Council_Mark_POS_RGB

17 August 2022

 

Dear Councillor,

In pursuance of the provisions of the Local Government Act, 1993 and the Regulations thereunder, notice is hereby given that an ORDINARY MEETING of Penrith City Council is to be held remotely using audio visual links, audio streamed and in the Council Chambers, Civic Centre, 601 High Street, Penrith on Monday 22 August 2022 at 7:00PM.

Attention is directed to the statement accompanying this notice of the business proposed to be transacted at the meeting.

Yours faithfully

 

 

Warwick Winn

General Manager

 

BUSINESS

 

1.           LEAVE OF ABSENCE

 

2.           APOLOGIES

 

3.           CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES

Ordinary Meeting - 25 July 2022.

 

4.           DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

Pecuniary Interest (The Act requires Councillors who declare a pecuniary interest in an item to leave the meeting during discussion of that item)

Non-Pecuniary Conflict of Interest – Significant and Less than Significant (The Code of Conduct requires Councillors who declare a significant non-pecuniary conflict of interest in an item to leave the meeting during discussion of that item)

 

5.           ADDRESSING COUNCIL

 

6.           MAYORAL MINUTES

 

7.           NOTICES OF MOTION TO RESCIND A RESOLUTION

 

8.           NOTICES OF MOTION AND QUESTIONS ON NOTICE

 

9.           ADOPTION OF REPORTS AND RECOMMENDATION OF COMMITTEES

Access Committee Meeting - 13 July 2022.

Local Traffic Committee Meeting - 1 August 2022.

 

10.         DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

11.         URGENT BUSINESS

 

12.         COMMITTEE OF THE WHOLE


ORDINARY MEETING

 

Monday 22 August 2022

 

table of contents

 

 

 

 

ADVANCE AUSTRALIA FAIR

 

 

WEBCASTING NOTICE

 

 

STATEMENT OF RECOGNITION OF PENRITH CITY’S ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER CULTURAL HERITAGE

 

 

PRAYER

 

 

COUNCIL CHAMBER seating arrangements

 

 

meeting calendar

 

 

confirmation of minutes

 

 

PROCEDURE FOR ADDRESSING COUNCIL MEETING

 

 

MAYORAL MINUTES

 

 

report and recommendations of committees

 

 

DELIVERY program reports


 

 

 

 

ADVANCE AUSTRALIA FAIR

 

 

Australians all let us rejoice,

For we are one and free;

We’ve golden soil and wealth for toil;

Our home is girt by sea;

Our land abounds in nature’s gifts

Of beauty rich and rare;

In history’s page, let every stage

Advance Australia Fair.

 

In joyful strains then let us sing,

Advance Australia Fair.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

 

 

 

 

 

WEBCASTING NOTICE

 

Please note that tonight’s meeting other than the

confidential sessions are being recorded and will be

placed on Council’s website. All in attendance should

refrain from making defamatory statements. Council

takes all care when maintaining privacy, however

members of the public gallery and those addressing

Council should be aware that you may be recorded.

 


Statement of Recognition of

Penrith City’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cultural Heritage

 

 

Council values the unique status of Aboriginal people as the original owners and custodians of lands and waters, including the land and waters of Penrith City.

 

Council values the unique status of Torres Strait Islander people as the original owners and custodians of the Torres Strait Islands and surrounding waters.

 

We work together for a united Australia and City that respects this land of ours, that values the diversity of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural heritage, and provides justice and equity for all.

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

PRAYER

 

 

 

“Sovereign God, tonight as we gather together as a Council we affirm that you are the giver and sustainer of life.  We come together as representatives of our community to make decisions that will benefit this city and the people within it. 

 

We come not in a spirit of competition, not as adversaries, but as colleagues.  Help us to treat each other with respect, with dignity, with interest and with honesty.  Help us not just to hear the words we say, but also to hear each others hearts.  We seek to be wise in all that we say and do.

 

As we meet, our concern is for this city.  Grant us wisdom, courage and strength.

 

Lord, help us.  We pray this in the name of Jesus Christ our Lord.  Amen.”

 

 

 

 

 


Council Chambers

Seating Arrangements


For members of the public addressing the meeting


 

 

 

Lectern


 

 

     Directors


 

 

 

General Manager
Warwick Winn
Her Worship the Mayor Councillor Tricia Hitchen



Governance Coordinator Adam Beggs






Minute Clerk

MediaClr Mark Davies

South Ward

 

Clr Mark Rusev

South Ward

 

 

Clr Bernard Bratusa

East Ward

 

 

Clr Glenn Gardiner

North Ward

 

 

Clr Ross Fowler OAM

North Ward

 

 

Clr Marlene Shipley

Public GalleryEast Ward

 

 

Clr Jim Aitken OAM

South Ward

 

 

Clr Jonathan Pullen

North Ward

 

Clr Sue Day

South Ward

 

Clr Kevin Crameri OAM

North Ward

 

Clr John Thain

North Ward

 

Clr Todd Carney

East Ward

 

Clr Robin Cook

East Ward

 

Clr Karen McKeown OAM

ManagersSouth Ward

 

 

Directors


 


Oath of Office

 

I swear that I will undertake the duties of the office of Councillor in the best interests of the people of Penrith and the Penrith City Council and that I will faithfully and impartially carry out the functions, powers, authorities and discretions vested in me under the Local Government Act 1993 or any other Act to the best of my ability and judgment.

 

 

Affirmation of Office

 

I solemnly and sincerely declare and affirm that I will undertake the duties of the office of Councillor in the best interests of the people of Penrith and the Penrith City Council and that I will faithfully and impartially carry out the functions, powers, authorities and discretions vested in me under the Local Government Act 1993 or any other Act to the best of my ability and judgment.

 

 

 

 

 

Local Government Act 1993, Section 233A

 


Council_Mark_POS_RGB2022 MEETING CALENDAR

January 2022 - December 2022

(Adopted by Council – 10 January 2022)

 

 

 

TIME

JAN

FEB

MAR

APRIL

MAY

JUNE

JULY

AUG

SEPT

OCT

NOV

DEC

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

 

Ordinary Council Meeting

7.00pm

 

 

 

 

 

2v

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10^

 

 

21@

 

28

 

30#

27*

25

22@

26^

31ü

28#+

12

Policy Review Committee

7.00pm

 

 

 

 

14

 

9

 

11

 

12

 

14

 

 

 v

Meeting at which the draft corporate planning documents (Delivery Program and Operational Plan) are endorsed for exhibition

 *

Meeting at which the draft corporate planning documents (Delivery Program and Operational Plan) are adopted

 #

Meetings at which the Operational Plan quarterly reviews (March and September) are presented

 @

Meetings at which the Delivery Program progress reports (including the Operational Plan quarterly reviews for December and June) are presented

 ^

Election of Mayor and/or Deputy Mayor

 ü

Meeting at which the 2021-22 Annual Statements are presented

 

Meeting at which any comments on the 2021-22 Annual Statements are adopted 

 +

Meeting at which the Annual Report is presented

Briefing to consider Budget, draft fees & charges and corporate document

-            Extraordinary Meetings are held as required.

-            Members of the public are invited to observe meetings of the Council (Ordinary and Policy Review Committee).

Should you wish to address Council, please contact Governance Coordinator, Adam Beggs on 4732 7597.

 

 

 


UNCONFIRMED MINUTES

 OF THE ORDINARY MEETING OF PENRITH CITY COUNCIL HELD REMOTELY USING AUDIO VISUAL LINKS, AUDIO STREAMED ON THE COUNCIL WEBSITE AND IN THE

COUNCIL CHAMBERS

ON MONDAY 25 JULY 2022 AT 7:00PM

 

NATIONAL ANTHEM 

The meeting opened with the National Anthem.

 

WEBCASTING STATEMENT

Her Worship the Mayor, Councillor Tricia Hitchen read a statement advising that Council Meetings are recorded and webcast.

 

STATEMENT OF RECOGNITION

Her Worship the Mayor, Councillor Tricia Hitchen read a statement of recognition of Penrith City’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cultural Heritage.

 

PRAYER

The Council Prayer was read by the Rev Christine Bayliss Kelly.

PRESENT

Her Worship the Mayor, Councillor Tricia Hitchen, Deputy Mayor Councillor John Thain, and Councillors Jim Aitken OAM, Bernard Bratusa, Todd Carney, Robin Cook, Kevin Crameri OAM, Mark Davies, Sue Day, Ross Fowler OAM, Glenn Gardiner, Karen McKeown OAM,  Mark Rusev and Marlene Shipley.

 

APOLOGIES

187  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Tricia Hitchen seconded Councillor Todd Carney that the apology received from Councillor Jonathan Pullen be received.

 

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES - Ordinary Meeting - 27 June 2022

188  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM seconded Councillor Marlene Shipley that the minutes of the Ordinary Meeting of 27 June 2022 be confirmed, with an amendment to Declarations of Interest to now read:

 

“Councillor Mark Rusev declared a Non-Pecuniary Conflict of Interest – Less than Significant in Item 4 - Centre Corporations - 2022-23 Business Plans, Item 9 - Adoption of Community Strategic Plan - Penrith 2036,+ 2022-32 Resourcing Strategy, Delivery Program 2022-26 and 2022-23 Operational Plan and Item 14 – WestInvest Program, as he is on the board of the Penrith CBD Corporation. Councillor Mark Rusev stated that he would remain in the meeting during consideration of these items but would not participate in discussion of the items.”

 

 

 

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

There were no declarations of interest.

 

SUSPENSION OF STANDING ORDERS

189  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Todd Carney seconded Councillor Glenn Gardiner that Standing Orders be suspended to allow members of the public to address the meeting, the time being 7:04pm.

 

Mr Samih Khan

 

Item 7 - Planning Proposal to amend Penrith LEP 2010 - Glenmore Park Stage 3 - draft Development Control Plan and draft Contributions Plan

 

Mr Khan, an affected person, spoke in opposition to the recommendation.  Mr Khan outlined his family’s long history of living in the Penrith LGA.  Mr Khan noted that their property on Chain O Ponds Road is the only one in the subject proposal which is not controlled by any purchase agreement with the proponent, as they had not signed an agreement with Mirvac when approached in the past when other landowners in the area had done so.  Mr Khan stated that he believed his family have been unfairly burdened with C2 Environmental zoning and Open Space, compared to the properties which would be controlled by the proponent, as they would then not be able to use approximately 60% of their land bordering the proposed development as this is proposed to be zoned for environmental protection and parklands.

 

 

Procedural Motion

190  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Todd Carney seconded Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM that an extension of time be granted to the speaker so that he may conclude his address, the time being 7:12pm.

 

Mr Khan concluded his address by requesting consideration of a better outcome for his family’s property, adding that R3 zoning should be included for the part of their property which borders onto the open space component of the proposal. 

 

 

RESUMPTION OF STANDING ORDERS

191  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Todd Carney seconded Councillor Sue Day that Standing Orders be resumed, the time being 7:26pm.

 

 

 

Mayoral Minutes

 

1        Passing of Glenn Sargeant OAM                                                             

192  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Tricia Hitchen seconded Councillor John Thain that the Mayoral Minute on Passing of Glenn Sargeant OAM be received.

 

 


 

 

2        2022 Local Celebration Award Winners                                                 

193  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Tricia Hitchen seconded Councillor John Thain that the Mayoral Minute on 2022 Local Celebration Award Winners  be received.

 

Reports of Committees

 

1        Report and Recommendations of the Heritage Advisory Committee Meeting held on 15 June 2022                                                                 

194  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM seconded Councillor Mark Rusev that the recommendations contained in the Report and Recommendations of the Heritage Advisory Committee meeting held on 15 June, 2022 be adopted.

 

 

DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Outcome 1 - We protect and enhance an ecologically sustainable environment

 

1        NSW Environmental Trust - Organics Collections Grants Program   

195  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Todd Carney seconded Councillor Robin Cook

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on NSW Environmental Trust - Organics Collections Grants Program be received

2.     Council accepts the $521,824.00 (ex GST) grant funding from the NSW Environmental Trust to support this trial.

 

 

2        Resilience Committee - Community and Professional Membership  

196  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Karen McKeown OAM seconded Councillor Robin Cook

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Resilience Committee - Community and Professional Membership be received

2.     The nominated professional organisations, and the five (5) community members selected through the expression of interest process outlined in the report, be appointed for the term of the Resilience Committee until August 2024, with an extension beyond this term if required.

 

 


 

 

Outcome 2 - We are welcoming, healthy, happy and connected

 

3        Request for Major Event Sponsorship - Australian Waterski and Wakeboard Federation Limited (t/a Wakeboard Australia)                  

197  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM seconded Councillor Bernard Bratusa

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Request for Major Event Sponsorship - Australian Waterski and Wakeboard Federation Limited (t/a Wakeboard Australia) be received

2.     Council endorse sponsorship funding of $10,000 (plus GST) to Wakeboard Australia in support of the 2022 Cable Wakeboard National Championships.

 

 

4        Request for Major Event Sponsorship - Band Association of NSW Incorporated                                                                                               

198  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM seconded Councillor Bernard Bratusa

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Request for Major Event Sponsorship - Band Association of NSW Incorporated be received

2.     Council endorse sponsorship funding of $5,000 (plus GST) to the Band Association of NSW Incorporated in support of the 2022 NSW State Band Championships event.

 

 

5        Request for Major Event Sponsorship - Veterans Cricket NSW Association Incorporated                                                                         

199  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM seconded Councillor Bernard Bratusa

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Request for Major Event Sponsorship - Veterans Cricket NSW Association Incorporated be received

2.     Council endorse sponsorship funding of $5,000 (plus GST) and $1,500 (plus GST) towards a civic reception to Veterans Cricket NSW in support of the 2022 Veteran Cricket NSW 60’s State Championships event.

 

 


 

 

Outcome 3 - We plan and shape our growing City

 

6        Affordable Rental Housing Contribution Scheme Planning Proposal

200  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Marlene Shipley seconded Councillor John Thain

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Affordable Rental Housing Contribution Scheme Planning Proposal be received.

2.     Council endorse the Planning Proposal presented in this report which has been provided as Enclosure 1 to this report.

3.     The General Manager be granted delegation to make minor changes to update and finalise the Planning Proposal referred to in resolution 2 prior to Council’s submission of the Planning Proposal to the Minister for Planning.

4.     Council officers forward the Planning Proposal to the Minister for Planning with a request to issue a Gateway Determination. The submission will include a request to issue Council with Delegation for plan making authority.

5.     The General Manager be granted delegation to make necessary minor changes to the Planning Proposal in the lead up to the Gateway Determination and prior to the public exhibition in response to the conditions of the Gateway Determination.

6.     Council publicly exhibits the Planning Proposal for a period specified in the Gateway Determination and in accordance with the community consultation requirements of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 and the Environmental Planning and Assessment Regulation 2000.

7.     A further report is presented to Council following the public exhibition of the Planning Proposal.

In accordance with Section 375A of the Local Government Act 1993, a DIVISION was then called with the following result:

For

Against

 

Councillor Karen McKeown OAM

 

Councillor Robin Cook

 

Councillor Todd Carney

 

Councillor John Thain

 

Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM

 

Councillor Sue Day

 

Councillor Jim Aitken OAM

 

Councillor Marlene Shipley

 

Councillor Ross Fowler OAM

 

Councillor Glenn Gardiner

 

Councillor Bernard Bratusa

 

Councillor Mark Rusev

 

Councillor Mark Davies

 

Councillor Tricia Hitchen

 

 

7        Planning Proposal to amend Penrith LEP 2010 - Glenmore Park Stage 3 - draft Development Control Plan and draft Contributions Plan                                                                                                             

201  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Todd Carney seconded Councillor Karen McKeown OAM

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Planning Proposal to amend Penrith LEP 2010 - Glenmore Park Stage 3 - draft Development Control Plan and draft Contributions Plan be received.

2.     The Planning Proposal for Glenmore Park Stage 3 (RZ18/0006) be placed on public exhibition and agency consultation as soon as practical, concurrently with the draft Section 7.11 Contributions Plan, draft Development Control Plan, and VPA Letters of Offer which are attached or enclosed to this report.

3.     A report be prepared for Council to present the outcomes of the public exhibition and agency consultation.

4.     After exhibition of the Letters of Offer, a draft Voluntary Planning Agreement be reported to Council for endorsement for public notification.

5.     The Department of Planning and Environment be provided with an update on Council’s decision.

6.     Council perform ground proofing on the properties in Chain O Ponds Road to confirm the ecology that is being proposed.

 

In accordance with Section 375A of the Local Government Act 1993, a DIVISION was then called with the following result:

For

Against

 

Councillor Karen McKeown OAM

Councillor Jim Aitken OAM

Councillor Robin Cook

Councillor Glenn Gardiner

Councillor Todd Carney

 

Councillor John Thain

 

Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM

 

Councillor Sue Day

 

Councillor Marlene Shipley

 

Councillor Ross Fowler OAM

 

Councillor Bernard Bratusa

 

Councillor Mark Rusev

 

Councillor Mark Davies

 

Councillor Tricia Hitchen

 

 


 

 

8        Voluntary Planning Agreement offer by Altis Frasers for the Yards Estate 657-769 Mamre Road, Kemps Creek                                           

202  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor John Thain seconded Councillor Sue Day

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on the Voluntary Planning Agreement offer by Altis Frasers for the Yards Estate 657-769 Mamre Road, Kemps Creek be received.

2.     Council endorse, for notification, the draft Voluntary Planning Agreement for by Altis Frasers for the Yards Estate 657-769 Mamre Road, Kemps Creek, provided as a separate enclosure to this report.

3.     A further report to Council be prepared following the notification of the VPA, that details any submissions received and should no significant issues be raised in submissions received, seek Council’s endorsement of the VPA.

In accordance with Section 375A of the Local Government Act 1993, a DIVISION was then called with the following result:

For

Against

 

Councillor Karen McKeown OAM

 

Councillor Robin Cook

 

Councillor Todd Carney

 

Councillor John Thain

 

Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM

 

Councillor Sue Day

 

Councillor Jim Aitken OAM

 

Councillor Marlene Shipley

 

Councillor Ross Fowler OAM

 

Councillor Glenn Gardiner

 

Councillor Bernard Bratusa

 

Councillor Mark Rusev

 

Councillor Mark Davies

 

Councillor Tricia Hitchen

 

 

Outcome 4 - We manage and improve our built environment

 

9        Grant Acceptance - Metropolitan Greenspace Program                      

203  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM seconded Councillor Marlene Shipley

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Grant Acceptance - Metropolitan Greenspace Program be received

2.     Council accept the Metropolitan Greenspace program funding for $100,000 and allocate the matched Council Contribution of $100,000 for the update of the Our River Masterplan

3.     Council write to relevant State Members and the Minister thanking them for their funding support towards delivering positive opportunities in planning public spaces for our community

4.     The General Manager (or their delegate) be authorised to sign all necessary legal documents in relation to this matter.

 

 

10      Multi-Sport Community Facility Fund - Grant Acceptance                  

204  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Todd Carney seconded Councillor John Thain

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Multi-Sport Community Facility Fund - Grant Acceptance be received.

2.     Council endorse acceptance of the grant awards for Gipps Street ($5m) and The Kingsway ($1.425m)

3.     Provisional stage 2 rates from Glascott Landscape and Civil Pty Ltd for Multi-Sport Community Facility Fund - Grant Acceptance, for an amount up to $5,000,000 (excluding GST) inclusive of rise and fall allowance be accepted.

4.     Letter of appreciation be issued to the NSW Government.

 

 

11      RFT21/22-09 Woodriff Gardens Tennis                                                   

205  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Todd Carney seconded Councillor John Thain

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on RFT21/22-09 Woodriff Gardens Tennis be received.

2.     Alpall Pty Ltd be awarded the Contract subject to the execution of a formal agreement for the RFT21/22-09 Woodriff Gardens Tennis for an amount of $2,282,000.00 excluding GST.

3.     The General Manager (or their delegate) be authorised to sign all necessary legal documents in relation to this matter.

 

12      RFT22/23-01 Surveyors Creek Footpath and Associated Civil Works

206  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Todd Carney seconded Councillor John Thain

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on RFT22/23-01 Surveyors Creek Footpath and Associated Civil Works be received

2.     The tender from Axial Construction Pty Ltd provided for the amount of $214,929.61 (excluding GST) be accepted for construction of a new footpath and drainage works at Surveyors Creek Softball Facility, Glenmore Park

3.     The General Manager (or their delegate) be authorised to sign all necessary legal documents in relation to this matter.

 

13      RFT22/23-07 City Park Landscape Construction and Allen Place Lane Construction Tender                                                                       

207  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Todd Carney seconded Councillor John Thain

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on RFT22/23-07 City Park Landscape Construction and Allen Place Lane Construction Tender be received.

2.     The total project budget be increased by $4.61m. This additional budget is to be funded from the Financial Management Reserve.

3.     The tender from Regal Innovations Pty Ltd, for the amount of $11,712,778.00 (excluding GST) be accepted for RFT22/23-07 City Park Landscape Construction and Allen Place Lane Construction.

4.     The General Manager (or their delegate) be authorised to sign all necessary legal documents in relation to this matter.

 

 

Outcome 5 - We have open and collaborative leadership

 

14      Local Government NSW Annual Conference 2022                               

208  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Marlene Shipley seconded Councillor Glenn Gardiner

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Local Government NSW Annual Conference 2022 be received

2.     Council nominate nine (9) Councillors as its voting delegates for motions to attend the 2022 LGNSW Conference being held at The Crowne Plaza Hunter Valley, from 23-25 October 2022.

3.     Council consider the nomination of observers to attend the 2022 LGNSW Annual Conference.

4.     Leave of absence be granted as appropriate for those Councillors attending the conference.

5.     Council motions as outlined in the report be endorsed and forwarded to LGNSW.

6.     A further report be brought back to the Council with any identified additional motions (if required).

 


 

 

15      Summary of Investment & Banking for the period 1 June 2022 to 30 June 2022                                                                                                   

209  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Ross Fowler OAM seconded Councillor Bernard Bratusa

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Summary of Investment & Banking for the period 1 June 2022 to 30 June 2022 be received

2.     The certificate of the Responsible Accounting Officer and Summary of Investments and Performance for the period 1 June 2022 to 30 June 2022 be noted and accepted.

3.     The graphical Investment Analysis as at 30 June 2022 be noted.

 

 

URGENT BUSINESS

 

 

UB 1           Prue Car MP     

Councillor Todd Carney requested that Council write to Prue Car MP wishing her a speedy recovery.

 

210  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Todd Carney seconded Councillor Karen McKeown OAM that the matter be brought forward and dealt with as a matter of urgency. 

 

Her Worship the Mayor, Councillor Tricia Hitchen, ruled that the matter was urgent and should be dealt with at the meeting.

 

211  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Todd Carney seconded Councillor Karen McKeown OAM that Council write to Prue Car MP wishing her a speedy recovery.

 

The Mayor vacated the Chair and the Deputy Mayor took the Chair, the time being 7:53pm.

 

UB 2           Briefing from Water NSW  

Councillor Tricia Hitchen requested that Council seek a briefing from Water NSW concerning future plans for Warragamba Dam and that information also be requested regarded future plans for flood evacuations.

212  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Tricia Hitchen seconded Councillor Robin Cook that the matter be brought forward and dealt with as a matter of urgency. 

 

Her Worship the Mayor, Councillor Tricia Hitchen, ruled that the matter was urgent and should be dealt with at the meeting.

 

213  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Tricia Hitchen seconded Councillor Robin Cook that Council seek a briefing from Water NSW concerning future plans for Warragamba Dam and that information also be requested regarded future plans for flood evacuations.

 

The Deputy Mayor then vacated the Chair and the Mayor retook the Chair, the time being 7:54pm.

 

UB 3           61-79 Henry Street, Penrith

Councillor Bernard Bratusa requested that an urgent memo be provided to all Councillors regarding the development at 61-79 Henry Street, Penrith.

214  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Bernard Bratusa seconded Councillor Todd Carney that the matter be brought forward and dealt with as a matter of urgency. 

 

Her Worship the Mayor, Councillor Tricia Hitchen, ruled that the matter was urgent and should be dealt with at the meeting.

 

215  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Bernard Bratusa seconded Councillor Todd Carney that an urgent memo be provided to all Councillors regarding the development at 61-79 Henry Street, Penrith.

 

 

Committee of the Whole

 

216 RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Jim Aitken OAM seconded Councillor Glenn Gardiner that the meeting adjourn to the Committee of the Whole to deal with the following matters, the time being 7:56pm.

 

1        Presence of the Public

 

CW1 RESOLVED on the motion of Councillor Jim Aitken OAM seconded Councillor Glenn Gardiner that the press and public be excluded from Committee of the Whole to deal with the following matters:

 

 

Outcome 5

 

2        Council Property - Variation of Lease - The Salvation Army - Suite 2, 54 Henry St, Penrith                                                                                                                                

 

This item has been referred to Committee of the Whole as the report refers to information that would, if disclosed, confer a commercial advantage on a person with whom the Council is conducting (or proposes to conduct) business and discussion of the matter in open meeting would be, on balance, contrary to the public interest.

 

3        Unsolicited Proposal to Purchase Lang and Kokoda Park - Detailed Proposal Reassessment                                                                                                                   

 

This item has been referred to Committee of the Whole as the report refers to commercial information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed (i) prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied it; or (ii) confer a commercial advantage on a competitor of the Council; or (iii) reveal a trade secret and discussion of the matter in open meeting would be, on balance, contrary to the public interest.

 

The meeting resumed at 7:58pm and the Mayor reported that the Committee of the Whole met at 7:56pm on 25 July 2022, the following being present

 

Her Worship the Mayor, Councillor Tricia Hitchen, Deputy Mayor Councillor John Thain, and Councillors Jim Aitken OAM, Bernard Bratusa, Todd Carney, Robin Cook, Kevin Crameri OAM, Mark Davies, Sue Day, Ross Fowler OAM, Glenn Gardiner, Karen McKeown OAM,  , Mark Rusev and Marlene Shipley.

 

and the Committee of the Whole excluded the press and public from the meeting for the reasons set out in CW1 and that the Committee of the Whole submitted the following recommendations to Council.

 

CONFIDENTIAL BUSINESS

 

2        Council Property - Variation of Lease - The Salvation Army - Suite 2, 54 Henry St, Penrith                                                                                                                                

RECOMMENDED on the MOTION of Councillor Ross Fowler OAM seconded Councillor Jim Aitken OAM  

CW2 That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Council Property - Variation of Lease - The Salvation Army - Suite 2, 54 Henry St, Penrith be received

2.     Council approve the proposed variation of lease for an additional 45sqm.

3.     The Common Seal of the Council of the City of Penrith be affixed to all documents as required, and the General Manager (or their delegate) be authorised to sign all necessary legal documents in relation to this matter.

 

 

3        Unsolicited Proposal to Purchase Lang and Kokoda Park - Detailed Proposal Reassessment                                                                                                                   

RECOMMENDED on the MOTION of Councillor Ross Fowler OAM seconded Councillor Jim Aitken OAM  

CW3 That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Unsolicited Proposal to Purchase Lang and Kokoda Park - Detailed Proposal Reassessment be received

2.     Council decline the Unsolicited Proposal submitted by Pacific Planning based on the details provided within this report.

