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Description automatically generated with medium confidence

9 November 2022

 

Dear Councillor,

In pursuance of the provisions of the Local Government Act, 1993 and the Regulations thereunder, notice is hereby given that a POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING of Penrith City Council is to be held remotely using audio visual links, audio streamed and in the Passadena Room, Civic Centre, 601 High Street, Penrith on Monday 14 November 2022 at 7:00PM.

Attention is directed to the statement accompanying this notice of the business proposed to be transacted at the meeting.

Yours faithfully

 

 

Alan Stoneham

Acting General Manager

 

BUSINESS

 

1.           LEAVE OF ABSENCE

 

Leave of absence has been requested by Councillor Jim Aitken OAM for:

Policy Review Committee Meeting on 14 November 2022, Ordinary Meeting on 28 November 2022 and Ordinary Meeting on 12 December 2022.

 

2.           APOLOGIES

 

3.           CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES

Policy Review Committee Meeting - 12 September 2022.

 

4.           DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

Pecuniary Interest (The Act requires Councillors who declare a pecuniary interest in an item to leave the meeting during discussion of that item)

Non-Pecuniary Conflict of Interest – Significant and Less than Significant (The Code of Conduct requires Councillors who declare a significant non-pecuniary conflict of interest in an item to leave the meeting during discussion of that item)

 

5.           ADDRESSING THE MEETING

 

6.           MAYORAL MINUTES

 

7.           NOTICES OF MOTION TO RESCIND A RESOLUTION

 

8.           NOTICES OF MOTION

 

9.           DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

10.         URGENT BUSINESS

 

11.         CONFIDENTIAL BUSINESS


POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING

 

Monday 14 November 2022

 

table of contents

 

 

 

 

 

webcasting notice

 

 

meeting calendar

 

 

confirmation of minutes

 

 

DELIVERY program reports

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

WEBCASTING NOTICE

 

Please note that tonight’s meeting other than the

confidential sessions are being recorded and will be

placed on Council’s website. All in attendance should

refrain from making defamatory statements. Council

takes all care when maintaining privacy, however

members of the public gallery and those addressing

Council should be aware that you may be recorded.

 


A picture containing text, tableware, plate, dishware

Description automatically generated2022 MEETING CALENDAR

January 2022 - December 2022

(Adopted by Council – 10 January 2022)

 

 

 

TIME

JAN

FEB

MAR

APRIL

MAY

JUNE

JULY

AUG

SEPT

OCT

NOV

DEC

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

 

Ordinary Council Meeting

7.00pm

 

 

 

 

 

2v

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10^

 

 

21@

 

28

 

30#

27*

25

22@

26^

31ü

28#+

12

Policy Review Committee

7.00pm

 

 

 

 

14

 

9

 

11

 

12

 

14

 

 

 v

Meeting at which the draft corporate planning documents (Delivery Program and Operational Plan) are endorsed for exhibition

 *

Meeting at which the draft corporate planning documents (Delivery Program and Operational Plan) are adopted

 #

Meetings at which the Operational Plan quarterly reviews (March and September) are presented

 @

Meetings at which the Delivery Program progress reports (including the Operational Plan quarterly reviews for December and June) are presented

 ^

Election of Mayor and/or Deputy Mayor

 ü

Meeting at which the 2021-22 Annual Statements are presented

 

Meeting at which any comments on the 2021-22 Annual Statements are adopted 

 +

Meeting at which the Annual Report is presented

Briefing to consider Budget, draft fees & charges and corporate document

-            Extraordinary Meetings are held as required.

-            Members of the public are invited to observe meetings of the Council (Ordinary and Policy Review Committee).

Should you wish to address Council, please contact Governance Coordinator, Adam Beggs on 4732 7597.

