022.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

Penrith Submission to the Draft WPC Blueprint and Economic Development Roadmap

7 Pages

Appendix

  


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                              28 March 2022

Appendix 1 - Penrith Submission to the Draft WPC Blueprint and Economic Development Roadmap

 

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Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                28 March 2022

 

 

 

5

Draft Mamre Precinct Development Contributions Plan   

 

Compiled by:               Natalie Stanowski, Principal Planner

Authorised by:            Natasha Borgia, City Planning Manager

Kylie Powell, Director - City Futures  

 

Outcome

We plan for our future growth

Strategy

Ensure services, facilities and infrastructure meet the changing needs of our City

Service Activity

Ensure services, facilitates and infrastructure meet the needs of a growing population through the contributions framework

 

Previous Items:           Mamre Precinct Development Contributions Plans and s7.12 Plan for Non-Residential Developmen t- Councillor Briefing - 18 Oct 2021

                                      Draft Mamre Road Development Contributions Plan - Ordinary Meeting - 26 Oct 2020

                                      Development Contributions Plan for the Aerotropolis- Councillor Briefing - 17 Aug 2020

                                      Re-exhibition of Draft Mamre Precinct Development Contributions Plan - Ordinary Meeting - 22 Nov 2021    

 

Executive Summary

Council resolved at its Ordinary Meeting of 26 October 2020 to exhibit the Draft Mamre Precinct s7.11 Development Contributions Plan (Mamre Precinct CP). The Mamre Precinct CP was first publicly exhibited from 19 November 2020 to 17 December 2020. Council resolved at its meeting of 22 November to re-exhibit the Mamre Precinct CP, due to significant changes in land values, construction costs, and several other matters.

Councillors have previously been briefed on the Mamre Precinct CP at its briefings of 17 August 2020 and 18 October 2021. A Councillor memo dated 23 March 2021 was provided, summarising the submissions received during the first exhibition of the Mamre Precinct CP. A Councillor memo dated 25 October 2021 was provided, advising of a shortfall in the Mamre Precinct CP if the s7.12 plan continued to apply to the precinct.

The draft Mamre Precinct CP was publicly re-exhibited between 9 December 2021 and 27 January 2022. 14 submissions were received in relation to the exhibition. Matters raised in the submissions include equity of road inclusion, definitions for net developable area, indexation, inclusion within the plan, works and land value costings, interim uses and stormwater drainage.

As a result of submissions, some changes to the draft Mamre Precinct CP are proposed.

It is critical for the progression of development in the precinct that a contributions plan come into force without delay. It is also critical that the plan comes into force for Council to be able to deliver critical infrastructure for the Precinct. Therefore, this report seeks Council’s final endorsement for the adoption of the Mamre Precinct CP.

Background

The Mamre Road Precinct (the precinct) is located within the Western Sydney Employment Area (WSEA) and the Western Sydney Aerotropolis. The Western Sydney Aerotropolis Plan (WSAP) identified the intended planning outcomes for the precinct as a warehousing and logistics precinct, as it is connected to the proposed Western Sydney Freight Line, affected by aircraft noise and is not suitable for noise sensitive land uses. In June 2020, land within the Mamre Road Precinct was rezoned and this resulted in approximately 850 hectares of industrial land which could provide about 5,200 construction jobs and 17,000 ongoing jobs when fully developed.

 

To support the rezoning and future development outcomes of the precinct, a Development Control Plan (DCP) was prepared, exhibited and by DPE. The DCP provides detailed design controls and the intended infrastructure servicing for the precinct, including road hierarchy, and stormwater detention. The DCP enabled Council to develop a Section 7.11 development contributions plan.

 

Status of Planning & Development in Mamre Precinct

 

There is currently a large amount of developer interest in the Mamre Precinct, with market conditions driving significant interest in new industrial land. Presently there are 18-20 State Significant Development (SSD) applications lodged with DPE for industrial and warehouse development in the precinct. In addition, several pre-lodgement meetings have been held for development applications in the precinct. Council staff have been actively engaging with developers, landowners and DPE regarding infrastructure delivery.

 

The Mamre Precinct DCP was made by the Department of Planning and Environment (DPE) on 19 November 2021. 

 

To date, one SSD in the Precinct has been determined by DPE, with 1-2 other determinations pending the formalisation of the contributions framework for the precinct. It is critical that Council continues to work towards the finalisation of the contributions framework for the Precinct to provide certainty for development in respect to infrastructure provision and development contributions.

 

Currently, development in the Mamre Precinct is unable to be approved, as Clause 270 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Regulations 2000, require a contributions plan to apply to the land or a Voluntary Planning Agreement (VPA) be entered into before consent can be granted to development. It is critical for the progression of development in the precinct that a contributions plan come into force without delay. The Mamre CP is important to use as a benchmark for negotiating VPAs.

 

Notably, Council has received 5 formal letters of offer to enter into VPA to deliver infrastructure identified in the draft Mamre CP, and it is expected that more offers are to be received imminently. We are also currently in early discussions with developers for a further 2 letters of offer. Council will be separately briefed on these offers as they are being developed with the landowners.

 

Amendment to Draft Mamre Precinct Contributions Plan

 

At the Ordinary Meeting of 22 November 2021, Council considered a report on the re-exhibition of the draft Mamre Precinct CP and endorsed an amended draft Mamre Precinct CP for re-exhibition. The proposed amendments, whether considered individually or in their totality, altered the character of the plan and therefore required exhibition. Amendments were proposed for several reasons including:

-     Consistency between the contribution plan and the DCP,

-     Removal of trunk drainage from the Contributions Plan,

-     Increase in land values and works costs to reflect current market rates,

-     Removal of the plan applying to land that was previously approved for an SSD development, and

-     Other minor administrative and technical changes.

 

The draft Mamre Precinct CP was not able to be finalised until after the DCP had been approved for the Precinct, which occurred in November 2021. The re-exhibition of the plan has been reported to Council it the first opportunity.

Public Exhibitions and Submissions

The draft Mamre Precinct CP has now progressed through two rounds of public exhibitions, the details of these are set out below:

 

Initial Exhibition

 

The draft Mamre Precinct CP was first publicly exhibited from 19 November 2020 to 17 December 2020. The public exhibition was undertaken in accordance with the Environmental Planning & Assessment Act, 1979 (‘The Act’) requirements. The draft Mamre Precinct CP was made available for the public to view on Council’s Your Say page, accessed via Council’s website. The exhibition was advertised on Council’s social media pages and on Council web pages. The draft plan was also available on the Planning Portal. The draft plan was also advertised in the Western Weekender newspaper.

 

A total of 14 submissions were received during this exhibition period from a range of property owners and development firms, including the Mamre Road landowners' group. Sydney Water also made a submission. A summary of the submissions was provided to Council in a memo dated 23 March 2021. The submissions commented on a range of matters including the costs of the plan, proposed road network, drainage, open space, transitional arrangements and works in kind.

 

Council officers committed to reporting the detail of the submission from the initial exhibition in the Councillor memo dated 23 March 2021. A summary of those submissions and a response is provided in Attachment 1.

 

Re-exhibition

 

The amended draft Mamre Precinct CP was publicly exhibited from 9 December 2021 to 27 January 2022. The public exhibition was undertaken in accordance with the Environmental Planning & Assessment Act, 1979 (‘The Act’) requirements. The draft Mamre Precinct CP was made available for the public to view on Council’s Your Say page, accessed via Council’s website. The draft plan was also available on the Planning Portal. The draft plan was also advertised in the Western Weekender newspaper.

 

A total of 15 submissions were received during this exhibition period from a range of property owners and development firms, including both Mamre Road landowners' group (LOG & LOG-E) and Sydney Water. The submissions focused predominantly on the technical aspects of the Plan. A submission was also received from the landowners of 657-769 Mamre Road Kemps Creek, the site that was removed from the re-exhibited draft Mamre Precinct CP.

 

Council Officers and consultants assisting with the preparation of the plan have reviewed the submissions. A summary of the submissions and a response is provided in Attachment 2. The key matters for consideration from the re-exhibition submissions are listed below:

 

 

 

 

Matter

Response

Equity of included roads

·    The extent of collector roads proposed under the contributions plan is inequitable and unnecessary.

·    Cost for collector Roads within the CP should only be the “extra over cost” to a local industrial road or that the Collector Roads are entirely removed from the Mamre CP.

·    Developers are making a net profit from having collector roads on their land.

·    Council has not considered scheduling for the delivery of roads and infrastructure.

·    The precinct comprises land with fragmented land ownership. The orderly and efficient development of land may be impeded by some owners with longer timeframes for their developments.

·    While some collector roads will be provided by adjacent developments as works in kind (with developers able to receive contributions credits for the delivery of these roads, with the agreement of Council), it is at least as likely that there will be instances where Council may have to intervene and provide lead-in collector roads in order to open up development sites.

·    Not all landowners will have collector roads on their land, however, all landowners benefit from their delivery across the precinct.

·    Council would not be able to construct the collector road infrastructure if the plan only collected for the difference between the cost of a local road and a collector road, as this would mean that the plan only collects for a small portion of the cost of delivering the collector roads. This would inhibit Council's ability to deliver the enabling road infrastructure required to support development.

·    It is not possible to assume which collector roads will be delivered by developers as works in kind, and the exclusion of collector roads from the plan on this basis is not supported. Council has therefore included all collector roads costs in the plan.

·    Infrastructure prioritisation scheduling and this has now been included in the Plan.

Excluded Lands

Land subject to SSD 9522 should be re-introduced into the plan for equity reasons and to enable the efficient determination of development applications.

·    SSD 9522 was approved ahead of the finalisation of the DCP and Draft Mamre Precinct CP. The consent included payment of contributions under Councils s7.12 plan for non-residential development and this was not suitable for delivering any infrastructure for this precinct.

·    A key principle of consideration is assurance that the contributions plan is not in shortfall as a result of early approvals. As a result, the site was removed from the re-exhibited Draft Mamre Precinct CP.

·    Further meetings and negotiations have been undertaken with the landowners. Expert advice has also been taken, with several scenarios reviewed.

·    Inclusion of the site in the plan will create a shortfall in the plan and increase the contribution rate to other landowners, which is not considered fair and equitable. Options to include the site in the plan and negotiate a VPA on the land are not possible, without creating a shortfall risk to Council. Technical considerations include Councils inability to include roads approved by the SSD in the Plan and all SSD approved buildings could not be subject to any contributions under the Plan.

·    With consideration of Councils fiscal obligations, it is recommended that the site remain excluded from the plan and where development is proposed on the subject site, VPA’s are negotiated.

Definition of Net Developable Area (NDA)

·    Inconsistency of definition between documents.

·    Transmission easements should be excluded from NDA.

·    Definition should reflect consistency with other state policies.

·    Drainage land should be excluded from NDA.

 

·    No change is proposed to the NDA definition, however, clarifications will be made to ensure the background document and the plan are consistent.

·    Transmission easements are not to be excluded from NDA as development can still occur within this land, such as parking.

·    Drainage land is not proposed to be excluded from calculations as it is necessary to support the development and will be privately owned and maintained.

Indexation

·    The proposed index for the land, Established House Price Index (EHPI) is inappropriate.

 

 

·    Specific indexation is not limited or prescribed by legislation.

·    Specialist expert advice was sought on this matter.

CPI is not appropriate in this location, given the significant increase in land values above CPI. The EHPI is considered the most appropriate index to consider the effect of land values.

Land Valuation

Further evidence was requested on the rate for unconstrained land acquisition.

 

·    Council engaged valuers to undertake an independent valuation and assessment of land acquisition rates in the draft Mamre Precinct CP.

·    The assessment recommended Council reduce land values as follows:

Unconstrainted land from $600sqm to $575sqm.

Constrained land from $100sqm to $90sqm.

·    A copy of this report is provided in Attachment 3.

·    As a result, the overall land costs of the plan have been reduced.

Interim Uses

Where interim uses are proposed on the future intermodal site, the contributions plan should not apply.

 

·    The plan calculates contributions based on either the area of land to create a final lot for future development or the area of land to be developed for permissible uses in the IN1 General Industrial zone. This zone allows for a broad range of uses that would generate the need for the infrastructure being delivered in the Precinct.

·    These triggers provide timely cash flow which correlates with the development and use of the land and the demand for infrastructure under the plan.

·    Differentiating between an interim use and final use on the site is difficult, as this use may continue and become a final use. This could result in shortfalls in the plan.

·    The plan does enable the deferred or periodic payment of contributions to be considered by Council, should this be requested by the landowner.

 

 

Additional submission matters

 

It is noted that a submission in support of the Draft Mamre Precinct CP was provided by Mirvac and sought the timely making of the plan.

 

A submission was made by Sydney Water, requesting Council delay the making of the plan until a regional stormwater model had been determined. The DCP, prepared by DPE provides the policy position in the precinct with respect to stormwater management, requiring on lot solutions to be delivered, owned and maintained by private landowners. The draft Mamre Precinct CP must be consistent with the DPE policy position. Where this position changes, the Mamre Precinct CP can be amended.

 

A submission was submitted by the Land Owners Group (east) in respect to a range of matters, including the cost of Aldington Road. The submission provided detailed information on proposed costs to deliver Aldington Road. These costs were reviewed by Council’s consultant and additional costs have been included for the road to accommodate pavement design, traffic management and demolition considerations. This has increased the cost of Aldington Road works.

 

Proposed Amendment to finalise the draft Mamre Precinct CP

 

As a result of the submissions, the following amendments are proposed to Draft Mamre Precinct CP and the accompanying background document, as provided in Attachment 4 and 5. Amendments include:

·    Clarifying and updating the net developable area definition.

·    Reductions in land values from $600sqm to $575sqm (unconstrained) and $100sqm to $90 (unconstrained).

·    Increase the cost of road works for Aldington Road to account for more detailed information provided by LOG-E, such as pavement design, traffic management and demolition allowances.

·    Inclusion of infrastructure delivery prioritisation.

·    Minor housekeeping, mapping and typographical amendments.

 

As a result of these amendments, costs have been revised for land and works and the contribution rate per net developable area (NDA) has been determined, as outlined in the table below:

 

Infrastructure

Cost

Roads

$130,375,587

Open space & recreation

$20,904,288

Land (roads and open space)

$281,097,665

Total rate (inc. plan admin 1.5%)

$599,225

 

The proposed amendments individually or in their entirety are not considered significant or change the character of the plan. It is therefore not proposed to re-exhibit the plan further.

 

The draft plan rate has been compared against similar contributions plans for predominately industrial/employment areas across Western Sydney. The rate per net developable hectare is comparable between these plans, as seen in the table below:

 

 

 

 

 

Area

LGA

Contribution Rate

Mamre Road Precinct

Penrith

$599,225

Box Hill Industrial

The Hills

$570,500-$1,141,000

Marsden Park Industrial

Blacktown

$536,720-$762,897

Eastern Creek Stage 3

Blacktown

$245,723-$432,247

 

Notably, the Mamre precinct CP at $599,225 is lower than the average of these similar contributions plans for employment precincts.

 

Financial Implications.

Income from this plan will be factored into the current operational budgets and made available to fund the implementation of infrastructure as set out in the Mamre Precinct CP.

Risk Implications

Until the Mamre Precinct CP is adopted by Council, cl 270 of the Regulations prevents the approval of future development unless a contributions plan applies to the Mamre Precinct or a planning agreement has been entered into. This has ensured that Council will reduce any potential shortfall in development contributions.

The making of the plan will enable development within the Precinct to be approved. The plan will allow Council to be able to deliver critical infrastructure to support the Precinct.