 

 

ADOPTION OF Committee of the Whole

 

217 RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Karen McKeown OAM seconded Councillor  Robin Cook that the recommendations contained in the Committee of the Whole and shown as CW1, CW2 and CW3 be adopted.

 

 

There being no further business the Chairperson declared the meeting closed the time being 8:00pm.

 


PENRITH CITY COUNCIL

 

Procedure for Addressing Meetings

 

Anyone can request permission to address a meeting, providing that the number of speakers is limited to three in support of any proposal and three against.

 

Any request about an issue or matter on the Agenda for the meeting can be lodged with the General Manager or Public Officer up until 12 noon on the day of the meeting.

 

Prior to the meeting the person who has requested permission to address the meeting will need to provide the Public Officer with a written statement of the points to be covered during the address in sufficient detail so as to inform the Councillors of the substance of the address and a written copy of any questions to be asked of the Council in order that responses to those questions can be provided in due course.

 

In addition, prior to addressing the meeting a person addressing Council or Committee will be informed that they do not enjoy any privilege and that permission to speak may be withdrawn should they make inappropriate comments.

 

It should be noted that persons who wish to address the Council are addressing a formal part of the Council Meeting. All persons addressing the Meeting should give consideration to their dress attire. Smart casual is a minimum that is thought to be appropriate when addressing such a forum.

 

It should be noted that speakers at meetings of the Council or Committee do not have absolute privilege (parliamentary privilege).  A speaker who makes any potentially offensive or defamatory remarks about any other person may render themselves open to legal action.

 

Prior to addressing the meeting the person will be required to sign the following statement:

 

“I (name) understand that the meeting I intend to address on (date) is a public meeting.  I also understand that should I say or present any material that is inappropriate, I may be subject to legal action.  I also acknowledge that I have been informed to obtain my own legal advice about the appropriateness of the material that I intend to present at the above mentioned meeting”.

 

Should a person fail to sign the above statement then permission to address either the Council or Committee will not be granted.

 

The Public Officer or Minute Clerk will speak to those people who have requested permission to address the meeting, prior to the meeting at 6.45pm.

 

It is up to the Council or Committee to decide if the request to address the meeting will be granted.

 

Where permission is to be granted the Council or Committee, at the appropriate time, will suspend only so much of the Standing Orders to allow the address to occur.

 

The Chairperson will then call the person up to the lectern or speaking area.

 

The person addressing the meeting needs to clearly indicate:

 

·       Their name;

 

·       Organisation or group they are representing (if applicable);

 

·       Details of the issue to be addressed and the item number of the report in the Business Paper;

 

·       Whether they are opposing or supporting the issue or matter (if applicable) and the action they would like the meeting to take;

 

·         The interest of the speaker (e.g. affected person, neighbour, applicant,    applicants spokesperson, interested citizen etc).

 

Each person then has five minutes to make their address.  Those addressing Council will be required to speak to the written statement they have submitted.  Permission to address Council is not to be taken as an opportunity to refute or otherwise the points made by previous speakers on the same issue. 

 

The Council or Committee can extend this time if they consider if appropriate, however, everyone needs to work on the basis that the address will be for five minutes only.

 

Councillors may have questions about the address so people are asked to remain at the lectern or in the speaking area until the Chairperson has thanked them.

 

When this occurs, they should then return to their seat.

 

Glenn McCarthy

Public Officer

02 4732 7649                                               

   


Notices of Motion

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

1        New Penrith Stadium                                                                                                         1

 

2        State Road Intersection Review                                                                                         2

 

 

 

 



Ordinary Meeting                                                                                               22 August 2022

Notice of Motion

1          New Penrith Stadium            

 

 

Councillor Bernard Bratusa TO MOVE:

 

That Penrith City Council:

 

1.   Strongly supports the NSW Government's plan to redevelop Penrith Stadium

 

2.   Notes the Penrith Paceway site is zoned recreation

 

3.   Does not support the re-zoning of the Penrith Paceway site for high-rise development

 

4.   Notes on the 4 July 2022 Infrastructure NSW commenced commercial negotiations for the acquisition of the Paceway site

 

5.   Acknowledges Infrastructure NSW efforts with the Penrith District A, H & I Society to fund the relocation of the Penrith Paceway as part of the acquisition process.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                               22 August 2022

Notice of Motion

2          State Road Intersection Review            

 

 

Councillor Glenn Gardiner TO MOVE:

 

That:

1.   Council write to the NSW Minister for Transport requesting an urgent review of all State Road intersections within the Londonderry, Berkshire Park and Llandilo area. These must include (but not be limited to) the following:

 

a)   Where there is insufficient undertaking opportunity with fixed and dangerous obstacles such as power poles and bus stops:

 

·    Londonderry and Whitegates Roads

·    Londonderry and Boscobel Roads

·    Cranebrook and Castlereagh Roads

·    Cranebrook and Tadmore Roads

·    Cranebrook and Church Roads

·    Castlereagh and West Wilchard Roads

·    The Northern and Fifth Roads

·    The Northern and Carrington Roads

 

b)   Where there is limited vision to safely navigate the intersection:

 

·    Cranebrook and Taylor Roads

·    Richmond and Llandilo Roads

 

2.   Council write to the Member for Londonderry seeking their support and advocacy for the review and upgrade of all State Road intersections within the Londonderry, Berkshire Park and Llandilo area.

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.  


Reports of Committees

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

1        Report and Recommendations of the Access Committee Meeting held on 13 July 2022                                                                                                                                              1

 

2        Report and Recommendations of the Local Traffic Committee Meeting held on 1 August 2022                                                                                                                                    4

 

 

 

 



Ordinary Meeting                                                                                               22 August 2022

 

REPORT AND RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE
 Access Committee MEETING

HELD ON 13 July, 2022

 

 

 

PRESENT

Her Worship the Mayor, Councillor Tricia Hitchen (Chair), Councillor Robin Cook, Councillor Todd Carney, Matthew Roger, Farah Madon, Alan Windley, Carole Grayson, Karen McIntyre, Dianne Brookes, Jeni Pollard – Manager City Resilience, Megan Whittaker – City Activation, Community and Place Manager, Natalie Wadwell – Community Capacity Officer, Allison Kyriakakis – Acting Community Resilience Coordinator, Sophie Davis – Social Strategy Officer, Gavin Cherry – Development Assessment Coordinator, Carlie Ryan – City Strategy.

 

APOLOGIES

Anthony Mulholland, Marcela Hart, Nik Proufas.

 

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES - Access Committee Meeting - 1 June 2022

The minutes of the Access Committee Meeting of 1 June 2022 were confirmed.

 

 

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

 

Farah Madon declared a conflict of interest in relation to DA22/0534 19 Middlebrook Rise, Glenmore Park.

 

 

UPDATE ON ACTION ITEMS FROM PREVIOUS MINUTES

 

Natalie Wadwell provided an update on action item GB4 Nepean Hospital Stage 1 Tower A.

 

Council is currently preparing a letter to Transport for NSW to advocate for a dedicated bus stop, initially suggested for Somerset Street. Matt Roger advised that due to the layout of the hospital, Somerset Street is now not a suitable location and that the letter should reference ‘the most practical location.’

 

Megan Whittaker provided an update on action item GB7 New Ministers.

 

Council is currently preparing letters to the new Government Ministers which will be sent out shortly. 


 

 

DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Outcome 2 - We plan for our future growth

 

1        Development Applications referred to Access Committee

DA22/0534 19 Middlebrook Rise, Glenmore Park

Farah Madon excused herself from the meeting due to a conflict of interest in relation to this item.

Gavin Cherry spoke to the construction and embellishment of a neighbourhood park as an extension of Pinnacle Park within Glenmore Park. The development has frontage to Middlebrook Rise to the west, Shorthorn Ave to the south and Capstone Terrace to the east.

Items discussed by the Committee included:

•        Provision of public toilet facilities

•        Concerns regarding placement of the balance beam and potential impacts for visually impaired people.                                                                                            

RECOMMENDED

That the information contained in the report on Development Applications referred to Access Committee be received.

 

2        Places of Penrith Strategic Framework update

Carlie Ryan spoke to the Places of Penrith Strategic Framework including the airport, Sydney Metro Western Sydney Line, employment lands etc. The strategies currently in progress include the Rural Lands Strategy, Local Housing Strategy, St Marys Structure Plan and Corridors and Centres                                                                                          

RECOMMENDED

That the information contained in the report on Places of Penrith Strategic Framework update be received.

 

Outcome 6 - We are healthy and share strong community spirit

 

3        Disability Inclusion Action Plan 2022-26 implementation and 30 Year Access Committee Anniversary

Natalie Wadwell provided an update on the implementation of the DIAP including:

•        Finalisation of the document had been completed to schedule through the required process

•        How staff will manage reporting internally, how this informs updates to the State Government and when the Access Committee will be updated. This included an update on impact measurement

•        How staff and the community will be kept informed through an internal and external communications campaign

•        Tentative date for 30-year celebration of the Access Committee

•        Staff training on vision impairment and neurodiversity, and considerations for inclusive events was delivered ahead of NAIDOC 2022.                                   

RECOMMENDED

That the information contained in the report on Disability Inclusion Action Plan 2022-26 implementation and 30 Year Access Committee Anniversary be received.

 

 

GENERAL  BUSINESS

 

GB 1           Community Access Concerns    

Acknowledging correspondence received from Mr Kevin Finley addressed to both Council and the Access Committee regarding concerns around community access, these concerns were addressed as part of the Public Exhibition of the DIAP and incorporated into the plan. A formal response will be sent to Mr Finley shortly.

 

GB 2           Lack of Pathway around the Bunnings North Penrith Site    

Matt Roger advised that he had been approached by a community member regarding the lack of a pathway around the Bunnings North Penrith site. Mayor Hitchen advised that plans are currently underway to upgrade this intersection including the installation of traffic lights, footpaths, and pram ramps in this area.

 

GB 3           Building Construction Code       

Farah Madon advised that the Building Construction Code has being updated and will come into place in September 2022, including a liveable design guideline. Currently NSW is not planning to take this code on board.

 

GB 4           Draft Development Control Plan (DCP)        

Farah Madon noted that her concerns raised in the previous Access Committee meeting had not been clearly minuted, Jeni Pollard offered an apology. Farah acknowledged the written update provided by City Planning in response to her request for the Access Committee to review the DCP prior to it going to public comment. City Planning have advised that the DCP needs to go to Council first, before going on public exhibition and it will come to the Access Committee for review before going on public exhibition. Comments from the Access Committee will be noted as part of the formal stakeholder engagement process. After public exhibition, feedback from all stakeholders will be considered, and changes made where practical.

 

GB 5           David Currie PlaySpace     

Mayor, Councillor Tricia Hitchen noted that the opening date for the David Currie PlaySpace has again been delayed due to poor weather conditions effecting final construction. The suggestion was noted that it would be great to hold the inauguration on International Day of Disability, however this would be dependent on several factors.

 

 

There being no further business the Chairperson declared the meeting closed the time being 6.15pm.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the recommendations contained in the Report and Recommendations of the Access Committee meeting held on 13 July, 2022 be adopted.

 


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                               22 August 2022

 

REPORT AND RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE
 Local Traffic Committee MEETING

HELD ON 1 August, 2022

 

 

(Note: due to prevailing public health crisis, and related COVID-19 protocols, the Local Traffic Committee Business Paper and reports were referred to members and a formal meeting held via on-line Microsoft Teams platform).

PRESENT

Councillor Robin Cook (Representative for the Member of Londonderry), Councillor Karen McKeown OAM (Council Representative) (Present for the meeting from 9.13am), Raymond Tran – Transport for NSW (TfNSW) and Sergeant Leon Cross - Nepean Police Area Command (PAC).

IN ATTENDANCE

Adam Wilkinson – Engineering Services Manager (Acting Chair), Michael Alderton – Acting Traffic Engineering Coordinator, Philip Saverimuttu – Senior Traffic Engineer, Liam Warda – Trainee Engineer, Wendy Read – Road Safety Officer, Isaac Mann – Acting Transport Engineer, Mia Ecob – Acting Engineering Services Secretary, Kylie Thornley – Traffic Administration Officer and Steve Grady – Busways.

 

APOLOGIES

Mayor Tricia Hitchen (Representative for the Member of Penrith), Andrew Jackson – Director Development and Regulatory Services, Kablan Mowad – Senior Traffic Engineer, Joshua Hull – Acting Senior Traffic Engineer, Lalaine Malaluan – Traffic Engineer and Tiana Dickson – Business Administration Trainee.

 

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES - Local Traffic Committee Meeting - 6 June 2022

The minutes of the Local Traffic Committee Meeting of 6 June 2022 were confirmed.

 

Noting Item 7 “Victoria Street Blackspot Project - Consultation Feedback and Endorsement of Design Plans AV39, AV40 and AV41” was deferred at the Ordinary Meeting and will be discussed at a further date following further investigation.

 

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

 

Nil.

 

DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Outcome 4 - We manage and improve our built environment

 

1        Jamison Road, Kingswood - Proposed 'Bus Zone' Signs

Steve Grady – Busways supports this proposal.                                                     

RECOMMENDED

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Jamison Road, Kingswood - Proposed 'Bus Zone' Signs be received.

2.     Bus Zone signage be installed at the two existing bus stops on Jamison Road, Kingswood, west of Somerset Street and Stapley Street, as shown in Appendix 1. 

3.     Council’s Rangers, the resident who reported the matter, and the affected residents be advised of Council’s resolution.​ 

 

2        Delegated Authority to Approve Signage and Line Marking Plans for Greenfield Subdivisions                                                                               

RECOMMENDED

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Delegated Authority to Approve Signage and Line Marking Plans for Greenfield Subdivisions be received.

2.     Delegated authority be given to Council’s Traffic Engineering Coordinator to sign-off signage and line marking plans for approval for greenfield subdivisions, following concurrence from the voting members of the Local Traffic Committee.

 

3        Great Western Highway, Kingswood - Proposed Change to Parking Restrictions                                                                                                   

RECOMMENDED

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Great Western Highway, Kingswood - Proposed Change to Parking Restrictions be received.

2.     Council write to Transport for New South Wales and advocate for changes to the parking restrictions signage on the State Road as shown in Appendix 1.

3.     The customer who reported the matter be advised of Council’s resolution.

 

4        William Howell Drive, Glenmore Park - Adjustments to Double-Barrier Line Marking and 'No Stopping' Restrictions

Steve Grady – Busways queried the direction of the arrows on the bus signage. Michael Alderton – Acting Traffic Engineering Coordinator advised it was just the way it was displayed on the plan, and that the signage was correct.                                      

RECOMMENDED

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on William Howell Drive, Glenmore Park - Adjustments to Double-Barrier Line Marking and 'No Stopping' Restrictions be received.

2.     The adjustments to the existing double-barrier line marking and ‘No Stopping’ restrictions be implemented on William Howell Drive, Glenmore Park, as shown in Appendix 2.

3.     All works associated with the installation of the signposting and line marking be undertaken by the applicant at no cost to Council.

4.     The applicant and Council’s Rangers be advised of Council’s resolution.

 

5        Evan Street, Penrith - Provision of 'No Parking - Australia Post Vehicles Excepted' Zone                                                                              

RECOMMENDED

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Evan Street, Penrith - Provision of 'No Parking - Australia Post Vehicles Excepted' Zone be received.

2.     Consultation be undertaken with affected properties regarding the proposed 'No Parking - Australia Post Vehicles Excepted' Zone’ on Evan Street, Penrith as shown in Appendix 1.

3.     Subject to no substantial objections being received, the proposed 'No Parking - Australia Post Vehicles Excepted' Zone’ be installed on Evan Street as shown in Appendix 1.

4.     Australia Post, Council’s Design and Project Engineer and Civil Works Engineer be advised of Council’s decision.

 

6        Jamison Road, Jamisontown - Endorsement of Signage and Line Marking Plans

Councillor Karen McKeown OAM (Council Representative) requested that residents of McNaughton Street be advised of the proposed works and resultant left in left out restrictions at the intersection of McNaughton Street and Jamison Road that were identified on the signage and linemarking plan. Michael Alderton – Acting Traffic Engineering Coordinator advised the residents were advised about the changes during the VPA notification a few years ago. Given the time since the last notification period new notification letters will now be sent to the affected residents on McNaughton Street.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

RECOMMENDED

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Jamison Road, Jamisontown - Endorsement of Signage and Line Marking Plans be received.

2.     The signage and line marking plans prepared by Diversi Consulting, Project No. 19007, Drawing No. C095 (Revision 1, dated 8/07/2021), C096 and C097 (both Revision 5, dated 25/02/2022) be endorsed for installation, as shown in Appendix 1.

3.     All works associated with the implementation of the signposting and line marking shall be undertaken by the applicant at no cost to Council.

4.     The applicant and Council’s Rangers be advised of Council’s resolution.

5.     Busways be advised of Council’s resolution.

6.     Residents on McNaughton Street, Jamisontown be notified of the proposed works, changes to access at Jamison Road, and advise of an estimation of when the works will be completed.  

 

 


 

 

7        Myrtle Road, Claremont Meadows - Proposed Traffic Calming Devices

RECOMMENDED

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Myrtle Road, Claremont Meadows - Proposed Traffic Calming Devices be received.

2.     Consultation be undertaken with affected properties regarding the proposed traffic calming devices along Myrtle Road, Claremont Meadows as shown in Appendix 1.

3.     Subject to no substantial objections being received, the project listed in Council’s Traffic Facilities Prioritisation Program be updated to include additional traffic calming devices for funding.

4.     Once funding has been obtained, the concept design, as shown in Appendix 1, be forwarded to Council’s Design Team for detailed design and construction estimates, with a further report submitted to the Local Traffic Committee for the detailed design plan finalisation and endorsement for construction.

5.     Resident who raised the concerns be advised of Council’s resolution.

 

 

8        Samuel Foster Drive and Fragar Road, South Penrith - Proposed 'No Stopping' Restrictions                                                                                  

RECOMMENDED

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Samuel Foster Drive and Fragar Road, South Penrith - Proposed 'No Stopping' Restrictions be received.

2.     Affected residents be notified of the proposed installation of ‘No Stopping’ restrictions at the intersection of Samuel Foster Drive and Fragar Road, South Penrith.

3.     Following notification to affected residents the ‘No Stopping’ restrictions be installed at the intersection of Samuel Foster Drive and Fragar Road, South Penrith, as shown in Appendix 1.

4.     Council’s Rangers and the resident who raised this matter be advised of Council’s resolution.

 

9        River Road, Emu Plains - Proposed Raised Pedestrian Crossing

Councillor Karen McKeown OAM (Council Representative) strongly supports this proposal and the safety benefits to the increasing pedestrian activity.                            

RECOMMENDED

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on River Road, Emu Plains - Proposed Raised Pedestrian Crossing be received.

2.     Consultation be undertaken with affected properties regarding the proposed raised pedestrian crossing and associated signage on River Road, Emu Plains as shown in Appendix 1.

3.     Subject to no substantial objections being received, the proposed raised pedestrian crossing and associated signage be listed to Council’s Traffic Facilities Prioritisation Program.

4.     Once funding for this proposed pedestrian facility is obtained, the concept design as shown in Appendix 1, be forwarded to Council’s Design Co-ordinator to finalise design and construction estimates, with a Design Endorsement Report to the Local Traffic Committee as these are finalised.

5.     A street lighting assessment be conducted in accordance with Council’s Public Domain Lighting Policy (August 2004) to ensure compliance with the relevant lighting category.

6.     The resident who reported the matter be advised of Council’s resolution.

 

10      Bakers Lane, Kemps Creek - Endorsement of Signage and Line Marking Plans

Raymond Tran – Transport for NSW (TfNSW) raised some comments last week including the C1 Line marking not being needed. Michael Alderton – Acting Traffic Engineering Coordinator will arrange for the Development Engineering Team to discuss this offline with TfNSW.                                                                                        

RECOMMENDED

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Bakers Lane, Kemps Creek - Endorsement of Signage and Line Marking Plans be received.

2.     The signage and line marking plans prepared by Costin Roe Consulting (Drawing No. C013362.02-C701, Issue 0, dated 16/11/2021; Drawing No. C013362.02-C702, Issue 0, dated 16/11/2021; and Drawing No. C013362.02-C703, Issue 01, dated 22/02/2022) be endorsed for installation, as shown in Appendix 1.

3.     All works associated with the implementation of the signposting and line marking shall be undertaken by the applicant at no cost to Council.

4.     The applicant and Council’s Rangers be advised of Council’s resolution.

 

11      Carpenter Street and Marsden Road, St Marys - Proposed Traffic Calming Devices

Steve Grady – Busways raised concerns about the proposed speed hump near White Parade and how it will affect the existing bus stop at this location. Isaac Mann – Acting Transport Engineer advised that this only a concept plan at this stage so it will be addressed before going to design stage. Adam Wilkinson – Engineering Services Manager (Acting Chair) advised we will arrange an onsite meeting between Council and Busways prior to undertaking consultation.                                                               

RECOMMENDED

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Carpenter Street and Marsden Road, St Marys - Proposed Traffic Calming Devices be received.

2.     Consultation be undertaken with affected properties regarding the proposed traffic calming devices and associated signage along Carpenter Street and Marsden Road, St Marys as shown in Appendix 1. 

3.     Subject to no substantial objections being received, the proposed traffic calming devices and associated signage be listed to Council’s Traffic Facilities Prioritisation Program for funding. 

4.     Once funding has been obtained, the concept design, as shown in Appendix 1, be forwarded to Council’s Design Team for detailed design and construction estimates, with a further report submitted to the Local Traffic Committee for the detailed design plan finalisation and endorsement for construction. 

5.     Residents who raised the concerns be advised of Council’s resolution. 

 

12      Ferntree Close, Glenmore Park - Proposed 'No Stopping' Signs           

RECOMMENDED

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Ferntree Close, Glenmore Park - Proposed 'No Stopping' Signs be received.

2.     Consultation be undertaken with affected properties regarding the proposed ‘No Stopping’ signs along the small western section Ferntree Close, Glenmore Park.

3.     Subject to no substantial objections being received, the proposed ‘No Stopping’ signs along Ferntree Close, Glenmore Park be installed as shown in Appendix 1.

4.     Council’s Rangers and the resident who reported the matter be advised of Council’s resolution.

 

General BUSINESS

 

GB 1           St Marys Spring Festival and Street Parade – Saturday, 3 September    2022 

Raymond Tran – Transport for NSW (TfNSW) noted the TfNSW contact details in the TMP need to be updated and advised that the VMS on the Great Western Highway & Charles Hackett Drive is not a suitable location due to it being a possible distraction for motorists.

Executive Summary

The purpose of this report is to consider the Traffic Management Plan (TMP) for the St Marys Spring Festival and Street Parade to be held on Saturday 3 September 2022. The report recommends that the TMP for the event be endorsed, subject to conditions.

 

Background

Council has received a request from St Marys Town Centre Ltd for endorsement of the traffic management arrangements for the annual St Marys Spring Festival and Street Parade to be held on Saturday 3 September 2022, commencing at 10.00am (with set up time from 6.00am) and concluding at 3.00pm (with pack up time to 6.00pm).

 

The event is considered as a part Class 2 and part Class 4 Event under the “Guide to Traffic and Transport Management for Special Events” and requires a TMP and a Risk Management Plan to be prepared and submitted to Transport for NSW (TfNSW) for approval prior to the event.

 

The Festival is a street fair held in Queen Street, with approximately 200 stalls and displays are set up on both sides of the road, in addition to the stages for entertainment and amusement rides. A parade of moving vehicles and walking groups will also be held between 12.15pm and 1.30pm.

 

The event has been successfully held in previous years with little traffic concerns raised.

As presented in Appendix 1, certain roads will require temporary closure during the times specified to enable sufficient time to set up, operate and disassemble the street fair stalls, and the set up and running of the parade.

 

Festival

When Queen Street is closed at 6.00am, event personnel (wearing identification) will be on duty along Queen Street to direct stallholders to their sites.  Stallholders’ vehicles will then be removed from the street by 10.00am. Any marshals directing traffic will have TfNSW accreditation. Access for emergency vehicles will be made available throughout the event. Stallholders will vacate Queen Street by 6.00pm, at which time the street will re-open.

 

Street Parade

The parade will once again assemble at 11.45am in Jack Jewry Reserve and will leave the corner of Acacia Avenue and Merinda Street at 12.30pm and turn left into Carinya Avenue, right into Nariel Street and right into Queen Street. It will then proceed south to Carsons Lane, where it will disperse. The Parade is estimated to conclude by 1.30pm.

 

As in previous years, any disruptions to taxi and bus operations will be minimised, particularly around St Marys Railway Station. All affected residents, businesses, bus companies and emergency services will be notified of the arrangements two weeks prior to the event.

RECOMMENDED

That:

1.    The information contained in the report on St Marys Spring Festival and Street Parade to be held on Saturday 3 September 2022 be received.

2.    The Traffic Management Plans for the Class 2 and Class 4 Special Events pursuant to Roads and Maritime Services “Guide to Traffic and Transport Management for Special Events 2006” for the St Marys Spring Festival and Street Parade to be held on Saturday 3 September 2022 be endorsed, subject to the following conditions:

a.    Approval be given for the temporary road closures listed in Appendix 1.

b.    A Traffic Management Plan and Traffic Guidance Scheme detailing each event, including a Risk Management Plan, be lodged by the event applicant with Transport for NSW for approval and NSW Police for information prior to the events. A copy of the Transport for NSW approval must be submitted to Council prior to the events.  The Traffic Guidance Scheme shall detail how a minimum 4.0m emergency lane is maintained at all times during the events.

c.    The event applicant submits to Council a copy of Public Liability Insurance (usually a Certificate of Currency) of minimum $20 million, prior to the events.  In addition, the event applicant indemnifies Council in writing against all claims for damage and injury which may result from the proposed events.

 

d.    The event applicant arranges to place barricades and provide Roads and Maritime Services accredited Traffic Controllers where required by the approved Traffic Management Plan.  Where the Traffic Management and Traffic Guidance Schemes indicate Traffic Controllers are to be used, all Traffic Controllers must have current Roads and Maritime Services certification.

e.    The event applicant must provide advice to Council prior to the events that the event addresses all requirements of the NSW Occupational Health & Safety Act 2000 and the NSW Occupational Health & Safety Regulations 2001.

f.     The event applicant advertises the proposed temporary road closures in local newspapers a minimum of two weeks prior to the events, and provide Variable Message Signs (VMS) in appropriate locations a minimum of one week prior to the events, with the locations of the VMS boards submitted to Council for endorsement prior to their erection.  VMS boards should be located in accordance with the Roads and Maritime Services Technical Direction TDT2002/11c.

g.    The event applicant deliver an information letterbox drop and personal communication to all business proprietors, property owners/tenants, residents and other occupants in the affected streets two weeks prior to the events.  Any concerns or requirements must be resolved by the applicant or referred back to Council for consideration.  Satisfactory arrangements must be made to address such concerns to allow the events to proceed.

h.    Signposting advising the date and time of all closures be provided and erected by the event organiser two weeks prior to the events (the applicant to liaise with the Roads and Maritime Services regarding size of sign and text height).

i.     The event organiser notifies ambulance and fire brigade (Fire and Rescue NSW and Rural Fire Services) and State Emergency Services of the proposed events and submit a copy of the notification to Council prior to the events.

j.     The event applicant notifies private bus companies of the proposed events and submit a copy of the notification to Council prior to the events.  Bus companies shall be requested to advertise the changed route for affected buses at least one week prior to, and during, the events.

k.    Should the consultation process resolve to temporarily relocate bus stops or bus routes that were not indicated in the original Traffic Management Plan, a further report will be required to be submitted to the next available Local Traffic Committee meeting.

l.     The event applicant shall ensure that noise control measures are in place as required by the Protection of the Environment Operations (Noise Control) Regulation 2000.

m.   The event applicant is to request participants to obey road rules and     Police directions during the events.