 

 

 



UNCONFIRMED MINUTES

 OF THE POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING OF PENRITH CITY COUNCIL HELD REMOTELY USING AUDIO VISUAL LINKS AND AUDIO STREAMED ON THE COUNCIL WEBSITE AND IN THE PASSADENA ROOM, PENRITH

ON MONDAY 12 SEPTEMBER 2022 AT 7:05PM

 

 

WEBCASTING STATEMENT

The Deputy Mayor, Councillor John Thain, read a statement advising that Council Meetings are recorded and webcast.

PRESENT

Deputy Mayor Councillor John Thain, and Councillors Bernard Bratusa, Todd Carney, Robin Cook, Kevin Crameri OAM, Sue Day, Glenn Gardiner, Jonathan Pullen, Mark Rusev and Marlene Shipley.

 

LEAVE OF ABSENCE

Leave of Absence was previously granted to Councillor Ross Fowler OAM for the period 6 September 2022 to 20 September 2022 inclusive.

 

APOLOGIES

PRC13  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Todd Carney seconded Councillor Marlene Shipley that apologies be accepted from Her Worship the Mayor, Councillor Tricia Hitchen and Councillors Karen McKeown OAM, Jim Aitken OAM and Mark Davies.

 

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES - Policy Review Committee Meeting - 9 May 2022

PRC14  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Sue Day seconded Councillor Robin Cook that the minutes of the Policy Review Committee Meeting of 9 May 2022 be confirmed.

 

 

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

 

Councillor Mark Rusev declared a Non-Pecuniary Conflict of Interest – Less than Significant in Item 1 - Penrith CBD Corporation - 2021-22 Annual Report and Audited Financial Statement as he is a Board Member of Penrith CBD Corporation and Council’s representative on the Board.  Councillor Mark Rusev stated that he would remain in the meeting but not take part in discussion of this item.

 

 


 

 

DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Outcome 2 - We are welcoming, healthy, happy and connected

 

1        Penrith CBD Corporation - 2021-22 Annual Report and Audited Financial Statement

Gai Hawthorn, CEO of Penrith CBD Corporation, and Darren Latty, President of the Penrith CBD Corporation, gave a presentation on this item.                              

PRC15  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Jonathan Pullen seconded Councillor Bernard Bratusa that the information contained in the report on Penrith CBD Corporation - 2021-22 Annual Report and Audited Financial Statement be received.

 

 

Outcome 5 - We have open and collaborative leadership

 

5        North Penrith Commuter car park Park and Ride Program -Transport for NSW

Senior Product Manager, Jayson Chau and Senior Community and Engagement Manager, Simon Cousins from Transport for NSW gave a presentation on this item.

PRC16  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Todd Carney seconded Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM that the information contained in the report on North Penrith Commuter car park Park and Ride Program -Transport for NSW be received.

 

 

Outcome 3 - We plan and shape our growing City

 

2        Draft Brand Policy                                                                                         

PRC17  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Jonathan Pullen seconded Councillor Todd Carney

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Draft Brand Policy be received.

2.     The Draft Brand Policy 2022 be endorsed.

 

3        Reporting on Determined Clause 4.6 Variations to Development Standards                                                                                                       

PRC18  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Bernard Bratusa seconded Councillor Robin Cook that the information contained in the report on Reporting on Determined Clause 4.6 Variations to Development Standards be received.

 

 


 

 

4        Amendment to Penrith Developer Infrastructure Agreements Policy    

PRC19  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM seconded Councillor Marlene Shipley

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Amendment to Penrith Developer Infrastructure Agreements Policy be received.

2.     The flowchart in Section 3.2 of the Penrith Developer Infrastructure Agreements Policy is amended to enable draft VPAs to be executed without a further report to Council, where no submissions are received and no changes are proposed to the draft VPA.

3.     Councillors are informed by Memorandum when the draft VPA is to be executed, without a further Council report, where no submissions are received during the public notification period and no changes are proposed to the draft VPA.

 

Outcome 5 - We have open and collaborative leadership

 

6        Policy on the Payment of Expenses and Provision of facilities to Mayor, Deputy Mayor and Councillors                                                       

PRC20  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Kevin Crameri OAM seconded Councillor Jonathan Pullen

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Policy on the Payment of Expenses and Provision of facilities to Mayor, Deputy Mayor and Councillors be received

2.     Council advertise for 28 days a public notice of its intention to adopt the amended Policy on the Payment of Expenses and Provision of Facilities to Mayor, Deputy Mayor and Councillors.