Conclusion

The rezoning of Mamre Road Precinct in WSEA has led to a significant amount of local infrastructure needing to be delivered in order to support employment related growth. In order to deliver this infrastructure, the Mamre Precinct Development Contributions Plan was prepared.

The Mamre Precinct CP was previously exhibited 19 November 2020 to 17 December 2020. Due to the number of significant changes required, the draft Plan required amending. The amended draft Mamre Precinct CP was publicly exhibited from 9 December 2021 to 27 January 2022.

There were a number of submissions were received during the re-exhibition. As a result, it is recommended that a number of changes are made to the plan and that the plan is adopted and made by Council. The proposed changes result in a decrease in the contribution rate of the plan to $599,225.

It is recommended that Council adopt the amended draft Mamre Precinct CP, in order to secure funding and the development of critical infrastructure and enable the approval of development within the Precinct, to provide jobs close to home.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Draft Mamre Precinct Development Contributions Plan be received.

2.     Council adopt the Mamre Precinct Development Contributions Plan in Attachment 4 of this report, as amended.

3.     Council provide the General Manager delegation to amend minor typographic or mapping errors in the Plan, should they exist.

4.     The Department of Planning and Environment and submitters are informed of Council’s decision.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

Summary of submission from the first exhibition of Mamre Precinct Development Contributions Plan

11 Pages

Attachments Included

2.

Summary of submission from the re-exhibition of Mamre Precinct Contributions Plan

9 Pages

Attachments Included

3.

Review of Land Acquisition Values in the Draft Mamre Development Contributions Plan

41 Pages

Attachments Included

4.

Draft Mamre Precinct Contributions Plan (as amended)

26 Pages

Attachments Included

5.

Mamre Precinct Contributions Plan Background Study (as amended)

28 Pages

Attachments Included

   


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


 

 

Outcome 3 - We can get around the City

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

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Outcome 4 - We have safe, vibrant places

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

6        RFT21/22-21 City Park Landscape Construction                                                            53

 

7        RFT21/22-23 Parker Street Upper Amenities                                                                  57

 

8        RFT21/22-26 U3A Building Refurbishment                                                                     61

 

9        RFT21/22-25 Refurbishment of Yoorami Childcare Out of School Hours Care             65

 

 

 

 

 

 



Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                28 March 2022

 

 

 

6

RFT21/22-21 City Park Landscape Construction    

 

Compiled by:               Matthew Buckley, Major Projects Coordinator

Authorised by:            Michael Jackson, Design and Projects Manager

Brian Steffen, Director - City Services  

 

Outcome

We have safe, vibrant places

Strategy

Make our public places safe and attractive

Service Activity

Plan and deliver Council’s major capital projects for public spaces

      

 

Executive Summary

The Tender reference RFT21/22-21 City Park Landscape Construction to facilitate the construction of a new City Park, was advertised through Apet360 on 18 November 2021. The Tender closed on 28 January 2022.

This report advises the Council of the outcome of the tender evaluation process and recommends that the tender received from Regal Innovations Pty Ltd, for the amount of $8,877,807.08 (excluding GST), be accepted for the full scope of works and provisional rate services as outlined in RFT21/22-21 City Park Landscape Construction works for City Park.

Background

Penrith City Council is getting ready to transform the CBD and deliver a vibrant green space for the community to use and enjoy. The demolition and remediation of the City Park site commenced late last year and shall be completed in April 2022.

This tender called for the services of contractors with suitable experience and qualifications to undertake the construction of the new City Park site bordered by Station Street, Henry Street, Gaymark Lane and Allen Place.

City Park includes features such as amenities building (with rooftop garden, storage, plant/ pump room), new hard and soft landscaping, concrete pergolas, water features, public fountains and Public Art.

Tender Evaluation Panel

The Tender Evaluation Panel consisted of Matthew Buckley - Major Project Coordinator, David Forward - Landscape Architect, Wasique Mohyuddin - Delivery Program Manager and was chaired by Michael Jackson - Design and Projects Manager. Laura Stott from Council’s Procurement team performed the role of tender administration and probity officer for this tender.

Tender Evaluation Criteria

Tenderers were required to submit their tender using the Apet360 tendering software, which clearly defined the response required against each of the evaluation criteria.

The tenders were assessed using the advertised evaluation criteria of:

·    Business references

·    Demonstrated ability

·    Works method and program

·    Financials

·    Employment policies and details (direct labour and sub-contractors)

·    Local Business Preference

·    Quality Assurance and Environmental Management Systems

·    Work Health & Safety

·    Value for money

Summary of Tenders Received

A total of three (3) tenders were received by the closing date of the advertised tender and are listed below in price order (ex GST).

Company

Tendered Price

Company Address

Owners/Directors

Regal Innovations Pty Ltd

$8,877,807.08

Unit 2, 30 Park Road

Mulgrave NSW 2756

Robert Stanton

Statewide Civil Pty Ltd

$11,469,287.43

Unit 9/40 Brookhollow Avenue, Baulkham Hills NSW 2153

Michael Dominello

Tallai Project Group Pty Ltd

$11,627,526.00

Unit 3, 1 Ashley Street

Hornsby NSW 2077

Luke Hill

Matt Lowe

Tam Nguyen

Paul Mountney

 

All three tenders submitted were considered in detail against the weighted evaluation criteria to determine an effectiveness rating. Consideration was then given to the tenderer’s price schedules, exclusions and assumptions to determine the best value for money solution with competency in technical aspects of the tender.

Evaluation of the Preferred Tender

After all tenders were evaluated, the tender submitted by Regal Innovations Pty Ltd provided the highest effectiveness rating and was considered by the Tender Evaluation Committee to offer best overall value for money.  The recommended price is in the range expected based on pre-tender Quantity Surveyor cost estimates.

The recommended company, Regal Innovations Pty Ltd, was selected based on their:

1)   Compliance with the tender evaluation criteria

2)   Delivery design and program method,

3)   Demonstrated ability to meet Council’s requirements,

4)   Extensive experience in demolition and remediation projects,

5)   Competitive price for the services offered; and

6)   Thorough understanding of project requirements and deliverables.

Regal Innovations Pty Ltd has relevant experience with undertaking complex public domain projects of similar scale and nature working for multiple Councils across NSW.

Minor clarifications were requested from Regal Innovations Pty Ltd, prior to finalising the committee’s recommendation to provide further assurance of program delivery and price. These clarifications are factored into the tender evaluation and do not represent a risk to the project.

Financial Implications

Included in the assessment of tenders was the commissioning of independent reference checks, financial analysis, and performance analysis on Regal Innovations Pty Ltd. These checks were completed by Equifax Australasia Credit Ratings Pty Ltd. Financial Services have reviewed the financial information provided by the tenderer and have recommended security be provided, which is Council standard practice for this contract type.

Included in the 2021/22 Operational Plan is an allocation for the City Park capital works project. Additional funding is available through an external loan and the NSW Public Spaces Legacy Program grant from the Department of Planning, Industry & Environment.

The estimated maintenance and operational cost requirements for the full implementation of the City Park project is $486,000 p.a.

There is no immediate requirement for these funds as the tender only calls for the landscape construction component. Council’s future asset maintenance budgets and asset renewal programs will be adjusted as per Council’s Budget Guidelines at completion of the entire capital works project.

Tender Advisory Group Comments

The objective of the Tender Advisory Group (TAG) is to support the Council to achieve fair and equitable tender processes. The TAG, consisting of Brian Steffen - Director City Services, Adam Beggs – Acting Governance Manager and Neil Farquharson – Financial Services Manager were briefed by the Design and Projects team about the background and the process followed.

The TAG considered the recommendations in relation to the tender for the RFT21/22-21 City Park Landscape Construction, noted the recommended company has demonstrated their ability to meet Council’s requirements, their proposal is the lowest cost and considered to be the most advantageous to Council. The TAG reviewed the evaluation process outlined within the report and is satisfied that the selection criteria have been correctly applied in making the recommendations.

Risk Implications

The tender process outlined in this report includes controls regarding probity and ensuring value for Council, overseen by the Tender Advisory Group. The works will be undertaken in accordance with Work Health & Safety systems. This project will construct a new park and structures with public safety a key part of the construction methodology and project plan.

Conclusion

All three tenders received were assessed against the evaluation criteria. Regal Innovations Pty Ltd provided the best price that also meet the tender evaluation criteria to undertake the project. It is recommended that the proposal and lump sum price from Regal Innovations Pty Ltd, for the amount of $8,877,807.08 (excluding GST) be accepted for RFT21/22-21 City Park Landscape Construction.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on RFT21/22-21 City Park Landscape Construction be received

2.     The tender from Regal Innovations Pty Ltd, for the amount of $8,877,807.08 (excluding GST) be accepted for RFT21/22-21 City Park Landscape Construction.

3.     The General Manager (or their delegate) be authorised to sign all necessary legal documents in relation to this matter.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                28 March 2022

 

 

 

7

RFT21/22-23 Parker Street Upper Amenities   

 

Compiled by:               Mitchell Sammut, Project Supervisor

Authorised by:            Michael Jackson, Design and Projects Manager

Brian Steffen, Director - City Services  

 

Outcome

We have safe, vibrant places

Strategy

Make our public places safe and attractive

Service Activity

Implement the Building Asset Renewal Program

      

 

Executive Summary

A tender for the demolition and construction of a new Parker Street Upper Amenities Building was advertised on 10 January 2022 on Apet360 and e-tendering websites and closed on Wednesday 9 February 2022.

This report advises Council of the outcome of the tender process and recommends that the tender from 2020 Projects Pty Ltd, for the amount of $2,539,896 (excluding GST) be accepted for demolition and construction of a new Parker Street Upper Amenities Building, Penrith.

Background

The current sporting amenities building at Upper Parker Street Fields, Penrith is beyond its useful lifecycle and is required to be replaced. Architectural drawings and specifications were produced for a new building to meet the current and future sporting users’ site requirements, standards and codes. Funding for the project is through Council’s Building Asset Renewal Program and the New South Wales Government’s 2019 Sport Election Commitment Program.

The tender called for the services of building contractors with experience in sporting amenities or other community facilities projects to demolish and construct a new amenities building. The new amenities include construction and installation of; canteen, cool room, canteen storeroom, storerooms, office room, referees’ room, four changerooms and male, female and accessible toilets (including provision for future change facilities) to current contemporary standards.

Tender Evaluation Panel

The Tender Evaluation Panel consisted of Projects Administrator Daniela Vecchio, Project Supervisor Mitchell Sammut and was chaired by Delivery Program Manager Wasique Mohyuddin. Allyce Langton from Council’s Procurement team performed the role of tender administration and probity officer for this tender.

Tender Evaluation Criteria

Tenderers for the project were required to submit their tender using the Apet360 tendering software, which clearly defined the response required against each of the evaluation criteria.

The tenders received were assessed using the advertised evaluation criteria of:

•        Company Profile

•        Conformance, Acceptance and Declaration

•        Business References

•        Completion of Forms Tender Price submitted

•        Compliance Statement

•        Demonstrated Ability

•        Works Method and Program

•        Local Business Preference

•        Financials

•        Employment Policies

•        Quality Assurance Systems

•        Environmental Management Systems

•        Work Health and Safety

Summary of Tenders Received

A total of six (6) tenders were received by the closing date of the advertised tender and are listed below in price order (ex GST).

Company

Tendered Price

Company Address

Owners/Directors

Coverit Building Group Pty Ltd

$2,063,548.00

Unit 18 37/47 Borec Road, Penrith NSW 2750

Shane Comans

Cranebrook Constructions

$2,444,097.00

97 Taylor Road, Cranebrook

Phil McNamara

Vbuilt Construction Group Pty Ltd

$2,445,288.26

6/74-76 Burwood Rd, Burwood NSW 2134

Cameron Alderman

2020 Projects Pty Ltd

$2,539,896.00

L14, 275 Alfred St NORTH SYDNEY NSW 2060

Joseph Peter Touma

AMA Projects Pty Ltd

$2,888,315.00

Level 2, 205 Clarence St, Sydney NSW 2000

Matthew Ferrari

Rogers Construction Group Pty Ltd

$3,222,258.00

Suite 306, 2-8 Brookhollow Avenue, Norwest NSW 2153

Mitchell Rogers
Ben Kavo

 

Evaluation of the Preferred Tender

At the Ordinary meeting held on 21 February 2022 Council awarded three construction projects totalling $3,790,820 to the Coverit Building Group. Coverit Building Group also holds the current tender with Council for Building Maintenance and Construction Works. It was recommended considering the amount of works the company had allocated from Council that the tender submitted by Coverit Building Group be excluded from further consideration on this occasion.

The remaining five tenders were assessed against the evaluation criteria.

Cranebrook Constructions didn’t score highly on the assessment criteria relative to other tenderers with similar prices. The assessment criteria required a more detailed submission given the level of complexity of the project. Therefore, overall the Cranebrook Constructions tender didn’t offer Council the best value despite the lower price.

VBuilt Construction Group Pty Ltd scored highly in effectiveness ranking but reference and financial checks identified that it is a relatively new corporate entity and was unable to demonstrate the capacity of this entity, as opposed to the extensive prior experience of the individual staff.

On assessment of the remaining tenders, the panel determined that 2020 Projects Pty Ltd’s submission provided the best overall value to Council based on price and responses to the assessment criteria, clearly demonstrating their suitability to undertake the project.

2020 Projects Pty Ltd submission provided several relevant examples of sporting amenities and community facilities building construction projects as part of their submission they had delivered including;

•        Parramatta City Council - Curtis Oval Pavilion - Construction of a new sports pavilion in Curtis Oval, total project value $2,387,000

•        Bayside Council - Scarborough Park & Tonbridge Reserve Sporting Amenities -Construction of two amenities blocks in Tonbridge Reserve & Scarborough Park, total project value $3,410,000

•        Parramatta City Council - Somerville Park Amenities - Construction of a new amenities block with associated landscaping works in Somerville Park, total project value $1,485,000

•        Bayside Council - Peter Depena Reserve Amenities Construction of an amenities building in Peter Depena Reserve, total project value $1,320,000

The recommended company, 2020 Projects Pty Ltd was selected based on their:

1.   Compliance with the tender evaluation criteria,

2.   Demonstrated ability to meet Council’s requirements; and

3.   Competitive price for the services offered.

The pricing from 2020 Projects Pty Ltd is in a range consistent with the market as evidenced by the similar pricing from both Cranebook Constructions and VBuilt.  The escalation of market prices is becoming evident in recent tenders and budgets will be reviewed by the Assets team for future projects.

Financial Implications

Included in the assessment of tenders was the commissioning of independent reference checks, financial analysis, and performance analysis on 2020 Projects Pty Ltd. These checks were completed by Equifax Australasia Credit Ratings Pty Ltd.  Financial Services have reviewed the financial information provided by the tenderer and have not identified any reason why the contract should not be awarded.

Included in the adopted Sports and Recreation Plan is funding for the new Parker Street Upper Amenities building. The recommended tender cost is within budget and includes an allocation under the New South Wales Government’s 2019 Sport Election Commitment Program and Council’s Building Asset Renewal Program.

 

The estimated maintenance and operational requirements of $71,000 p.a. for the new building will be reflected in Council’s future asset maintenance budgets and accounted for in the asset renewal programs as per Council’s Budget Guidelines.

 

Tender Advisory Group Comments

The objective of the Tender Advisory Group (TAG) is to support the Council to achieve fair and equitable tender processes. The TAG, consisting of Brian Steffen - Director City Services, Adam Beggs – Acting Governance Manager and Neil Farquharson – Financial Services Manager were briefed by the Design and Projects team about the background and the process followed.