 

3.    As a requirement of the RMS "Guide to Traffic and Transport Management for Special Events 2006”, this approval endorsing the traffic management plans be considered as Council’s Authorisation to regulate traffic on Council roads.

4.    The applicant be advised of Council’s resolution.

 

GB 2           Azalea Court and Acacia Avenue, Glenmore Park         

Councillor Karen McKeown OAM (Council Representative) raised concerns on behalf of Mr Nigel Nash. It is advised that the special needs bus enters these streets twice daily and they are having issues with low visibility on Azalea Court and speeding on Acacia Avenue. They have requested a Convex Mirror which is not supported by TfNSW and speed control devices. Adam Wilkinson – Engineering Services Manager (Acting Chair) advised we have received this request and have investigated the matter. Mia Ecob – Acting Engineering Services Secretary has distributed the current correspondence to the Committtee.

RECOMMENDED

That information to be provided to Councillor’s in a memo once an investigation has been completed.

 

 GB 3          86-90 Henry Street, Penrith         

Councillor Robin Cook (Representative for the Member of Londonderry) advised the footpath at this location on Henry Street is really uneven and concerned about this as it will be used frequently for City Park. Councillor Robin Cook requested investigation of a disabled parking spot at this location.

RECOMMENDED

That:

1.     Council’s City Presentation Team be requested to inspect the footpath and carry out maintenance as determined.

2.     Council’s Traffic Officers investigate the possibility of putting in a disabled parking space on Henry Street.  

 

GB 4           Lakeside Parade and Cullen Avenue, Jordan Springs  

Councillor Robin Cook (Representative for the Member of Londonderry) asked if we could check the sequencing of the lights at this intersection.

RECOMMENDED

That Council’s Traffic Officers investigate the light sequencing issues and liaise with Transport for NSW if changes are warranted.

 

GB 5           Upcoming Bus Zone Requests   

Steve Grady – Busways will have some bus zone requests coming up and wasn’t sure who to send these to. Michael Alderton – Acting Traffic Engineering Coordinator advised he is the current contact.

 RECOMMENDED

That the information be noted.

 


 

 

GB 6           Glenmore Park High School       

Adam Wilkinson – Engineering Services Manager (Acting Chair) on behalf of Mayor Tricia Hitchen (Representative for the Member of Penrith) raised issues about pedestrian access and road safety at the entry points to Glenmore Park High School. Adam Wilkinson – Engineering Services Manager (Acting Chair) advised we will make contact with the School Principal and Department of Education Road Safety Officer via Wendy Read – Road Safety Officer and if needed a further report will come back to Local Traffic Committee.

RECOMMENDED

That Wendy Read – Road Safety Officer contact Glenmore Park High School Principal and Department of Education Road Safety Department to discuss issues around pedestrian access and road safety.

 

There being no further business the Chairperson declared the meeting closed the time being 10:15am.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the recommendations contained in the Report and Recommendations of the Local Traffic Committee meeting held on 1 August, 2022 be adopted.

  



DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

 

Outcome 2 - We are welcoming, healthy, happy and connected

 

1        Community Assistance Program Allocation                                                                       1

 

2        Request For Major Event Sponsorship - Rowing New South Wales Incorporated         10

 

3        Submission to Australian Government - Office of the Arts on Draft National Cultural Policy                                                                                                                                           16

 

4        RFT22/23-06 - Ripples Pool Plant & Equipment Routine Maintenance                          28

 

 

Outcome 3 - We plan and shape our growing City

 

5        Endorsement of Rural Lands Strategy                                                                             34

 

6        Endorsement of Local Housing Strategy                                                                         46

 

7        Public exhibition of draft St Marys Town Centre Structure Plan                                     58

 

8        Glenmore Park Stage 2 Voluntary Planning Agreement- Deed of Variation

Procedural note: Section 375A of the Local Government Act 1993 requires that a division be called in relation to this matter.                                                                78

 

 

Outcome 4 - We manage and improve our built environment

 

9        Elizabeth Drive Upgrade (West & East) ISEPP Council Submission providing High Level Feedback                                                                                                                          92

 

10      RFT22/23-08 - South Penrith Neighbourhood Centre Refurbishment                            96

 

Outcome 5 - We have open and collaborative leadership

 

11      RFT21/22-30 St Marys Gidley Street Car Park Architectural Services                         104

 

12      Organisational Performance and Financial Review - June 2022                                  111

 

13      Audit, Risk and Improvement Committee                                                                      120

 

14      Local Government NSW Annual Conference 2022                                                       130

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

15      Model Code of Conduct for Local Councils in NSW and Procedures                           134

 

16      Summary of Investment & Banking for the period 1 July 2022 to 31 July 2022           136

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

Outcome 1 - We protect and enhance an ecologically sustainable environment

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


Outcome 2 - We are welcoming, healthy, happy and connected

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

1        Community Assistance Program Allocation                                                                       1

 

2        Request For Major Event Sponsorship - Rowing New South Wales Incorporated         10

 

3        Submission to Australian Government - Office of the Arts on Draft National Cultural Policy                                                                                                                                           16

 

4        RFT22/23-06 - Ripples Pool Plant & Equipment Routine Maintenance                          28

 

 

 

 

 

 



Ordinary Meeting                                                                                               22 August 2022

 

 

 

1

Community Assistance Program Allocation   

 

Compiled by:               Natalie Wadwell, Community Capacity Officer

Marcela Hart, Community Capacity Lead

Authorised by:            Megan Whittaker, City Activation, Community and Place Manager

Jeni Pollard, Manager - City Resilience

Kylie Powell, Director - City Futures  

 

Outcome

We are welcoming, healthy, happy, creative and connected

Strategy

Build and support community resilience to adapt to changing circumstances

Principal Activity

Work with local communities to identify priority issues in their area and build local resilience

      

 

 

Executive Summary

This report informs Council on the delivery of the Community Assistance Program (CAP) for 2022-23 and seeks approval to award funding to the eligible community organisations and groups proposed in this report.

Council’s Community Assistance Program provides small community grants of up to $1,500 to non-profit organisations and auspiced local community groups for one-off activities, programs and events to meet identified community needs, build capacity and contribute to community wellbeing.

The CAP has two (2) components: a planned component with a budget in 2022-23 of $42,155, and a rolling component with a base budget of $8,746 in 2022-23. The planned component opens once a year for applications. The rolling component is available for organisations to apply for at any time.

Applications for the planned component of the CAP 2022-23 opened on 30 May 2022 and closed 8 July 2022. Council received 34 applications from 19 groups and organisations. Together, the 34 applications totalled $45,103 in funding requests.

Councillors were notified of the CAP 2022-23 round opening in a memo dated 11 May 2022.

Applications were assessed against eligibility and assessment criteria. A total of 28 applications from 18 groups and organisations, worth a combined value of $37,007, are recommended for funding from the planned component of the CAP 2022–23.

The remaining planned component funds, totalling $5,148, are recommended to be transferred and available for distribution throughout 2022–23 through the CAP rolling component. This would enable Council to release small amounts of funding to respond to emerging community needs throughout the year.

The report recommends that the information contained in the report on the CAP Planned Component 2022-23 be received; that Council approve funding to 18 groups and organisations outlined in this report for a total amount of $37,007; and that the remaining $5,148 is distributed in 2022-23 via the CAP Rolling Component, supplementing the existing rolling funds for 2022-23.

Background

The Community Assistance Program is entering its 28th year of providing small grants to local community groups and organisations for one-off projects that benefit the residents of Penrith City and foster happy, connected, healthy and resilient communities. Since moving to an online grants platform in 2011, over 600 online applications have been submitted to CAP, with close to $200,000 allocated to support local community projects.

Councillors were notified of the CAP 2022 – 23 round opening in a memo dated 11 May 2022.

CAP assists local groups to respond to emerging needs, try new ways of increasing community participation and wellbeing, and build their ability to deliver projects with public funds. Applicants are also supported to leverage Council’s one-off contribution to obtain funding or sponsorship from other sources.

There are two components of the Community Assistance Program:

1.   Planned Component
The Planned Component is advertised annually, inviting applications from local community groups for projects and activities planned for delivery in the current financial year. The majority of CAP funds are allocated under the Planned Component. This year’s budget is $42,155.

 

2.   Rolling Component
Recognising that not all community funding needs can be foreseen, the Rolling Component allows for one-off requests to be considered by Council at any time during the financial year. This provides a flexible supplement to the Planned Component of the program. The Rolling Component has a base budget of $8,746 in 2022-23.

Promotion of CAP 2022-23

The CAP 2022-23 Planned Component opened 30 May 2022 and closed 8 July 2022. The grant round was promoted on Council’s website and social media, as well as through local community networks and interagencies.

Applications were invited through the user-friendly Smarty Grants portal to make the process simple and streamlined to support a quick turnaround.

To assist local community groups with the application process, Council Officers hosted two online Grant Information Sessions on Tuesday 14 June and Wednesday 15 June. Attendees had the opportunity to learn techniques for a well-written grant application, understand local community priorities and ask questions about the Program.

 

CAP Eligibility and Assessment Criteria

All Planned and Rolling Component applications are assessed against eligibility and assessment criteria within the existing CAP framework that has been in use since 2018. Council officers are currently reviewing Council’s community funding programs and frameworks, and this includes the CAP program. Opportunities regarding Council’s future community funding will be put to Council for consideration.

Currently, all projects must satisfy the following criteria to be eligible for CAP funding:

·    Community based non-profit organisations providing one off activities

·    Direct benefit to, and participation by, Penrith City residents

·    Project and project management in line with Council’s Access and Equity Principles

Fundraising programs or organisations whose main role is to fundraise are not eligible to apply for CAP funding.

All projects must satisfactorily respond to the following assessment criteria:

·    How effectively the proposed project addresses priority social needs of Penrith City residents

·    The expected outcomes and beneficiaries of the project, ensuring the distribution of funds to meet the needs of the diverse communities of Penrith City

·    The willingness of the applicant to work collaboratively with residents and other community groups

·    How effectively the proposed project contributes to capacity in the community or community groups

·    The capacity of the applicant to access alternative resources or funding for the proposed project, including whether the proposed project is a core responsibility of an existing Government funded program

·    How achievable and cost-effective the proposed project is

A panel of three Council officers completed the assessment.

Applications recommended for funding

From the 34 applications received, 28 applications submitted from 18 groups and organisations have been recommended for funding. The 28 applications proposed for funding are detailed in the table below. 

Table 1. Applications recommended for funding

No

Recipient

Project Title

Project Description

Amount Requested

Amount Recommended

1

Baptist Church Penrith

Our Garden

Establishing a community garden at Women’s Day Refuge in St Marys

$1,500

$1,500

2

Baptist Church Penrith

Craft Circle

A craft group for women providing companionship and new interests

$1,500

$1,500

3

Blue Mountains and Penrith Woodworking Club Inc

Enhancing woodworking safety

Safety equipment for use during regular club workshops and activities

$1,081

$1,081

4

City Of Penrith Returned and Services League Sub Branch

Nepean Valley Excursion Seniors Group

Supporting a day trip for seniors

$1,500

$1,500

5

Community Junction - Colyton

Colyton Colour Run

Colyton Colour Run will be a fun-filled Community Event for residents of the Colyton area and surrounds

$1,500

$1,500

6

Community Junction - North St Marys Neighbourhood Centre       

Light it Up!

An outdoor music and disco night held at North St Marys Neighbourhood Centre. This event will be a community event for people of all ages

$1,500

$1,500

7

Community Junction – St Clair 

Teens to Adulthood

A weekly program for knowledge and skill building to support employment pathways, life skills, further education community connection.

$1,472

$1,472

8

Community Junction – Werrington Youth Space

Connected self defence program

A self-defence and healthy eating program for young people

$565

$565

9

Community Junction

Celebrating Women’s Health Week

A program of events focused on celebrating good health and wellbeing.

$1,115

$1,115

10

Emu Plains Community Baptist Church

Emu Plains Community Baptist Church Craft Group

Offering a safe place for people to come together to enjoy craft activities, meet new people and develop friendships.

$1,500

$1,500

11

Emu Plains MOPS (Mothers of Pre-schoolers

Play Equipment and Storage

Play equipment to create a friendly environment and encourage physical activity among children

$1,500

$1,500

12

Nepean Area Disability Organisation (NADO)

Friends of NADO Caring for Carers Event

An event celebrating and giving back to our carers during National Carers Week - 16-22 October within the Penrith Region, by acknowledging their caring roles.

$1,500

$1,500

13

Nepean Community & Neighbourhood Services

A Sense of Giving

Tote bags with personal items for children and women supported by Haven

$1,500

$1,500

14

Nordoff Robbins Music Therapy TA Noro Music

Showcasing Drumming & Adult Music Club

An end of year concert to showcase talent developed through their weekly Drumming & Music Club

$1,500

$1,500

15

Paying it Forward Homeless Services Inc

Living Essentials

Essential packs for people in need distributed at weekly dinner service

$1,500

$1,500

16

Penrith Softball Club

School Holiday Program

Equipment for a school holiday softball program for school children

$1,500

$1,500

17

Platform Youth Services

Beautify Me Penrith

A program to help young people maintain a positive identity

$1,500

$1,500

18

Platform Youth Services

SHS Care Packs - Welcome Packs

To provide young people with a individual care pack that has the basic essential items that is needed when entering a crisis accommodation unit

$1,500

$1,500

19

Platform Youth Services

Beautify me – Homeless Youth Accommodation Penrith

Providing our extraordinary young people with the opportunity to be part of a beauty program helping create a safe space to care about their identity

$1,500

$1,500

20

Riverland Harmony Chorus

The Australian Sweet Adelines Chorus Convention and Competition

To purchase new music and cover the costs of coaching sessions for upcoming competition

$1,500

$1,500

21

St Clair and District Men's Shed Inc.

Shed Mates

A bus service enabling men who no longer drive to visit the Men’s Shed.

$1,200

$1,200

22

St Thomas' Anglican Church Cranebrook

Reach out to youth night

Purchasing equipment to support activities with young people

$374

$374

23

The Blank Canvas AU

Mental Health Month ‘walk & talk’

An awareness-raising walk in the month of October (mental health month) to bring about awareness to any mental health issue.

$750

$750

24

The Blank Canvas AU Inc

Becoming 'work-ready' workshop

A one-off event that will subsidise a workshop for 10 children that are disadvantaged either financially or with a disability.

$1,100

$1,100

25

The Blank Canvas AU Inc-Online

Fortnightly interactive sensory craft groups - Online

Play-based social interactive online sessions for children with mental illness + their families (the money will create + send craft packs to the families)

$1,150

$1,150

26

Thornton Community Group

Conversational English Class

The project engages people isolated by language and cultural barriers by teaching written and spoken English in a supportive and inclusive community environment

$1,200

$1,200

27

Turkish Community Group        

Turkish Community Outings      

A chance for an isolated community to engage in different activities and experiences through joint outings

$1,500

$1,500

28

Uniting

More Say for R U OK Day

Conversation packs for pop up brunches around Penrith to normalise talking about mental health

$1,500

$1,500

Total funding recommended for CAP 2022-23

$37,007

Following Council’s endorsement, Council officers will notify the successful and unsuccessful applicants.

Applications that sought support for programs and services located outside of the Penrith LGA, that were considered core business for an organisation or were previously funded last year were not recommended for funding in this round. Unsuccessful applicants will receive feedback to help strengthen future funding applications. Where appropriate, Council staff will facilitate connections between applicants and local organisations that may be in a position to provide support.

Ongoing support for applicants

CAP is a one-off grant, with the aim to support short term projects and activities. While the same eligible organisations can apply for funds each year, the projects they are funded to deliver as part of the 2022-23 program will be ineligible for funding next year.

The panel identified projects that will need support to assist with their sustainability and impact. This support will be provided to those groups by officers from Council’s Community Capacity team.

 

Financial Implications

Funding for 2022-23 Community Assistance Program (CAP) – Planned Component is available within existing City Activation, Community and Place budgets included in Council’s 2022-23 Operational Plan. Funding of up to $42,155 is available for successful projects and applicants were able to apply for up to $1,500 for projects.

The selection panel recommendation is that Council spend $37,007 on 28 applications for the current around of 2022-23 CAP – Planned Component with the remaining $5,148 to be reallocated to the 2022-23 CAP Rolling Component.

Risk Implications

All applicants must comply with Council’s policies and procedures as a condition of receiving the grant, including maintaining Public Liability Insurance. Council officers will work closely with successful applicants to ensure project activities mitigate any possible risks to the community.

Conclusion

Council’s Community Assistance Program, Planned Component, was open for applications between 30 May – 8 July 2022. Groups and organisations can apply for up to $1,500 to address a range of targeted social needs and increase social participation, foster connection and contribute to community wellbeing.

The available budget for the CAP Planned Component in 2022–23 is $42,155.

Council received 34 applications from 19 groups and organisations to CAP 2022-23 Planned Component, totalling $45,103 in funding requests.

It is recommended that 28 projects from 18 groups and organisations be funded, to a total value of $37,007. It is further recommended the remaining $5,148 from the Planned Component of the CAP be allocated to the Rolling Component and distributed throughout the year in response to emerging community needs.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Community Assistance Program Allocation be received

2.     Council approve CAP – Planned Component funding to the organisations and groups as outlined in Table 1, to a total of $37,007

3.     Council approve the remaining CAP – Planned Component 2022–23 budget of $5,148 to be allocated and distributed as needed through the CAP- Rolling Component during 2022 - 23.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                               22 August 2022

 

 

 

2

Request For Major Event Sponsorship - Rowing New South Wales Incorporated    

 

Compiled by:               Shelley Lee, Activation and Event Development Officer

Beau Reid, Place and Activation Coordinator

Authorised by:            Megan Whittaker, City Activation, Community and Place Manager

Jeni Pollard, Manager - City Resilience

Kylie Powell, Director - City Futures  

 

Outcome

We are welcoming, healthy, happy, creative and connected

Strategy

Support and provide opportunities to participate in activities and events that celebrate our diversity, culture and creativity

Principal Activity

Conduct and support events that include all members of our community

      

 

Executive Summary

The purpose of this report is to present to Council two major event sponsorship proposals received from Rowing New South Wales (Rowing NSW or RNSW), the state peak body for rowing.

This report provides Council with details of the sponsorship proposals received, including the proposed sponsorship benefits and an assessment of each sponsorship proposal.

Rowing NSW governs the sport of rowing in NSW. It decides on the rules for racing in NSW, determines boat classes for racing events, sets an annual calendar of regattas, and promotes rowing as a sport in NSW. Through the club and school system the sport caters for rowers of all ages, from elite to novice level including athletes with a disability.

Rowing NSW has submitted two proposals for sponsorship from Council for its two premier events planned to be held in Penrith at the Sydney International Regatta Centre (SIRC) in 2023:

1.       The 2023 NSW Rowing Championships, 10 - 12 February 2023, and

2.       The 2023 Australian Masters Rowing Championships from 1 – 4 June 2023.

Rowing NSW has sought sponsorship of $10,000 (plus GST) for the 2023 NSW Rowing Championships and $15,000 (plus GST) for the 2023 Australian Masters Championships (a total investment of $35,000). Council officers have estimated the two events combined could deliver approximately $1,096,895 in local economic benefit.

This report recommends that Council provides sponsorship of $5,000 (plus GST) for the 2023 NSW Rowing Championships from 10-12 February and $5,000 (plus GST) for the 2023 Australian Masters Rowing Championships from 1 – 4 June 2023 to be held at SIRC Penrith.

Background

Penrith City Council was approached by Rowing NSW on 21 July 2022 to consider two sponsorship proposals; the 2023 NSW Rowing Championships to be held from 10-12 February 2023 at the SIRC and the 2023 Australian Masters Championships to be held from 1 – 4 June 2023 at the SIRC.

Council endorsed the Events Sponsorship Policy (‘the Policy’) in June 2020. The Policy includes criteria for Major Event Sponsorship.

Council endorsed the Think Penrith, Think Events – Penrith Events Strategy 2020-2024 in June 2020. The Events Strategy provides for up to $200,000 annually to support the attraction and retention of major events in the Penrith Local Government Area.

Current Situation

The two proposals received from Rowing NSW seek a total of $35,000 (plus GST) in sponsorship. This includes $10,000 (plus GST) for the 2023 Rowing Championships (10 -12 February 2023) and $15,000 (plus GST) for the 2023 Australian Masters Rowing Championships (1- 4 June 2023).

The funds are requested to assist with operating costs associated with running each event, including the venue hire, infrastructure hire costs and event marketing.

Further details on both events are provided below:

2023 NSW Rowing Championships

The NSW Rowing Championships were first held in Penrith over 35 years ago on the Nepean River. It was moved to SIRC in 1996 and has remained there since.

The NSW Rowing Championships continues to be the premier regatta of Rowing NSW, showcasing the best rowing talent from across Australia. The event will be held at SIRC, Penrith from 10-12 February 2023 and attracts around 1,500 athletes who compete for the State Title in their racing category, as well as over 3,000 spectators and support staff.

The event is estimated to attract 1500 athletes (750 interstate, 113 NSW regional and 637 NSW metro) and 3000 spectators (774 interstate, 2000 NSW metro and 226 NSW regional).

It is anticipated that 1863 of the athletes and spectators will stay within the Penrith Local Government Area (LGA) for approximately 3 nights during the event.

Proposed Sponsorship Benefits

The sponsorship opportunities presented by Rowing NSW for the 2023 event would provide Council and the community of Penrith City with several benefits including:

·    Council logo will be displayed on RNSW website as an Event Sponsor.

·    3x Event Bulletins.  PCC logo will be on the front cover with opportunities to have advertisement spreads throughout. Bulletins are published on event website, throughout newsletters and displayed on RNSW event documents page.

·    Venue signage - 3m x 3m vinyl banner located on the course southern bank, which is broadcasted to daily livestream (with an average of 33,050 viewers over the 3-day event). Corflute signage located around the venue including boat park, presentation dais area, finish line area and athlete administration area - at least 5 physical signs on display (provided by RNSW).

·    10 PCC digital marketing opportunities which can be used on ads and collateral on Event Website, Event emails, Bulletins, Social Media posts and general member e-newsletters. The 10 can be chosen by Council.

 

·    Inclusion of 2 x full page advertisements in RNSW event program (provided by Council).

 

·    Council logo to be printed on medal ribbon.

2023 Australian Masters Rowing Championships

The Australian Masters Rowing Championships (AMRC) is one of Rowing Australia’s largest national rowing events. Penrith is set to host the 2023 AMRC for the first time since 2015.

The AMRC will attract master level rowers and their family/friends from all states to compete in a four-day competition at SIRC from 1 - 4 June 2023. The event attracts over 950 athletes annually that participate in a number of rowing events including the Masters Interstate races, which are the most anticipated races within the Masters rowing community.

Each year, the AMRC is billeted to a different State Sporting Organisation as a partnership with Rowing Australia. Rowing NSW will host the Championship regatta in 2023 where Rowing Australia will oversee the execution of all operations.

Over the course of the 4 days, the wider rowing community will have access to SIRC to compete, spectate and socialise at the AMRC Event Function to be held after the Masters Interstate races.

The event is estimated to attract 950 athletes (450 interstate, 400 NSW metro, 100 NSW regional), and 475 spectators (225 interstate, 200 NSW metro, 50 regional).

It is anticipated that 829 athletes and spectators (58% of attendees) will stay within the Penrith LGA for approximately 4 nights during the event.

Proposed Sponsorship Benefits

The sponsorship opportunities presented by Rowing NSW for the 2023 event would provide Council and the community of Penrith City with several benefits including:

·    Council promoted on both Rowing NSW website and Rowing Australia Event page website as an Event Sponsor.

 

·    3x Event Bulletins.  PCC logo will be on the front cover with opportunities to have advertisement spreads throughout. Bulletins are published on event website, throughout newsletters and displayed on Rowing Australia event documents page.

 

·    Venue signage can include but is not limited to: a 3m x 3m vinyl banner located on the course southern bank, which is broadcasted to daily livestream. Corflute signage located around the venue including boat park, presentation dais area, finish line area and athlete administration area - at least 5 physical signs on display (provided by RNSW).

 

 

·    10 PCC digital marketing opportunities which can be used on ads and collateral on Event Website, Event emails, Bulletins, Social Media posts and general member e-newsletters. The 10 can be chosen by Council.

 

·    2 x full page advertisements in AMRC event program.

 

 

·    PCC logo to be printed on medal ribbon.

Previous sponsorship to Rowing NSW

Council has previously provided sponsorship to Rowing NSW on 7 occasions, to a total of $41,545 + GST, as follows:

Year

Sponsorship Amount

(exc GST)

2014

$5,000

2015

$5,000

2016

$4,545

2017

$10,000

2018

$5,000

2019

$6,000

2020

$6,000

TOTAL

$41,545

Previous sponsorship has enabled Rowing NSW to support Rowing Australia to host a VIP Function for the Kings and Queens Interstate Regatta for each of these years.

This is the first time that Rowing NSW have made a request for sponsorship from Council for 2 events within one financial year.

Assessment of sponsorship proposals

Both sponsorship proposals have been assessed against Council’s Events Sponsorship Policy criteria for Major Event Sponsorship. Both events are eligible for funding from Council.

The events encourage community involvement and partnership, overnight visitation to the Penrith Local Government Area and is expected to have positive economic benefits to the local Penrith economy that exceed the total cost of running the events.

Based on the projected event visitation provided by the event organiser, Council officers have estimated the economic benefit of both the scheduled events to the local economy is approximately $1,096,895.

This estimate is calculated by using projected attendance information provided by the applicant and loading it in the “Economic value of Tourism & Events" schedule which is published by Destination NSW and has set rates based on the type of event. The DNSW method is the industry standard.

Sponsorship of $5,000 (plus GST) for both events (combined investment of $10,000 plus GST) is considered appropriate to go towards the event operating and marketing campaign costs and infrastructure. This level of funding reflects the nature of the proposed sponsorship benefits to Council, and the estimated economic benefits from both events. This level of funding is also consistent with Council’s approach to levels of sponsorship for events with comparable benefit returns, as estimated using the Destination NSW “Economic value of Tourism & Events” calculator.

 

Financial Implications

Major Event Sponsorship funding to support the delivery of the 2023 NSW Rowing Championships and the 2023 Australian Masters Rowing Championships is available within the existing City Activation, Community and Place budget included in Council’s 2022-23 Operational Plan.

As at 25 July 2022, for this financial year Council has endorsed a total of $20,000 worth of major events sponsorship.

Should the recommendations of this report totalling $10,000 be endorsed, the total sponsorship funding remaining for 2022-23 will be $142,000. Separately on the Business paper tonight at Item 11, Council is considering the Organisation Performance and Financial Review Report. That report proposes a revote for this program, and subject to Council endorsing the recommendations of that report, there will be $170,000 available for the balance of the year.