3.     A further report be presented to an Ordinary Meeting of Council at the conclusion of the exhibition period.

 

 

7        Child Safe Policy                                                                                           

PRC21  RESOLVED on the MOTION of Councillor Todd Carney seconded Councillor Sue Day

That:

1.     That the information on the Child Safe Policy be received

2.     The Child Safe Policy be endorsed.

 

 

There being no further business the Chairperson declared the meeting closed the time being 7:50pm.

    



DELIVERY PROGRAM REPORTS

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

 

Outcome 2 - We are welcoming, healthy, happy and connected

 

1        St Marys Town Centre Corporation - 2021-22 Annual Report and Audited Financial Statement                                                                                                                           1

 

2        Children's Services Cooperative Annual Report                                                               7

 

 

Outcome 3 - We plan and shape our growing City

 

3        Reporting on Determined Clause 4.6 Variations to Development Standards                 15

 

Outcome 4 - We manage and improve our built environment

 

4        Penrith Whitewater Annual Report 2021-2022                                                                19

 

Outcome 5 - We have open and collaborative leadership

 

5        Annual Review of Council's Investment Policy and Strategy                                          25

 

6        Draft Community Engagement Policy and Draft Community Engagement Strategy and Community Participation Plan                                                                                          31

 

7        ARIC & Internal Audit Annual Reports                                                                             34

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


 

 

Outcome 1 - We protect and enhance an ecologically sustainable environment

 

 

There were no reports under this Delivery Program when the Business Paper was compiled


 

 

 

 

THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK  INTENTIONALLY


Outcome 2 - We are welcoming, healthy, happy and connected

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

1        St Marys Town Centre Corporation - 2021-22 Annual Report and Audited Financial Statement                                                                                                                           1

 

2        Children's Services Cooperative Annual Report                                                               7

 

 

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                            14 November 2022

 

 

 

1

St Marys Town Centre Corporation - 2021-22 Annual Report and Audited Financial Statement   

 

Compiled by:               Beau Reid, Place and Activation Coordinator

Authorised by:            Megan Whittaker, City Activation, Community and Place Manager

Jeni Pollard, Manager - City Resilience

Kylie Powell, Director - City Futures  

 

Outcome

We are welcoming, healthy, happy, creative and connected

Strategy

Enhance community wellbeing, safety and neighbourhood amenity

Principal Activity

Work in partnership to support the revitalisation of the Penrith, St Marys and Kingswood centres

 

Previous Items:           1- Town Centre Corporations Business Plans 2021-2022- Policy Review Committee- 19 Apr 2021 7:00PM    

 

Presenters:                  Nicola Haslegrave – Town Centre Manager, St Marys Town Centre Corporation
Faye Aboghazaleh – Chair, St Marys Town Centre Corporation


Executive Summary

This report provides an overview and commentary on the documentation submitted by the St Marys Town Centre Corporation (the Corporation) as per the Service Level Agreement endorsed by Council in June 2020. Attached to this report is the Annual Report and Audited Financial Statement for 2021-22 and the agreed Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for 2020-23.

 

Reflecting on the 12 months of the reporting period, it is acknowledged that the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic has been significant for our local community and economy. The St Marys Town Centre Corporation has played an important role at the local level, working with Council to respond to community concerns and support economic recovery in the St Marys Town Centre. Several of the initiatives delivered in 2021-22 were reimagined to meet immediate needs of local businesses. In addition to the impacts of COVID-19 restrictions on the business community, the Corporation did not have a Town Centre Manager between 1 July and 14 October 2021 which has had an overall impact on the operational capacity of the Corporation to deliver against the endorsed KPI framework.