The TAG considered the recommendations in relation to the tender RFT21/22-23 Parker Street Upper Amenities noting that, while the recommended tender was not the lowest price, the company has demonstrated their ability to meet Council’s requirements and their proposal was considered to be the most advantageous to Council for the scale of this project.  The TAG reviewed the evaluation process outlined within the report and is satisfied that the selection criteria have been correctly applied in making the recommendations.

Risk Implications

The tender process outlined in this report includes controls regarding probity and ensuring value for Council, overseen by the Tender Advisory Group. The works will be undertaken in accordance with Work Health & Safety systems. This project will replace the existing amenities with public safety a key part of the construction methodology and project plan.

Conclusion

Six tenders were assessed against the evaluation criteria. 2020 Projects Pty Ltd provided the best price that also met the tender evaluation criteria to undertake the project. It is recommended that the proposal and lump sum price from 2020 Projects Pty Ltd, for the amount of $2,539,896 (excluding GST) be accepted for Construction of Parker Street Upper Amenities, Penrith.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on RFT21/22-23 Parker Street Upper Amenities be received

2.     The tender from 2020 Projects Pty Ltd, for the amount of $2,539,896 (excluding GST) be accepted for Parker Street Upper Amenities, Penrith.

3.     The General Manager (or their delegate) be authorised to sign all necessary legal documents in relation to this matter.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                28 March 2022

 

 

 

8

RFT21/22-26 U3A Building Refurbishment   

 

Compiled by:               Wasique Mohyuddin, Major Projects Coordinator

Greg Bretherton, Project Supervisor

Authorised by:            Brian Steffen, Director - City Services

Michael Jackson, Design and Projects Manager  

 

Outcome

We have safe, vibrant places

Strategy

Make our public places safe and attractive

Service Activity

Implement the Building Asset Renewal Program

      

 

Executive Summary

A Tender for the refurbishment of the Council owned U3A Building, 7 Castlereagh Street Penrith (formerly the Penrith School of Arts) was advertised on the APET 360 E-tender portal on 20 January 2022 as well as on Council’s website. The tender closed on 23 February 2022

This report advises Council of the outcome of the tender process and recommends that the tender from AWS Sydney Pty Ltd for the full scope of works outlined in RFT21/22-26 U3A Building Refurbishment is accepted in the amount of $343,987.50 ex GST.

Background

Penrith City Council has allocated funding for the refurbishment of a number of Community Buildings in its 20/21 Asset Renewal Program (ARP). The U3A building is one of several centres identified as requiring significant refurbishment for the 20/21 financial year.

Work at this site features the following;

• Access improvements – new access stairs at the rear of the building, improved accessible bathroom facilities and improvements to carparking and the footpath linking the carpark to the main entry points of the building

• Refurbishment and upgrade of the existing bathroom facilities to current codes and standards including full accessibility. Note that due to heritage issues and existing building design, provision for an adult change facility will not be able to be achieved as part of this work.

• Improvements to security, lighting and power, including upgrade existing services up to current codes

• Heritage sensitive internal repairs including previous water damage and internal cracking repairs and associated paintwork and new door hardware (access compliant)

• Heritage sensitive external refurbishment work including roof repairs and repainting, repairs to the façade and new external paintwork

• Asbestos removal - all existing asbestos material on site to be removed and replaced.

Given the significant use of this building by the community, particularly by senior citizens, refurbishment work will make the centre more user friendly enabling current groups to operate in a safe and compliant environment. The heritage significance of this building is also an important factor and the proposed refurbishment work has been designed to maintain and preserve the building for many years to come.

Responding parties were required to submit their tender on a standard pro forma sheet which clearly defined the response required against each of the evaluation criteria.

Tender Evaluation Process

The Tender Evaluation Committee consisted of Rosemarie Canales – Design Supervisor, Design and Projects, Greg Bretherton - Project Supervisor and was chaired by Wasique Mohyuddin - Delivery Program Manager, Design and Projects. Allyce Langton from Council’s Procurement team performed the role of tender administration and probity officer for this tender.

The evaluation criteria advertised and used in assessing the tenders received included the following:

•        Business References

•        Demonstrated Ability

•        Works Method and Program

•        Financials

•        Employment Policies and details (Direct labour and Sub Contractors)

•        Support of Local Businesses within the Penrith LGA - Suppliers and Contractors

•        Quality Assurance Systems

•        Environmental Management Systems

•        Work Health & Safety

Initial Tender Review

A full listing of the tenders received is detailed below in price order (ex GST).

Company

Tendered Price

Company Location

Directors

AWS Sydney Pty Ltd t/a AWS Services

$343,987.50

7/2 Bolton St, Sydenham NSW

Carlos Abreu

Vertex Group Australia Pty Ltd

$434,172.75

Level 1, 27 Dell St, Woodpark NSW

Anthony Elmargi, William Abuali, Martin Hoang

Buildpark Homes Pty Ltd

$509,319.36

Level 3, 565 High St, Penrith NSW

Michael Green

Perfect Remediation Pty Ltd t/a Perfect Remediation & Refurbishment

$526,224.40

Unit 4/8 Lillian Fowler Pl, Marrickville NSW

Mateuz Jedruszek

AMA Projects Pty Ltd

$545,066.00

Level 2, 205 Clarence St, Sydney

Matthew Ferrari,
Alex Singer,
Andrew Peereboom

All five tenders received and noted above were considered for initial assessment and were evaluated using Apet360 software to provide a ranking for conformance with the evaluation criteria. 

Evaluation of the Preferred Tender

Following an initial assessment, the tender from AWS Sydney Pty Ltd was considered by the Tender Evaluation Committee to best fulfil Council’s proposal based on this company’s tender responses and in particular their experience with similar sized local government projects recently completed for various councils in Victoria. This was also the lowest priced tender and the best ranked tender overall when taking into account all of the evaluation criteria.

The recommended company, AWS Sydney Pty Ltd was selected based on their:

1)      Compliance with the tender evaluation criteria,

2)      Demonstrated ability to meet Council’s requirements; and

3)      Competitive price for the services offered.

The Tender Evaluation Committee thoroughly reviewed the information provided pertaining to past experience of the proposed tenderer and conducted reference checks which were positive. 

Recommended Tenderer

AWS Sydney Pty Ltd is a mid-sized building company operating from offices in Sydenham, Sydney. The company has experience across a range of local government construction projects (specifically in Victoria) including childcare, sport and recreation facilities, accessibility compliance work and heritage restoration projects which are comparable in size and scope to the U3A refurbishment. The company’s services and activities are controlled by documented management systems to meet Safety, Quality and Environmental regulatory requirements. These systems are externally ISO accredited and operate within industry guidelines for quality, environmental and WHS management and meet the necessary standards for Council projects. 

Financial Implications

Included in the assessment of tenders was the commissioning of independent reference checks, financial analysis, and performance analysis of the AWS Sydney Pty Ltd. These checks were completed by Equifax Australasia Credit Ratings Pty Ltd.  Financial Services have reviewed the financial information provided by the tenderer and have not identified any reason why the contract should not be awarded. The report recommends acceptance of the tender by AWS Sydney Pty Ltd, with sufficient funds being available.

The 2021/22 Operational Plan has a sufficient budget allocation for the refurbishment of the U3A building under Council’s Building Asset Renewal Program.

The estimated maintenance and operational requirements of $9,000 p.a. for the new building will be reflected in Council’s future asset maintenance budgets and accounted for in the asset renewal programs as per Council’s Budget Guidelines.

Tender Advisory Group (TAG) Comment

The objective of the Tender Advisory Group (TAG) is to support the Council to achieve fair and equitable tender processes. The TAG, consisting of Brian Steffen - Director City Services, Adam Beggs – Acting Governance Manager and Neil Farquharson – Financial Services Manager were briefed by the Design & Projects team about the background and the process followed.

The TAG considered the recommendations in relation to the tender for the refurbishment of the U3A Building. The group considered that AWS Sydney Pty Ltd has demonstrated their ability to meet Council’s requirements and their proposal was considered to be the most advantageous to Council. The TAG reviewed the evaluation process outlined within the report and is satisfied that the selection criteria have been correctly applied in making the recommendations.

Risk Implications

The tender process outlined in this report includes controls regarding probity and ensuring value for Council, overseen by the Tender Advisory Group. The works will be undertaken in accordance with Work Health & Safety systems.

Conclusion

The Tender Evaluation Committee is of the opinion that AWS Sydney Pty Ltd provided the most advantageous tender and it is recommended that the Company be awarded the contract for a sum of $343,987.50 ex GST.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on RFT21/22-26 U3A Building Refurbishment be received

2.     AWS Sydney Pty Ltd be awarded the Contract subject to the execution of a formal agreement for the refurbishment works to U3A Building for the amount of $343,987.50 excluding GST.

3.     The General Manager (or their delegate) be authorised to sign all necessary legal documents in relation to this matter

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                28 March 2022

 

 

 

9

RFT21/22-25 Refurbishment of Yoorami Childcare Out of School Hours Care   

 

Compiled by:               Wasique Mohyuddin, Major Projects Coordinator

Greg Bretherton, Project Supervisor

Authorised by:            Michael Jackson, Design and Projects Manager

Brian Steffen, Director - City Services  

 

Outcome

We have safe, vibrant places

Strategy

Make our public places safe and attractive

Service Activity

Implement the Building Asset Renewal Program

      

 

Executive Summary

A Tender for the refurbishment of the Council owned Yoorami Childcare Out of School hours care (OOSH) building was advertised on the APET 360 E-tender portal on 13 January 2022 as well as Council’s website. The tender closed on 9 February 2022.

This report advises Council of the outcome of the tender process and recommends that the tender from Cranebrook Constructions for the full scope of works outlined in RFT21/22-25  Yoorami OOSH Refurbishment is accepted in the amount of $308,398 ex GST.

Background

Penrith City Council has allocated funding for the refurbishment of a number of Childcare centres in its 20/21 Asset Renewal Program (ARP) in conjunction with Council’s Children’s Services department. Yoorami OOSH is one of two centres identified as requiring significant refurbishment for the 20/21 financial year.

Work at this site features the following;

• Access improvements – new access ramp at the rear of the building, improved accessible bathroom facilities and improvements to the main paths of travel within the building.

• Refurbishment of the existing bathroom facilities

• Re-design and improvements to staff and children’s facilities, play and preparation areas, storeroom and under cover veranda improvements

• Kitchen refurbishment to meet current food preparation standards

• Upgrades to existing Air Conditioning systems

• Improvements to security, lighting and power (including bringing existing services up to current codes)

• General ‘cosmetic’ work including internal and external painting, roof and gutter repairs, new flooring, repairs to existing joinery, new door hardware, and security screens.

Given the competitive nature of the childcare industry, refurbishment works will raise the profile of these centres and encourage ongoing and increased enrolments, which in-turn provides an income for Council.

Responding parties were required to submit their tender on a standard pro forma sheet which clearly defined the response required against each of the evaluation criteria.

Tender Evaluation Process

The Tender Evaluation Committee consisted of Deone White – Business Manager for Children’s Services, Greg Bretherton - Project Supervisor and was chaired by Wasique Mohyuddin - Delivery Program Manager, Design and Projects. Allyce Langton from Council’s Procurement team performed the role of tender administration and probity officer for this tender.

The evaluation criteria advertised and used in assessing the tenders received included the following:

•        Business References

•        Demonstrated Ability

•        Works Method and Program

•        Financials

•        Employment Policies and details (Direct labour and Sub Contractors)

•        Support of Local Businesses within the Penrith LGA - Suppliers and Contractors

•        Quality Assurance Systems

•        Environmental Management Systems

•        Work Health & Safety

Initial Tender Review

A full listing of the tenders received is detailed below in price order (ex GST).

Company

Tendered Price

Company Location

Contact

Vbuilt Construction Group Pty Ltd     

$280,420.00

6/74-76 Burwood Rd Burwood NSW

Cameron Alderman
Andrew Erakleous

Cranebrook Constructions

$308,398.00

97 Taylor Rd Cranebrook NSW

Phil McNamara

Versabuild Pty Ltd

$346,000.00

Shop 6
1822 The Horsley Dr
Horsley Park NSW

Tony Trimbole, Gaetano Belardo

Buildpark Homes Pty Ltd

$391,735.80

Level 3, 565 High St Penrith NSW

Michael Green

Rogers Construction Group Pty Ltd

$397,157.20

Suite 306, 2-8 Brookhollow Ave Norwest NSW

Mitchell Rogers

AWS Sydney Pty Ltd T/A Aws Services

$402,010.87

7/2 Bolton St
Sydenham NSW

Carlos Abreu

Perfect Remediation Pty Ltd

$411,200.60

Unit 4/8 Lillian Fowler Place
Marrickville NSW

Mateusz Jedruszek

2020 Projects Pty Ltd

$413,595.00

L14, 275 Alfred St North Sydney NSW

Joseph Touma

MBR Building & Maintenance

$455,671.00

3/8 Carhullen St
Merrylands NSW

Matthew Rostami

The five (5) lowest priced tenders were considered for initial assessment and were evaluated using Apet360 software to provide a ranking for conformance with the evaluation criteria.  Tenders evaluated were the submissions from the VBuillt Constructions Group Pty Ltd, Cranebrook Constructions, Versabuild Pty Ltd, Buildpark Homes Pty Ltd and Rogers Construction Group Pty Ltd.

VBuilt Construction Group Pty Ltd score highly in effectiveness ranking but reference and financial checks identified that it is a relatively new corporate entity and was unable to demonstrate the capacity of this entity, as opposed to the extensive prior experience of the individual staff.

The remaining tenders were not considered for evaluation as their tender price fell into a range not allowed for in Council’s budget and five competitively priced tenders were deemed sufficient for this project.

Evaluation of the Preferred Tender

Following an initial assessment, the tender from Cranebrook Constructions was considered by the Tender Evaluation Committee to best fulfil Council’s proposal based on this company’s tender responses and in particular their experience with similar sized local government projects including some previous successful projects with Penrith City Council.  Although not the lowest priced, they were considered to offer the best tender overall when taking into account all of the evaluation criteria including building references and demonstrated ability.

The recommended company, Cranebrook Constructions was selected based on their:

1)      Compliance with the tender evaluation criteria,

2)      Demonstrated ability to meet Council’s requirements; and

3)      Competitive price for the services offered.

The Tender Evaluation Committee thoroughly reviewed the information provided pertaining to past experience of the proposed tenderer and conducted reference checks which were positive. 

Recommended Tenderer

Cranebrook Constructions are a small to mid-sized family-owned business operating from Cranebrook in the Penrith LGA. The company has had exposure to various local and state government projects of a similar size and value to the Yoorami OOSH refurbishment project.  Recent works have included projects for NSW Health and National Parks along with community building refurbishments and sporting and public amenities for various councils including Penrith. The company’s services and activities are controlled by documented management systems which meet Safety, Quality and Environmental regulatory requirements.

Financial Implications

Included in the assessment of tenders was the commissioning of independent reference checks, financial analysis, and performance analysis of Cranebrook Constructions. These checks were completed by Equifax Australasia Credit Ratings Pty Ltd. Financial Services have reviewed the financial information provided by the tenderer and have not identified any reason why the contract should not be awarded. The report recommends acceptance of the tender by Cranebrook Constructions, with sufficient funds being available.

The 2021/22 Operational Plan has a sufficient budget allocation for the refurbishment of Yoorami Childcare OOSH building under Council’s Building Asset Renewal Program.

The estimated maintenance and operational requirements of $8,000 p.a. for the new building will be reflected in Council’s future asset maintenance budgets and accounted for in the asset renewal programs as per Council’s Budget Guidelines.