 

Risk Implications

If the sponsorships are endorsed, Council will enter into a sponsorship agreement with Rowing NSW to detail the expected sponsorship benefits to be delivered to Council and the community in exchange for Council’s investment.

To minimise commercial risk, funds will be paid to Rowing NSW in instalments upon delivery of agreed deliverables and meeting agreed milestones.

Council is mindful of the potential impacts on water-based activities due to poor water quality that can result from flooding or severe weather events. Council will build measures into the sponsorship agreement that account for the possibility that the event may not be able to go ahead.  

Conclusion

Two requests for sponsorship have been received from Rowing NSW for the 2023 NSW Rowing Championships and the 2023 Australian Masters Rowing Championships. The request seeks a total of $35,000 to deliver both events.

Council officers have assessed the sponsorship proposal against the Events Sponsorship Policy.

It is estimated that the return to the community of Penrith City from both events could be in the order of $1,096,895 in economic benefits.  A total sponsorship of package of $10,000 (plus GST), made up of $5,000 (plus GST) for each event, is considered reflective of the estimated benefits and reach of both events.

Should Council resolve to endorse either or both sponsorship proposals, Council will enter into a sponsorship agreement with Rowing NSW detailing the expected sponsorship benefits to be delivered to Council in exchange for its investment.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Request For Major Event Sponsorship - Rowing New South Wales Incorporated  be received

2.     Council endorse sponsorship funding of $5,000 (plus GST) to Rowing New South Wales Incorporated in support of the 2023 Rowing NSW Championships.

3.     Council endorse sponsorship funding of $5,000 (plus GST) to Rowing New South Wales Incorporated in support of the 2023 Australian Masters Rowing Championships.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                               22 August 2022

 

 

 

3

Submission to Australian Government - Office of the Arts on Draft National Cultural Policy   

 

Compiled by:               Tiffany LeeShoy, Senior Cultural Strategy Officer

Sophie Davis, Social Strategy Officer

Authorised by:            Megan Whittaker, City Activation, Community and Place Manager

Jeni Pollard, Manager - City Resilience

Kylie Powell, Director - City Futures  

 

Outcome

We are welcoming, healthy, happy, creative and connected

Strategy

Support and provide opportunities to participate in activities and events that celebrate our diversity, culture and creativity

Principal Activity

Support and implement initiatives which contribute to culture and creativity across our City

 

Previous Items:           Developing a Cultural Action Plan for the City - Councillor Briefing - 18 Oct 2021    

 

Executive Summary

This report seeks Council’s endorsement for a submission to the Australian Government’s Office for the Arts on their proposed National Cultural Policy.

Council officers have prepared a submission for Council’s consideration using the required submission template. Penrith Performing & Visual Arts (PPVA) have also provided input. The proposed submission is found at Appendix 1.

The submission is informed by feedback received during Council’s recent community engagement, undertaken between September 2021 and March 2022, to support the development of a Draft Cultural Strategy and Action Plan which is currently under way.

Council was advised of the development of a Cultural Strategy and Action Plan at a Councillor Briefing on 18 October 2021. Outcomes from the community engagement were reported to Council via a Councillor memo dated 12 April 2022.

The National Cultural Policy proposes actions under five pillars:

1.   First Nations

2.   A Place for Every Story

3.   The Centrality of the Artist

4.   Strong Institutions

5.   Reaching the audience

The proposed submission communicates support for the 5 proposed pillars and seeks to champion a favourable national cultural policy environment that enables and supports the successful delivery of Council’s cultural, arts and entertainment strategies, programs and facilities. The submission also seeks to present the case for priority investment in arts, entertainment, and cultural pursuits in Western Sydney.

The closing date for submissions to the Office for the Arts is 22 August 2022. The Office for the Arts has been notified that Council will be in a position to provide its submission, following consideration and if endorsed, at its Ordinary Council meeting of 22 August 2022.

The report recommends that Council note the information contained in the report on Submission to Australian Government - Office of the Arts on Draft National Cultural Policy, and further that Council endorse the proposed submission on the draft National Cultural Policy at Appendix 1.

Background

On 1 July 2022, the Australian Government Office for the Arts opened consultation on the development of a new National Cultural Policy (the Policy).

The new Policy, shaped by the diverse voices of the Australian arts, entertainment and cultural sector, proposes actions under 5 pillars: 

1.   First Nations: recognising and respecting the crucial place of these stories at the centre of our arts and culture.

2.   A place for every story: reflecting the diversity of our stories and the contribution of all Australians as the creators of culture.

3.   The centrality of the artist: supporting the artist as worker and celebrating their role as the creators of culture.

4.   Strong institutions: providing support across the spectrum of institutions which sustain our arts and culture.

5.   Reaching the audience: ensuring our stories reach the right people at home and abroad.

The Office for the Arts has provided a template for written submissions.

Submissions are due by 22 August 2022. The Office for the Arts has been notified that Council will be in a position to provide its submission, following consideration and if endorsed, at its Ordinary Council meeting of 22 August 2022. 

Proposed Submission

The proposed submission is found in full at Appendix 1.

Council’s submission is informed by feedback received from the community engagement undertaken between September 2021 to March 2022, to support the development of Council’s Draft Cultural Strategy and Action Plan. Work on this Plan is currently under way and will be presented to Council later in 2022. Council was advised of the development of a Cultural Strategy and Action Plan at a Councillor Briefing on 18 October 2021. The outcomes of the community engagement, including key themes and emerging opportunities, were reported via a Councillor Memo dated 12 April 2022.

The proposed submission seeks to establish a favourable national cultural policy environment that enables and supports the future successful delivery of Council’s cultural, arts and entertainment strategies, programs and facilities. The submission also seeks to present the case for priority investment in arts, entertainment, and cultural pursuits in Western Sydney.

The PPVA have been engaged in the preparation of the submission.

The submission communicates support for the 5 proposed pillars. The following key comments and opportunities for action are noted:

1.   First Nations: recognising and respecting the crucial place of these stories at the centre of our arts and culture.

 

·    Our community have told us they want more opportunities to learn about First Nations cultures and stories, and for these to be shared more and increasingly visible in the public domain.

 

2.   A place for every story: reflecting the diversity of our stories and the contribution of all Australians as the creators of culture.

 

·    Our community tells us that they want to see greater diversity and inclusion in the arts. Penrith City Council supports a National Cultural Policy and in it, sees Western Sydney as a priority area for focus and investment. 

 

·    Western Sydney is home to over half of Greater Sydney’s population, and this will increase in coming years. It is the most ethnically diverse region in Australia, has the largest First Nations population and is the 4th largest economy.

 

·    Western Sydney still does not secure proportionate amounts of grant funding or facilities for arts. Penrith City Council contributed to the 2015 report ‘Building Western Sydney’s Cultural Arts Economy – A Key to Sydney’s Success’ by Deloitte, which identified that Western Sydney represents 1 in 10 Australians yet attracts only 1% of Commonwealth arts program funding. The report also noted “On a per capita basis Western Sydney’s arts and cultural sector has been grossly underfunded and supported”.

 

·    At this time of significant population growth, cultural transformation and infrastructure development, a sustained funding and policy focus on Western Sydney is required to ensure that amidst these dramatic changes, people’s values and the quality of their day-to-day life remains central.

 

·    Support for Western Sydney artists and arts organisations, particularly those that work with communities to grow their capabilities to creatively express their stories and experiences, is vital to our residents feeling heard, seeing themselves reflected in their places, and enhancing their sense of belonging in a changing environment. 

 

·    The community of Penrith City is increasing in its cultural diversity. Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CALD) artists experience barriers to accessing funding, mentorships and support for developing new work. CALD Australians are typically under-represented in leadership roles across the cultural sector, where decisions are made and strategies are set. Actions to reflect the diversity of the community in arts, entertainment and cultural pursuits are required, and could include setting diversity standards and targets in the creative sector, monitoring, reporting and evaluating the impact of actions to increase diversity, promoting inclusion of CALD communities in arts leadership, and creating more pathways to leadership through mentorships.

 

·    Penrith City Council has recently adopted its Disability Inclusion Action Plan 2022 –26 which includes several actions to improve arts engagement for people living with disability, reflecting the desire for increased creative opportunities to tell the unique stories of Penrith. An action to renew the National Arts and Disability Strategy will further assist to us the arts to incorporate the diverse perspectives of people living with disability into the national identity. 

 

3.   The centrality of the artist: supporting the artist as worker and celebrating their role as the creators of culture.

 

·    The Penrith community have expressed an increasing desire to support local artists, as much to provide local employment, as to enable a deeper connection to place-based stories and references and to generate a sense of pride.

 

·    During COVID shutdowns Penrith artists and cultural industries lost work through cancellation of local events and touring shows.

 

·    Council adopted the Penrith City Economic Development Strategy in 2016, which highlights Arts and Culture as one of six target sectors identified for growing jobs.

 

·    Council supports initiatives that enable artists to develop skills in early career development, and to earn a living income from their work.

 

 

4.   Strong institutions: providing support across the spectrum of institutions which sustain our arts and culture.

 

·    As a result of COVID-19, like most arts bodies, Penrith’s main cultural institutions, the Penrith Regional Gallery and Joan Sutherland Performing Arts Centre have been adapting and evolving to “the new normal”. Having appropriate resources to maintain arts and culture access locally, including programs that embed local communities and have local relevance, is critically important. The strength of Penrith’s cultural organisations and facilities is fundamental to increasing the reach of arts and cultural representation with new and emerging communities and generations across a growing Western Sydney.  Resourcing of this work and anchor facilities should reflect, respect and recognise that our cultural organisations and institutions are vital homes for local voices and cultural expression.    

 

·    Penrith City has had numerous cancelled events with resulting financial implications for producers and artists alike. Since early 2020, private insurers have removed the option to buy back ‘communicable disease cover.’ Without insurance to cover the cost of event cancellations caused by Covid-19 restrictions or other such outbreaks, event organisers, artists, sole traders, venues and small to medium organisations take significant risks when programming major events and commissioning new art works. Organisations such as The Committee for Sydney and NAVA (National Association for the Visual Arts) have identified the opportunity for government support to establish a National Exhibitions and Events Business Insurance fund including covering communicable disease for all events.

 

5.   Reaching the audience: ensuring our stories reach the right people at home and abroad.

 

·    Our communities tell us that they greatly appreciate being able to attend free and accessible arts events and activities, and they desire more creative arts opportunities for children and young people. This was also identified in Council’s Youth Action Plan endorsed by Council in 2021.

 

·    Schools and other educational institutions can play an important role locally in the cultural lives of young people, and the community. The inclusion of arts in education cultivates individual creativity and self-expression, entrepreneurship, social intelligence, problem solving and critical thinking skills (all vital 21st century work skills) and creates active citizens who have a lifelong appreciation for the arts.

 

The proposed submission also notes that the National Cultural Policy has the opportunity to drive collaboration across Federal government departments to achieve diverse policy goals through arts-based approaches. Artists are problem solvers and communicators that think outside the box. These skills can be utilised to tackle complex issues across a range of disciplines, for example health and ageing, social services and environment. Art responses work effectively to communicate important and complex information and encourage people to “spend time” with an issue. Integrating cross policy funding and collaborations can enable such approaches that embed the skills of artists to support complex problem solving. 

 

Financial Implications

 

There are no financial implications for Council associated with this report.

Risk Implications

There is no perceived risk to Council in making this submission.

The benefits include highlighting and elevating the needs of Penrith City residents for consideration within the setting of national policy considerations, as well as drawing attention to funding for Western Sydney arts and culture programs, services and facilities. 

Conclusion

The Australian Government Office for the Arts is undertaking consultation to develop a new National Cultural Policy. Council officers have prepared a submission on the template provided for Council’s consideration.

The proposed submission content is based on feedback from community engagement that was undertaken between September 2021 to March 2022, to inform the development of Council’s Cultural Strategy and Action Plan, currently under way. The PPVA have also provided input to shape the submission.

The proposed submission communicates support for the 5 proposed pillars and seeks to champion a favourable national cultural policy environment that enables and supports the successful delivery of Council’s cultural, arts and entertainment strategies, programs and facilities. The submission also seeks to present the case for priority investment in arts, entertainment, and cultural pursuits in Western Sydney.

The closing date for the consultations is 22 August 2022. The Office for the Arts has been notified that Council’s submission will be sent, following the Ordinary Council meeting on 22 August if endorsed by Council.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.   The information contained in the report on Submission to Australian Government - Office of the Arts on Draft National Cultural Policy be received.

 

2.   Council endorse the proposed submission on the draft National Cultural Policy at Appendix 1 to be submitted to the Australian Government - Office for the Arts.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

National Cultural Policy Submission

6 Pages

Appendix

  


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                            22 August 2022

Appendix 1 - National Cultural Policy Submission

 

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Ordinary Meeting                                                                                               22 August 2022

 

 

 

4

RFT22/23-06 - Ripples Pool Plant & Equipment Routine Maintenance   

 

Compiled by:               Simone Egan, Manager - Member Experience

Authorised by:            Robert Tweddle, Manager - Ripples

Michael Jackson, Acting Director - City Services  

 

Outcome

We are welcoming, healthy, happy, creative and connected

Strategy

Enhance community wellbeing, safety and neighbourhood amenity

Principal Activity

Deliver Health, Fitness and Aquatic services to support social, health and wellbeing in the community

      

 

Executive Summary

A tender for the provision of the Ripples Pool Plant & Equipment Routine Maintenance was published on the APET 360 portal, the E-Tendering Portal and on Council’s website on 9 June 2022. The tender closed on 13 July 2022.

The report advises Council of the outcome of the tender process and recommends that the tender from B & G Enterprises Pty Limited, be accepted for the scheduled maintenance of Ripples Pool Plant & Equipment Maintenance services for a contract period of 3 years with an estimated value of $318,135, with an option to extend two (2) x one (1) year periods, by mutual agreement, subject to satisfactory performance.

Background

Pool Plant & Equipment Maintenance for Ripples is an integral component of owning and operating safe and functional aquatic venues & equipment to deliver key services for Council and the community. This tender relates to the scheduled maintenance on Council facilities at Ripples St Marys, Hydrotherapy, Ripples Penrith, Thornton Splash Park and Triangle Park Splash Park.

The purpose of this tender is to seek a service provider to undertake the provision of scheduled maintenance in the following plant rooms:

·    St Marys Main Indoor plant room

·    St Marys Indoor Spa plant room

·    St Marys Outdoor 50m plant room

·    St Marys Outdoor splash park plant room

·    Hydrotherapy St Marys plant room

·    Thornton splash park plant room

·    Triangle Park splash park plant room

·    Penrith outdoor 50m plant room

·    Penrith outdoor splash park plant room

Tenderers were required to submit their tender on a standard pro forma sheet, which clearly defined the response required against each of the evaluation criteria.

 

Tender Evaluation Panel

The Tender Evaluation Panel consisted of Joshua Martin – Building Assets Coordinator, Daniel Brown – Venue Operations Coordinator, Ripples and was chaired by Simone Egan Manager – Member Experience, Ripples. Allyce Langton from Council’s Procurement team performed the role of tender administration and probity officer for this tender.

Tender Evaluation Criteria

The selection criteria advertised and used in selecting the successful tenderer were –

·    Capacity to Perform Works

·    Construction Methodology and Program

·    Local Supplier Preference

·    Quality Assurance Systems

·    Environmental management

·    Work Health and Safety

Summary of Tenders Received

A total of two (2) tenderers were received by the closing date of the advertised tender and are listed below in alphabetical order:

Tenderers Name

Location of the Business

Name of Business

Owners/Directors

Estimated Annualised Cost

B & G Enterprises Pty Limited

286 High Street, Penrith NSW 2750

Grahame Gunton & Matthew Gunton

$106,045.00

Roejen Services

Unit 6/22 Hudson Avenue, Castle Hill NSW 2154

Joseph Calello, Malcolm Lees & John Coppock

$140,541.00

Price Evaluation

All tenderers submitted the price schedule as requested. For comparison purposes, the schedule of rates offered by all companies were annualised based on historic actual data for reactive maintenance and the schedules listed in the tender documentation.

Current Situation

The information provided to the panel established an understanding of business acumen, however the panel decided further detail was required, so clarifications were requested of both parties. Both organisations provided the additional information and demonstrated the ability to fulfil the scope and detailed how they would best service Penrith City Council.

Roejen Services were detailed in their responses and gave examples of deliverable efficiencies. Their price point of total cost for service was significantly higher with no variation to the scope supplied in the tender. Roejen Services also highlighted the response time to the inherent cause with less than favourable time frames to within 24 hours.

B & G Enterprises Pty Ltd were detailed in their responses and adequately highlighted how they would accommodate and deliver their services. They established best value for price point under the scope of the tender. B & G Enterprises Pty Ltd demonstrated a competitive edge with a significant difference in response time to the inherent cause to within 1 hour.

As a result of the detailed assessment undertaken, the Tender Evaluation Panel agreed that B & G Enterprises Pty Limited be selected to deliver the Pool Plant and Equipment Routine Maintenance for Penrith City Council based on:

·    Competitive price for the services offered

·    Response time in reactive scope

·    Compliance with the tender evaluation criteria

 

Financial Implications

 

Included in the assessment of tenders was the commissioning of independent reference checks, financial analysis, and performance analysis on B & G Enterprises Pty Limited.  These checks were completed by Equifax Australasia Credit Ratings Pty Ltd. Financial Services have reviewed the financial information provided by the tenderer and have not identified any reason why the contract should not be awarded.

 

This report advises Council of the outcome of the tender process and recommends that B & G Enterprises Pty Limited be accepted for provision of Pool Plant & Equipment routine Maintenance for all Ripples Venues at a projected cost of $106,045 per annum for a period of three years.

 

The cost of scheduled pool maintenance is provided for within asset maintenance operational budgets. 2020-21 Operational Plan includes sufficient funds to cover the cost of recommended tender.

Tender Advisory Group comments

The objective of the Tender Advisory Group (TAG) is to support the Council to achieve fair and equitable tender processes. The TAG, consisting of Brian Steffen - Director City Services, Glenn McCarthy - Governance Manager and Neil Farquharson – Financial Services Manager were briefed by the Ripples team about the background and the process followed.

The TAG considered the recommendations in relation to the tender for Pool Plant and Equipment Routine Maintenance. The TAG considered that B & G Enterprises Pty Ltd has demonstrated their ability to meet Council’s requirements and their proposal was considered to be the most advantageous to Council. The TAG reviewed the evaluation process outlined within the report and is satisfied that the selection criteria have been correctly applied in making the recommendations.

Risk Implications

The tender process outlined in this report includes controls regarding probity and ensuring value for Council, overseen by the Tender Advisory Group. The delivery of scheduled and reactive maintenance services to key Council buildings represents a critical service for the organisation. The thorough assessment and evaluation of this tender mitigates any potential risks associated with system failure or non-performance.

Conclusion

B & G Enterprises Pty Limited have demonstrated their capacity and capability to deliver the service as tendered. Accordingly, B & G Enterprises Pty Limited is recommended as the preferred provider of Pool Plant & Equipment routine Maintenance for Penrith City Council.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on RFT22/23-06 - Ripples Pool Plant & Equipment Routine Maintenance be received

2.     B & G Enterprises Pty Limited be awarded the contract as the provider of Pool Plant & Equipment in accordance with the terms and conditions of the Tender for a three (3) year period with an estimated value of $318,135. The contract will have an option to extend two (2) x one (1) year periods, subject to satisfactory performance.

3.     The General Manager (or their delegate) be authorised to sign all necessary legal documents in relation to this matter.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.  


Outcome 3 - We plan and shape our growing City

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

5        Endorsement of Rural Lands Strategy                                                                             34

 

6        Endorsement of Local Housing Strategy                                                                         46

 

7        Public exhibition of draft St Marys Town Centre Structure Plan                                     58

 

8        Glenmore Park Stage 2 Voluntary Planning Agreement- Deed of Variation

Procedural note: Section 375A of the Local Government Act 1993 requires that a division be called in relation to this matter.                                                                78

 

 

 

 

 

 



Ordinary Meeting                                                                                               22 August 2022

 

 

 

5

Endorsement of Rural Lands Strategy   

 

Compiled by:               Paula Tomkins, Executive Planner

Fiona McDermott, Urban Strategist

Authorised by:            Carlie Ryan, City Strategy Manager

Kylie Powell, Director - City Futures  

 

Outcome

We plan and shape our growing City

Strategy

Undertake strategic planning that will ensure balanced growth and liveability

Principal Activity

Ensure our strategic framework and vision are contemporary and informs our land use planning and advocacy

 

Previous Items:           Draft Rural Lands Strategy - Councillor Briefing - 14 Mar 2022

                                      Public Exhibition of the draft Rural Lands Strategy - Ordinary Meeting - 28 Mar 2022

                                      Outcomes of public exhibition of draft Rural Lands Strategy- Councillor Briefing - 11 Jul 2022    

 

Executive Summary

The purpose of this report is to seek Council endorsement of the Rural Lands Strategy provided under separate enclosure. The Rural Lands Strategy provides a strategic approach to managing the environmental, economic and social values of Penrith City’s rural lands over a twenty-year period.

A draft Rural Lands Strategy and its supporting technical documents were placed on public exhibition from 5 April to 17 May 2022. Community members and key stakeholders were given an opportunity to provide comment. As part of the public exhibition, 218 responses from various channels were received. Council staff have collated the feedback from the community, government agencies and organisations, provided responses to key issues, and revised the Rural Lands Strategy accordingly, as outlined in this report and supporting Community Engagement Report provided under separate enclosure.

The Rural Lands Strategy forms one component of the Places of Penrith strategic planning framework, which will establish the vision and directions for the Penrith Local Government Area (LGA). Other components of Places of Penrith, the Employment Lands Strategy and Green Grid Strategy, were adopted in 2021. A further component, the Local Housing Strategy, will also be considered for endorsement at this Ordinary Meeting. The draft Local Housing Strategy and draft Rural Lands Strategy have been prepared and exhibited concurrently as they have a complementary relationship aimed at establishing a boundary between residential and rural areas to protect and enhance the role of rural areas.

Council’s Local Strategic Planning Statement (LSPS), adopted by Council in March 2020, prioritises the definition and protection of the values and opportunities within the Metropolitan Rural Area and includes an immediate action to complete the Rural Lands Strategy and supporting technical studies (Action 17.1).

Councillors were briefed in relation to the development of the Rural Lands Strategy on 14 March 2022. Councillors were also briefed earlier on the progress of the broader Places of Penrith work on 20 September 2021. At the 28 March 2022 Ordinary Meeting, Council endorsed the public exhibition of the draft Rural Lands Strategy. Councillors were briefed on the outcomes of the public exhibition period on 11 July 2022.

A revised Rural Lands Strategy has been prepared addressing issues raised during the public exhibition period and is provided under separate enclosure. There are no changes to the three supporting technical documents which are also provided under separate enclosure. It is recommended that Council endorse the Rural Lands Strategy and finalise the supporting technical documents.

Background

The Greater Sydney Region Plan recognises the importance of protecting and enhancing the environmental, social and economic values in rural areas. It also identifies and maps the Metropolitan Rural Area (MRA), a large part of which lies in the Penrith LGA and states that retaining the values and integrity of the MRA are of critical importance. The Western City District Plan builds on this by prioritising the better management of rural areas and protecting and enhancing scenic and cultural landscapes. In addition, the Western City District Plan includes two actions relating to rural lands – the first to maintain or enhance the values of the MRA using place-based planning and the second to limit urban development to within the urban area and identified urban investigation areas.

 

Council’s Local Strategic Planning Statement (LSPS), adopted by Council in March 2020, recognises the importance of our rural lands identifying planning priority 17 to define and protect the values and opportunities within the MRA and includes an immediate action to complete the Rural Lands Strategy and supporting technical studies (Action 17.1).

 

An earlier draft Rural Lands and Villages Strategy was exhibited with the draft LSPS in late 2019, however was not finalised at that time on account of work being undertaken by the State government with direct implications for Penrith’s rural lands including the precinct plans for the Western Sydney Aerotropolis, route finalisation and station locations for Sydney Metro Western Sydney Airport and the development of the Cumberland Plain Conservation Plan.

 

The Places of Penrith strategic planning framework comprises five City-wide strategies that will establish a vision and directions for our Local Government Area (LGA). In 2021, Council adopted the Employment Lands Strategy and Green Grid Strategy. Development of the fifth component, the Corridors and Centres Strategy, is continuing.

Councillors have had dealings with the development of the Rural Lands Strategy on a number of occasions as set out below:

·    20 September 2021: Councillor briefing providing an update on the Places of Penrith Strategy Framework.

·    14 March 2022: Councillor briefing on the draft Rural Lands Strategy prepared for public exhibition.

·    28 March 2022: Ordinary Meeting in which the draft Strategy was endorsed for public exhibition.

·    11 July 2022: Councillor briefing outlining the outcomes of public exhibition of the draft Rural Lands Strategy.

Current Situation

Public exhibition of the draft Rural Lands Strategy and its three supporting technical studies ran from 5 April to 17 May 2022. The exhibition period was initially scheduled to end on 10 May 2022, but was extended by a week to allow for further community consultation following a Councillor request for provision of an additional drop-in session at Berkshire Park. The following sections outline the engagement activities undertaken, feedback received, key issues raised in feedback and changes to the Rural Lands Strategy as a result. Further details can be found in the Community Engagement Report provided under separate enclosure.

Community Engagement Activities

A series of face to face and online engagement activities were undertaken to obtain community and stakeholder feedback. Council staff attended three Village Café sessions at Kingswood, North St Marys and Llandilo in April 2022. Three further drop-in sessions were held at Mulgoa, Penrith and Berkshire Park during April and May 2022. Online engagement activities were available, including a survey and webinar. The Strategy was advertised through a number of mediums including in the Mayoral Column of the Western Weekender newspaper and Council’s social media channels.

The Rural Lands Strategy had a dedicated webpage on Council’s Your Say platform that provided opportunities to download the draft Rural Lands Strategy, complete an online survey, read responses to Frequently Asked Questions, and watch a webinar about the draft Strategy.

Key stakeholders including government agencies, industry and community groups were notified directly of the exhibition and invited to make submissions.

Feedback Received

The public exhibition activities attracted 218 responses across various channels including:

·    53 formal written letter or email submissions

·    54 hardcopy feedback forms completed at drop-in sessions

·    111 online surveys completed

More than half of all responses (58%) were received from ‘local residents across rural lands in the Penrith LGA’, with a broad representation of the community in terms of age and gender; and included people with a disability, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, and people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds.

1. Formal Submissions

Formal submissions came from four State Government agencies, four community groups, two industry groups or other organisations, and 43 private individuals or landowners. Feedback from the formal submissions followed several broad themes:

·    Concerns about defining a hard ‘rural edge’ precluding consideration of future development opportunities

·    Stakeholder nomination of sites for rezoning (residential, commercial, industrial, agribusiness uses)

·    Support for subdivision to create smaller ‘rural residential’ lots

·    The need to meet the future housing needs of an ageing rural population in rural villages

·    Stakeholder concerns about sites designated as ‘highly visually sensitive landscape’ and ‘scenic and cultural landscape’

·    Concerns about the impact of certain business activities on rural character and amenity (‘big shed’ developments and heavy vehicles)

·    Concerns about the impact of development on the natural environment and biodiversity

·    The importance of local knowledge and community involvement in planning and decision making (opportunity for Council to collaborate with the community to implement the Strategy)

·    The need for better communication and engagement with the rural community

·    Inconsistencies in the draft Strategy relating to the green grid connections shown for the Rural South West Precinct or the ecological mapping differing from that presented in other State government documents.