 

St Marys Town Centre Limited will provide a presentation of highlights from the Annual Report of its activities for Financial Year 2021-22 and Audited Financial Statement at this meeting. This report recommends that Council receive the information on the St Marys Town Centre Limited Annual Report and Audited Financial Statement for 2021-22.


Background

Penrith City Council works with the St Marys Town Centre Corporation and Penrith CBD Corporation to jointly manage the centres to support their ongoing vitality and viability. Council collects rates from non-residential properties in the city centres and returns these to the Corporations. In 2021-22, $352,749 (exc. GST) was paid to the St Marys Town Centre Corporation to undertake the proposed activities as outlined in their KPIs for 2021-22.

 

At the Ordinary Meeting on 22 June 2020, Council endorsed a Key Performance Indicator Framework for both Centre Corporations and a 3-year Service Level Agreement. The KPIs were developed in consultation with the Corporations and support them to continue building their profile with local businesses and explore opportunities to promote the St Marys Town Centre to local residents, visitors and potential new business operators and property investors.

 

The KPIs identify four objectives to support management and alignment with Council’s strategic vision for the Town Centre and improve reportable outcomes. The St Marys Town Centre Corporation’s four objectives are:

1. Governance

2. Marketing

3. Strategy

4. Facilitation

 

The St Marys Town Centre Corporation’s Business Plan for 2021-22 was endorsed by Council at the 19 April 2021 Policy Review Committee meeting. This process is in accordance with the Service Level Agreement and enables Council to review and provide feedback on the proposed activities of the Corporation, ahead of the financial year they are intended to be delivered.

 

The 3-year Service Level Agreement with each Corporation is due for review in the 2022- 23 Financial Year.

 

The Impact of COVID-19

Over the 12 months from July 2021 – June 2022, the Corporation has faced a difficult operating environment, continuing to supporting small businesses across the retail and service industry to navigate the continually changing restrictions and Public Health Orders associated with COVID- 19. The Corporation has assisted new businesses coming into the town centre and supported existing businesses to leverage off the change and opportunity.

 

Both Corporations have been challenged to deliver programs within the changing health restrictions and many planned activities have had to be postponed or cancelled. It is noted that St Marys was one of the suburbs that experienced the highest level of lockdowns from 6 August to 15 September 2021 which had a significant impact on many businesses and families within the trading catchment of the St Marys Town Centre Corporation.

 

The Corporation has worked to increase its digital presence with improvements to the St Marys Town Centre website and a stronger focus on online engagement with members and the general public through electronic newsletters and marketing campaigns.

 

The impacts of the lockdown in 2021 have seen a handful of local businesses struggle to meet overheads which has resulted in a small number of closures. However, several businesses have also benefitted from the growing community sentiment to support local.

 

Both Corporations have actively worked with Council over the reporting period and have participated with the Chamber of Commerce in the key Business Partners meetings to support responses to COVID 19 restrictions and recovery initiatives.

 

As restrictions eased, Council has worked closely with St Marys Town Centre Corporation to deliver initiatives that safely encourage foot traffic into the city centre again.

 

Annual Report and Audited Financial Statement for 2021-2022

The Corporation has prepared an Annual Report on their activities during the 2021-22 financial year. In 2021-22, a total of $352,749 (exc. GST) was paid to the St Marys Town Centre Corporation from Council.

 

The role of Town Centre Manager was vacant from the beginning of the financial year until 14 October 2021, with the commencement of Nicola Haslegrave into the role.

 

The Annual Report provides an overview of the initiatives and events held during the year such as networking, activations and newsletters, as well as COVID-19 responses on more day-to-day activities supporting businesses with marketing and operations.

 

Notably, the Corporation was involved in the Economic Recovery Taskforce, stood up as a local response to the impacts of COVID-19. The Corporation was also involved in supporting Council with the delivery of the successful St Marys Lights Up activation program during May 2022.

 

The presentation from the St Marys Town Centre Corporation that accompanies this report will go into further detail on the Annual Report for 2021-22. The Annual Report and Audited Financial Statement 2021-22 are attached to this report for Council’s consideration (Attachments 1 and 2).