Tender Advisory Group (TAG) Comment

The objective of the Tender Advisory Group (TAG) is to support the Council to achieve fair and equitable tender processes. The TAG, consisting of Brian Steffen - Director City Services, Adam Beggs – Acting Governance Manager and Neil Farquharson – Financial Services Manager were briefed by the Design & Projects team about the background and the process followed.

The TAG considered the recommendations in relation to the tender for the refurbishment of the Yoorami OOSH building. The group considered that Cranebrook Constructions has demonstrated their ability to meet Council’s requirements and their proposal was considered to be the most advantageous to Council. The TAG reviewed the evaluation process outlined within the report and is satisfied that the selection criteria have been correctly applied in making the recommendations.

Risk Implications

The tender process outlined in this report includes controls regarding probity and ensuring value for Council, overseen by the Tender Advisory Group. The works will be undertaken in accordance with Work Health & Safety systems.

Conclusion

The Tender Evaluation Committee is of the opinion that Cranebrook Constructions provided the most advantageous tender and it is recommended that the Company be awarded the contract for a sum of $308,398 ex GST.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on RFT21/22-25 Refurbishment of Yoorami Childcare Out of School Hours Care be received

2.     Cranebrook Constructions be awarded the Contract subject to the execution of a formal agreement for the refurbishment works of Yoorami Childcare Out of School Hours Care for the amount of $308,398 excluding GST.

3.     The General Manager (or their delegate) be authorised to sign all necessary legal documents in relation to this matter.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.  


Outcome 5 - We care about our environment

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

10      Acceptance of Grant Funding Offer - NSW Floodplain Management Program 2021/22   71

 

11      Acceptance of Grant Funding – Crown Reserves Improvement Fund 2021-2022         74

 

 

 

 



Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                28 March 2022

 

 

 

10

Acceptance of Grant Funding Offer - NSW Floodplain Management Program 2021/22   

 

Compiled by:               Mylvaganam Senthilvasan, Floodplain Engineering Coordinator

Authorised by:            Adam Wilkinson, Engineering Services Manager

Andrew Jackson, Director - Development and Regulatory Services  

 

Outcome

We care for our environment

Strategy

Minimise risks to our community from natural disasters and a changing climate

Service Activity

Manage the risk to and impact on life and property from the existing and potential future use of the floodplain

      

 

Executive Summary

The purpose of this report is for Council to consider an offer of grant funding towards three floodplain management initiatives. The report recommends the acceptance of grant funding being offered by the NSW Government under its Floodplain Management Program 2021/22 for undertaking a floodplain risk management study and a flood study and to prepare detailed designs of a flood mitigation of work.

Background

The NSW Government’s Flood Prone Land Policy states that the management of flood prone land is primarily the responsibility of Councils. To facilitate this, the State Government has published the Floodplain Development Manual, April 2005 to provide guidance to Councils in the implementation of the Policy. The State Government also provides financial assistance and technical support to local Councils for managing their floodplains.

Floodplain Risk Management Studies and Plans for various catchment areas within the Penrith Local Government Area (LGA) will be required to effectively manage Council’s floodplains. To effectively manage the multitude of studies across the LGA, catchment areas have been prioritised to undertake studies and to develop floodplain risk management plans.

Over the last seven years Council completed nine (9) flood studies covering almost the entire urban areas located within the LGA including flood studies for South Creek and Nepean River. In addition to this, five (5) floodplain risk management plans were completed and adopted.  The flood mitigation measures recommended in these management plans are now listed for consideration for applying to future grant funds and to allocating Council’s funds for the implementation on a priority basis.

In February 2021, the NSW Government invited grant funding applications to be considered under the 2021/22 NSW Floodplain Management Program. Council submitted six (6) applications for the following projects:

a)   Emu Plains Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan;

b)   Rickabys Creek Catchment Flood Study;

c)   Oxley Park levee –Investigation and Detailed Design;

d)   Eighth Avenue Bridge Boom Gate;

e)   St Marys Stormwater Drainage Upgrade – Investigation and Design; and

f)    South Creek Stream Gauge.

The NSW Department of Planning and Environment (DPE) manages the grant funding, and has recently advised Council that the following three projects have been approved for funding under the NSW 2021/22 Floodplain Management Program.

a)   Emu Plains Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan;

b)   Rickabys Creek Catchment Flood Study; and

c)   Oxley Park levee – Investigation and Detailed Design

The remaining three projects were unsuccessful for funding under the 2021/22 funding program however these projects will be considered for the future grant funding applications.

Grant Funding Offered

The condition of the funding offers (Attachments 1, 2 and 3) is that the offers must be accepted, and the funding agreements signed and returned before 30 March 2022 and that the projects must be completed prior to 28 February 2025; except the Oxley Park Levee- Investigation and Detailed Design that must be completed prior to 28 March 2024.

The funding offers for flood related projects are based on a $2(State): $1(Council) funding ratio as detailed in the Table 1 below.

Table 1: Grant Funding Offers

No.

Project Description

Estimated Project Cost

$

Grant Funding Offer

$

Council’s Contribution Required ($)

a.

Emu Plain Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan

355,995

237,330

118,665

b.

Rickabys Creek Catchment Flood Study

329,003

219,335

109,668

c.

Oxley Park levee - Investigation and Detailed Design

150,000

100,000

50,000

 

TOTAL

834,998

556,665

278,333

 

Financial Implications

Acceptance of the grant funding outlined in this report requires Council to provide matching funds at a ratio of 2:1. Matching funds for these projects are available within the budget allocations for Flood Studies which is funded from the Stormwater Management Service Charge.

Conclusion

The NSW Government has offered grant funding to undertake a Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan, to undertake a detailed flood study, and to prepare detailed designs of flood mitigation of works. These three projects continue to deliver upon Council’s Floodplain Management Program and works towards ensuring we provide sound floodplain management across our various catchments.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Acceptance of Grant Funding Offer - NSW Floodplain Management Program 2021/22 be received

2.     Council accept the grant funding offers from the NSW Government for the following studies:

a.   Emu Plains Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan - $237,330;

b.   Rickabys Creek Catchment Flood Study - $219,335; and

c.   Oxley Park levee - Investigation and Detailed Design - $100,000.

3.     Council write to Local Members and the Department of Planning and Environment, expressing appreciation of their continued support and funding towards Council’s Floodplain Management programs.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

Emu Plains Floodplain Risk Management Study and Plan - Funding Offer and Agreement

13 Pages

Attachments Included

2.

Rickabys Creek Flood Study - Funding Offer and Agreement

13 Pages

Attachments Included

3.

Oxley Park Levee - Funding Offer and Agreement

13 Pages

Attachments Included

  


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                28 March 2022

 

 

 

11

Acceptance of Grant Funding – Crown Reserves Improvement Fund 2021-2022   

 

Compiled by:               Justine Vella, Bushland Management Coordinator

Authorised by:            John Gordon, City Presentation Manager

Brian Steffen, Director - City Services  

 

Outcome

We care for our environment

Strategy

Protect and improve the environment of our City

Service Activity

Deliver programs that help improve our City’s natural environment, including significant native roadside vegetation

      

 

Executive Summary

This report provides information on the outcome of a grant application that was submitted by Council’s Bushland Management Coordinator, to the NSW Department of Planning and Environment’s Crown Reserves Improvement Fund Program for the control of weeds at McCanns Island in Emu Heights.

The application was successful and funded works are scheduled to commence once endorsed by Council and funding is received.

The report recommends that Council accept the funding of $57,845 from the NSW Department of Planning and Environment to implement the program.

Background

The project will see the undertaking of primary weed control along the Nepean River at McCanns Island, otherwise known as Emu Green Reserve. Following the 2021/22 devastating floods the grant funding will be used to utilise natural materials to construct elements of river habitat restoration and install erosion controls for riverbank stabilisation. The material for the restoration works has been repurposed from the Northern Road upgrade works in 2019-2020 and includes rock, logs and root balls and will be used to create habitat for native species.

Aligning with Council’s bushland management program, this project will enhance the preservation of our natural bushland areas as well as providing opportunities for resident participation and increasing education and awareness through Council’s Bushcare Program.

Current Situation

Grant Program

The Crown Reserves Improvement Fund Program (CRIF) provides financial support for the development, maintenance and protection of Crown reserves. More than $200 million has been allocated by the NSW Government through the CRIF over the last 11 years. This funding has supported important initiatives such as the maintenance of showgrounds and community halls, the improvement of local parks, reserves and caravan parks, and eradication of pests and weeds.

Key objectives of the CRIF include:

 

maintain and develop recreational and tourism facilities on public reserves for community use and enjoyment, and to support new tourism opportunities.

• manage and renovate infrastructure and other assets on public reserves to optimise value to the community and comply with regulatory obligations, in particular to ensure public safety and work health and safety is maintained on Crown reserves.

• enhance environmental assets by supporting conservation initiatives, bushfire management and invasive species (pest and weed) control on public reserves

• support the important role that volunteers play in the ongoing management of Crown land.

• to assist in building resilience and restoring community amenity following adverse events (e.g. public health closures, bushfire, floods, drought)

Financial Implications

As there is no requirement for Council to provide matching funding there are no financial implications for Council associated with this report.

Risk Implications

Should participation numbers in the education program be low, it is unlikely that Council would be able to secure funding for similar programs in future grant rounds.

Catastrophic events and environmental impacts occurring at the site may result is future variations to the project and to the future management of the site.

Conclusion

Council’s Bushland Management Coordinator (City Presentation Department) was successful in applying for grant funds to control of weeds at McCanns Island in Emu Heights, over the next 12 months. This project is supported by the following community groups; Bass Sydney Fishing Club and OzFish Unlimited and is also supported by Greater Sydney Local Land Services and Hawkesbury River County Council.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Acceptance of Grant Funding – Crown Reserves Improvement Fund 2021-2022 be received

2.     Council accept the offer of grant funding of $57,845 from the NSW Department of Planning and Environment for weed control at McCanns Island, Emu Heights.

3.     The General Manager (or their delegate) be authorised to sign all necessary legal documents in relation to this matter.

4.     Council write to relevant State Members thanking them for their funding and support towards delivering community engagement initiatives around bushland management.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.  


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


Outcome 6 - We are healthy and share strong community spirit

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

12      Public Exhibition Draft Disability Inclusion Action Plan 2022-2026                                 79

 

13      Multicultural Working Party Terms of Reference and Community Members                  87

 

14      Requests for Community Events Sponsorship - Cancer Council NSW & TRT Running 94

 

15      Grant Success - NSW Government Open Space Program - Places to Play (Pilot), Gipps Street Youth Precinct                                                                                                       97

 

16      Nepean Avenue Shared Path - Community Consultation Results                                100

 

17      RFT21/22-14 Hickeys Lane Amenities Building Construction - Amended                    106

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                28 March 2022

 

 

 

12

 Public Exhibition Draft Disability Inclusion Action Plan 2022-2026   

 

Compiled by:               Marcela Hart, Community Capacity Lead

Natalie Wadwell, Community Capacity Officer

Allison Kyriakakis, Community Safety Team Lead

Authorised by:            Megan Whittaker, City Activation, Community and Place Manager

Jeni Pollard, Manager - City Resilience

Kylie Powell, Director - City Futures  

 

Outcome

We are healthy and share strong community spirit

Strategy

Provide opportunities for our community to be healthy and active

Service Activity

Deliver programs and work with government and community organisations to improve the capacity and social wellbeing of the community

      

 

Previous Items: Proposed Disability Inclusion Action Plan 2020 – 2026   Engagement Plan – Council Ordinary Meeting – 16 July 2021

 

Executive Summary

This report seeks Council endorsement for the public exhibition of the Draft Disability Inclusion Action Plan 2022-2026.

Inspired by our community, Council is proud to lead the way in ensuring inclusion and access for all people living in, working in or visiting Penrith. We all benefit and are stronger when we live in a community that values inclusion.

 

The Draft Disability Inclusion Action Plan 2022 – 2026 (DIAP or The Plan) outlines Council’s priorities for the next four years to support equity and inclusion across our City. The Plan acknowledges and aims to remove the barriers often faced by people with disability to lead an independent and meaningful life and participate fully in our community.

 

This Draft DIAP was developed based on information gleaned through formal community engagement that took place in November and December 2021. A comprehensive summary of the engagement approach and outcomes can be found in the Disability Inclusion Action Plan 2022-2026 - Engagement Outcomes Report (Attachment 1).

 

This report recommends that the Draft Disability Inclusion Action Plan 2022-2026 (Attachment 2) be received and endorsed for public exhibition for a 28 day period from 11 April – 10 May 2022.

Background

Penrith City is transforming. The revitalisation includes significant infrastructure investment across transport, education, health, sport, culture and public domain. It brings new opportunities for Penrith City Council (Council) to leverage this growth to meet the needs of our communities. As we progress, it is essential that we also build a community in which all of our people share in that positive future. We are committed to creating an inclusive and accessible City for everyone.

Significant improvements in access and inclusion for our community have been achieved since the development of Council’s first Disability Action Plan in 2003. Notable outcomes include the delivery of more inclusive play spaces; recognition for inclusion of adult change facilities in Council amenity buildings; and supporting employment for people with disability through the ‘Nepean Jobs for All’ project. This work has been delivered with support from community partners and the efforts of our Access Committee.

 

In 2017 Council produced its first DIAP under the NSW Disability Inclusion Act 2014. The Draft Disability Inclusion Action Plan 2022-2026 continues Council’s commitment and strategic focus.

 

Once the Draft DIAP 2022 - 2026 is endorsed as final, the actions will not only result in improved outcomes for people living with disability, but for the wider community as well. Everyone benefits from increased flexibility, access and service improvements. We all benefit and are stronger when we live in a community that values inclusion. 

 

The context for Access and Inclusion

Disability Inclusion Action Plans are underpinned by international, national, and state legislation, guidelines and conventions. This includes:

·    The United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (2006)

·    Australia’s Disability Strategy (2021-2031)

·    The NSW Disability Inclusion Act (2014)

·    The New South Wales Disability Inclusion Plan (2021-2025)

All levels of government have committed to improving access and inclusion for people with disability and their families.

In New South Wales, DIAPs are a legislated requirement under the NSW Disability Inclusion Act 2014. This legislation provides a consistent framework for all Councils to identify how they will proactively address barriers in their day-to-day work across four focus areas:

1.   Attitudes and behaviours

2.   Liveable communities

3.   Employment

4.   Systems and processes

Local councils play a key role in achieving socially just, inclusive and sustainable communities. While legislation supports Council’s framework, the work itself is guided by an overarching commitment to uphold access, equity, community participation, and basic human rights and freedom for all members of the community and organisation.

 

The process for developing a DIAP in NSW 

Local Councils are required to develop and submit DIAPs to the NSW Department of Communities and Justice (DCJ) for endorsement. This should occur every four years. The DIAP for the period 2022 – 2026 is due with the DCJ by 30 June 2022.

Councils report on their progress annually to the NSW Disability Council on the actions and outcomes delivered.

DIAPs are embedded into Council’s existing work across the organisation and involve people with disability throughout implementation. They are a vital part of work to achieve Penrith City Council’s vision and priorities for the City as outlined in its Community Strategic Plan.

 

Penrith City Council’s ‘Bridging’ DIAP 2020-2021

Council endorsed and implemented a DIAP for the period 2017-2020, and had prepared for a consultation process to start work on the next plan which would commence in 2021.

As a result of the impacts and lockdowns of the COVID-19 pandemic, the DCJ and Local Government NSW (LGNSW) advised Councils to create a one year “bridging” DIAP for 2021-2022, followed by a four-year DIAP for 2022-2026.