2. Online surveys and feedback forms

Both the hardcopy feedback forms and online surveys asked respondents to select their ‘level of agreement or disagreement with the five priorities and outcomes for Penrith City’s rural lands provided in draft Rural Lands Strategy’. Overall, respondents indicated their level of agreement with the priorities put forward by the Strategy as follows:

·    Priority 5: Provide housing and services to meet the needs of the community (100 respondents or 61% agreed)

·    Priority 3: Preserve open spaces, natural beauty and cultural connections (83 respondents or 50% agreed)

·    Priority 4: Support a diverse rural community (83 respondents or 50% agreed)

·    Priority 2: Protect ecological health and biodiversity (74 respondents or 45% agreed)

·    Priority 1: Secure the rural edge (63 respondents or 38% agreed)

The online survey and hardcopy feedback forms also provided respondents with an opportunity to provide additional comments in their own words. These freeform comments were grouped into broad themes and the most common emerging themes were:

·    Support for further subdivision and/or rezoning for urban development, either generally or in a specific location

·    Concerns about the impact of heavy vehicle movements on rural character and amenity

·    Concerns about the impact of development on the natural environment and biodiversity

·    The importance of preserving cultural heritage in our rural areas

·    Concerns about the condition and adequacy of infrastructure and services in rural areas

·    The need for better communication and engagement with the rural community.

 

In addition to the above themes, we also heard from a number of respondents in relation to miscellaneous ‘rural lands’ issues that are not directly related to the draft Strategy, such as maintenance of local roads, footpaths and drainage infrastructure, and general concerns about community safety and Council rates.

Response to Community Feedback and Amendments to the Strategy

All the comments, suggestions and issues raised during the public exhibition have been considered and are addressed in the Community Engagement Report provided under separate enclosure. Of all the feedback, six key issues emerged:

·    Development potential of Penrith rural lands versus securing the Metropolitan Rural Area;

·    Balancing competing interests (rural character and amenity concerns);

·    Meeting the needs of the rural community, including housing for an ageing population;

·    Management of biodiversity and protection of the natural environment;

·    Management of scenic and cultural landscapes and highly visually sensitive landscapes; and

·    Adequacy of communication and engagement with the rural community.

Based on the feedback received and the themes that emerged from the community consultation, it is clear that there are different views within the community in relation to the future for Penrith City’s rural lands. While there are some community members who would like our rural lands and their values preserved and protected, there are others who see potential for further development and would like to explore opportunities for subdivision to allow more rural residential development and/or rezoning for urban development.

Overall, it is encouraging that most of the feedback was either supportive or aligned with the key priorities put forward by the draft Strategy, with the exception of specific feedback and comments on Priority 1 – Secure the rural edge from a select group of respondents. Whilst we acknowledge the opportunities and concerns raised by submitters in this regard, these matters were considered in the broader strategic context of other endorsed policy documents relating to our rural lands (including the Western City District Plan and Penrith LSPS – defining the MRA for our City) and supporting technical studies to the Rural Lands Strategy which, on balance, provide evidence supporting this priority. It is also worth noting that the draft Local Housing Strategy, exhibited alongside the draft Rural Lands Strategy, demonstrates that housing demand in our LGA up to 2036 can be accommodated in existing urban areas and within urban investigation areas, thereby providing further justification to secure the rural edge.

Overall, the existing position of the draft Rural Lands Strategy that urban development is not supported in the rural areas and the rural edge mapped in the document is proposed to be retained in the final Strategy for the following reasons:

·    The significant areas of land with environmental significance that would come under additional pressure with urban development;

·    The importance of the agricultural industries that operate here and the need to support their ongoing viability, in part by providing adequate separation to reduce land use conflicts;

·    Lack of access to reticulated sewer and limited ability to expand the existing reticulated water network;

·    Flooding impacts experienced both from the local South Creek catchment and backwater flooding from the Hawkesbury – Nepean River and the limited evacuation capacity of the existing road network;

·    To meet the required actions of the Western City District Plan. The District Plan includes two actions relating to rural lands – the first to maintain or enhance the values of the Metropolitan Rural Area using place-based planning and the second to limit urban development to within the urban area and identified urban investigation areas; and

·    The Local Housing Strategy shows that sufficient housing for the projected population of Penrith City can be accommodated in the existing urban areas and identified urban release areas elsewhere in the LGA.

With such divergent views expressed in the feedback received, the Rural Lands Strategy is not able to accommodate all suggestions. Irrespective, all comments, suggestions and issues raised during the public exhibition have been considered and are addressed in the Community Engagement Report provided under separate enclosure.

In response to the community and stakeholder feedback, the Rural Lands Strategy has been updated to incorporate the following amendments:

·    Addition of reference to Risk-based Framework for Considering Waterway Health Outcomes in Strategic Land Use Planning Decisions.

Following a suggestion of the NSW Environment Protection Agency reference to this NSW Government document has been included in the Rural Lands Strategy as part of Outcome 2.2 Waterways are Maintained or Improved.

 

·    Amendments to text to clarify small businesses that are acceptable in the rural lands and highlight the need to balance competing lifestyle/environmental interests.

Feedback received raised concern that the small businesses the draft Rural Lands Strategy was seeking to facilitate would negatively impact on the environmental and scenic values of the rural lands. Particular concerns were raised in relation to movement of heavy vehicles and proliferation of large sheds. The Rural Lands Strategy does not propose to change existing permissible land uses relating to small businesses. The text of Outcome 4.3 Small Businesses are Permitted in Rural Lands are Supported and Encouraged in the Rural Lands Strategy has been amended to provide further clarity on the small businesses permitted in rural lands.

 

·    Review of text regarding Mulgoa Road to include further detail relating to Council’s aspirations/vision for this State road.

Several submissions outlined the need for Mulgoa Road to retain its rural character into the future and suggested further detail be provided in the Rural Lands Strategy. Mulgoa Road is a state road managed by Transport for NSW. Irrespective, further detail has been included for the Rural South West Precinct in the Rural Lands Strategy outlining Council’s future vision for Mulgoa Road, reflecting the Penrith Development Control Plan 2014 and recent comments provided through a submission to the NSW Government on the Fernhill Estate Landscape Management Plan.

 

·    Clarification that future uses on Deerubbin LALC land will be subject to the assessment of the Penrith Structure Plan by the NSW government.

Some submitters were concerned that the draft Rural Lands Strategy stated that Council supported the Penrith Structure Plan developed by Deerubbin LALC. The Rural Lands Strategy has been updated to make it clear that Council is not a party to the agreement between the NSW Government and Deerubbin LALC and that the outcome of this process will enable Council to respond to the structure plan in future.

 

·    Investigation of additional rural views suggested for the Mulgoa Valley and inclusion where appropriate.

Additional rural views within the Mulgoa Valley were highlighted in submissions that were not identified in Figure 14: Important Rural Vistas. Outcome 3.3 Important Rural Vistas are Maintained has been updated to clarify that the important rural vistas referred to are regional views. Figure 14: Important Rural Vistas has been updated to include a number of additional views. 

 

·    Inclusion of reference to the existence of extensive agriculture, including grazing.

Submitters were concerned that the importance of grazing in Penrith City’s rural lands was not recognised in the draft Rural Lands Strategy. While this information is available in the supporting technical document Draft Penrith Rural Economy and Agribusiness Opportunities Study (Part 1), reference to the presence of extensive agriculture, including grazing, has been included in Outcome 4.1 Land Suitable for Agriculture is Identified and Protected in the Rural Lands Strategy.

 

·    Correction of green grid connections shown in the Rural South West Precinct map (Figure 19).

Figure 19 Rural South West Precinct in the draft Rural Lands Strategy incorrectly showed the green grid connections in the south of this precinct, around Park Road. Figure 19 has been amended to correctly reflect the endorsed Green Grid Strategy.

 

·    Deletion of text suggesting the need to enhance vegetation along Castlereagh Road to screen quarry activities.

A submission and subsequent investigations by Council staff highlighted the fact that quarrying activities are not visible from Castlereagh Road, therefore this text has been deleted.

 

·    Inclusion of reference to ‘community’ as one of the key groups that Council will collaborate with to implement the Strategy.

A number of submissions suggested that Council should collaborate further with the community. Section 4.2 Implementation Plan of the Rural Lands Strategy has been amended to include reference to the community as one of the key groups that Council will collaborate with to implement the Strategy. This better reflects the intention to further collaborate with the community and is consistent with Council’s adopted Community Engagement Strategy and Community Participation Plan (that is consistent with the International Association for Public Participation (IAP2) spectrum for stakeholder participation in decision making).

 

·    Inclusion of action to manage one hectare lots in Llandilo.

There are one hectare lots in Llandilo that, under the requirements of the Penrith Local Environmental Plan 2010, require consolidation to meet the minimum 2 hectare requirement to construct a dwelling. While this requirement has been in place for many years, it seems that not all relevant landowners and local real estate agents are aware of them. While no submissions were received from affected landowners,  the Rural Lands Strategy has been updated to include an action for Council to engage with landowners and real estate agents to educate them on the consolidation requirements.

Several other minor amendments have been made to the final Rural Lands Strategy such as removal of reference to it being draft, minor corrections and corrections to the legend for Figure 14.

Financial Implications

Should Council endorse the Rural Lands Strategy, there will be financial implications associated with its implementation over time. Implementation of the identified actions (which can be found in Appendix 1) in the Rural Lands Strategy will be funded through a combination of Council’s future Operational and Delivery Programs and grant funding opportunities, where necessary.

 

 

Risk Implications

The Rural Lands Strategy has been developed to align with the planning priorities in Council’s LSPS and respond to the Western City District Plan. Should the Rural Lands Strategy not be endorsed and finalised, this may compromise Council’s ability to meet commitments made to the community and the NSW Government.

The Rural Lands Strategy identifies priorities and outcomes for our rural lands and provides a robust Council wide framework for future implementation. This reduces risk by clearly identifying actions that will be pursued and facilitate alignment across Council. 

Conclusion

The Rural Lands Strategy is a key element of the Places of Penrith strategic framework. Importantly, the Rural Lands Strategy will provide a strategic approach to managing the environmental, economic and social values of our rural lands over the next 20 years.

Public exhibition of the draft Rural Lands Strategy and its three supporting technical studies was undertaken for six weeks from 5 April to 17 May 2022. A number of engagement activities were carried out during this time with a range of feedback being received. Following exhibition, Council staff have collated the feedback from the community, government agencies and organisations and provided responses to key issues as outlined in this report and supporting Community Engagement Report under separate enclosure.

An amended Rural Lands Strategy has been produced and is provided under separate enclosure. The three supporting technical documents have not been changed but are also separately enclosed. It is recommended that Council endorse the Rural Lands Strategy and finalise the three supporting technical documents. This will allow the Rural Lands Strategy to be implemented across our City.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Endorsement of Rural Lands Strategy be received

2.     Council note the feedback received as part of the exhibition of the draft Rural Lands Strategy provided under separate enclosure

3.     Council endorse the amended Rural Lands Strategy and finalise the three supporting technical studies provided under separate enclosure

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

Summary of Rural Lands Strategy Actions

4 Pages

Appendix

  


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                            22 August 2022

Appendix 1 - Summary of Rural Lands Strategy Actions

 

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Ordinary Meeting                                                                                               22 August 2022

 

 

 

 

6

Endorsement of Local Housing Strategy   

 

Compiled by:               Marianna Kucic, Urban Strategist

Fiona McDermott, Urban Strategist

Authorised by:            Carlie Ryan, City Strategy Manager

Kylie Powell, Director - City Futures  

 

Outcome

We plan and shape our growing City

Strategy

Undertake strategic planning that will ensure balanced growth and liveability

Principal Activity

Ensure our strategic framework and vision are contemporary and informs our land use planning and advocacy

 

Previous Items:           Draft Local Housing Strategy- Councillor Briefing - 14 Mar 2022

                                      Public Exhibition of the draft Local Housing Strategy - Ordinary Meeting - 28 Mar 2022

                                      Outcomes of public exhibition of draft Local Housing Strategy - Councillor Briefing - 11 Jul 2022      

 

Executive Summary

The purpose of this report is to seek Council endorsement of the Local Housing Strategy provided under separate enclosure. The Local Housing Strategy provides a strategic approach to managing housing and population growth over a twenty year period.

A draft Local Housing Strategy was placed on public exhibition from 5 April to 17 May 2022. Community members and key stakeholders were given an opportunity to provide comment. As part of the public exhibition, over 65 responses from various channels were received. Council staff have collated the feedback from the community, government agencies and organisations, provided responses to key issues, and revised the Local Housing Strategy accordingly, as outlined in this report and supporting Community Engagement Report provided under separate enclosure.

The Local Housing Strategy forms one component of the Places of Penrith strategic planning framework, which will establish the vision and directions for the Penrith Local Government Area (LGA). Other components of Places of Penrith, the Employment Lands Strategy and the Green Grid Strategy, were adopted in 2021. A further component, the Rural Lands Strategy, will also be considered at this Ordinary Meeting. The draft Local Housing Strategy and draft Rural Lands Strategy have been prepared and exhibited concurrently as they have a complementary relationship aimed at focussing residential development in urban areas, and establishing a boundary between residential and rural areas to protect and enhance the role of rural areas.

The Local Housing Strategy is identified as an immediate action in Council’s LSPS, adopted by Council in March 2020, with Action 3.1 being ‘Prepare a Local Housing Strategy’. Preparation of a Local Housing Strategy is a requirement under the Greater Sydney Region and District Plans.

Councillors were briefed in relation to the development of the Local Housing Strategy on 14 March 2022 and 11 July 2022. Councillors were also briefed earlier on the progress of the broader Places of Penrith work on 20 September 2021. At the 28 March 2022 Ordinary Meeting, Council endorsed the public exhibition of the draft Local Housing Strategy.

A revised Local Housing Strategy has been prepared addressing issues raised during the public exhibition period and is provided under separate enclosure. It is recommended that Council endorse the Local Housing Strategy.

Background

The Greater Sydney Region Plan requires that all councils develop a housing strategy, being the main tool for understanding the need and planning for housing and infrastructure delivery. The Region Plan requires that housing strategies outline how housing growth is to be managed, identify the right locations for additional housing supply in each local government area, and inform updates of local environmental plans. The Western City District Plan provided further guidance on housing strategies, including the setting of initial housing targets for each council to meet. 

Council’s Local Strategic Planning Statement (LSPS), adopted on 23 March 2020, identified the preparation of a Local Housing Strategy as an immediate action (Action 3.1). An earlier draft of the Local Housing Strategy was exhibited with the LSPS in late 2019, however was not finalised at that time on account of revised State Government population projections, the announcement of Sydney Metro station locations, and the need to determine the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Places of Penrith strategic planning framework comprises five City-wide strategies that will establish a vision and directions for our Local Government Area (LGA). In 2021, Council adopted the Employment Lands Strategy and the Green Grid Strategy. At this Ordinary Meeting, Council will be asked to endorse the Local Housing Strategy and Rural Lands Strategy. Meanwhile, development of the fifth component, the Corridors and Centres Strategy, is continuing and includes the development of a draft Structure Plan for St Marys Town Centre.

Councillors have been briefed in relation to the development of the Local Housing Strategy on a number of occasions as set out below:

·    20 September 2021: Councillor briefing providing an update on the Places of Penrith Strategy Framework.

·    14 March 2022: Councillor briefing on the draft Local Housing Strategy prepared for public exhibition.

·    28 March 2022: Ordinary Meeting in which the draft Strategy was endorsed for public exhibition.

·    11 July 2022: Councillor briefing on the outcomes of public exhibition of the draft Local Housing Strategy.

Current Situation

Public exhibition of the draft Local Housing Strategy ran from 5 April to 17 May 2022. The exhibition period was initially scheduled to end on 10 May 2022, but was extended by a week to allow for further community consultation following a Councillor request for provision of an additional Drop-in Session at Berkshire Park. The following sections outline the engagement activities undertaken, feedback received, key issues raised in feedback and changes to the Local Housing Strategy as a result. Further details can be found in the Community Engagement Report which has been provided under separate enclosure. 

Community Engagement Activities

A series of face to face and online engagement activities were undertaken to obtain community and stakeholder feedback. Council staff attended three Village Café sessions at Kingswood, North St Marys and Llandilo in April 2022. Three further drop-in sessions were held at Mulgoa, Penrith and Berkshire Park during April and May 2022. Online engagement activities were also available, including a survey and webinar. The Strategy was advertised through a number of mediums including in the Mayoral Column of the Western Weekender newspaper and Council’s social media channels.

The Local Housing Strategy had a dedicated webpage on Council’s Your Say platform that provided opportunities to download the draft Local Housing Strategy, complete an online survey, read responses to Frequently Asked Questions, and watch a webinar about the draft Strategy.

Key stakeholders including government agencies, industry and community groups were notified directly of the exhibition and invited to make submissions.

Feedback Received

The public exhibition activities attracted over 65 responses across various channels including:

·    16 formal written letter or email submissions

·    25 hardcopy feedback forms completed at drop-in sessions

·    24 online surveys completed

The majority (71%) of responses were received from property owners in the Penrith LGA, with a good representation of the community in terms of age and gender. Feedback received was largely positive.

1.  Formal Submissions

Formal submissions came from five State Government agencies/corporations, three community groups or land councils, two industry organisations, and six private individuals. Feedback included several broad themes:

·    Nomination of specific sites for future housing by submitters.

·    Identification of risks to housing delivery, such as flooding and the uncoordinated delivery of infrastructure.

·    Expression of a desire to work closely with Council.

·    The importance of design quality and responding to environmental issues.

·    Recognition of the importance of meeting our community’s needs, especially housing affordability.

·    Identification of the importance of evidence.

·    Expression of concerns in respect to planning documents and decisions that were perceived to be out-dated or short-sighted.

2.  Combined Feedback – Online Surveys and Feedback Forms

Feedback from the online surveys and feedback forms can be summarised as follows:

·    The top responses when asked for the “areas for improvement that Council can make to residential areas” were: Housing affordability (37%); prevent overdevelopment (24%); more tree planting (24%); and flood planning (22%). Respondents were permitted three selections, hence the percentage represents the proportion of respondents who marked that response within their “top three”.

·    The top responses when asked “which of the draft Strategy’s nine objectives would you rate as your highest priority” were: Delivery of additional dwellings to meet a rapidly growing population (29%); Sustainable neighbourhoods with improved environmental performance and high quality public spaces (21%); and delivering affordable housing for low to moderate income groups (13%).

·    Online surveys were mostly completed by owner-occupiers in the Penrith LGA (74%), followed by property investors in the Penrith LGA (22%). Meanwhile, the feedback forms were mostly submitted by property owners in the Penrith LGA (53%) and renters in the Penrith LGA (26%).

The online surveys, hardcopy feedback forms and Facebook comments provided respondents with an opportunity to provide additional comments, either elaborating on their previous responses or providing feedback in their own words. These open-ended, freeform comments followed several broad themes:

·    The need for high quality buildings, good design, and development done well.

·    The need for better access to jobs and reducing the time residents spend travelling to work.

·    The potential for Penrith City Centre to be revitalised, and for it to be the location of higher-density development.

·    The need to improve the quality of footpaths and expand bicycle infrastructure.

·    The need to address the urban heat island effect.

·    The need to mitigate traffic congestion and improve the function of road infrastructure, as well as highlighting the need to address on-street parking demand.

·    Issues related to the future of Rural Lands – with some respondents expressing a desire to develop rural properties for residential development, while others objected to redevelopment of existing rural areas.

·    Issues relating to the diversity of housing types in Penrith LGA, and the importance of meeting the housing needs of the existing and future community.

·    The opportunity to strengthen Penrith as a destination, including an improved night-time economy.

·    A desire to avoid overdevelopment – with respondents tending to object to medium-density and high-rise developments.

·    Supporting the intensification of housing development and release of greenfield areas.

·    The need for social and affordable housing.

To a large extent, the themes that emerged from the community consultation were reflective of the matters dealt with in the draft Local Housing Strategy, or more broadly in other Council documents like the LSPS and Resilient Penrith Action Plan. This is reassuring that while the draft Strategy may not be able to solve all the issues raised, Council’s work is in step with our community’s sentiments and needs.

Response to Community Feedback and Amendments to the Strategy

All the comments, suggestions and issues raised during the public exhibition have been considered and are addressed in the Community Engagement Report provided under separate enclosure. Of all the feedback, eight key issues emerged:

·    Housing affordability.

·    High quality buildings, good design, and development done well.

·    Sustainability, resilience and environmental concerns.

·    Submitters nominating specific sites/precincts for future housing.

·    The importance of meeting community needs and undertaking community engagement.

·    Collaboration and the desire of stakeholders to work closely with Council.

·    The potential for revitalising Penrith’s City and Centres.

·    The need to improve active transport, car travel and road networks.

The relationship of the draft Local Housing Strategy to the draft Rural Lands Strategy is important in acknowledging how Council will seek to manage the interface of urban and rural lands. This was why both strategies were prepared and exhibited together. The Rural Lands Strategy is subject to a separate report to this Ordinary Meeting, also seeking endorsement for its finalisation.

The issue of urban development in rural areas came through in some of the community feedback. The position of the Rural Lands Strategy is that urban development is not supported in the rural areas, and the rural edge mapped in that document is proposed to be retained for the following reasons:

·    The importance of the agricultural industries that operate in rural lands and the need to support their ongoing viability, in part by providing adequate separation to reduce land use conflicts;

·    The lack of access to reticulated sewer and limited ability to expand the existing reticulated water network;

·    Flooding impacts experienced both from the local South Creek catchment and backwater flooding from the Hawkesbury–Nepean River and the limited evacuation capacity of the existing road network;

·    Significant areas of rural land with environmental significance that would come under additional pressure with urban development.

·    To meet the required actions of the Western City District Plan. The District Plan includes two actions relating to rural lands – the first to maintain or enhance the values of the Metropolitan Rural Area using place-based planning and the second to limit urban development to within the urban area and identified urban investigation areas; and

·    The Local Housing Strategy demonstrates that sufficient housing for the projected population of Penrith City can be accommodated in the existing urban areas and identified urban release areas of the LGA.

Recommended changes

In response to the community and stakeholder feedback, it is proposed that the Local Housing Strategy incorporate the following amendments:

·    Strengthening the concept of high-quality housing within the housing objectives, specifically the Strategy’s Housing Objective 4 being revised to reference ‘the delivery of a diversity of high-quality housing types…’. The importance of high-quality design and a building’s longevity came through strongly in the community feedback. This change would be in addition to existing actions in the Strategy that relate to improving the quality of building design and public domain. A summary of the Strategy’s priorities, outcomes and actions can be found at Appendix 1.

 

·    Revising the wording of two Potential Mechanisms related to Kingswood and Werrington to emphasise that the suggested DCP review focuses on design quality and improving a building’s environmental performance. A building’s performance may relate to such matters as its choice of materials, energy efficiency, durability and resilience.

 

·    Deleting two Potential Mechanisms which refer to the possibility of prohibiting low-density and medium-density housing forms in the R4 high-density zone. This in-part responds to submitters who argued that low-density housing forms were preferred by the community. It acknowledges that developers would continue to have a choice in what housing product they deliver.

 

·    Deleting a reference to development incentives that gives the example of reduced car parking rates. Note that this was not proposed as an explicit action in the Strategy, it was simply outlined as one example of a development incentive. Deletion of this reference responds to feedback citing a lack of on-street parking in medium to high density areas.

 

·    Including a new Potential Mechanism related to Werrington that encourages engagement with the community to develop a vision, desired future character and determining community aspirations for the precinct. This in-part responds to submitters who felt that the community should have a greater say over the future of their locality, and is reflective of recent community engagement activities undertaken at St Marys and Kingswood.

 

·    Revising the wording of one of the Potential Mechanisms in relation to rural areas to avoid ambiguity and clarify its intent. The mechanism would read: “Support opportunities to deliver housing in rural villages for sub-markets such as seniors living, where this can be shown to maintain the value and amenity of the rural lands and provide the required infrastructure”. Support for seniors housing and aging-in-place came through in a number of the community feedback responses.

 

·    Additional wording to be included to respond to the Environmental Protection Authority’s submission with regard to minimising noise impacts on communities. This inclusion seeks to acknowledge that implementing noise control measures at the strategic planning stage provides an effective means of minimising noise impacts on communities. Noise control measures can include spatial separation of incompatible land uses, minimising noise emissions at the source, and reducing noise impacts at receivers through best practice design, siting and construction.

 

·    The Deerubbin Local Aboriginal Land Council and Landcom to be listed as Partner Stakeholders in the Section 9.1 Implementation and Delivery Plan. The identification of these additional stakeholders were nominated by the Land Council, and the Urban Development Institute of Australia (UDIA) respectively.

 

·    Minor revision of the Key Growth Precincts map to more precisely depict residential areas around Sydney Science Park and the southern section of the Orchard Hills Urban Investigation Area. This has stemmed from advice from DPE representatives and aligns with State Government planning documents (e.g. Aerotropolis Precinct Plan). Also, the Luddenham Urban Investigation Area will be removed from some maps and clarified in the text on account of the DPE having recently clarified that its anticipated future use will be enterprise land, not residential.

In response to the availability of new data, it is also proposed that the Local Housing Strategy incorporate the following amendments:

 

·    Revised text, graphs and tables to reflect the revised population projections released by the Department of Planning and Environment (DPE) on 31 May 2022. In particular, this projection forecasts a much lower population for Penrith City than was anticipated by the exhibited draft Strategy. The lower population projection points to a likely lower demand for housing in 2036.

 

·    Revised text, graphs and tables to reflect the Census of 2021 which was released by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) on 28 June 2022. In particular, this latest data has been used to update the demographic and dwelling profile information contained in the Strategy wherever possible.

Minor housekeeping and editorial amendments will also be made throughout the document as necessary. For instance, the new name of the Greater Cities Commission will need to be reflected, and reference to the Strategy as “draft” will be removed if endorsed.

Financial Implications

The costs associated with the public exhibition of the draft Local Housing Strategy have been funded within existing City Strategy budgets adopted as part of the 2022-23 Operational Plan and Delivery Program. Specific actions in the Local Housing Strategy will have their own financial implications over the course of the next 15 years. It is intended that these actions will be integrated within Council’s future Operational Plans and Delivery Programs with grant funding opportunities also being investigated.

Risk Implications

The draft Local Housing Strategy has been identified as an immediate action for Council in its LSPS and fulfils Council’s obligation to prepare a housing strategy under the Western City District Plan. The Local Housing Strategy enables Council to guide development and lead conversations to ensure a sufficient supply of residential land is available into the future. Should Council not endorse the Strategy, this may compromise Council’s ability to deliver the quantum and diversity of housing required by our community, and doing so in a strategic, timely and transparent manner. Failing to progress the Local Housing Strategy could also result in reputational damage to Council.