 

Key Performance Indicators 2020-23

As part of the Triennial Impact Review of the City Centre Corporations undertaken in 2020, 53 KPIs were developed in consultation with the Corporation. The KPIs were developed to help quantify the outputs and outcomes of the Corporations’ activities and sought stronger alignment to Council’s strategic vision for the St Marys Town Centre. This financial year is the second of three years of the KPI framework.

 

Delivery of activities against a number of KPIs in both Q1 and Q2 of the Financial Year was limited as a result of the Corporation experiencing a number of key challenges in this period. The impacts of COVID-19 NSW Public Health restrictions between July 2021 and February 2022 meant that significant components of the events and activations program, as well as the workshop training and networking programs were unable to take place. Additionally, the Corporation operated without a Town Centre Manager between July and October 2021 which greatly limited the capacity of the Corporation to deliver against the set KPIs in those Q1 and Q2 reporting periods.

 

The Corporation has delivered against the majority of the 53 KPIs for 2021-22. Self-reporting from the Corporation indicates that 5 of the KPIs are deemed to have been not met, either partially or totally. 

 

Further commentary on the 5 KPIs is provided below:

 

·   Objective 2.1 Coffee Catch-Ups: To hold a minimum of 10 per year to build and maintain network connections

 

This KPI has been partially met. The coffee catch-up business networking program did not occur between July 2021 and February 2022 due to staff vacancies and the impacts of the COVID-19 lockdown. The program returned from March to May 2022, but no coffee catch-up was held in June 2022 due to staff leave. A total of 3 catch ups were held in the reporting period.

 

·    Objective 2.2 Workshops and Training: Assist businesses by offering a minimum of 6 skills workshops per year aimed at positive business outcomes

 

This KPI has not been met. The Corporation has provided feedback to Council that face-to-face format workshops have limited attendance from local businesses. The Corporation is working towards the delivery of the workshops and training program via online modules and pre-recorded learning that will be hosted on the Corporation’s website and promoted through the Town Centre’s newsletter. Council has been advised that this training will be live on the St Marys Town Centre website by the end of the 2022 calendar year.

 

·    Objective 2.8 Annual Business Audit: Conduct annual audit of Town Centre to assist with delivering improvements for businesses

 

This KPI has not been met. The Annual Business Audit is due for completion by 31 March each calendar year but this was unable to occur due to resourcing constraints. The Corporation and Council staff have discussed this action and the Corporation have committed to completing the audit by the end of the 2022 calendar year.

 

·    Objective 2.9 Stakeholder Relations: Engage with business owners regularly to build capacity and awareness of the Town Centre. Visit a minimum of 25 businesses per week

 

This KPI has been partially met. The Corporation has reported that it engages on an ad-hoc basis with approximately 5 businesses per week rather than the agreed 25 businesses. The Corporation has provided feedback that engagement with 25 businesses per week is not achievable within current resourcing. The Corporation notes that in lieu it utilises email and monthly newsletters to connect with businesses on a regular basis. The Corporation may wish to raise a review of this KPI with reference to the minimum number of businesses for visits each week with Council.

 

·    Objective 4.7 Information Seminar: Hold an event to provide information regarding development opportunities in St Marys

 

This KPI has not been met. Outlined in the KPI framework, the information seminar is due to be delivered by 30 November each year. In 2021, this was not possible due to COVID-19 Public Health restrictions. The Corporation has provided feedback that holding the information seminar at an alternative time prior to 30 June 2022 was not possible within their available resources.

 

An overview of the KPIs and activities undertaken in Financial Year 2021-22 is attached to this report for Council’s reference (Attachment 3). This is provided by the St Marys Town Centre Corporation for Council’s consideration.

 

Financial Implications

The audited Annual Financial Statements have been provided by the St Marys Town Centre Corporation (The Corporation) with a net profit of $35,528 in 2021-22 compared to a net loss of $189,350 in 2020-21.