The bridging DIAP outlined key projects that Council would deliver during 2020-2021. Key outcomes included the development of the Penrith Disability Snapshot and a review and evaluation of the DIAP 2017-21 actions.

The Penrith Disability Snapshot

The principal outcome from the Bridging DIAP was the development of the Penrith Disability Snapshot (Snapshot) in 2021. This valuable planning document was created in consultation with disability service providers, community members and Penrith City Council staff, with the support of Council’s Access Committee.

The Snapshot pulled together social data, including statistics and stories, to help us

understand the distinctive characteristics of Penrith’s communities living with disability.

It provides a picture of what is working well and where we can and should improve social

infrastructure and services.

The objectives were to:

·    Profile the diversity of disability in Penrith LGA

·    ​Inform decision making and planning, especially providing evidence for the development of the Disability Inclusion Action Plan 2022-2026​

·    ​Be a resource for local disability and community services, and​

·    ​Highlight the importance of, and crucial need for, inclusive practices​

The 2021 Penrith Disability Snapshot was launched in partnership with Western Sydney Community Forum on 18 November 2021. The Penrith Disability Snapshot is found at Attachment 3.

Review of the DIAP 2017-2021

A review of the DIAP 2017-21 and the highlights were reported to Council via the Access Committee at its meeting on 13 October 2021. The key outcomes from the previous DIAP included:

·    ‘Nepean Jobs For All’ A series of business breakfasts were held across the region to educate local businesses about the benefits of employing people with disability and address some common myths and stereotypes. The initiative was led by Penrith City Council in partnership with Blue Mountains City Council, Hawkesbury City Council, and the Regional Strategic Alliance

 

·    Adult Change Facilities requirements and recognition from the NSW Disability Council - Penrith is exceeding the national standards by choosing to construct adult change facilities in venues not currently required by the standards, such as in shopping centres for 3000+ people and large entertainment facilities. Adult change facilities enable people requiring additional toileting support to attend venues and events and participate more fully in community life

 

·    Input into the upgrades underway at Tench Reserve and Regatta Park - The Access Committee provided feedback into the final design of these significant public assets for the community to ensure access and inclusion outcomes are front of mind in design

 

·    Everyone Can Play’ - The NSW Government Everyone Can Play Program commenced in 2018 to improve access and inclusion at local play spaces. Since then, Council has been successful in receiving funding for five (5) projects including

Robin Wiles Park, North St Marys

Ironbark Drive Park, Cranebrook

The Carriageway, Glenmore Park

Spence Park, Penrith

David Currie Playspace, St Clair

Other projects identified by the bridging DIAP are still being progressed and have been incorporated into the new Draft DIAP 2022-2026. This includes work to improve accessible transport and pedestrian movement in and around Penrith, and the continued provision of accessible Council buildings and facilities.

 

Developing the Draft DIAP 2022-2026

The Draft DIAP 2022-2026 builds on previous efforts to ensure we are an inclusive organisation and city. The following steps have been taken to prepare the Draft Plan for public exhibition:

·    Review of the previous Disability Inclusion Action Plan 2017-2021 and the key outcomes over the course of its implementation

·    Academic and best practice research to identify current best practice approaches to improving access and inclusion outcomes, including within a local government context

·    Demographic research to identify the profile of people living with disability in Penrith City, including the preparation of a Penrith Disability Snapshot 2021

·    Community and stakeholder engagement to capture feedback from residents, community services and the Access Committee – we listened to what is working well and what Council could improve upon

·    Staff engagement to capture challenges, aspirations and knowledge

·    Analysis to review and consolidate feedback and information inputs and identify key issues, needs, gaps, aspirations and priorities 

Engagement underpins the development of the Draft DIAP and this will be further described in the following section.

Community and Stakeholder Engagement

Engagement with our community and other stakeholders ensures actions in the Draft DIAP respond to the needs, aspirations and priorities of people with lived experience of disability.

 

Council’s proposed DIAP 2022 – 2026 Engagement Plan was presented and endorsed by the Access Committee at its meeting on 16 June 2021, and later adopted at Council’s Ordinary Meeting on 16 July 2021. Whilst engagement was due to commence shortly after, the surge in COVID-19 and related restrictions in the second half of 2021 significantly impacted Council’s capacity to engage at that time.

Engagement with internal and external stakeholders occurred largely during November – December 2021 following the easing of restrictions. Council officers engaged with people with disability, carers, carers with disability, disability workers and staff of Penrith City Council.

The Access Committee received a report on the engagement process and outcomes at the meeting on 16 March 2022.

The effects of COVID-19 were still being felt in the community at this time and for some communities this continues. Feedback suggests that this period has been a particularly difficult time for people living with a disability to safely connect and this is reflected in participant numbers. Consequently, there is further opportunity for engagement throughout the implementation of the DIAP 2022 - 2026. 

Community engagement was encouraged through various formats. Approximately 85 people participated through:  

·    Online feedback via Your Say Penrith

·    Four community group conversations

·    One-on-one conversations in person and over the phone

·    Email

·    Four community services interagency discussions 

Disclosing information about type of disability was optional. Efforts were made to make sure Council heard from a range of perspectives. Of the feedback provided approximately half was from people with lived experience including carers and the other half was from people from the disability sector. The feedback provided through the surveys and one on one interviews was of a depth and quality that supports the actions identified in the Draft DIAP 2022-2026.

Key priorities emerging from the stories and information shared by our community include the need for inclusive transport options (public and private), safe pedestrian pathway networks, provision of inclusive community events and programs, meaningful employment pathways and community awareness and education regarding living with a disability.  

Approximately 41% of responses were about liveable communities, 27% were about Council’s systems and processes, 16% of responses were about attitudes and behaviours and 15% were about employment matters. 

Internal engagement was undertaken with management and staff from across Council during December 2021. This included a briefing session with managers, meetings with specific teams and a staff survey completed by 42 staff. In summary staff told us they wanted education and awareness of visible and invisible disabilities, tools to assist with accessible communications, and noted the opportunity for bold policy, communication and action regarding access and inclusion.

Further details of the engagement process and outcomes is found in the document titled Disability Inclusion Action Plan 2022-2026 - Engagement Outcomes Report Final at Attachment 1.

 

The Draft DIAP 2022 – 2026

Council has listened to feedback from the community and staff, and reflected on learnings from previous work, to identify priorities over the next four years. The Draft DIAP 2022 – 2026 includes 15 strategies aligned to focus areas as outlined below:

Attitudes and Behaviours

1.   Increase awareness and knowledge of access and mechanisms for inclusion for Penrith City Council staff

2.   Raise awareness and promote the benefits of inclusion to the community

3.   Raise awareness and promote the benefits of inclusive customer practices with local business

Liveable Communities

4.   Raise awareness and promote the benefits of inclusive customer practices with local business

5.   Increase access and participation in recreational and sporting opportunities 

6.   Support participation in the creative arts for producers, makers and audiences with disability

7.   Improve accessibility within Penrith City’s town centres

8.   Provide accessible Council buildings and facilities

9.   Improve accessible transport and pedestrian movement in and around Penrith

10. Support people with disability to be prepared, respond, and recover from emergencies, shocks and stresses

Meaningful Employment

11. Increase employment of people living with disability within Penrith City Council

12. Support employment of people with disability within local businesses

System and Processes

13. Increase engagement and participation of people living with disability in Council decision making

14. Embed inclusion focused outcomes in Council planning processes and program and service design 

15. Increase access to information

 

The Draft DIAP 2022-2026 is found in full at Attachment 2.

 

Next Steps

This report seeks endorsement to commence a 28-day public exhibition period from 11 April – 10 May 2022, to invite feedback from our community on the Draft DIAP 2022 – 2026. Noting the Easter and school holiday period, Council staff will proactively contact key community stakeholders to advise of the public exhibition period and offer multiple feedback options to suit individual needs.

The Draft DIAP will be presented to the Access Committee on April 6th, 2022, seeking feedback on strategies and actions as well as Committee member support in promoting feedback through their networks during the public exhibition period.

The document will be graphic designed following approval as a Draft, to support the public exhibition period.

Following public exhibition, any feedback received will be considered and the Draft DIAP 2022-2026 revised as appropriate. The final DIAP 2022 – 2026 will be presented to Council for consideration and endorsement, and once approved, will be submitted to the NSW Department of Communities and Justice. This is required to be completed by 30 June 2022.

 

Financial Implications

 

The Draft Disability Inclusion Action Plan 2022 – 2026 outlines Council’s priorities for the next four years to support equity and inclusion across our City. Actions in this plan have been agreed on and committed to with Managers and will be funded within existing budget allocations and integrated within Council’s future Operational and Delivery Programs with appropriate grant funding opportunities also being investigated.

Risk Implications

DIAPs are a legislated requirement and thus our performance is reported annually to the State Government via the NSW Disability Council.

Conclusion

Penrith City is transforming, bringing with it new opportunities for Penrith City Council to leverage growth and transformation for the benefit of all our community. Through this process, Council is committed to creating an inclusive and accessible Penrith City for everyone.

Council’s Draft Disability Inclusion Action Plan 2022 – 2026 seeks to remove barriers and outlines Council’s priorities for the next four years to support access and inclusion through direct actions, partnerships and advocacy efforts. The Plan aims to support people living with disability with opportunities to participate in all areas of community life.

The Draft DIAP 2022 – 2026 builds on past learnings and achievements and responds to those matters that our community identified during consultation and engagement as priorities for action.

The Access Committee have received a number of reports and presentations in the development of the Draft DIAP and will be invited to provide feedback through an extraordinary meeting to be held on April 6th, 2022.

Public exhibition of the Draft DIAP 2022 – 2026 enables our community to provide further feedback on the Draft Plan, letting us know what else Council can consider in leading and shaping a more accessible and inclusive city for all.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on  Public Exhibition Draft Disability Inclusion Action Plan 2022-2026 be received.

2.     The Draft Disability Inclusion Action Plan 2022 - 2026 (Attachment 2) be endorsed for a 28-day Public Exhibition period from 11 April – 10 May 2022.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

Disability Inclusion Action Plan 2022-26 - Engagement Outcomes Report

7 Pages

Attachments Included

2.

DIAP 2022-2026 Draft Report and Detailed Action Plan- For Public Exhibition

50 Pages

Attachments Included

3.

Penrith Disability Snapshot 2021

22 Pages

Attachments Included

 

 


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                28 March 2022

 

 

 

13

Multicultural Working Party Terms of Reference and Community Members   

 

Compiled by:               Marcela Hart, Community Capacity Lead

Allison Kyriakakis, Community Safety Team Lead

Authorised by:            Megan Whittaker, City Activation, Community and Place Manager

Jeni Pollard, Manager - City Resilience

Kylie Powell, Director - City Futures  

 

Outcome

We are healthy and share strong community spirit

Strategy

Provide opportunities for our community to be healthy and active

Service Activity

Deliver programs and work with government and community organisations to improve the capacity and social wellbeing of the community

      

 

Executive Summary

The purpose of this report is to present the Multicultural Working Party (Working Party) Draft Terms of Reference 2022 – 2026, and outline the process undertaken to select eight community members for a four-year term, for Council’s consideration. 

The Multicultural Working Party enables Council to understand the needs and work closely with our diverse community to foster inclusivity and community wellbeing. In a memorandum dated 28 January 2022, Councillors were informed about the intention to resume the Multicultural Working Party and invite community members to nominate for a 4-year term 2022 – 2026 through an Expression of Interest (EOI) process.

Four Councillors were nominated to the Multicultural Working Party at Council’s ordinary meeting on 10 January 2022, being Councillor Mark Rusev, Councillor Karen McKeown OAM, Councillor Robin Cook and Councillor Jonathan Pullen.

During February and March 2022, Council sought Expressions of Interest (EOI) from the community for membership to the Multicultural Working Party for a four-year period from 2022 to 2026. Twelve (12) applications were received, and eight (8) community members have been recommended to represent the culturally and linguistically diverse community of Penrith City on the Working Party.

This report seeks Council endorsement of the Multicultural Working Party Draft Terms of Reference 2022-2026; and recommends the appointment of the community members listed to the Multicultural Working Party for a period of four years from 2022-2026.

Background

 

Penrith City has a culturally diverse population, and this will continue to grow. Data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics 2016 Census indicates that one in five people living in Penrith City were born overseas, and over 33,000 people spoke a language other than English. This is a 30% increase from 2006 (Penrith Community Profile, 2018). New release areas within Penrith City appear to have more cultural diversity than more established suburbs, a trend that is expected to be verified by the new Census 2021 data when it is released.

 

In June 2008, Council signed a declaration to be a Refugee Welcome Zone, which acknowledges the human rights of refugees in our community and demonstrates the compassion of our residents to people who have arrived through an often-difficult journey to find a place of safety. This declaration affirms Council’s commitment to support the settlement of refugee communities and culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) communities in Penrith City.

 

Council recognises that “a diverse and inclusive community is a more resilient community” (Community Profile, 2018). We are committed to social inclusion through facilitating mutual understanding and dialogue between established communities and newer communities, and between people of diverse cultural backgrounds.

 

Council’s Multicultural Working Party

Council’s Multicultural Working Party was first established in November 2016, by resolution of Council. Its function is to ensure representation from Penrith’s multicultural communities to engage with Council and contribute to social inclusion and community wellbeing across the City. Its establishment was prompted by changes to Multicultural NSW’s consultative mechanisms at that time, identifying the opportunity for Councils to take a lead role in engaging with and advocating for their multicultural communities.

The former Multicultural Working Party completed its four-year term in September 2020.  Efforts to renew membership at that time were impacted by the onset of COVID-19 and the immediate need for day-to-day support for our culturally and linguistically diverse communities. The pandemic brought challenges in the provision of accessible information and on-the-ground support.

Council continued to engage and tailored its support during the pandemic by implementing the 'Better Together’ initiative, bringing together local multicultural leaders to regular meetings throughout 2021, including those connected through Council’s Multicultural Working Party. Efforts focused on working collaboratively to meet the needs of the culturally and linguistically diverse community during COVID-19.

This initiative was led by the former Mayor of Penrith, Councillor Karen McKeown OAM, and served as a valuable mechanism for Council to listen, act and advocate on behalf of Penrith’s diverse communities. The initiative strengthened existing connections with local leaders and between key stakeholders and service providers. Advocacy efforts achieved greater provision of vaccination hubs, emergency food relief and targeted messaging in key community languages.

With the easing of COVID-19 restrictions, it has been possible to reconsider the next term of the Multicultural Working Party. In a memorandum dated 28 January 2022, Councillors were informed about the intention to resume the Multicultural Working Party and invite community members to nominate for a 4-year term 2022 – 2026 through an Expression of Interest (EOI) process. Previous membership of the working party had been 2-year terms. The Draft Terms of Reference were also circulated at this time.

Four Councillors were nominated to the Multicultural Working Party at Council’s ordinary meeting on 10 January 2022, being Councillor Mark Rusev, Councillor Karen McKeown OAM, Councillor Robin Cook and Councillor Jonathan Pullen.

 

Draft Terms of Reference (TOR)

The Draft TOR outline the aims, objectives, membership, selection criteria and operational guidelines of the working party. The objectives are as follows:

1.   To actively support and work with Council to deliver initiatives that improve the wellbeing of Penrith City’s culturally and linguistically diverse communities.

 

2.   To advise on relevant Council policies and procedures to ensure they incorporate the needs of the City’s culturally and linguistically diverse communities.

 

3.   To identify and raise opportunities and issues of concern relating to the City’s culturally and linguistically diverse communities.

 

4.   To assist Council in strategic advocacy efforts to improve access and social inclusion for people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds.