Conclusion

The Local Housing Strategy is a key element of the Places of Penrith Strategy Framework. Importantly, the Local Housing Strategy will guide Council’s housing delivery over the next 15 years to ensure that our community’s needs are being met.

Public exhibition of the draft Local Housing Strategy was undertaken for six weeks from 5 April to 17 May 2022. A number of engagement activities were carried out during this time with a range of feedback being received, with the majority in support of the Strategy. Following exhibition, Council staff have collated the feedback from the community, government agencies and organisations, provided responses to key issues, and revised the Strategy accordingly, as outlined in this report and supporting Engagement Report provided under separate enclosure.

A final Local Housing Strategy has been prepared and is separately enclosed for the information of Councillors. It is recommended that Council endorse the Strategy allowing it to be implemented across our City.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Endorsement of Local Housing Strategy be received

2.     Council note the feedback received as part of the exhibition of the draft Local Housing Strategy provided in the separate enclosure.

3.     Council endorse the revised Local Housing Strategy provided under separate enclosure.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

Summary of Priorities, Outcomes and Actions

4 Pages

Appendix

  


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                            22 August 2022

Appendix 1 - Summary of Priorities, Outcomes and Actions

 

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Ordinary Meeting                                                                                               22 August 2022

 

 

 

7

Public exhibition of draft St Marys Town Centre Structure Plan   

 

Compiled by:               Renata Ferreira, City Design Lead

Aditya Malshe, Urban Design Officer

Fiona McDermott, Urban Strategist

Authorised by:            Carlie Ryan, City Strategy Manager

Kylie Powell, Director - City Futures  

 

Outcome

We plan and shape our growing City

Strategy

Undertake strategic planning that will ensure balanced growth and liveability

Principal Activity

Ensure our strategic framework and vision are contemporary and informs our land use planning and advocacy

 

Previous Items:           Progress Update Corridors and Centres Strategy and St Marys Structure Plan - Councillor Briefing - 21 Mar 2022

                                      Update on St Marys - Planning, Projects and Delivery - Councillor Briefing - 01 Aug 2022    

 

Executive Summary

The purpose of this report is to seek Council endorsement for the public exhibition of the draft St Marys Town Centre Structure Plan (Enclosure 1).

The draft St Marys Town Centre Structure Plan has been prepared to guide the growth of St Marys Town Centre over the next 20 years and builds on the Interim East-West Centres Strategy and Interim St Marys Structure Plan adopted by Council in April 2020. It has been developed with input from the St Marys’ community and stakeholders and has involved extensive place-based research, collaboration and evidence-based planning and design.

The draft St Marys Town Centre Structure Plan has been prepared as the first stage of Council’s strategic planning pathway to guide the development of the St Marys Town Centre in the medium to long term. The second stage of the St Marys planning pathway will involve the preparation of a Master Plan to refine the Structure Plan directions and inform potential planning control amendments. The draft Structure Plan forms part of Council’s Places of Penrith Strategic Framework

To guide the preparation of the draft Structure Plan for St Marys Town Centre, Council officers undertook engagement activities between 21 February to 3 April 2022 to inform the draft vision and desired character for St Marys. Councillors were briefed on the outcomes of this engagement at the 21 March 2022 and 1 August 2022 Councillor Briefings. Further information on the community engagement can be found in the St Marys Town Centre Structure Plan – Stage 1 Community Engagement Report (Enclosure 2).

 

The draft St Marys Town Centre Structure Plan is informed by background evidence outlined in the report titled ‘Understanding St Marys’ (Enclosure 3) and the Duration Cottages Heritage Investigation (Enclosure 4).

 

The information gathered through the community engagement has informed the proposed Place Vision Statement (Appendix 1) and 10 proposed place outcomes and 26 strategic and spatial directions that will guide the future growth of St Marys in the next twenty years.

Building on the community engagement carried out earlier this year, it is proposed to exhibit the draft St Marys Town Centre Structure Plan for community consultation for four weeks in September 2022.

Councillors were briefed on the detail of the draft St Marys Town Centre Structure Plan at the 1 August 2022 Councillor Briefing.

Additional Councillor updates on the work leading up to the preparation of the Structure Plan have included:

·    21 October 2021: Councillor Memo on the establishment of St Marys Collaboration Group

·    22 October 2021: Councillor Memo on strategic planning in St Marys Town Centre and request for the establishment of a City Park in St Marys

·    11 November 2021: Councillor Memo relating to St Marys Town Centre Structure Plan

·    4 February 2022: Councillor Memo on early community engagement to support the development of character statements for the Corridors and Centres Strategy and St Marys Structure Plan

·    22 June 2022: Councillor Memo on St Marys Town Centre Structure Plan – Heritage Investigation of the Duration Cottages, St Marys

It is recommended that Council endorse the draft St Marys Town Centre Structure Plan for public exhibition. Following the public exhibition period, feedback on the draft St Marys Town Centre Structure Plan will be considered and relevant documents updated if necessary, before reporting back to Council for endorsement of the final Structure Plan in late-2022 / early-2023.

Background

The draft St Marys Town Centre Structure Plan forms part of Council’s Places of Penrith Strategic Framework comprising a suite of City-wide strategies that will collectively establish a vision and directions for our Local Government Area (LGA). Other components of Places of Penrith have either already been finalised (Employment Lands Strategy and Green Grid Strategy) or will be considered for finalisation through a separate report at this Ordinary Meeting (Local Housing Strategy and Rural Lands Strategy). A further component (Corridors and Centres Strategy) continues to be developed.

St Marys Town Centre is one of two major centres in Penrith City, located at the apex of the East-West and North-South Corridors of the Economic Triangle. The area is undergoing significant transformation with investment in city-shaping transport infrastructure such as the Sydney Metro Western Sydney Airport.

In 2020, Council prepared the Interim East-West Corridor Centres Strategy and Interim St Marys Town Centre Structure Plan following the announcement of the Sydney Metro Western Sydney Airport. The current draft St Marys Town Centre Structure Plan builds upon the previous strategic work and the community’s aspirations for this strategic centre.

Councillors were briefed on the progress of the draft St Marys Town Centre Structure Plan at the 20 September 2021 Councillor Briefing (in the context of the broader Places of Penrith Strategic Framework). The Structure Plan is a technical document that will underpin the Corridors and Centres Strategy (in development).

Councillors were subsequently briefed on 21 March 2022 on progress towards a structure plan for St Marys Town Centre including the strategic planning pathways; the purpose, scope and timeframe to prepare the Structure Plan; and the opportunities identified. At the same time, Councillors were presented the preliminary findings of the Stage 1 community engagement activities. This offered an opportunity for Councillors to provide feedback in the early stages of strategic planning for St Marys.

Councillors were briefed on the detail of the draft St Marys Town Centre Structure Plan at the 1 August 2022 Councillor Briefing.

Current Situation

The draft St Marys Town Centre Structure Plan has been prepared as the first stage of Council’s strategic planning pathway to guide the development of the St Marys Town Centre in the medium to long term. The second stage of the St Marys planning pathway will involve the preparation of a Master Plan to test and refine the Structure Plan directions and inform potential planning control amendments.

Public exhibition and finalisation of the Structure Plan are currently estimated to take 4 to 6 months. The Master Plan is currently estimated to take 16-18 months to complete. Together, this planning pathway for St Marys provides a thorough and considered process that will provide certainty to landowners and investors going forward. Combined with the Structure Plan, the Master Plan will inform potential amendments to planning controls, if required, for the long term.

The draft St Marys Town Centre Structure Plan: ‘Shaping the Future of St Marys’ (Enclosure 1) proposes a place vision for the future Town Centre, defining a set of 10 place outcomes and 26 spatial and strategic directions to guide towards achieving the vision.

The draft St Marys Town Centre Structure Plan is informed by background evidence outlined in the report titled ‘Understanding St Marys’ (Enclosure 3). This report provides a thorough analysis of St Marys’ existing conditions and establishes a set of issues and opportunities informed by place research and engagement.

Collectively these two reports provide the foundation for decision making and sound policy development and comprise the first stage of a place-based, design-led process to guide growth and change in St Marys over the next 20 years.

It is important to note that the draft St Marys Structure Plan is a long-term staged plan yet to be both tested and costed through technical studies. Some of the initiatives and directions in the plan could take up to 20 years to realise. Following the endorsement of the Structure Plan, work will continue on a more detailed Master Plan for St Marys Town Centre. The Master Plan will build on the Structure Plan by undertaking detailed analysis to test the assumptions against resources and capacity for delivery. 

The draft vision, proposed place outcomes and strategic directions and spatial framework are outlined below:

Draft Vision Statement

The shared place vision (Appendix 1) directs the transformation of the Town Centre over the next twenty years into a vibrant, welcoming and sustainable place that retains its celebrated authenticity.

“St Marys: A thriving destination in the Western Parkland City

In 20 years from now, St Marys will have transformed from a suburban centre offering local convenience to a vibrant strategic centre with a welcoming, sustainable and authentic urban experience.

With living, commercial, service, industrial, cultural and recreational areas served by an integrated regional transport hub, St Marys will be a place where one would find everything one needs – a mixed-use centre in its true sense.

Celebrating its abundant natural assets and rich history, St Marys will be known for its place beside South Creek with green landscapes and views of the Mountains.

With a network of people-places connected by a walkable and safe public realm, and a contemporary and high-quality built environment, St Marys will attract people from all walks of life as well as businesses looking to operate in an inclusive and diverse community.”

Draft Place Outcomes and Directions

The place vision is supported by 10 place outcomes addressing a variety of themes, supported by a set of directions (26 in total) which provide a clear pathway for achieving the outcomes.

Place Outcome 1: Have four magnetic hubs linked by key activity spines

·    Direction 1: Create a Civic Heart

·    Direction 2: Integrate the Recreational Hub with the Town Centre Core

·    Direction 3: Complement the Transport Hub with a Commercial Core and anchor it to Queen Street

·    Direction 4: Further investigate St Marys Corner

Place Outcome 2: Have a human-centred street network balancing the efficient movement of people and goods

·    Direction 5: Better balance the movement of vehicles, buses, pedestrians and cyclists

·    Direction 6: Designate place-sensitive local bus routes and improve overall bus network efficiency, capacity and frequency  

·    Direction 7: Advocate the delivery of the Werrington Arterial Stage 2

Place Outcome 3: Be a centre for employment growth

·    Direction 8: Provide up to 9,100 jobs in St Marys Town Centre by 2041

·    Direction 9: Attract new businesses and diversify the day and night economy 

·    Direction 10: Preserve and enhance the role of the North St Marys Industrial Precinct

Place Outcome 4: Offer inclusive and diverse housing for all

·    Direction 11: Provide housing diversity

·    Direction 12: Provide a mix of affordable and social housing to meet the needs of the future St Marys community

·    Direction 13: Provide up to 7,200 dwellings in the St Marys Town Centre by 2041

Place Outcome 5: Be a cool and green centre with nature at its heart

·    Direction 14: Create a network of easily accessible open spaces where residents and workers are within 200m – 400m of a green open space

·    Direction 15: Deliver public open spaces with a diversity of activities and a range of sizes and functions to cater to people of all abilities and ages

·    Direction 16: Ensure that the quantum of green open spaces is sufficient, well-located and well-sized to cater to the anticipated 20-year growth projection

·    Direction 17: Achieve 25% of tree canopy cover by 2041 and improve biodiversity

Place Outcome 6: Grow sustainably supported by infrastructure investment

·    Direction 18: Cost and fund infrastructure delivery to align with the 20-year growth projection

·    Direction 19: Deliver stormwater infrastructure and improve water quality

·    Direction 20: Advocate the delivery of key utility infrastructure and school upgrades

Place Outcome 7: Be a place that fosters civic pride and celebrates its history, culture and diversity

·    Direction 21: Provide communal places and services that strengthen social capital

·    Direction 22: Embed country-centred design principles in design and planning processes

·    Direction 23: Identify and protect items and values of shared heritage significance

Place Outcome 8: Be a low-carbon centre

·    Direction 24: Reduce local emissions for a more sustainable future of St Marys

Place Outcome 9: Have quality design in the public and private realms

·    Direction 25: Create attractive, liveable, healthy and sustainable public and private places through quality design and Country-centred design

Place Outcome 10: Evolve through partnerships and collaboration

·    Direction 26: Acknowledge the complexities of city-making and develop partnerships to achieve the best outcome for our community

Draft Spatial Framework Plan

The spatial framework plan is the culmination of all the place outcomes and strategic directions. It represents the following key initiatives of the draft Structure Plan:

·    Retain and enhance the existing assets including the thriving industrial lands and the economic activity along Queen Street.

·    Designate four key hubs – a transport hub around the proposed metro station; a civic heart at the core of the centre including a new Town Park; a sport and recreational hub along South Creek; and the existing St Marys Corner.

·    Link the four hubs via north-south and east-west pedestrian-friendly activity spines with a great public domain.

·    Intensify employment activity near the transport interchange.

·    Test the intensification of residential uses near amenity to provide housing diversity.

·    Redevelop strategic Council lands to offer community uses/mixed-use development.

·    Create a peripheral movement network around the Town Centre core for private vehicular and bus movement.

·    Support the peripheral movement network with consolidated car parking sites for commuters and non-commuters.

·    Provide a network of walking and cycling paths connecting key destinations.

·    Form a network of parks and plazas.

·    Provide new community facilities to meet community needs.

Further details of the draft Structure Plan is provided in the summary outline at Appendix 2.

Further explanatory information

Current Capacity – Existing Planning Controls

In late 2020, external consultants Hill PDA were engaged to undertake a discrete package of work in relation to planning controls in St Marys and surrounding neighbourhoods. Hill PDA estimated the current capacity of St Marys area (as per REMPLAN St Marys boundary) to be in the order of around 11,000 dwellings. Hill PDA concluded that the current planning controls for St Marys are fit for purpose and provide an adequate supply for the short term for mixed use development (both commercial and residential) and allow for a sufficient capacity to accommodate significant market fluctuations.

There are currently 1,672 dwellings in St Marys Town Centre. Projections show that the Town Centre could deliver between 6,600 to 7,200 dwellings by 2041. The capacity for St Marys Town Centre to deliver these dwellings, including consideration of the necessary supporting infrastructure for this growth, will be both tested and costed during work on the more detailed Master Plan. Similarly, there were 3,522 jobs in St Marys Town Centre in 2016. Projections show that the Town Centre should aim to provide between 5,600 to 9,100 jobs by 2041. The capacity of the Town Centre to realise this employment growth in the long term will also be further considered through the Master Plan process.

Upon public consultation and finalisation of the Structure Plan, the Master Plan will be prepared, supported by various technical studies. It is currently estimated that the Master Plan will take around 16-18 months to complete. The St Marys Planning Pathway is a thorough and considered process that will provide certainty to landowners and investors going forward. Combined with the Structure Plan, the Master Plan will inform potential amendments to planning controls, if required, for the long term.

Connecting and activating the northern industrial precinct

The existing North St Marys industrial precinct is a thriving local hub that is integral to meeting employment/jobs targets for the Town Centre into the future. The draft Structure Plan proposes an Arrival & Interchange Precinct straddling the Western Train Line in the vicinity of the existing station and new Sydney Metro transport interchange. This precinct is envisaged as a unifying 24x7 precinct that achieves a ‘one-centre’ approach and delivers a transport interchange to enhance local and regional public transport access and connectivity. It will have a key role in connecting the North St Marys Industrial Precinct with the Town Centre Core to the south. A range of precinct-specific interventions, including potential future uses and urban design initiatives, will be considered in more detail and tested through the Master Plan process.

Traffic implications for Glossop Street

Glossop Street is a regional movement corridor for vehicles and freight with traffic generation beyond the St Marys Town Centre. The current planning controls can accommodate the proposed range of additional dwellings to support a growing population in the Town Centre. Over time, this will contribute to traffic generation in and around the Town Centre. The draft Structure Plan acknowledges the existing traffic conditions and proposes a holistic approach to ‘movement and place’ for the St Marys Town Centre, and modal shift towards public and active transport. Glossop Street in particular is limited in its capacity to cater for additional traffic and this is recognised in the draft plan in so far as it does not propose intensification of land uses along this road corridor. Notwithstanding, a key initiative of the plan is to transition towards a peripheral movement network for through-traffic and freight to support the high ‘place’ function of Queen Street and key east-west activity spines. Delivering this change will require adjustments to the existing road network. As part of the Master Plan process, an Integrated Street Network Plan will be prepared that includes traffic modelling to test the implications of the proposal on the broader street network.

State agency collaboration

The draft Structure Plan acknowledges the need to foster collaboration and form effective partnerships with government agencies and key stakeholders to achieve the various outcomes of the shared place vision for St Marys. Council will continue to lead the St Marys Town Centre Collaboration Group while progressing towards the implementation of the draft Structure Plan. The Structure Plan also recognises the importance of the Town Centre Corporation and other key community groups in delivering on-the-ground initiatives for the St Marys community. Council will continue to engage with landowners, business owners and the wider community throughout the St Marys planning pathway.

Reducing emissions

The draft Structure Plan articulates an ambitious goal for St Marys to be a low carbon centre. This direction supports the Resilient Penrith Action Plan (adopted by Council in June 2021) which seeks, amongst other things, to reduce emissions at the local level through energy efficiency measures and uptake of renewable energy. The Resilient Penrith Action Plan proposes to set a net zero emissions target and develop a pathway to achieve emissions reduction for the Penrith LGA. The draft Structure Plan supports this opportunity by guiding the transition towards reducing local emissions for a more sustainable future for St Marys Town Centre.

Mix of affordable and social housing

The draft Structure Plan addresses the need to provide affordable and social housing to meet the needs of the future St Marys community. Finding the right balance between public/private and social/key worker housing will be key to achieving a desirable outcome for the Town Centre. It is important to note that whilst there is a higher need for this type of housing in St Marys it is not the only location where affordable housing will be delivered. Other precincts within both Penrith and nearby Blacktown LGA will also deliver housing to meet the needs of very-low, low, and medium income tenants. The St Marys Structure Plan is only seeking to meet the local need for affordable and social housing and not shoulder the burden for greater western Sydney. Further analysis to determine the appropriate mix of affordable and social housing for St Marys will be undertaken through the Master Plan process.

Achieving jobs target growth

The draft St Marys Structure Plan identifies the need to provide more than double the number of jobs in St Marys in the future to support the Town Centre becoming a new employment hub in the Western Parkland City. A range of initiatives are proposed to help achieve this jobs growth, including the possible intensification of commercial floor space in the Commercial Core and Arrival and Interchange Precincts immediately adjacent to the station/transport interchange. Importantly, the draft Structure Plan also preserves the industrial lands to the north of the rail line and seeks to improve the walkability and amenity of this area to attract workers. Employment will also be provided to a lesser extent in other precincts within the Town Centre in retail, food and drink, service and education-based roles. An estimated 2,100 - 5,600 (projected) additional jobs will be needed in the St Marys Town Centre between the 2016-2041 period based on a range of population and typical industry growth projections. The proposed range of 5,600 to up to 9,100 jobs in total to be delivered in the St Marys Town Centre by 2041 will be reviewed and refined as new 2021 Census data is made available.

Duration Cottages Heritage Investigation

The Duration Cottages in St Marys were erected in 1942 to provide housing for the workers of families employed at the St Marys Munitions Filling Factory (now Dunheved Industrial Estate), which operated during Second World War. The Duration Cottages precinct is located southwest of St Marys Train Station, bound by Camira Street in the north, Charles Hackett Drive in the south, Kalang Avenue in the west, and Carinya Avenue in the east.

As part of the Structure Plan background analysis, City Plan Heritage were engaged to undertake a Heritage Investigation of the Duration Cottages, St Marys (July 2022) to inform the future development within St Marys Town Centre by providing understanding of the level of heritage significance of the precinct, and further provide guidance with respect to sensitive development approaches, appropriate development controls, and heritage interpretation. The investigation has found the original subdivision pattern with its central park (Jack Jewry Reserve) and street layout to be of heritage significance and worthy of retention. However, the investigation found that retention of the Duration Cottages (buildings) themselves is not essential.

Accordingly, the draft Structure Plan retains the existing R2 Low Density Residential zoning and development standards pertaining to the Duration Cottages precinct. The smaller parcels provide a valuable role in delivering housing diversity by enabling detached dwelling houses on smaller lots – thereby promoting a compact housing form that may not be otherwise available in St Marys. Further information can be found in the Duration Cottages Heritage Investigation (Enclosure 4).

Public Exhibition and Engagement Activities

Building on the community engagement carried out earlier this year, it is proposed to exhibit the draft St Marys Town Centre Structure Plan for community consultation for four weeks in September 2022. An outline of the proposed engagement program is provided below.

Advertising and Notification

A mix of traditional and social media will be used to promote the exhibition of the draft St Marys Town Centre Structure Plan to ensure that we reach a broad demographic range both within the study area and more broadly throughout the Penrith LGA. This will include a media release and utilisation of Council’s social media channels including Facebook and Twitter.

Council’s Your Say Webpage

A dedicated Your Say webpage will provide all materials and information related to the exhibition of the draft St Marys Town Centre Structure Plan. This webpage will include a short survey on the draft St Marys Town Centre Structure Plan that community members can complete, as well as instructions for making a written submission.

 

 

Face-to-face activities

Face-to-face engagement activities (e.g. drop-in sessions) for the draft St Marys Town Centre Structure Plan will be held within the study area and potentially more broadly throughout Penrith City to engage with residents who may not necessarily access our website or social media. Council staff will be available at these sessions to seek feedback and answer questions. Such activities may be held in conjunction with Village Cafés.

Targeted engagement

Correspondence and/or meetings with key stakeholders of the project will be convened as relevant/required during the engagement period.

Following the public exhibition period, feedback on the draft St Marys Town Centre Structure Plan will be considered and relevant documents updated if necessary, before reporting back to Council for endorsement in late 2022 – early 2023.

St Marys Planning Pathway Stage 2 – Draft Town Centre Master Plan

The draft St Marys Structure Plan is a long-term staged plan yet to be both tested and costed. Some of the initiatives and directions in the plan could take up to 20 years to realise. Following the endorsement of the Structure Plan, work will continue on a more detailed Master Plan for St Marys Town Centre. The Master Plan will build on the Structure Plan by undertaking some additional technical studies to refine the spatial and strategic directions against resources and capacity for delivery.  Appendix 3 to this report provides an indicative program for the St Marys planning pathway including the development of the Master Plan.

Work has already commenced on the Master Plan, such as a heritage assessment for the Duration Cottages at St Marys (Enclosure 4). Preliminary findings from this report have been included in the draft Structure Plan report to support the future land use approach for the precinct.

 

Work on the Master Plan will continue to refine the strategic and spatial directions of the Structure Plan, investigate mechanisms for implementation, and will include the preparation of additional technical studies such as feasibility study, land contamination, biodiversity, traffic modelling, etc. The Master Plan, combined with the Structure Plan, will inform potential amendments to planning controls in the Local Environmental Plan and Development Control Plan as required. 

Financial Implications

The costs associated with the public exhibition of the draft St Marys Town Centre Structure Plan will be funded within existing budgets as part of the 2022-23 Operational Plan and Delivery Program.

Additionally, the draft Structure Plan proposes several infrastructure initiatives and enhancements for the Town Centre that, should they proceed to be considered in the Master Planning stage, will have significant resource implications for Council over the next 20 years. Proposed improvements to the Town Centre are all unfunded at this stage and indicatively could require in excess of $250m to achieve, subject to further investigation. For Council to consider possible funding solutions for these elements to be realised, the feasibility and achievability will be tested in the Master Planning stage and the financial implications and potential funding strategies will be considered alongside Council’s current Long-Term Financial Plan.

As foreshadowed earlier in this report, the outcomes of the exhibition will be reported back to Council prior to the Structure Plan being finalised. Progression to the Master Planning phase will require additional works, including feasibility analysis and a number of technical studies.  It is anticipated that these costs, which are indicatively forecast at approximately $1.5m, can be accommodated within existing capacity, including priority allocation from programs included in the 2022-26 Delivery Program and Internal Reserves related to the specific studies.  The required budget allocations can be accommodated as part of the September 2022 Financial Review.

Risk Implications

The preparation of the draft St Marys Town Centre Structure Plan reduces risk by clearly articulating the planning pathway and planning and design framework that Council is undertaking for the future development of St Marys Town Centre.

If Council does not proceed with the draft St Marys Town Centre Structure Plan, it will impact the timeline for the St Marys planning pathway with the risk that Council’s strategic vision and intentions for the future growth and development of the Town Centre may not be fully understood and considered by external stakeholders (e.g. Sydney Metro and Department of Planning and Environment) as part of their respective work on St Marys. Without an endorsed plan, Council’s ability to lead conversations and influence planning and decision making by external authorities is limited.

Conclusion

The draft St Marys Town Centre Structure Plan seeks to guide the growth of St Marys Town Centre over the next 20 years.

The draft St Marys Town Centre Structure Plan (Enclosure 1) forms part of Council’s Places of Penrith Strategic Framework and is a key component of the planning pathway for St Marys Town Centre. It adopts a place-based and design-led approach to guide the growth of St Marys Town Centre over the next 20 years. The draft Structure Plan proposes a Place Vision Statement, 10 place outcomes and 26 strategic and spatial directions. 

The draft Structure Plan is supported by thorough research, analysis and technical studies including the ‘Understanding St Marys: Evidence Report’ (Enclosure 3) and Duration Cottages Heritage Investigation (Enclosure 4).

It is proposed to publicly exhibit the draft St Marys Town Centre Structure Plan in September 2022 to enable wide community and stakeholder feedback. Following public exhibition, the draft St Marys Town Centre Structure Plan will be further refined to reflect community and stakeholder feedback before being reported to Council again for endorsement of the final version.

Following the endorsement of the Structure Plan, work will continue on a more detailed Master Plan for St Marys Town Centre. The Master Plan will build on the Structure Plan by undertaking some additional technical studies to refine the spatial and strategic directions against resources and capacity for delivery.  Appendix 3 to this report provides an indicative program for the St Marys planning pathway including the development of the Master Plan.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Public exhibition of draft St Marys Town Centre Structure Plan be received

2.     Council endorse the draft St Marys Town Centre Structure Plan to be publicly exhibited in September/October 2022 for a period of at least 4 weeks.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

Draft St Marys Town Centre Vision Statement

2 Pages

Appendix

2.

Draft St Marys Town Centre Structure Plan - Summary

6 Pages

Appendix

3.

St Marys Town Centre Planning Pathway

1 Page

Appendix

  


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                            22 August 2022

Appendix 1 - Draft St Marys Town Centre Vision Statement

 



Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                            22 August 2022

Appendix 2 - Draft St Marys Town Centre Structure Plan - Summary

 







Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                            22 August 2022

Appendix 3 - St Marys Town Centre Planning Pathway

 

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Ordinary Meeting                                                                                               22 August 2022

 

 

 

8

Glenmore Park Stage 2 Voluntary Planning Agreement- Deed of Variation   

 

Compiled by:               Natalie Stanowski, Principal Planner

Authorised by:            Natasha Borgia, City Planning Manager

Kylie Powell, Director - City Futures  

 

Outcome

We plan and shape our growing City

Strategy

Undertake strategic planning that will ensure balanced growth and liveability

Principal Activity

Ensure services, facilities and infrastructure meet the needs of a growing population through the contributions framework

     

Procedural note: Section 375A of the Local Government Act 1993 requires that a division be called in relation to this matter.