 

5.   To promote Penrith as a City that respects and promotes intercultural understanding as a part of a thriving, inclusive and cohesive place for all.

The full Draft Terms of Reference can be found in Appendix 1.

Meeting dates will be set following Council endorsement of the Draft TOR and proposed membership, as outlined further below.

Expression of Interest for Community Members 2022 - 2026

An Expression of Interest (EOI) process was open from 3 February 2022 to 3 March 2022 seeking members for a 4-year term. The EOI was shared widely with local networks including multicultural and multifaith groups as well as previous members of the Multicultural Working Party.

An assessment panel, comprising 2 Council staff and an external representative from the Western Sydney Community Forum, considered applicant’s skills and experience (both lived and professional) against selection criteria. The panel sought diverse representation that reflects a range of community backgrounds, perspectives, needs and aspirations.

The selection criteria align with the Draft Terms of Reference, and specified that applicants should:

·    Represent one or more of Penrith City’s culturally and linguistically diverse community groups (either an established community or emerging community group new to Penrith City)

·    Have an understanding of the issues experienced by local culturally and linguistically diverse communities in their everyday life 

·    Have a demonstrated capacity to seek out and engage with people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds (for example, as a leader of a local cultural group or through work with local multicultural communities)

·    Share a willingness to contribute and work with Council to support and implement agreed initiatives

·    Have an understanding of, or willingness to learn, how Council’s policies and procedures and relevant legislation apply to culturally and linguistically diverse communities

·    Are recognised as an emerging leader or advocate for the community, or leader with experience providing advice or advocating on multicultural matters

·    Are a resident, work or study in the Penrith Local Government Area

Multicultural Working Party Proposed Community Members

A total of 12 applications were received and considered by the panel. The recommendations for membership to the Multicultural Working Party for 2022 - 2026 are as follows:

1.   Jose Relunia OAM

 

2.   Faye Aboghazaleh

 

3.   Elfa Moraitakis

 

4.   Nikhat Khan

 

5.   Pearl Wynmarra

 

6.   Laura Sardo.

 

7.   Divya Lotliker

 

8.   Dennis Smith

 

The expressions of interest received were of a high standard and demonstrated varied levels of personal, community-focused, and professional experience relevant to the Working Party’s aims and objectives.

 

The panel assessed all applications against the selection criteria to deliver fairness, a diverse representation of members, and a balance between local resident and community organisation representation.

 

While regrettably we are unable to offer all applicants a position, the volume and quality of the applications received is a positive reflection of the desire for community participation and interest in community leadership positions in Penrith City. For those applicants that were unsuccessful in this round, their ongoing interest will be encouraged through invitation to events and activities.

 

Following Council endorsement, letters will be sent to all applicants advising of the outcome of their application and acknowledging their efforts and interest.

 

Financial Implications

 

The Multicultural Working Party is made up of eight community members who volunteer their time with all costs associated with the management of the Multicultural Working Group funded within existing City Activation Community and Place annual budgets.

 

 

Risk Implications

Council officers will continue to monitor COVID-19 health advice and move towards a hybrid meeting model, to allow for virtual or face to face attendance to accommodate member’s needs. 

Conclusion

Penrith City has a culturally diverse population, and this will continue to grow. Council’s Multicultural Working Party enables Council to understand the needs and work closely with our diverse community to foster inclusivity and community wellbeing.

 

The former Multicultural Working Party completed its four-year term in September 2020. With the easing of COVID-19 restrictions, it has been possible to reconsider the next term of the Multicultural Working Party. 

 

During February – March 2022 Council sought Expressions of Interest for community members to join its Multicultural Working Party for a four-year term from 2022 – 2026.

 

Eight (8) community members, outlined in this report, are recommended to join the Multicultural Working Party, advising Council in supporting and celebrating local diversity through community leadership, partnerships and participation.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Multicultural Working Party Terms of Reference and Community Members be received

2.     Council endorse the Terms of Reference for Multicultural Working Party

3.     Council endorse the proposed eight community members as listed in this report for a four year term of the Multicultural Working Party 2022 – 2026

4.     Council write to all applicants to thank them for their interest.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

Draft Multicultural Working Party Terms of Reference 2022-26

2 Pages

Appendix

  


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                              28 March 2022

Appendix 1 - Draft Multicultural Working Party Terms of Reference 2022-26

 

PDF Creator

PDF Creator


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                28 March 2022

 

 

 

14

Requests for Community Events Sponsorship - Cancer Council NSW & TRT Running   

 

Compiled by:               Shelley Lee, Activation and Event Development Officer

Beau Reid, Place and Activation Coordinator

Authorised by:            Megan Whittaker, City Activation, Community and Place Manager

Jeni Pollard, Manager - City Resilience

Kylie Powell, Director - City Futures  

 

Outcome

We are healthy and share strong community spirit

Strategy

Help build resilient, inclusive communities

Service Activity

Conduct and support events that include all members of our community

      

 

Executive Summary

The purpose of this report is to present to Council requests for community sponsorship received from the Cancer Council NSW and the Track Road Trail Group (TRT Running), both to support community events being held within Penrith City.

This report provides Council with details of the sponsorship proposals received, including the proposed sponsorship benefits.

Cancer Council NSW has submitted a request for $3000 sponsorship from Council to support the 2022 Penrith Relay for Life event, to be held at the Penrith Paceway on 30 April and 1 May 2022.

TRT Running has submitted a request for $1000 sponsorship from Council for the Sydney International 100k event, to be held at the Sydney International Regatta Centre (SIRC) on 23 April 2022.

Council officers have assessed both applications against the Events Sponsorship Policy’s criteria for community event sponsorship.

This report recommends that Council provides sponsorship to Cancer Council NSW of $3000 to support the 2022 Penrith Relay for Life event, and $1,000 to TRT Running for the Sydney International 100k event.

2022 Penrith Relay for Life Event

Council has received a request for community sponsorship from Cancer Council NSW to support the 2022 Penrith Relay for Life Event 30 April – 1 May 2022. The value of the requested sponsorship is $3,000.

The Penrith Relay for Life Event is a community fundraising challenge in which registered teams raise money for cancer research by taking turns in completing laps of the Paceway. The 24-hour event features a relay style walk with a festival atmosphere with entertainment and activities for all ages.

The 2022 Penrith Relay for Life Event is scheduled to take place at Penrith Paceway on 30 April and 1 May 2022 and is estimated to attract 500 attendees over the 24-hour period.

Council’s sponsorship will be used towards necessary infrastructure hire such as additional waste bins, black and gold barriers and witches’ hats required for the event.

Council has provided $3000 of sponsorship to Cancer Council NSW each year from 2016 to 2020 in support of the Relay for Life event, a total of $15,000.

Proposed Sponsorship Benefits

The sponsorship opportunity presented by the Cancer Council NSW for the 2022 Penrith Relay for Life event would provide Council and the community of Penrith City with benefits including:

·    Opportunity for the community to participate in healthy activities, and come together to have fun, reconnect and support people in need

·    Opportunity to display Council promotional signage at the event

·    Council recognised as an event sponsor in promotional material and associated media coverage

·    Opportunity for the Cancer Council to deliver workplace health talks at Penrith Council.

Sydney International 100K event

Council has received a request for community sponsorship from Track Road Trail Group (‘TRT Running’) to support the Sydney International 100K Event. The value of the requested sponsorship is $1,000.

The Sydney International 100K is a new community event planned for 23 April 2022 at the Sydney International Regatta Centre. The event provides registered participants the ability to participate in three running events – the 100km, 50km and Half-Marathon.

The event is being run by Track Road Trail Running Group (‘TRT Running’), and is affiliated with the Australian Ultra Runners Association, the peak-body for marathon running in Australia. The 100km and 50km races will provide the opportunity for participants to qualify for the 100km World Championships in Germany in 2022 and the 50km World Championships in South Africa in 2023.

This is the first time this event is being held. Organisers are planning for the event to be run each year for the next 5 years as a qualifying event for future Asia Pacific and World Championship ultra-marathon events.

The event is estimated to attract 500 competitors. Council funding will be used towards necessary event infrastructure and covering hire fees.

Proposed Sponsorship Benefits

The sponsorship opportunity presented by TRT Running for the Sydney International 100k event would provide Council and the community of Penrith City with benefits including:

·    Opportunity for the community to participate in healthy activities, and to reconnect with others who enjoy similar running pursuits

·    Opportunity to display Council signage at the event

·    Council recognised as an event sponsor in promotional material and associated media coverage

Assessment of community sponsorship proposals

Council endorsed the Events Sponsorship Policy (‘the Policy’) in June 2020. The Policy includes criteria for eligibility for Community Event Sponsorship.

Both sponsorship proposals have been assessed against Council’s Events Sponsorship Policy criteria for Community Event Sponsorship and are eligible for financial sponsorship from Council.

Financial Implications

 

Funding is available within the existing City Activation, Community and Place budgets for 2021-22 including the Community Event Sponsorship budget which is specifically for the purpose of working in partnership and supporting the local community to encourage, develop and conduct a wide range of local recreational, business, cultural and community events that make a positive contribution to Penrith City.

Risk Implications

There are no risk implications for Council associated with this report.

Conclusion

Council has received two requests for community sponsorship from the Cancer Council NSW and TRT Running. The requests total $4,000.

The report recommends that Council sponsors Cancer Council NSW for $,3000 towards the Penrith Relay for Life event, and TRT Running for $1,000 towards the Sydney International 100k event. Funds are available from the Community Events Sponsorship budget.

Should Council resolve to support either or both requests for community event sponsorship, Council with enter into sponsorship agreements with each event organiser.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Requests for Community Events Sponsorship - Cancer Council NSW & TRT Running be received

2.     Council endorse $3,000 community sponsorship to Cancer Council NSW in support of the 2022 Penrith Relay for Life event

3.     Council endorse $1,000 community sponsorship to Track Road Trail Group in support of the Sydney International 100k event.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                28 March 2022

 

 

 

15

Grant Success - NSW Government Open Space Program - Places to Play (Pilot), Gipps Street Youth Precinct   

 

Compiled by:               Virginia Tuckerman, Community Facilities and Recreation Planning and Projects Coordinator

Authorised by:            Andrew Robinson, Community Facilities and Recreation Manager

Brian Steffen, Director - City Services  

 

Outcome

We are healthy and share strong community spirit

Strategy

Provide opportunities for our community to be healthy and active

Service Activity

Plan for the provision of and facilitate the delivery of community, sport and recreation facilities

      

 

Executive Summary

This report outlines that a grant of $500,000 has been awarded from the NSW State Government’s Department of Planning and Environment’s Open Spaces Program (OSP) - Places to Play (Pilot) stream. Other streams in the program include Places to Roam and Places to Swim.

The grant will contribute towards the development of the adventure play included in the Youth Precinct at Gipps Street. The precinct, which will be floodlit, will be the first of its kind in the City. It includes a skate park and pump track capable of hosting events, climbing walls, parkour and multisport courts. These will be complemented by ancillary infrastructure, including tree canopy cover, path connections, shade structures, and seating.

The total cost of the project, as part of the overall Gipps Street development, will be $5,400,000. Council will contribute $4,900,000 towards the project through the 7.11 District Open Space Contributions Plan and Waste Reserve in 2022/23.

The report recommends that Council accept the award of $500,000 from the NSW Government’s Open Spaces Pilot Program – Places to Play stream to deliver the adventure play in the Youth Precinct, at Gipps Street and, that Council enter into a funding agreement with the NSW Government’s Department of Planning and Environment.

It also recommends that Council write to the NSW Government to thank it for the grant contribution.

Council officers will continue looking for further grant funding opportunities.

Background

The NSW Government’s Open Spaces Program, which opened on 16 November 2021 will invest $50 million over three years in new and improved open spaces where people can swim, play, roam, ride and connect with nature, across three different streams. The grant program streams are Places to Play, Places to Roam, and Places to Swim.

The Places to Play stream includes a $16.7 million investment over three years for projects across NSW that deliver inclusive public open spaces for adventure, nature and water play. In the 2021/22 round of the Places to Play program, a total of $9 million in funding is available. This includes: $4 million each for adventure play, and nature and water play, with $1 million for pilot/demonstration projects.

Applicants could apply for up to $500,000 for adventure play projects and up to $250,000 for nature play and water play projects. Places to Play is a competitive grant program, and while matched funding is not a requirement, projects that include a financial contribution will be prioritised.

The Department allocated funding for Pilot projects that could demonstrate best practice, inclusive adventure and/or nature and water play projects in 2021/22. Successful pilot projects would receive funds ahead of the grant program. The criteria included projects being well-planned and developed, ready to begin immediately and be completed within 18 months. Expressions of interest were due on 1 December 2021.

Gipps Street Recreation Precinct, Claremont Meadows and the Trinity Drive Mixed Recreation Space, Cambridge Gardens were submitted to the Places to Play stream pilot project for the full grant amount available. These projects best aligned with the grant fund pilot project criteria, aims, objectives and focus areas and were at a suitable state of project readiness to meet the recommended delivery timelines.

Current Situation

On 1 February 2022, notification was received from the Department of Planning and Environment that Council’s application for pilot project funding for Gipps Street Recreation Precinct was approved for the maximum allocation of $500,000. The application for Trinity Drive Mixed Recreation Space was unsuccessful, however grant funding has been secured through the NSW Government’s Everyone Can Play and, ClubGrant Infrastructure Fund Programs, and the project is fully funded.

The realisation of the Gipps Street Recreation Precinct, Claremont Meadows is a priority for the strategic transformation of Penrith LGA. The inclusion of a dedicated adventure play area; including the skate park, pump track, multi-sport courts and youth area has been designed to be at the heart of the precinct. The location of this infrastructure will ensure that users of all ages, abilities and backgrounds are provided with readily accessible active recreation opportunities outside of formal sport, to improve their health and wellbeing.

Throughout the community consultation for both Gipps Street Recreation Precinct and the Penrith Sport and Recreation Strategy, the community called for increased adventure play, water play and nature play. The Gipps Street Recreation Precinct, including the youth area (adventure play) has been co-designed following consultation and collaboration with the community.

Specifically, the design of the district level LED floodlit skate park at Gipps Street has been completed by industry leaders Convic. The designs will deliver a facility capable of hosting skate events, to service a range of skate disciplines and to provide contemporary facilities.

The Gipps Street pump track, the first of its kind in the Penrith LGA has been designed by industry leaders Dirtz; ensuring the current and future needs of riders are captured at this site. Riders of all ages and abilities will benefit from the innovative multi-faceted design which will also allow the facility to potentially host events.

Council has identified an investment of $4,900,000 towards the adventure play elements including the skate park, pump track, multi-sport courts and youth area within the Gipps Street Recreation Precinct.

Financial Implications

This report outlines the successful grant funding through NSW Government Open Spaces – Places to Play program. This grant will provide Council with the opportunity to leverage existing funding to construct the new adventure play facilities at Gipps Street Recreation Precinct.

Where co-contribution of funding has been identified as part of the project budget, these will be accommodated through Council’s existing programs like District Open Space Contributions and waste reserve.

The estimated annual operational and maintenance cost for Gipps Street Recreation Precinct (adventure play components only) is $135,000 based on an estimated 2.5% operational and maintenance cost. The future asset replacement cost is estimated at $7,273,017 based on a 20-year useful life value and an estimated LGCI of 1.5%.

Risk Implications

There are no significant risks for Council associated with this report. All project risks will be managed by Council staff through risk management procedures.

Conclusion

Since the COVID-19 pandemic, the importance of investing in diverse and exciting active recreation facilities for our community has become increasingly evident. Gipps Street Recreation Precinct will provide Penrith LGA residents and visitors with a variety of infrastructure which meets the changing trends in passive and active recreation.

The successful pilot project proposal for Gipps Street Recreation Precinct will assist Council achieving the realisation of improved open space, environmental, active, and healthy living outcomes that will increase our City’s liveability.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Grant Success - NSW Government Open Space Program - Places to Play (Pilot), Gipps Street Youth Precinct be received

2.     Council accept the award of $500,000 from the NSW Government’s Open Spaces Program – Places to Play (Pilot) for Gipps Street Recreation Precinct, Claremont Meadows

3.     Council write to the NSW Government thanking it for the grant funding support

4.     Council enter into a funding agreement with NSW Government for the sum of $500,000 from the Open Spaces Program – Places to Play (Pilot) to deliver adventure play facilities at Gipps Street Recreation Precinct, Claremont Meadows.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                28 March 2022

 

 

 

16

Nepean Avenue Shared Path - Community Consultation Results   

 

Compiled by:               Michael Shahidi, Project Supervisor

Michael Jackson, Design and Projects Manager

Steven Baskett, Projects Administrator

Authorised by:            Brian Steffen, Director - City Services  

 

Outcome

We are healthy and share strong community spirit

Strategy

Provide opportunities for our community to be healthy and active

Service Activity

Plan and deliver Council’s major capital projects for open space and recreation

 

Previous Items:           Nepean Ave Shared Path Concept Design - Community Consultation - Councillor Briefing - 07 Feb 2022

                                      Dunheved Road Upgrade - Consultation Report - Councillor Briefing - 21 Mar 2022      

 

Executive Summary

The Nepean Avenue Shared Path is an important link in the Great River Walk and a consultation process has been held to seek feedback on the design proposal. Just under 50% of the residents of Nepean Ave have submitted a letter opposing the construction of the proposed path and preferring to leave the street in its current form with suggestions to reduce speed limits further and rely on painted lines only.

It is recommended to proactively address the safety concerns on Nepean Avenue by proceeding to the implementation phase of the project as per the advertised design proposal, making minor design amendments to address specific issues that have been raised by various parties through the consultation process.

Background

The Nepean Avenue shared path project will deliver a critical missing link on the Great River Walk, connecting the existing Bridge-to-Bridge walk and cycling loop to make the walk more accessible and safer for users.

Nepean Avenue is approximately one kilometre in length and located between Memorial Avenue and Tench Reserve in Penrith. The street is tree lined, reflecting its riverside residential character, but it has no footpath infrastructure and only limited room on the road verge.

Pedestrian activity is significant and growing along the Great River Walk and has increased since the opening of the Yandhai Nepean Crossing in 2018 and due to social distancing mandates necessitated by the COVID-19 pandemic. 

A Council survey in 2020 recorded 500 pedestrian movements per hour during peak times on Nepean Avenue, a weekly average of 32,500 pedestrians and annual use by over 1.5 million people.

These numbers are projected to increase based on current and future investments in the River Precinct, which is one of Penrith’s most popular recreation areas and tourist attractions.

In the absence of any formal pedestrian infrastructure on Nepean Avenue and because room on the western side road verge is limited, pedestrians typically walk directly on the road. 

This represents a clear safety risk, particularly for vulnerable road users including older people, families with young children and prams, as well as people with limited mobility. A new path is important for community safety so that people using the Great River Walk do not need to walk on the road to travel along Nepean Avenue.

The new path will be for all pedestrians, including older people, families with young children and prams, as well as people with limited mobility. The pathway will still provide an opportunity for people jogging and for children and adults riding bikes for leisure (at slow speeds). More confident bike riders should use the roadway in keeping with the NSW Road Rules.

Temporary safety measures were implemented by Council on Nepean Avenue in 2020 with a view to still pursuing a longer-term pathway solution for better community safety.

Reducing the speed limit to 40km/h, making changes to parking zones, introducing new signage and road markings were all important permanent measures, but a dedicated path is still needed to make Nepean Avenue and the Great River Walk safer.

Consultation Process

The community consultation period on the draft design has been open between 14 February and 21 March including an extension granted in recognition of the flood impacts during that period.

Nepean Avenue residents and the broader community have been encouraged to get involved and give us their feedback on the draft design.

This consultation process has included writing to all residents on Nepean Avenue to invite them to meet with us individually to discuss the draft designs if they would like to.

The consultation program also saw 383 visits from 266 unique visitors on Council’s Your Say Penrith page, 273 downloads including;

·    131 downloads of the Draft Concept Plan

·    101 downloads of the Masterplan

·    41 downloads of the FAQ.

This level of engagement resulted in:

•     68 email responses, 39 of these were a duplicated letter

•     6 requests for individual resident meetings

The survey and email responses provided similar feedback. Some people commented on specific design proposal details while others commented more generally on the path.

 

The main issues raised include:

• Concerns for walkers to continue to walk on the road and the potential for a trip hazard on the kerb 

• Operation and logistics for the bus and waste collection services

• Proposal for a second line marking as an alternative to the kerb barrier

 

A table summarising the key issues & proposed responses is below.


 

 

Key Topic

Comment

Way Forward

Kerb Barrier and Pathway

 

52 Comments

Concerns were raised regarding congestion, walkers, runners, and group walkers not using the pathway, or for the potential to trip on the kerb

Shared paths are designed to be used by pedestrians and casual bicycle riders.

Bicycle riders must keep left and give way to pedestrians on shared paths.

Pedestrians should be aware of their surroundings and keep a look out for other pedestrians and riders using the path. If you are walking with pets, keep them on a short lead and under control

Parking, Bus, and garbage access

 

45 Comments

Concerns were raised for the operation and logistics of the bus and waste service to be completed

Council Traffic Management Team critically analyse all aspects for traffic access and vehicle turning circles. The Waste team have confirmed a solution will be able to be implemented allowing for weekly and bulky waste pickups.

Second Line Marking
Pathway Painted
Signage

 

43 Comments

Proposed a second yellow/white line 2.5m-3m wide as an alternative to the concrete kerb and footpath with the pathway painted rather than excavation for concrete along with further signage at both ends. Also, repainting the clearway line

A paint only solution does not offer pedestrians the protection of a raised kerb structure.

Maintenance of line marking will be undertaken.

Lowering Speed limit

 

39 Comment

Proposed lowering of the speed limit to 30kmph

Council will consider this feedback. The temporary safety measures implemented by Council on Nepean Avenue in 2020 were done with a view to still pursuing a longer-term pathway solution for better community safety.

Reducing the speed limit to 40km/h, making changes to parking zones, introducing new signage and road markings were all important measures, but the dedicated path is still needed to make Nepean Avenue and the Great River Walk safer.

Parking Permit

 

39 Comment

A comment was raised to issue parking permits to reduce traffic

Parking permits can be considered, but other schemes proposed in much higher demand environments have not been adopted.

Lighting standards

 

39 Comments

The plan does not comply with Australian standards AS/NZS 1158.3.1.2020  for lighting with regards to pathways

Lighting upgrades are planned.  Endeavour Energy have been engaged to install additional light fixtures where possible.

Lighting levels as defined in the AS/NZS standards are selected based on the desired outcome.

Requesting waste and bus service communication evidence

 

39 Comments

Requesting copies of correspondence with waste contractor which verifies they have been included in the consult process

Council manage the Waste contract & have taken into consideration the requirements of that contractor.   The Waste team have confirmed a solution will be able to be implemented allowing for weekly and bulky waste pickups.

Bus operator consultation is undertaken as part of the next phase of the project.

Heavy vehicle turning paths including waste vehicles and buses have been taken into consideration in this design.

Traffic Studies

 

39 Comments

Have traffic studies been completed on site to simulate the reduced width of the road and how that will impact on the flow of traffic at a time when there are buses, garbage trucks, larger delivery vehicles or stationery removalist vehicles on the road?

Council critically examine all aspects of the design with various teams involved.  As with any other road environment, traffic management practices will be required where a part of the road is to be blocked temporarily.  Operators such as Removalists are well aware of these requirements.

Delays when reversing out of driveways

 

39 Comments

As pedestrian numbers increase as forecast, residents will be left with significant delays when going about their daily business.

The proposal does not alter the current situation where this already occurs.  Council reminds our Nepean Avenue visitors and residents to remember to give way to pedestrians:

− at pedestrian crossings
− when turning at intersections
− when doing a U-turn
− when entering or leaving a driveway.

Always slow down and be prepared to stop if there is any danger of colliding with a pedestrian.

Drivers should also remember to park their vehicle safely and legally by complying with the NSW Road Rules.

Maintenance

 

39 Comments

Feedback was raised with regards to how the maintenance of the pathways would be completed

Council will continue to deliver City Presentation services and this concept has been reviewed for maintainability

Shared Pathway Support

 

12 Comments

Responses were received that this is a needed pathway for pedestrians and safety to complete the river loop and must conjoin to existing pathways

This project will deliver a critical missing link on the Great River Walk by completing the Bridge-to-Bridge loop. The creation of new walking and bike riding infrastructure will eliminate the need for pedestrians to walk on the road along Nepean Avenue and addresses important road safety issues.

Shared Pathway Sizing

 

10 Comments

Responses were received that the size of the path is not adequate

The path width is a compromise between the path and road widths.

Width of the road

 

7 Comments

Concerns were raised with regards to the width of the road being reduced and causing it to be harder to reverse a car or trailer

The path width is a compromise between the path and road widths.

Disability Accessible

 

6 Comments

Officers met with some accessibility committee members. They highlighted the importance of the missing path as part of the loop. They provided suggestions for improving the accessibility of the path. Improvement included:

·      Tactile identifiers

·      Texture of finish surfaces

·      Speed hump as an alternative to the kerb

·      Grooves along the side of the path 

·      Reduce low overhanging branches

·      Speed hump or raised edge along the path at Fitch Ave

Council will consider this feedback in the detail design to continue to deliver accessible pathways

Noise

 

4 Comment

Concerns were raised for the noise of walkers at 4:30 am

The public is encouraged to follow all regulations to public noise laws

Nepean and Memorial Ave

 

2 Comments

Concerns were raised for the sight lines at the corner where the crossing is proposed and suggested Memorial Ave as an alternative.

Council will consider this feedback in the detail design and ensure adequate vision is provided.

 

Financial Implications

The construction of the shared path has been funded through the state government Metropolitan Greenspace Program and the Section 7.11 District Open Space contributions plan.  Additional operational and maintenance costs associated with the path concept will be taken into consideration in future budgets.

Risk Implications

The increasing pedestrian traffic on the path corridor is resulting in unsafe conditions.  Residents of Nepean Ave have noted that no serious accidents have occurred as yet and thus the path is not justified.  Council officers have taken the pro active approach to minimise risk in recommending path separation rather than await serious injury or death.

Conclusion

The consultation results as above demonstrate that a significant proportion (nearly 50%) of the residents of Nepean Ave are against the construction of a path and would prefer the current arrangement is retained. The path concept as presented will go some way to actively address safety risks on the corridor and the alternative option of not constructing the path does not provide any safety improvement for either residents or path users.

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Nepean Avenue Shared Path - Community Consultation Results be received

2.     Council resolve to implement the Nepean Avenue Shared Path proposal with only amendments to address specific concerns.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                28 March 2022

 

 

 

17

RFT21/22-14 Hickeys Lane Amenities Building Construction - Amended   

 

Compiled by:               Michael Shahidi, Project Supervisor

Wasique Mohyuddin, Major Projects Coordinator

Authorised by:            Michael Jackson, Design and Projects Manager

Brian Steffen, Director - City Services  

 

Outcome

We are healthy and share strong community spirit

Strategy

Provide opportunities for our community to be healthy and active

Service Activity

Plan and deliver Council’s major capital projects for open space and recreation

 

Previous Items:           RFT21/22-14 Hickeys Lane Amenities Building Construction - Ordinary Meeting - 21 Feb 2022    

 

Executive Summary

At the Ordinary meeting of 21 February 2022 the report RFT21/22-14 Hickeys Lane Amenities Building Construction recommended the award of the construction contract to Coverit Building Group Pty Ltd however the report failed to note the recommendation to award tender options as part of the contract.

This report recommends that tender options listed below also be awarded to the recommended contractor.

The tender evaluation did include the tender options and the successful contractor recommendation remains the same. Coverit Building Group Pty Ltd were awarded the contract for the lump sum portion only and this report advises Council of the award of options 1, 2 and 3 as part of the same contract for the additional total amount of $346,765 excluding GST.

Background

Tender RFT21/22-14 Hickeys Lane Amenities Building Construction, was advertised with 3 tender options in addition to main lump sum scope of works, in order to give Council the flexibility to award works based on available budget. These options included:

·    Option 1 - Construction of stage 4 of the building design which included additional change rooms

·    Option 2 - Upgrade of the new lighting from halogen lighting option to LED lighting

·    Option 3 - Upgrade of the existing fields lighting to LED lighting.

Summary of Tenders Received

A total of seven (7) tenders were received by the closing date of the advertised tender and are listed below in price order (ex GST).

 

 

 

Company

Tendered Price

Tender option 1

Tender option 2

Tender option 3

Company Address

Owners/ Directors

Coverit Building Group Pty Ltd

$1,280,201

$302,555

$22,560

$21,650

18 37-47 Borec Rd Penrith 2750

Shane Comans

Reld Group Pty Ltd

$1,471,251

$289,500

$28,900

$156,000

Unit 1, 41 Bertram street

Mortlake NSW 2137

Elie Esber

Alpall Pty Ltd

$1,538,800

$394,000

$46,000

$84,000

PO Box 710 Springwood NSW 2777

David Crum

 

Phillip McNamara t/a Cranebrook Constructions

$1,624,198

$98,421

$52,640

$19,968

97 Taylor Road Cranebrook NSW 2749

Phillip McNamara

Met Build Pty Ltd

$1,658,398

$345,352

$74,400

$51,200

Suite 6 495 Princes Highway

Rockdale NSW 2216

Nazmeen Khan

Rogers Construction Group Pty Ltd

$1,734,622

$347,984

No submission

$245,581

Unit 306, 2-8 Brookhollow Avenue, Norwest NSW 2153

 

Mitchell Rogers

SDL Project Solutions Pty Ltd

$1,823,394

No submission

No submission

No submission

23/14 Loyalty Road

North Rocks NSW 2151

Seng Laphai

 

Tender Advisory Group Comments

The objective of the Tender Advisory Group (TAG) is to support the Council to achieve fair and equitable tender processes. The TAG, consisting of Brian Steffen - Director City Services, Adam Beggs – Acting Governance Manager and Neil Farquharson – Financial Services Manager were briefed by the Design and Projects team about the background and the process followed.

 

The TAG considered the recommendations in relation to the tender it was noted that the recommended proposal is the lowest cost, the company strongly demonstrated their ability to meet Council’s requirements and their proposal was considered to be the most advantageous to Council. The TAG reviewed the evaluation process outlined within the report and is satisfied that the selection criteria have been correctly applied in making recommendations.

 

Financial Implications

Included in the assessment of tenders was the commissioning of independent reference checks, financial analysis, and performance analysis on Coverit Building Group Pty Ltd. These checks were completed by Equifax Australasia Credit Ratings Pty Ltd and took into account the combined value of the tenders Coverit Building Group Pty Ltd were recommended for in the February business paper. Financial Services have reviewed the financial information provided by the tenderer and have not identified any reason the contract should not be awarded.

Included in the adopted Sports and Recreation Plan is funding for the upgrade and renewal of the Hickeys Lane amenities building. The budget includes an allocation under the New South Wales Government’s 2019 Sport Election Commitment Program and Council’s Building Asset Renewal Program.