 

Landowner: Assunta Vianello

Proponent: Assunta Vianello

 

Executive Summary

This report seeks Council’s endorsement to notify a draft Deed of Variation to a current executed Voluntary Planning Agreement (VPA) for Glenmore Park Stage 2 (GP2). This variation is sought by Assunta Vianello (Landowner).

The original VPA was executed in 2007 to provide for the orderly delivery of infrastructure required to support GP2. Council is a party to the VPA, as is Vianello, and other landowners/developers of the Glenmore Park Stage 2 release area estate including:

·    Lensworth Glenmore Ltd (Lensworth),

·    Mulpha FKP Pty Ltd (Norwest Land),

·    Holicombe Pty Ltd (Holicombe) and

·    Mint Holdings Pty Ltd (Mint Holdings).

The VPA contains a range of obligations for the parties including the delivery of trunk drainage works, biodiversity corridor planting works, land dedication and monetary contributions towards affordable housing and employment. A second VPA also exists for GP2 and delivers other essential infrastructure such as roads and parks.

The Deed of Variation seeks to only amend the timing of the delivery of the remaining biodiversity corridor planting works on the proponent’s land, to instead align with future stages of development.  This will reduce the potential for future development works to impact the corridor planting, including proposed future development as part of Glenmore Park Stage 3, currently under consideration by Council.

The Deed has been prepared in accordance with the adopted Penrith Developer Infrastructure Agreements Policy (PDIAP).

This report recommends that Council endorse the draft Deed of Variation to be placed on public notification. Should Council endorse the draft Deed, it will be publicly notified in accordance with the Environmental Planning and Assessment Regulation 2000 and DPIAP. Following the notification period, a further report will be prepared for Council, detailing any submissions received.

Background

Consent was granted under DA20/0782 on 23 February 2022 for the subdivision of the subject Vianello land in four stages. The consent also requires biodiversity corridor planting works on land subject to this consent, as triggered by the VPA that was executed in 2007.

The VPA requires biodiversity corridor planting works and the dedication of part of the Vianello Land for the creation of a biodiversity corridor known as the “Surveyors Creek Corridor”. The biodiversity corridor planting works are to occur prior to the issue of the subdivision certificate for the 225th lot meaning full delivery of the biodiversity corridor planting works in the first out of four stages.

This means that any future road construction, adjacent to the biodiversity corridor, may damage the biodiversity corridor planting works if they are required to be carried out in the first stage and prior to the road works for later stages of Vianello’s development.

In addition to the practicalities of planting out of the biodiversity corridor prior to the construction of the adjacent roads, this biodiversity corridor is impacted by the Glenmore Park Stage 3 Planning Proposal (GP3) currently on public exhibition. The GP3 structure plan proposes a collector road traversing the subject biodiversity corridor.

Current Situation

An amendment to the VPA is proposed through a draft Deed of Variation, to align the rollout of the biodiversity corridor planting works with the subdivision stages approved under DA20/0782. This is detailed in a biodiversity planting plan attached to the draft Deed of Variation (Appendices 1 & 2). This means that subdivision certificates will not be released for the relevant stages unless the biodiversity corridor planting works are completed. The amendments will also provide a ‘sunset’ trigger to deliver the works, where it is identified that no further changes are sought as a result of the consideration of GP3. This will ensure there is a final trigger for the completion of the work. There are no changes proposed to the land dedication requirements in the VPA.

Whilst there are several parties attached to the VPA, Clause 11(c) of the VPA enables any one landowner to vary obligations under the VPA specific to the party by way of a Deed of Variation without the consent and approval of any other landowner. This is provided that any such variation does not have an adverse effect on the rights and obligations of the other landowners. This variation does not impact the rights and obligations of the other landowners under the executed VPA.

A review of the Offer has been undertaken in accordance with the PDIAP and this review has been considered by Council’s Local Infrastructure Contributions Working Group (LICWG) at its meeting on 26 April 2022.

The draft Deed of Variation has been prepared in accordance with the PDIAP and has been reviewed by Council’s Legal Services Team who have provided advice that the draft Deed of Variation can be placed on public notification, subject to Council’s endorsement.

 

Financial Implications

The costs associated with the public notification of the Deed of Variation are available within existing City Planning budgets Adopted as part of the 2022-23 Operational Plan and Delivery Program.

 

Risk Implications

The potential risks of this matter are the non-delivery of the biodiversity corridor planting works. This is proposed to be managed through the alignment of the delivery of works and the release of the subdivision certificate for the relevant stage. Further to ensure that there is an end date for the full works to be delivered, a sunset trigger will apply and be included in the Deed.

 

Next Steps

Should Council endorse the draft Deed of Variation, it will be placed on public notification, in accordance with the Environmental Planning and Assessment Regulation 2000 and PDIAP.  Notification will include publishing the draft Deed on Council’s Your Say page and the Department of Planning and Environment (DPE) Planning Portal, along with a newspaper advertisement in the Western Weekender. Formal written notification to the other parties to the VPA will be undertaken.

Following the notification period, a further report will be prepared for Council. This report will provide details of any submissions received and seek the endorsement of the execution of the Deed, where any issues raised have been addressed.

Conclusion

A draft Deed of Variation to the GP2 VPA has been prepared to amend the trigger dates for the delivery of biodiversity corridor planting works on the proponent’s land. The amendment was requested in order to align the approval subdivision rollout and the VPA works, in order to reduce potential damage to the works and enable the consideration of the Planning Proposal for GP3, which is proposed to affect the subject biodiversity corridor. Should Council endorse the draft Deed of Variation, it will be placed on public notification in accordance with Environmental Planning and Assessment Regulation 2000 and PDIAP. A further report would be presented to Council at the conclusion of the notification period.  

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Glenmore Park Stage 2 Voluntary Planning Agreement- Deed of Variation be received.

2.     Council endorse for notification, the draft Deed of Variation to the Voluntary Planning Agreement for Glenmore Park Stage 2, provided in Appendices 1 & 2.

3.     The draft Deed of Variation be publicly notified in accordance with the requirements of Environmental Planning and Assessment Regulation 2000 and Penrith Developer Infrastructure Agreements Policy.

4.     A further report will be prepared for Council following the notification of the draft deed, detailing any submissions received and seeking endorsement for execution, where any issues raised, have been addressed.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

Draft Deed of Variation to Glenmore Park Voluntary Planning Agreement

7 Pages

Appendix

2.

Vianello Biodiversity Corridor Planting Plan

2 Pages

Appendix

  


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                            22 August 2022

Appendix 1 - Draft Deed of Variation to Glenmore Park Voluntary Planning Agreement

 

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Ordinary Meeting                                                                                                            22 August 2022

Appendix 2 - Vianello Biodiversity Corridor Planting Plan

 

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 Outcome 4 - We manage and improve our built environment

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

9        Elizabeth Drive Upgrade (West & East) ISEPP Council Submission providing High Level Feedback                                                                                                                          92

 

10      RFT22/23-08 - South Penrith Neighbourhood Centre Refurbishment                            96

 

 

 

 



Ordinary Meeting                                                                                               22 August 2022

 

 

 

9

Elizabeth Drive Upgrade (West & East) ISEPP Council Submission providing High Level Feedback   

 

Compiled by:               Walter Sinnadurai, Transportation Planner

Authorised by:            Adam Wilkinson, Engineering Services Manager

Andrew Jackson, Director - Development and Regulatory Services  

 

Outcome

We manage and improve our built environment

Strategy

Plan for and maintain accessible, safe and high quality infrastructure

Principal Activity

Provide technical advice and work collaboratively with stakeholders to development and implement road safety programs

      

 

Executive Summary

The purpose of this report is to seek Council’s endorsement of draft submission to Transport for NSW (TfNSW) in response to the consultation being undertaken as part of the State Environmental Planning Policy (Transport and Infrastructure) 2021 (ISEPP) for the Proposed Upgrade of Elizabeth Drive (West & East) between The Northern Road, Luddenham and Westlink M7, Cecil Hills. This project is being designed and delivered by TfNSW as it is a critical item of infrastructure supporting development within the Aerotropolis. This report will provide an outline of the key issues that have been raised by Council in our submission.

The report recommends that the Engineering Services Manager be authorised to finalise a submission, based on this report, and forward to TfNSW by the closing date of 26 August 2022.

The Key Points of Council’s Submission include:

·    Council supports the proposed upgrade of the arterial road corridor.

·    Landscaping and urban form are priority issues for the project.

·    Acquisition of private land shall be undertaken in a fair and equitable manner, with consideration to individual circumstances and timing.

·    Traffic & Transport impacts need to be carefully managed.

·    Protection and retainment of critical biodiversity areas.

·    Minimise heritage impacts.

·    Appropriate water management techniques to be adopted

·    Construction management is to minimise impact.

·    Maintenance responsibilities will not be accepted by Council

Background

Elizabeth Drive is the main east-west corridor between Liverpool and surrounding suburbs and extends from the M7 Motorway to The Northern Road. It is approximately 14km in length and is mainly a two-lane undivided road with no footpaths or median. Elizabeth Drive has a sign posted speed limit of 80km/h except through the village of Kemps Creek where the speed is signposted at 60km/h.

TfNSW is committed to supporting the delivery of the Western Sydney International Airport and the Western Parkland City. The upgrade of Elizabeth Drive will improve as a movement corridor that performs an important role in the transport network supporting the South West Growth Area, the Western Parkland City and the Western Sydney International (Nancy-Bird Walton) Airport.

Current Situation

TfNSW’s proposes to upgrade the entire Elizabeth Drive corridor between The Northern Road, Luddenham and Westlink M7, Cecil Hills, however, the concept design has been divided into 2 stages, those being Elizabeth Drive West and Elizabeth Drive East, which forms the current ISEPP Consultation.

·    Elizabeth Drive West Upgrade between The Northern Road, Luddenham and Badgerys Creek Road.

·    Elizabeth Drive East Upgrade between Badgerys Creek Road, Badgerys Creek and just short of Westlink M7.

·    The section of Elizabeth Drive upgrade, which forms the remaining connection to the M7, that is not included under the ISEPP Consultation, and will be addressed as part of the M12 Motorway project.

TfNSW is proposing the realignment, upgrade and widening of approximately 11.4 kilometres of Elizabeth Drive Road – West and East from two lanes to four lanes, including a central median (which would allow for potential future expansion to six lanes). The key features include:

·    Two lanes in each direction with wide central median for provision for a future third lane in each direction.

·    Traffic signals at a number of intersections to improve safety and increase journey time reliability:

-     New intersection of Elizabeth Drive and The Northern Road, delivered as part of the Northern Road upgrade

-     Proposed new traffic light intersection and realignment of Luddenham Road with a new temporary U-turn facility be provided to the south of Elizabeth Drive

-     Reconfiguration and widening of Adams Road to provide an upgraded intersection with Elizabeth Drive. A new turning bay would also be provided to the south of Elizabeth Drive

-     Taylors Road and Badgerys Creek Road: intersections with these roads would be closed/adjusted as part of the M12 Motorway project and would not be further altered by the proposal.

-     Proposed new traffic light intersection at Martin Road

-     Proposed new traffic light intersection at Western Road

Proposed new traffic light intersection and realignment of Devonshire Road and/or Salisbury Avenue

-     Proposed new traffic light intersection at Mamre Road

-     Proposed new traffic light intersection at Range Road

-     Proposed new traffic light intersection at Duff Road

 

·    New 5.5-metre-wide one-way service road (eastbound) adjacent to Kemps Creek shops, to be accessed from the eastbound side of Elizabeth Drive between Clifton Avenue and Salisbury Avenue. The service road would exit onto Salisbury Avenue.

·    Provision of new bus priority infrastructure (jump-start lanes) on Elizabeth Drive on the approach and departure sides of seven new signalised intersections.

·    Provision of new separated walking and cycling paths along the full length of the proposal on both sides of Elizabeth Drive.

·    Intersections on Elizabeth Drive without traffic lights would be left in, left out access only.

·    Provision of a new roundabout at the northern end of the realigned Salisbury Road about 200 metres north of the intersection with Elizabeth Drive.

·    Provision of U-turn facilities at the northern legs of Martin Road, Range Road and Western Road.

·    Provision of ancillary infrastructure and activities including drainage infrastructure, utilities, road furniture, and basins.

Draft Submission to the ISEPP:

There are several matters that Council will bring to the attention of TfNSW which are listed in the summary below. A full copy of Council’s draft submission is provided in Attachment 1. This will form the basis of Council’s submission to TfNSW. Key matters relate to:

1.   Planning

2.   Transport and Traffic

3.   Active Transport

4.   Air Quality Impact

5.   Biodiversity

6.   Acoustic

7.   Contamination

8.   Soil and Water Management

9.   Dams/Basins

10. Heritage

11. Flooding & Flood Evacuation

12. Water Management

13. Landscape

14. Maintenance

 

Financial Implications

There are no financial implications for Council associated with this report.

Risk Implications

There are no risks associated with the content of the report and the draft submission to TfNSW.

Conclusion

The proposed upgrade of Elizabeth Drive Upgrade would increase road capacity for future growth and development to reduce congestion impacts on the community. It will provide improved access to the Western Sydney Airport and the Western Sydney Aerotropolis and supports the development of the Western Parkland City.

The improvements and upgrade to this critical arterial road corridor are supported in principle, subject to the matters contained within this report (and Council’s submission) being addressed by the TfNSW in the finalisation of the design and the Review of Environmental Factors (REF) for the proposal. Our submission to TfNSW will seek to reinforce Council’s in-principle support of the project and highlight a number of matters which warrant further consideration.

The key issues and comments identified within Attachment 1 will be included in Council’s submission to TfNSW and Council officers will continue to work with the TfNSW to ensure that the future upgrade delivers appropriate outcomes for all stakeholders.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Elizabeth Drive Upgrade (West & East) ISEPP Council Submission providing High Level Feedback be received

2.     Council’s Engineering Services Manager be authorised to finalise a submission, based on this report and attachments, to Transport for NSW (TfNSW) by 26 August 2022.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

Elizabeth Drive Upgrade (West & East) ISEPP Council Submission providing High Level Feedback

13 Pages

Attachments Included

  


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                               22 August 2022

 

 

 

10

RFT22/23-08 - South Penrith Neighbourhood Centre Refurbishment   

 

Compiled by:               Greg Bretherton, Project Supervisor

Authorised by:            Michael Jackson, Acting Director - City Services  

 

Outcome

We manage and improve our built environment

Strategy

Plan for and maintain accessible, safe and high quality infrastructure

Principal Activity

Design and deliver Council’s major capital projects

      

 

Executive Summary

A tender for the refurbishment of the South Penrith Neighbourhood Centre building was advertised on both the APET 360 E-tender portal and Council’s website on 10 June 2022. The tender closed on 13 July 2022.

This report advises Council of the outcome of the tender process and recommends that the tender from Buildpark Homes Pty Ltd for the full scope of works outlined in RFT22/23-08 South Penrith Neighbourhood Centre Refurbishment is accepted in the amount of $589,842 ex GST.

Background

As part of Council’s ongoing Asset Renewal Program, South Penrith Neighbourhood Centre was nominated as one of a number of community facilities requiring refurbishment works to bring the building up to current codes and standards as well as improving the appearance and functionality of the site.

Works include the following:

·    Access improvements – internal alterations including widening doorways, main access corridors and dedicated paths of travel, improved accessible and ambulant bathroom facilities and improvements to the existing main entry area and footpaths linking the carpark to the building.

·    Refurbishment of the existing bathroom facilities bringing them up to current access codes and standards. Note that due to structural and floorspace limitations within the existing building design, provision for an adult change facility will not be able to be achieved as part of this work.

·    New kitchen, compliant with food service codes.

·    Improvements to services including air-conditioning, security, communication, lighting and power bringing them up to current service standards and codes.

·    Internal upgrades including new storage facilities, new flooring and paint throughout.

·    External upgrades including full roof restoration (existing metal roof resprayed in a heat resistant colour in line with Council’s Cooling the City Strategy), painting and new illuminated signage. A dedicated garbage bin storage area, new services bay and refurbishment of the existing covered area off the main hall.

·    Minor landscape improvements including new boundary fencing and drought tolerant, shade providing planting.

Given the significant use of this building by the community and a long-standing community service tenant, this work will make the centre more user friendly, enabling current groups and staff to operate in a safe and compliant environment.

Responding parties were required to submit their tender on a standard pro forma sheet which clearly defined the response required against each of the evaluation criteria.

Tender Evaluation Process

The Tender Evaluation Committee consisted of Rosemarie Canales – Architectural Supervisor, Greg Bretherton - Project Supervisor and was chaired by Wasique Mohyuddin - Delivery Program Manager. Allyce Langton from Council’s Procurement team performed the role of tender administration and probity officer for this tender.

The evaluation criteria advertised and used in assessing the tenders received included the following:

•        Business References

•        Demonstrated Ability

•        Works Method and Program

•        Financials

•        Employment Policies and details (Direct labour and Sub Contractors)

•        Support of Local Businesses within the Penrith LGA - Suppliers and Contractors

•        Quality Assurance Systems

•        Environmental Management Systems

•        Work Health & Safety

Initial Tender Review

A full listing of the tenders received is detailed below in price order (ex GST).

Company

Tendered Price

Company Location

Contact/Directors

Skyview Building Group

$393,738.67

339 Saunders Rd
Oakville NSW

Arben Muslic

Buildpark Homes Pty Ltd

$589,842.00

Level 3, 565 High St
Penrith NSW

Michael Green

Buildco Projects Pty Ltd

$616,454.00

237 Mount Vernon Rd
Mount Vernon NSW

Danny Trifunovic

V Built Construction Group Pty Ltd

$699,848.49

64 Pemberton St
Botany NSW

Andrew Erakleous

Cranebrook Constructions

$710.135.00

97 Taylors Rd
Cranebrook NSW

Phil McNamara

AWS Sydney Pty Ltd t/a AWS Services

$718 341.50

7/2 Bolton St
Sydenham NSW

Carlos Abreu

Rogers Construction Group Pty Ltd

$775,094.14

3.06 2-8 Brookhollow Dr Norwest NSW

Ben Kavo

2020 Projects Pty Ltd

$775,518.00

L5, 4 Columbia Ct
Baulkham Hills NSW

John Touma

Coverit Building Group Pty Ltd

$839,612.00

Unit 18, 37-47 Borec Rd
Penrith NSW

Shane Comans

Acron Building Services Pty Ltd

$905,295.12

18/20 Tucks Rd
Seven Hills NSW

Kevin Wilson

AMA Projects Pty Ltd

$952,667.00

Unit 6, level 1, 18 Lonsdale St
Braddon ACT

Matthew Ferrari

Struct Homes

$995,685.00

Suite 313, 400 Pacific Highway St
Leonards NSW

Charles Huang

World Blinds Pty Ltd

Non-conforming

Unit 6, 1-3 Ferngrove Pl Chester hill NSW

Joseph Ryu

All 12 conforming tenders received were considered for initial assessment.

In line with an independent Quantity Surveyors estimate of this project the 4 lowest priced tenders from Skyview Building Group, Buildpark Homes Pty Ltd, Buildpro Projects Pty Ltd and VBuilt Construction Group Pty Ltd were considered for final evaluation. The tender submitted from World Blinds only addressed a portion of the works and therefore was non-conforming and unable to be considered.

Apet360 software was used to provide a ranking for conformance with the evaluation criteria. 

Evaluation of the Preferred Tender

Following the detailed assessment review, the tender from Buildpark Homes Pty Ltd was considered by the Tender Evaluation Committee to best fulfil Council’s proposal based on this company’s tender responses. Whilst not the lowest priced tender (second lowest price) it was the best ranked tender overall when considering all the evaluation criteria.

1)      Compliance with the tender evaluation criteria,

2)      Demonstrated ability to meet Council’s requirements; and

3)      Competitive price for the services offered.

The Tender Evaluation Committee thoroughly reviewed the information provided pertaining to past experience of the proposed tenderer and conducted reference checks which were positive.

The lowest priced submission from Skyview Building Group did not demonstrate comparable experience and scored poorly against the key criteria for this project.

Recommended Tenderer

Buildpark Homes Pty Ltd is a mid-sized local building company operating from offices in Penrith. The company has been in operation for the past 30 years with experience across a range of residential and light commercial construction projects. Previous projects include single dwellings, mid-sized multistorey residential unit developments and various small commercial projects including showrooms and offices. The company’s services and activities are controlled by documented management systems to meet Safety, Quality and Environmental regulatory requirements. Whilst not externally ISO accredited, these systems operate within industry guidelines for quality, environmental and WHS management and meet the necessary standards for Council projects. Referees provided for Buildpark Homes Pty Ltd were contacted and the feedback received was positive on all accounts relating to project delivery including quality, WHS, and working within set budgets and programs.

Financial Implications

Included in the assessment of tenders was the commissioning of independent reference checks, financial analysis, and performance analysis of the Buildpark Homes Pty Ltd. These checks were completed by Equifax Australasia Credit Ratings Pty Ltd. Financial Services have reviewed the financial information provided by the tenderer and have not identified any reason why the contract should not be awarded. The report recommends acceptance of the tender by Buildpark Homes Pty Ltd with sufficient funds being available for this contract.

Tender Advisory Group (TAG) Comment

The objective of the Tender Advisory Group (TAG) is to support the Council to achieve fair and equitable tender processes. The TAG, consisting of Brian Steffen - Director City Services, Glenn McCarthy - Governance Manager and Neil Farquharson – Financial Services Manager were briefed by the Design & Projects team about the background and the process followed.

The TAG considered the recommendations in relation to the tender for the refurbishment of the South Penrith Neighbourhood Centre. After a satisfactory response to a request for clarification regarding price and the ability to meet the required program, the TAG considered that Buildpark Homes Pty Ltd has demonstrated their ability to meet Council’s requirements and their proposal was considered to be the most advantageous to Council. The TAG reviewed the evaluation process outlined within the report and is satisfied that the selection criteria have been correctly applied in making the recommendations.

Risk Implications

The tender process outlined in this report includes controls regarding probity and ensuring value for Council, overseen by the Tender Advisory Group. The works will be undertaken in accordance with Work Health & Safety systems.

Conclusion

The Tender Evaluation Committee is of the opinion that Buildpark Homes Pty Ltd provided the most advantageous tender and it is recommended that the Company be awarded the contract for a sum of $589,842.00 ex GST.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on RFT22/23-08 - South Penrith Neighbourhood Centre Refurbishment be received.

2.     Buildpark Homes Pty Ltd be awarded the Contract subject to the execution of a formal agreement for the refurbishment works to South Penrith Neighbourhood Centre for the amount of $589,842.00 excluding GST.

3.     The General Manager (or their delegate) be authorised to sign all necessary legal documents in relation to this matter.

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.  


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


Outcome 5 - We have open and collaborative leadership

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

11      RFT21/22-30 St Marys Gidley Street Car Park Architectural Services                         104

 

12      Organisational Performance and Financial Review - June 2022                                  111

 

13      Audit, Risk and Improvement Committee                                                                      120

 

14      Local Government NSW Annual Conference 2022                                                       130

 

15      Model Code of Conduct for Local Councils in NSW and Procedures                           134

 

16      Summary of Investment & Banking for the period 1 July 2022 to 31 July 2022           136

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



Ordinary Meeting                                                                                               22 August 2022

 

 

 

11

RFT21/22-30 St Marys Gidley Street Car Park Architectural Services   

 

Compiled by:               Tatum Mckee, Project Officer

Kathy Banda, Development Manager

Authorised by:            Nathan Ritchie, Property Development Manager

Andrew Moore, Director - Corporate Services  

 

Outcome

We have open and collaborative leadership

Strategy

Deliver an efficient, transparent and accountable service to the community

Principal Activity

Provide property services and manage community and commercial requests for the use of Council owned or controlled land

      

 

Executive Summary

The tender reference RFT21/22-30 Architectural Services Gidley Street Carpark was published on 16 June 2022 through APET 360. The tender closed on 20 July 2022.

This report advises Council of the outcome of the tender process and recommends that the tender from The Trustee for The Philip Cox & Partners Unit Trust is accepted for the Phase 2 Architectural Services valued at $142,784.75 (excl. GST) for Gidley Street Commuter Car Park.

Background

The federal government has committed $33.75M in funding for the delivery of a multi-storey car park on approximately 3,720m2 at-grade Council car park at 5 -13 Gidley St in St Marys. The land value of the site is approximately $3.9M, which is Council’s contribution to the project.

Key features of the project include approximately 600 to 667 parking spaces, cold shell space for commercial use (proposed 1600 m2), Cooling the City and incorporating environmental initiatives.

The purpose of this tender is to seek Architectural Services to deliver a commuter carpark in St Marys. The Tenderers were required to submit their tender using the APET 360 tendering software, which clearly defined the response required against each evaluation criteria.

The Architectural Services were tendered based on the life of the project, with the successful proponent to be engaged in stages upon funding approval for each phase as the project progresses. This project is funded by the Federal Government’s Urban Congestion Fund and the funding agreement splits the project in 5 Phases, aligned to the milestones for funding. Phase 1 of the project did not require Architectural services. 

The initial engagement of the successful proponent would therefore be for Phase 2. It would then be proposed that the successful proponent would awarded Phase 3, Phase 4 and Phase 5 upon funding approval for each Phase. A separate report will be presented to Council recommending to award each Phase once funding and progression is approved by the Federal Government. The Phases of the project are outlined below.

Phase 1: Project Initiation involved a High Level Business Case, secured funding and approval for the Scoping Phase Project Proposal Report. Architectural Services were not required for this phase of the project.

Phase 2: Scoping Phase involves the detailed site investigations, options analysis, approval of the concept design and approval of the Development Phase Project Proposal Report to secure funding for the next phase.

Phase 3: Development Phase involves the design development and planning approval, construction tender design documentation and procurement, along with the approval of the Delivery Phase Project Proposal Report will be required to secure funding for the next phase.

Phase 4 and 5: Delivery Phase includes a range of provisional options which are described below. Provisional options were tendered on to provide flexibility with the project delivery pathway post development approval.

The approved Delivery Phase Project Proposal Report in Phase 3 will determine the proposed methodology and pathway and confirm the option the successful consultant will be engaged to deliver.

Details of the provisional options listed below: 

Option A: Phase 4 Construction Certificate Documentation

Option B: Phase 4 D&C Construction Design and Support Services

Option C: Phase 4 D&C Design Review Services Construction Phase & Post Completion

Option D: Phase 5 D&C Completion Phase

 

Tender Evaluation Process

The Tender Evaluation Committee consisted of Amanda McMurtrie – Acting Property Development Manager (Chair), Kathy Banda – Development Manager, Paul Chapple – APP Project Manager, Nirali Oza – APP Project Manager and Tatum McKee – Development Manager.

Laura Stott from Council’s Procurement team performed the role of tender administration and probity officer for this tender.

The selection criteria advertised and resourced in selecting the successful tenderer included the following:

·    Compliance with the tender evaluation criteria

·    Demonstrate capability to perform the works

·    Demonstrate understanding of project scope and program

·    Competitive price for the services offered

 

A total of twelve (12) tenderers were received by the closing date of the advertised tender. These tenders are listed below in price order.