The maintenance and operational requirements of the upgraded building will be reflected in Council’s future asset maintenance budgets and asset renewal programs as per Council’s Budget Guidelines.

Risk Implications

The tender process outlined in this report includes controls regarding probity and ensuring value for Council, overseen by the Tender Advisory Group. The works will be undertaken in accordance with Work Health & Safety systems.

Conclusion

The Tender Evaluation Committee is of the opinion that tender options 1, 2 and 3 be awarded to Coverit Building Group Pty Ltd under existing contract RFT21/22-14 for the total amount of $346,765 excluding GST.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on RFT21/22-14 Hickeys Lane Amenities Building Construction - Amended be received

2.     Scope of works identified as Options 1, 2 and 3 be awarded to Coverit Building Group Pty Ltd under the existing contract.

3.     The General Manager (or their delegate) be authorised to sign all necessary legal documents in relation to this matter.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.  


Outcome 7 - We have confidence in our Council

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

18      2022 Australian Local Government Women's Association NSW Annual Conference   111

 

19      Permanent Road Closure of Part Allen Place Penrith and Lot Consolidation              113

 

20      Licence for Temporary Wharf Facilities - Tench Reserve Regentville                          122

 

21      Workers Insurance (Compensation) Service Review                                                    130

 

22      Regatta Park Plan of Management                                                                                134

 

23      Plans of Management                                                                                                    138

 

24      Summary of Investment & Banking for the period 1 February 2022 to 28 February 2022                                                                                                                                         141

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                28 March 2022

 

 

 

18

2022 Australian Local Government Women's Association NSW Annual Conference   

 

Compiled by:               Sasha Sultana, Acting Senior Executive Assistant

Authorised by:            Jemma Brock, Acting Executive Officer  

 

Outcome

We have confidence in our Council

Strategy

Be open and fair in our decisions and our dealings with people

Service Activity

Support the Councillors and the Leadership Team

      

 

Executive Summary

The Australian Local Government Women’s Association (ALGWA) NSW Annual Conference will be held in Fairfield from Thursday, 7 July – Saturday, 9 July 2022.

It would be appropriate for delegates to be nominated at this meeting.

Background

The ALGWA was founded in 1951 with its principal aims and objectives being:

·    To assist in furthering women's knowledge and understanding of the function of local government;

·    To protect and enhance the interests and rights of women in local government;

·    To take action in relation to any subject or activity of particular interest to women affecting local governing bodies and/or local government legislation;

·    To act in an advisory capacity to intending women candidates for local government elections;

·    To encourage women into professional careers in local government.

A number of Penrith City Councillors are members of the ALGWA, Cr Karen McKeown OAM, who is an Executive Member.

Current Situation

The 2022 ALGWA NSW Annual Conference will be hosted by Fairfield City Council, in Fairfield from Thursday, 7 July to Saturday, 9 July 2022. The theme of the Conference is What’s your superpower, to encourage women in Local Government to empower themselves and each other.

The Annual ALGWA Conference provides a platform for Councillors to discuss current and emerging issues facing women in Local Government. Delegates will experience a conference that is exciting, adventurous, engaging and thought provoking.

Financial Implications

A budget has been established for Councillor Conference Costs in the 2021-22 Operational Plan which funds attendance at various conferences throughout the financial year. Participation in the ALGWA NSW Annual Conference can be accommodated within this budget.

 

Risk Implications

There are no risk implications identified.

Conclusion

ALGWA supports and promotes women in local government through advocacy, advice and action. The Annual Conference is an opportunity to come together and engage in learning and networking that will assist in personal and professional development.

Council has a strong association with ALGWA over many years and it would be appropriate to nominate any interested councillors as delegates for the Conference in March to allow registrations and bookings to be made.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on 2022 Australian Local Government Women's Association NSW Annual Conference be received

2.     Council nominate its delegates to attend ALGWA’s NSW Annual Conference, to be held in Fairfield from Thursday, 7 July to Saturday, 9 July 2022.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                28 March 2022

 

 

 

19

Permanent Road Closure of Part Allen Place Penrith and Lot Consolidation   

 

Compiled by:               Tara Braithwaite, Development Manager

Authorised by:            Nathan Ritchie, Property Development Manager

Andrew Moore, Director - Corporate Services  

 

Outcome

We have confidence in our Council

Strategy

Manage our money and our assets to be sustainable now and into the future

Service Activity

Provide property services and manage community and commercial requests for the use of Council owned or controlled land

      

 

Executive Summary

Penrith City Council is transforming the Penrith City Centre with the delivery of a new $12 million City Park. At approximately 7,000sqm, City Park will be a significant green space in a prime location on the corner of Henry Street and Station Streets, Penrith.

As part of the land assembly, part of Allen Place Penrith (dedicated road, previously used as public car parking) known as Lot 1 DP1263787, must be permanently closed. Upon closure, it is proposed the land vest in Council and be classified as “Operational Land” under the provisions of the Local Government Act 1993 (Attachment 1)

Following the permanent road closure, the newly created lot will be consolidated with the eight (8) adjoining parcels to finalise the assembly of the land for the park (Attachment 2).

Background

The creation of a City Park in the heart of Penrith was identified as a key component in shaping our City for the future back in 2006. City Park will be located on the corner of Henry and Station streets in the heart of the Penrith City Centre, which will reinforce Penrith’s role as a major Western Sydney centre for business, employment and urban living.

The Development Application DA for the construction of a new park was approved in September 2021 and the demolition and remediation of the site commenced in October 2021. Land assembly and infrastructure provisioning are continuing to facilitate project construction.

A condition under DA21/0047 for the construction of City Park, requires the road closure of part of Allen Place to be finalised and the lots consolidated prior to the issue of an Occupation Certificate for the development.

Permanent Road Closure

It is proposed to permanently close a small section of Allen Place road reserve (Lot 1 DP1263787) currently used as a public car park. The remaining portion of Allen Place will remain as dedicated road and will continue to be used to provide public car parking to the east of the new City Park. A plan showing the extent of the road reserve closure can be found in attachment 1 of this report.

The proposed road closure has been assessed against the Roads Act consideration applying to this process. The main considerations are:

1.   The road is considered constructed under section 38E of the Roads Act;

2.   The road is not required for present or future needs;  

3.   The road does not provide continuity for an existing road network and  

4.   Another public road provides lawful and reasonably practical vehicular access to adjoining land. 

 

As part of the statutory process, the NSW Department of Planning, Industry & Environmental – Crown Lands (Crown Land) were provided with notice of the proposal to close the public road. Crown Land concurrence was obtained on 10 November 2021, with no objection to the closure nor the vesting of the road in Council upon closure.

 

In accordance with the regulatory provisions of the Roads Act 1993, public notification has been undertaken with surrounding property owners, tenants, relevant authorities and those deemed to be affected by the proposed closure.

 

During the twenty-eight (28) day notification period, Council received two (2) notifiable authority objections and no submissions or enquiries from the community.

 

The two (2) notifiable objections were received from Jemena and Endeavour Energy regarding the location of existing assets within the subject road reserve. Council’s project team are working with Jemena and Endeavour Energy to relocate the existing services and for the creation of easements where required. On acceptance of the proposed relocation or protection of existing assets, Jemena and Endeavour Energy will withdraw their objections to the road closure. The final gazettal of the road closure will proceed once these matters have been resolved.

Consolidation

The DA for the construction of City Park includes a condition of consent that requires all eight (8) lots comprising the development area to be consolidated prior to the issue of an Occupation Certificate.

Upon completion of the road closure and issue of a new title for this parcel, it is proposed to consolidate the nine (9) parcels of land to create one (1) lot.

A draft consolidation plan can be found in attachment 2 of this report.

 

Financial Implications

All costs associated with the permanent road closure and lot consolidation will be funded by the City Park Project budget as allocated in the 2021-22 Operational Plan.

Risk Implications

The risk implications for this project have been considered and there are no risks that have been identified that would result from the matter being considered as contained in this report.

Conclusion

To finalise the land assembly of City Park, the permanent road closure of part Allen Place Penrith is required.  The closure process has been undertaken in accordance with the requirements of the Roads Act and can be progressed pending Jemena & Endeavour Energy infrastructure relocation. In addition, it is proposed to consolidate the nine (9) parcels of land that comprise the City Park development, upon finalisation of the road closure, in accordance with the DA conditions for the development.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Permanent Road Closure of Part Allen Place Penrith and Lot Consolidation be received

2.     Part Allen Place Penrith, as identified within this report, be permanently closed in accordance with the Roads Act 1993

3.     Upon closure and once vested in Council, the land be classified as Operational Land

4.     Upon closure the land be consolidated with the adjoining land parcels as identified within this report

5.     The common seal be affixed to all documents as required, and the General Manager (or their delegate) be authorised to sign all necessary legal documents in relation to this matter.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

Proposed Road Closure Plan DRAFT

4 Pages

Appendix

2.

City Park Consolidation Plan DRAFT

1 Page

Appendix

3.

Letter from DPIE Crown Lands no objection

1 Page

Appendix

  


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                              28 March 2022

Appendix 1 - Proposed Road Closure Plan DRAFT

 

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Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                              28 March 2022

Appendix 2 - City Park Consolidation Plan DRAFT

 


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                              28 March 2022

Appendix 3 - Letter from DPIE Crown Lands no objection

 

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Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                28 March 2022

 

 

 

20

Licence for Temporary Wharf Facilities - Tench Reserve Regentville  

 

Compiled by:               Rebecca Marshall, Program Manager

Authorised by:            Nathan Ritchie, Property Development Manager

Andrew Moore, Director - Corporate Services  

 

Outcome

We have confidence in our Council

Strategy

Manage our money and our assets to be sustainable now and into the future

Service Activity

Provide property services and manage community and commercial requests for the use of Council owned or controlled land

      

 

Executive Summary

The purpose of this report is to obtain approval from Council to licence a temporary wharf facility that is to be constructed on part of Tench Reserve Regentville, whilst the Tench Reserve Jamisontown upgrade is being completed, for use by the Nepean Belle for the purposes of a temporary wharf facility.

Background

The NSW Department of Planning, Industry and Environment (DPIE) are working in partnership with Penrith City Council to deliver major upgrades to Tench Reserve, Jamisontown. During these upgrades the current wharf utilised by the Nepean Belle at Tench Reserve Jamisontown will be impacted.

 

To ensure continuous operations of the Nepean Belle a temporary wharf facility will be constructed by DPIE at Tench Reserve Regentville – a proposed site plan and aerial view are provided at Appendix 1.

 

This report only relates to the licence of the temporary wharf facilities, after construction, with the consent conditions permitting the use of the structures for the purposes of a temporary wharf facility covered off under construction approvals.

Current Situation

The Nepean River ‘Our River’: Plan of Management for Tench Reserve, River Road Reserve and Weir Reserve’, adopted by Council in February 2015, authorises the leasing or licencing of the Tench Reserve for the purposes of a paddle steamer / tourist river boat including embarking and disembarking.

 

The site of the proposed licence where the temporary wharf facility will be constructed is residue land identified on the DP16540 provided at Appendix 2.  The parcel is bounded by the road (see words ‘no occupation and ‘no fencing’). The parcel does not have a statutory title.

 

The land is subject to the Common Law. The Common Law has always regarded the possession or occupation of a parcel of land as sufficient evidence of ownership. Council can show evidence of having maintained the subject land as a public reserve for a period in excess of 12 years, and that the public have been able to use the land for that period of time, therefore providing sufficient evidence of ownership.

 

An existing walking trail traverses that area of land and continues along the river edge until it reaches the northern section of Tench reserve (near the M4 bridge). It also appears the carpark is located on the same parcel (in part). In the fullness of time a possessory title application could be made to formalise Council’s ownership.

 

The temporary wharf (~ 4 sqm concreate slab) is proposed to be constructed on land that is subject to Common Law the relevant provisions to protect Councils interests will be drafted into the licence.

 

As the surrounding parcels of land are classified as Community, it is proposed to complete public notification in accordance with Section 47A of the Local Government Act 1993. The Licence Agreement requires public advertisements in the local newspaper, notification to adjoining residential property owners and a public notice erected on site allowing the public 28 days for any submissions concerning this matter. During this 28-day notification period, if any submissions are received, the Property Development Department will seek to resolve any issues prior to issuing the Licence Agreement.

 

The general terms and conditions of the licence are outlined below :

 

Licence Agreement:

 

 

Licensee:

 

Bennett Cruising Pty Ltd

 

Trading as:

-     Nepean Belle Paddlewheeler

-     Penrith Platypus Cruises

-     Bennett’s on the River

 

ABN: 34 163 515 428

Directors: Carol & Christopher Bennett

 

Term:

12 months

 

Site:

 

Temporary wharf facility at Tench Reserve Regentville

 

 

Purpose

 

Mooring and Access including embarking and disembarking.

 

 

Rent:

 

$1

 

 

Licence Commencement Date:

 

Estimated April 2022

Licensee Obligation:

-     Licence is granted for mooring and access including embarking and disembarking.

-     Use of the temporary wharf will be subject to any consent conditions that permit the use of the structures for a particular purpose and any other conditions of construction approval provided.

-     Licensee responsible to keep the area in a clean and tidy condition.

-     Licensee responsible for maintenance of moorings and associated infrastructure once constructed.

-     Licensee must not undertake any works without prior written approval of the Council.

-     Licensee must not block access to the carpark, reserve or driveways.

-     Licensee must maintain public liability insurance to the value of $20 million with Council noted as an interested party and provide an up to date copy to Council.

 

 

Financial Implications

The DPIE is working in partnership with Council to deliver major upgrades to Tench Reserve, Jamisontown, and in order to ensure continuous operations of the Nepean Belle a temporary wharf facility will be constructed by DPIE at Tench Reserve Regentville.

This report seeks approval to licence this temporary wharf facility for use by the Nepean Belle while the Tench Reserve Jamisontown upgrade is being completed. A nominal rent of $1 will be received in relation to this licence. Once constructed the Licensee will be responsible for the maintenance of moorings and associated infrastructure, and maintaining appropriate Public Liability insurance.

Risk Implications

The risk implications have only been considered for the licence following construction of the temporary wharf facility. Public exhibition of the licence may result in submissions that can be bought back to Council.

 

There is a risk that the site is not in Council ownership. In the absence of a possessory title application, and in the absence of any other evidence, Council can strongly argue that it is the common law owner of the land. Relevant provisions will be drafted into the Licence Agreement to protect Council if a challenge is made to Council’s title.

Conclusion

This report recommend that Council provide approval to licence the temporary wharf facility at Tench Reserve Regentville, once constructed, whilst Tench Reserve Jamisontown upgrade is being completed, for use by the Nepean Belle.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Licence for Temporary Wharf Facilities - Tench Reserve Regentville be received

2.     Council approve the proposed new licence agreement as per the terms and conditions listed in this report

3.     The Common Seal of the Council of the City of Penrith be affixed to all documents as required, and the General Manager (or their delegate) be authorised to sign all necessary legal documents in relation to this matter.

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

Aerial view and Proposed site plan for Licence for temporary wharf facilities

2 Pages

Appendix

2.

Deposited Plan

2 Pages

Appendix

  


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                              28 March 2022

Appendix 1 - Aerial view and Proposed site plan for Licence for temporary wharf facilities

 



Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                              28 March 2022

Appendix 2 - Deposited Plan

 



Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                28 March 2022

 

 

 

21

Workers Insurance (Compensation) Service Review   

 

Compiled by:               Kath Garth, Work Health and Safety Manager

Authorised by:            Joshua Fayle, People and Culture Manager

Sandy Davies, Director - Community and People  

 

Outcome

We have confidence in our Council