 

Tenderers Name

Location of the Business

Phase 2 & Phase 3 excl GST

Provisional Options* Total excl GST

Total Price incl. Provisional Options excl. GST

Directors

Jesse Jacob Lochart-Krause

Sydney

$208,208.00

$89,232.00

$297,440.00

Jesse Jacob     Lochart-Krause

Kyearn & King Associates Pty Ltd

North Sydney

$171,640.00

$238,000.00

$409,640.00

Yong Xiang Ngoi

King Keng Lee

VTAS Architecture

Surry Hills

$299,550.00

$155,130.00

$454,680.00

Austin Tuon

Toan Ngo

Mode Design Corporation Pty Ltd

Fortitude Valley

$306,880.00

$184,960.00

$491,840.00

Rhonan O’Brien

Peter Bertram

Collard Maxwell Architects

North Sydney

$322,440.00

$348,960.00

$671,400.00

Charles Fortin

The Trustee for The Philip Cox & Partners Unit Trust

Sydney

$373,517.25

$364,224.76

$737,742.01

David Holm

Ian Connolly

Joe Agius

John Richardson

Nick Tyrrell

Russell Lee

Alex Small

John Ferendinos

Lachlan Abercrombie

Ramin Jahromi

Satvir Mand

Brooke Lloyd

Lippmann Partnership

Surry Hills

$400,000.00

$710,000.00

$1,110,000.00

Ed Lippmann

DWP Australia

Sydney

$791,840.00

$441,000.00

$1,232,840.00

Angus Rose

Michael Hegarty

David Rose

Brenton Mauriello

Johnson Pilton Walker Pty Ltd

Sydney

$740,600.00

$521,520.00

$1,262,120.00

Kiong Lee

Matthew Morel

Graeme Dix

Paul van Ratingen

Koturic & Co. Pty Ltd

Concord

$705,000.00

$585,000.00

$1,290,000.00

Steven Koturic

GHD Pty Ltd

Sydney

$723,250.00

$664,990.00

$1,388,240.00

Craig Muir

Craig Brown

Paul Thatcher

Dean McIntyre

Jane Cassidy

Catherine Startari

Rachel Todd

Weston Williamson + Partners**

Melbourne

$790,315.60

$1,279,477.32

$2,069,792.92

Christopher Andrew Williamson

Robert Naybour

Thomas Frederic Salvant

David lorimer Pringle

Antonio Alvaro

Mickael Pinto

 

* Engagement of provisional options tendered are dependent on the development approval pathways and construction delivery contract to be determined as the project progresses.

** WW&P included subconsultants fees (landscape, signage and wayfinding, facade design and safety in design) in their tendered price.

 

The shortlisting was completed using the APET 360 platform, which is a tender and evaluation platform. All twelve (12) submissions were assessed and scored against all evaluation criteria by each member of the Evaluation Committee.

The following submissions were excluded due to non-price scores, which indicated that their bid demonstrated a lower capability in meeting and satisfying the project requirements. The sequence of the applications below does not indicate ranking.

·    Jesse Jacob Lochart-Krause

·    Kyearn & King Associates Pty Ltd

·    Collard Maxwell Architects

·    Lippmann Partnership

·    Weston Williamson + Partners

·    Johnson Pilton Walker Pty Ltd

·    Koturic & Co. Pty Ltd

·    VTAS Architecture

With the remaining of the four (4) Tenderer, their submissions were evaluated based on price. The following submissions were excluded due to exceeding Council’s budget for these services:

·    DWP Australia

·    GHD Pty Ltd

 

The Tender Evaluation Panel shortlisted the following tenders to proceed with further detailed evaluations. The shortlisted companies were:

 

Tenderers Name

Location of the Business

Phase 2

Phase 3

Provisional Options* Total excl GST

Total Price incl. Provisional Options excl. GST

Mode Design Corporation Pty Ltd

Fortitude Valley

$51,840.00

$255,040.00

$184,960.00

$491,840.00

The Trustee for The Philip Cox & Partners Unit Trust

Sydney

$142,784.75

$230,732.50

$364,224.76

$737,742.01

 

Mode Design Corporation Pty Ltd provided a competitive price and demonstrated strong car park experience. However, the resources allocated for Phase 2 of the project is not consistent with Council’s expectations, due to the extent of work required for this stage of works. Their methodology was thorough however, project issues identified were general and did not address project specific issues.

The Trustee for The Philip Cox & Partners Unit Trust (Philip Cox and Partners) was selected as the recommended tender based on the highest non-price score. They submitted a very strong, competitive and quality bid compared with the other shortlisted tender. Their submission showed clear experience in similar car park projects of a comparable scale and demonstrated experience working on Council-led projects. Philip Cox and Partners presented their knowledge on the project through a detailed methodology incorporating sustainable initiatives and ideas to future proof the development. The proposed resource allocation is consistent with the project deliverables and program. The project program outlined the project activities and efficiencies in line with the initial project program.

 

Financial Implications

Included in the assessment of tenders was the commissioning of independent reference checks, financial analysis, and performance analysis on Cox Architecture Pty Ltd. These checks were completed by Equifax Australasia Credit Ratings Pty Ltd. Financial Services have reviewed the financial information provided by the tenderer and have not identified any reason why the contract should not be awarded.

This report recommends that The Trustee for The Philip Cox & Partners Unit Trust is recommended as the preferred provider of the Architectural Services for Gidley Street Carpark. While this report seeks to award Phase 2 works to the value of $142,784.75, it is noted that subject to approval from the Federal Government to continue through the project, the total cost of the contract is $737,742.01 (excl GST). The Federal Government has committed $33.75m in funding for the delivery of a multi-storey car park with the land value of the site being approximately $3.9m which represents Council’s contribution to the project.

The grant funds for this project are being received aligned to the project milestones. To date funding $700,000 has been approved for this project. While the tendered services are for the life of the project, it is proposed that the successful proponent be engaged in phases as funding approval for each phase is approved. The proposed Phase 2 engagement is costed at $142,784.75 (excl. GST) which can be accommodated within the grant funds approved to date.

Tender Advisory Group (TAG) Comment

The objective of the Tender Advisory Group (TAG) is to support the Council to achieve fair and equitable tender processes. The TAG, consisting of Andrew Moore - Director Corporate Services, Glenn McCarthy - Governance Manager and Neil Farquharson – Financial Services Manager were briefed by the Property Development team about the background and the process followed.

The TAG considered the recommendation in relation to the tender for Architectural Services for the Gidley Street Car Park, St Marys noting that the proposed contract is for Phase 2 as described above. The TAG considered that the recommended tenderer has demonstrated their ability to meet Council’s requirements and their proposal was considered to be the most advantageous to Council particularly in their demonstrated experienced in other similar projects. The TAG reviewed the evaluation process outlined within the report and is satisfied that the selection criteria have been correctly applied in making the recommendations.

Risk Implications

The tender process outlined in this report includes controls regarding probity and ensures value for money, which are overseen by the Tender Advisory Group.

Conclusion

The Tender Evaluation Committee is of the opinion that The Trustee for The Philip Cox & Partners Unit Trust is recommended as the preferred provider of the Architectural Services and have demonstrated their capacity and capability to deliver the services requested of the RFT Architectural Services.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on RFT21/22-30 St Marys Gidley Street Car Park Architectural Services be received

2.     The recommended tender from The Trustee for The Philip Cox & Partners Unit Trust be accepted for RFT21/22-30 Architectural Services Gidley Street Carpark for Phase 2 valued at $142,784.75 (excl. GST)

3.     The General Manager (or their delegate) be authorised to sign all necessary legal documents in relation to this matter

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.


Ordinary Meeting                                                                                               22 August 2022

 

 

 

12

Organisational Performance and Financial Review - June 2022   

 

Compiled by:               Geraldine Brown, Strategic Finance Coordinator

Neil Farquharson, Financial Services Manager

Craig Shepherd, Corporate Performance Lead

Authorised by:            Andrew Moore, Director - Corporate Services  

 

Outcome

We have open and collaborative leadership

Strategy

Deliver an efficient, transparent and accountable service to the community

Principal Activity

Support financial sustainability through financial planning and budget management and provide accurate reporting to the community

      

 

Executive Summary

This report outlines Council’s progress towards implementing its five-year Delivery Program 2017-22 and annual Operational Plan 2021-22 and focuses on the period of 1 January 2022 to 30 June 2022. The report should be read in conjunction with the Organisational Report – June 2022, which records significant Variations, Reserve Movements, proposed Revotes, Contracts, Consultancies and Legal Expenses, Cash and Investments position, Income and Expenses by Program and our progress in completing the organisation’s Operating and Capital projects for the final quarter of 2021-22.  

 

At 30 June 2022, 82% of Council’s 199 reportable projects, and 90% of Council’s 98 reportable actions were ‘on schedule’ or ‘completed’. 

 

Council projected a balanced Budget in the adoption of the original 2021-22 Operational Plan. The year-end result as at 30 June 2022 is a balanced position after a proposed allocation to the Financial Management Reserve of $1.8m to provide Council with the capacity to respond to emerging priorities in 2022-23 onwards, and $2.2m to continue the repayment of the COVID Impact internal loan.

 

All actual figures are subject to end-of-year adjustment, external audit checking and confirmation. Once finalised the Draft 2021-22 Financial Statements will be presented to the Ordinary Meeting of the Council on 26 September 2022 and the audited Draft Financial Statements will be presented on 31 October 2022, which will include a detailed explanation of Council’s audited financial position.

 

Further details on proposed major variations are provided in this report, with more detail also included in the Organisational Report – June 2022.

 

This report recommends that the Organisational Performance and Financial Review Report – June 2022 be received, and that the revised Budget estimates identified in the report and detailed in the Organisational Report – June 2022 be adopted.  

 

Organisational Performance Summary

The Organisational Performance Report provides information on Council’s progress, achievements and challenges for the six-month period between 1 January 2022 to 30 June 2022.

 

Table 1 provides a performance summary, which overall demonstrates that Council, while impacted by COVID-19, is still successfully delivering its services and programs. 

 

 

Table 1

 

 

Completed

On Schedule

Delayed due to COVID-19

Delayed

 

Number

%

Number

%

Number

%

Number

%

Actions

43

44%

45

46%

5

5%

5

5%

Projects

98

49%

65

33%

16

8%

20

10%

Organisational Highlights

Council has continued to deliver on programs and services during the reporting period. Some of the highlights were:

 

·    significant progress was made to the Regatta Park, Gipps Street, City Park, Soper Place multi deck carpark, Police Cottage refurbishment and Joan Café projects

·    Urban Heat Planning Control Package was endorsed by Council

·    work progressed on the Places of Penrith Strategic Planning Framework

·    just over 80,000 sqm. of road pavement was resurfaced over the last six months, including over 200 tonnes of recycled glass used in asphalt mix

·    5.73km of footpath was constructed

·    delivered 7 events under the Open Streets Program that attracted over 18,000 people

·    completion of the Penrith Mayoral Challenge at Spence Park, Penrith

·    planted 11,248 native plants into a range of Council reserves

·    achieved a 59% diversion rate of resources from landfill

·    completed a City-wide Community and Cultural needs study

·    adoption of the 2022-26 Disability Action Plan

·    adoption of the new suite of Integrated Planning and Reporting documents.

Financial Position Summary

This report covers the final quarter of the 2021-22 financial year. Details of significant Variations, Reserve Movements and the status of Council’s Operating and Capital Projects compared to Budget are included in this document. 

 

Council projected a balanced Budget in the adoption of the original 2021-22 Operational Plan. The year-end result as at 30 June 2022 is a balanced position after a proposed allocation to the Financial Management Reserve of $1.8m to provide Council with the capacity to respond to emerging priorities in 2022-23 onwards, and $2.2m to continue the repayment of the COVID Impact internal loan.

 

During the final quarter of 2021-22 the variations to Budget were mainly positive including additional Rates Income ($771k) and Interest on Investments ($304k), savings on Debt Servicing ($419k) and overall Employee Costs after end of year adjustments to reflect the movement in ELE ($1.3m), and a reduction in contingency funds required for S7.11 Plans in Deficit ($332k). These positive variations were partially offset by additional expenditure on Roads Maintenance ($825k) and Building Maintenance ($338k).

 

Additionally, a total of $28.1m of Capital and Operating Project revotes are proposed within this June 2022 Quarter Review, as all works have not been completed in the 2021-22 financial year. Further details on proposed major variations and revotes are provided later in this report and in the Organisational Report – June 2022.

 

This final review for 2021-22 highlights the importance of the financial sustainability, with Council in a strong financial position and able to successfully navigate the current pandemic situation due to our prudent financial strategy which has included building contingency internal reserves over many years.

 

This report recommends that the revised Budget estimates as at 30 June 2022, including revotes, identified in this report and detailed in the Organisational Report – June 2022 be adopted.

Financial Position for the June 2022 Quarter

The financial position of Council for the quarter is expressed by providing information in compliance with Quarterly Budget Review Statement (QBRS) requirements on:

·    Budget position (whether balanced/surplus/deficit)

·    Significant Variations

·    Identified Revotes

·    Funding summary

·    Reserve movements for the Quarter

·    Capital and Operating Budget Projects list for the quarter

·    Key Performance Indicators

·    Income and Expenses

·    Capital Budget

·    Cash and Investments

·    Contracts and Other Expenses

·    Consultancy and Legal expenses

 

Budget Position

 

$’000s

Original Budget Position

0

September 2021 Quarter Variations Adopted by Council

211

December 2021 Quarter Variations Adopted by Council             

208

March 2022 Quarter Variations Adopted by Council

126

June 2022 Quarter Review Proposed Variations

1,249

Sub-total year-end Budget surplus (after repayment of COVID-19 Impact Internal Loan)

1,794

Less:  Transfer to Financial Management Reserve

(1,794)

Revised balanced Budget Position June 2022

0

 

This Review recommends a number of both favourable and unfavourable adjustments to the Adopted Budget for 2021-22. Commentary is provided below on some of the more significant variations in the June Quarterly Review (F= Favourable, U= Unfavourable, A= Allocation). Further details of all proposed variations impacting the Budget position, variations with no impact on available funds, revotes, and reserve movements are detailed in the Organisational Report – June 2022.

Net Salary Savings- $1,337,745 F (1%)

During the first three quarters of the year, salary savings (predominantly from staff vacancies) of $1.9m were identified and retained in the Employee Cost budget to offset any additional costs and assist in year-end balancing of this expenditure category. In the final quarter these salary savings were combined with the provision for retirement/resignations, with on-cost recovery adjustments, and the movement in Employee Leave Entitlements (ELE) calculated as part of the end of year process and resulted in an overall $1,337,745 net favourable impact on Employee Costs. Council policy is to maintain an amount of at least 20%, averaged over three years, of leave entitlements (excluding annual leave) in the ELE Reserve. The balance of the ELE Reserve as at 30 June 2022 is 22.78% ($5.9m) of entitlements.

 

Roads Maintenance - $825,005 U (9%)

Council responded to 1,839 customer requests regarding potholes and resolved over 70% of the requests within five (5) days to ensure our roads are in a serviceable and safe condition. This unprecedented amount of customer requests relating to potholes and road failures is due to the severe weather conditions in March and April 2022. Council is currently working with Transport for New South Wales (TfNSW) to claim costs associated with the flood event under the NSW Natural Disaster Essential Public Asset Restoration program. It is anticipated that some of this unplanned expenditure on roads maintenance will be recoverable, however at this stage the extent is yet to be determined.

 

Rates Income – $770,579 F (0.55%)

Rates income was greater than anticipated and this was due mainly to (1) additional General Rates and interest income, and (2) lower than anticipated write-offs, postponements and rebates.

1.   Rates income was around $134k (F) above the prior estimates, mainly due to rating categorisation changes and supplementary valuations received for land developments around the Aerotropolis. Rates arrears were higher compared to the previous year, and therefore interest income was $43k (F) above the prior estimates by year end.

2.   Provisions for rates and interest write-offs for the year were not fully utilised with rate abandonments being $30k (F) under the annual provision and interest abandonments being $94k (F) under the annual provision. Allowances made for postponement of rates for high valued land around the Aerotropolis were not required due to a lower than anticipated take-up of postponement of rates by owners of properties with postponed rates being sold during the financial year, eventuating in approximately $493k (F) less rates postponed than forecast. This year there was also lower than anticipated pension rebates provided, which when netted off against the resulting lower rebate NSW Government subsidy, resulted in additional net income of around $20k (F).

 

Debt Servicing- $419,158 F (4.7%)

The favourable variance relates to the new 2021-22 Borrowings of $20m Multi-Deck Carpark at Soper Place and $4m City Park, which were reported to the Council for approval on the 22 November 2021. The original budgets for both projects had 30 June 2021 as the loan drawdown dates. The $20m Multi-deck Carpark at Soper Place was drawdown in January 2022, and in May 2022 for $4m City Park. The timing difference on the projected drawdown dates drove the favourable variance between actual and budget for 2021-22 debt service costs.

 

 

S7.11 Cultural Facilities Financial Management - $332,207 F (100%)

As reported to Council on 26 March 2018 the 2017-18 Borrowing Program included $2.9m to offset the S7.11 Lambridge Estate Plan that is currently in deficit, as agreed as part of the Financial Capacity Review. Also reported to the Council on 25 February 2019 the 2018-19 Borrowing Program included $2.7m to offset the S7.11 Cultural Facilities Plan that is currently in deficit. Funding for the debt servicing costs for these loans was included in the 2016-17 SRV. During 2021-22 Council has received development contributions for the s7.11 Cultural Facilities Plan. These funds have reduced the total Plan deficit which in turn has reduced the funds required to be held in Reserve to reduce the possible impact to Council in the future.

 

Building Maintenance- $337,965 U (10%)

This variation relates to the ongoing program of scheduled and reactive building maintenance across Council's Building Assets. The program is designed to ensure all building assets are maintained to meet the requirements of the facility. The budget continues to run over annual allocations due to the size, age, and expansion of Council’s asset portfolio and this is reflected in our building backlog ratio. The larger expenditure on assets in 2021-22 include for the Civic Centre and Penrith Library, neighbourhood centre facilities (Glenmore Park Family Precinct, Regentville Hall), Ripples swim centres, childcare centres (Werrington County CCC, Jamisontown CCC), the Joan Sutherland Performing Arts Centre, and Penrith Regional Gallery.

 

However, compared to the previous financial years the level of reactive maintenance has reduced due to the positive impact of Council’s Building Asset Renewal Program. An increased asset renewal program is currently being reviewed using funding from the recently approved Special Rate Peg starting in 2022-23. The proposed program will further improve Council’s building backlog ratio and will reduce reactive maintenance requirements through proactive measures.  

 

Interest on Investments - $304,135 F (161%)

The Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA), at the last quarter of 2021-22, decided to increase the cash rate. This was in response to the 5.1% reported inflation rate at the beginning of 2022. The cash rate at the end of 2021-22 closed at 0.85%. The exponential increase in the cash rate drove the rate of return on investments being offered by banks upward. Council projected interest income return for 2021-22 of 0.45% has been favourably surpassed in June 2022 by 111 basis points –Council’s investment portfolio yield for June 2022 was 1.56%. In addition to this, a $23.3m ‘Accelerated Infrastructure Funding’ grant was received at the end of May 2022, which was not included when the original budget was calculated.

 

Transfer to Financial Management Reserve - $1,793,882 A

The development of the annual budget each year requires a number of assumptions to be made in relation to both expenditure and income that are dependent on factors that are outside Council’s control. To safeguard against movements in these assumptions and forecasts it is proposed that $1.8m be transferred to Reserve. This allocation will provide capacity to respond to current and emerging priorities, and also fund priority resource requests from 2022-23 onwards.

 

Transfer to COVID Impact Reserve - $2,211,084 A

As part of the June Quarterly Review a budget surplus has been achieved and as a result $2.2m is proposed to be transferred to the COVID Impact Reserve. This will result in a closing deficit balance of $1.5m for this Reserve as at 30 June 2022, and with $500k p.a. repayments scheduled for the next 3 years this will result in the Reserve being repaid by June 2025.

 

 

Other variations with no impact on Available Funds and Proposed Revotes

A number of other variations, proposed as part of this review, do not have an impact on the available funds. Details of these adjustments are provided in the Organisational Report – June 2022.

 

In addition to the aforementioned variations, a total of $28.1m of planned Capital and Operating projects are proposed for revote this quarter. The total value of revotes for the year to date is $60.2m (including the proposed June Quarter revotes) compared to $21.8m for the same period in 2020-21. A full list of Revotes is included in the Organisational Report – June 2022.

Summary of COVID Impact

Prior years

As previously reported in 2019-20 and 2020-21, in order to track the actual impact of COVID on Council’s operations and revenue a separate COVID Impact Reserve was created initially resulting in a deficit balance for the Reserve as we are notionally funding from this Reserve. It has effectively resulted in a loan against our Internal Reserves. At the conclusion of each reporting period a review of Actual vs Budgeted impact was undertaken with any variance adjusted against the original source of funding for this Reserve and any surplus directed towards the repayment of this Internal Reserve.

 

The table below details the financial impact of COVID for the fifteen months from April 2020 to June 2021. As reported to the Council in the June 2021 Quarterly Review, the final impact on Council’s General revenue (available funds) for this period was $4.38m. Budget variations during this period which did not impact on available funds were $649,000, resulting in a total impact of $5m for April 2020 to June 2021.

 

2019-20

2020-21

 

 

2019-20

2020-21

TOTAL

 

 COVID IMPACT 2019-21

3 Months - Apr to June 2020

July 2020 to June 2021

2019-20 and 2020-21 

Actual

Actual

Actual

($’000)

($’000)

($’000)

 

 

 

As at June 2020 Review

As at June 2021 Review

Cumulative impact 2019-20 and 2020-21

Impact on General Revenue

 

 

 

 

Revenue

$2,728

$2,594

$5,322

 

Expenditure (savings)

-$353

-$110

-$463

 

 

PWS Relief Request

$0

$570

$570

 

 

Less: Repayment of Internal Loan

-$551

-$500

-$1,051

 

 

$1,824

$2,554

$4,378

Impact on Reserves

 

 

 

 

Revenue

$244

$405

$649

TOTAL COVID IMPACT 2019-21

$2,068

$2,959

$5,027

 

This Reserve was closed off from 1 July 2021 with a closing deficit balance of $4.38m, as we move into the recovery stage of the pandemic with the focus on repaying this Reserve.

Current Financial Year

While the COVID Impact Reserve has now been closed off and any impacts from 2021-22 onwards are sought to be absorbed within any operational surplus, in 2021-22 we have continued to track this impact and report to Council on a quarterly basis. The final quarter of 2021-22 has seen no further COVID impacts on Council’s operations and some savings on predicted COVID related costs. These savings have been incorporated into the June 2022 revised budget position.

 

It is proposed as part of this June Quarterly Review to transfer $2.2m to this Reserve bringing the closing deficit balance to $1.5m as at 30 June 2022. The 2021-22 Original Budget included the first of four annual repayments of $500,000 to this COVID Impact Reserve ensuring that after the proposed allocation to Reserve in the June Quarterly Review of $2.2m we will repay this Reserve by 30 June 2025 as scheduled in the Long Term Financial Plan.

 

The table below summarises the impact of COVID on Council’s operations in 2021-22 as at June 2022 and highlights a final impact on General Revenue (available funds) of $2.78m for 2021-22. This impact has been addressed as part of each quarterly review and is included in the final 2021-22 budget result. Those COVID variations not impacting General Revenue are $1.28m, resulting in a total impact of $4.07m in 2021-22.

 

 

 

2021-22

2021-22

2021-22

2021-22

TOTAL

 

COVID IMPACT 2021-22

Sep-21

Dec-21

Mar-22

Jun-22

2021-22

Quarter

Quarter

Quarter

Quarter

Actual

($’000)

($’000)

($’000)

($’000)

($’000)

 

 

 

As at September 2021 Review

As at December 2021 Review

As at March 2022 Review

As at June 2022 Review

Total YTD impact for   2021-22

Impact on General Revenue

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenue (reduction)

1,494

1,349

533

 

3,376

 

Expenditure (savings)

-171

-384

-175

-12

-742

 

 

Expenditure (additional)

175

28

 

10

213

 

 

Less: CivicRisk – COVID Assistance to Councils

 

-63

 

 

-63

 

 

1,498

930

358

-2

2,784

Not Impacting on General Revenue

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenue (reduction)

150

492

200

 

842

 

 

Expenditure (savings)

 

 

 

-69

-69

 

 

Expenditure (additional)

207

119

-68

1

259

 

 

New COVID related projects (funded from OLG COVID Pandemic Support)

 

250

 

 

250

 

 

 

357

861

132

-68

1,282

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL COVID IMPACT FOR 2021-22

1,855

1,791

490

-70

4,066

 

Total COVID Impact – 2019-22

The table below identifies that the final total impact across all years on Council’s General Revenue (available funds) is $7.16m. It also identifies that COVID variations across all years not impacting General Revenue is a total $1.93m. Examples of variations that have not impacted General Revenue included reduced revenues from parking enforcement that would have been transferred to the Parking Reserve and reduced rental income being received by the Property Development Reserve as a result of rental relief provided. The final total impact on Council’s operations of the 2019-22 COVID pandemic is $9.09m as shown in the table below.

 

 

 

 

2019-20

2020-21

2021-22

TOTAL

 

COVID IMPACT 2019-22

 

 

 

2019-22

Actual

Actual

Actual

Actual

($’000)

($’000)

($’000)

($’000)

 

 

 

 

 

Impact on General Revenue

1,824

2,554

2,784

7,162

 

 

 

 

 

 

Not Impacting on General Revenue

244

405

1,282

1,931

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL COVID IMPACT

2,068

2,959

4,066

9,093

 

Financial Implications

Adopting the recommendations within this report will result in Council’s presenting a balanced position for 2021-22. Further details of the financial implications are contained within the attached Organisational Report – June 2022.

Risk Implications

Clause 203 of the Local Government Regulation requires that the Budget Review Statements, and a revision of estimates must be reported to the Council within two months after the end of each quarter (except the June quarter). However, it is considered prudent for councils to conduct this June Quarterly Review in line with the year-end Financial Statements process. This quarterly review incorporates a comprehensive analysis of Budgets vs Actual results across all areas of the organisation, and also proposes variations to annual Budget to be approved by the Council including Revotes.

The Long Term Financial Plan is updated on a quarterly basis in line with the reviews to ensure that forward projections reflect the most current assumptions. This review process, and long term forecasting, minimise financial risk by supporting financial sustainability, transparency, and accountability.

Conclusion

This report, and the more detailed Organisational Performance Report – June 2022, demonstrates that Council has made significant progress over the past six months despite the many challenges presented by the current pandemic. The pre-audit end of year result is an excellent outcome and Council’s financial position remains sound with a surplus achieved in 2021-22 that has allowed Council the ability to transfer funds into Reserve for current and emerging priorities and to accelerate repayment of the COVID Impact internal loan, resulting in a balanced Budget position for June 2022. This Review, and the proposed allocations, continue to demonstrate Council’s commitment to strong financial management.

 

The Organisational Report – June 2022 will be placed on Council’s website and will be available in hard copy on request.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Organisational Performance and Financial Review - June 2022 be received

2.     The Organisational Performance and Financial Review - June 2022 as at 30 June 2022, including the revised estimates outlined in this report, and detailed in the Organisational Report- June 2022, be adopted.

3.     Council revote the works as detailed