 

Revenue has increased by $244,690 (220%) to total revenue of $356,063 in 2021-22 ($111,373 in 2020-21), based on the annual financial statements the increase in revenue and is predominately due the amount of Grants Revenue from Penrith City Council, recognised in 2020-21 after the Corporation returned $245,454.55 excl. GST of surplus funds to Council to advance and revitalise the St Marys Town Centre as reported to Council on the 22 June 2020.

In addition, expenditure has increased by $19,812 (2.7%) in 2021-22 to total expenditure of $320,535 compared to $300,723 for 2020-21, the Corporation's equity position has increased to $450,242 in 2021-22 from $414,714 in 2020-21, increasing the level of cash and cash equivalent reserves to $495,138 in 2021-22 ($425,914 in 2020-21).  

       Table

Description automatically generated              

                 

Conclusion

The St Marys Town Centre Corporation has submitted its Annual Report and Audited Financial Statement with highlights from activities undertaken during 2021-22.

 

The year presented a challenging operating environment, supporting small business across the retail and service industry to navigate the continually changing restrictions and Public Health Orders associated with COVID-19. In addition to the challenges and impacts of COVID-19, the Corporation was without a Town Centre Manager between July and October 2021.

 

This report provides an overview and commentary on the documents as presented by the St Marys Town Centre Corporation. The Corporation was involved in delivering a number of local COVID-19 responses and ongoing efforts to support current businesses and new business attraction.

 

The Corporation delivered against the majority of the 53 KPIs for 2021-22. The documents provided by the Corporation outline a number of challenges and constraints in delivering fully against the endorsed Service Level Agreement and Key Performance Indicator Framework throughout the 2021-22 financial year.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the information contained in the report on St Marys Town Centre Corporation - 2021-22 Annual Report and Audited Financial Statement be received.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

St Marys Town Centre Corporation 2021-22 Annual Report

29 Pages

Attachments Included

2.

St Marys Town Centre Limited - Audited Financial Statement 2021-22

25 Pages

Attachments Included

3.

St Marys Town Centre Corporation KPI Commentary for 2021-22

4 Pages

Attachments Included

  


Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                            14 November 2022

 

 

 

2

Children's Services Cooperative Annual Report    

 

Compiled by:               Jade Bradbury, Children's Services Operations Manager

Authorised by:            Sandy Davies, Director - Community and People  

 

Outcome

We are welcoming, healthy, happy, creative and connected

Strategy

Plan for, deliver and improve community services

Principal Activity

Deliver high quality children’s services

      

 

Executive Summary

This report provides information on Penrith City Council’s Children’s Services, that are managed by the Penrith City Children’s Services Cooperative (PCCSC), for the period July 2021 to June 2022. This report includes information on the financial operations of the services managed by the Cooperative. The report recommends that the information be received, and that Council underwrite the operations of the PCCSC Ltd until the presentation to Council of the Penrith City Children’s Services Cooperative Ltd Annual Report for 2022-23.

Background

The PCCSC became effective on 1 January 2003 and was created to manage several services on Council’s behalf including long day care, preschool, before and after school care and vacation care. The Board also took on management of the Glenmore Park Child and Family Centre in July 2015. The structure of the Cooperative is a Board of 11 Directors including parent representatives, three Councillors, a staff representative, community representatives and a representative of the General Manager. The Board meets on a bi-monthly basis and operates under Council delegation. The Board looks at broad policy matters, sets the direction for Children’s Services and makes major decisions about service provision. Parent advisory committees, elected annually at each site, provide valuable input into the operational aspects of individual services. 

On Council’s behalf, the Board manages 44 services in 26 facilities including 18 long day care centres, 5 preschools, 15 before and after school care services and 6 vacation care services. In January 2017, the Board also took on the development and management of OSHC (Out of School Hours Care) in school grounds at 6 local public schools and in February this year took on York Public School permanently. In 2023, Children’s services will also take on OSHC at Nangamay, Regentville, Kingswood South, and Bennett Road Public Schools. Approximately 3,100 children aged 0-12 years attend the services managed by the Board annually with approximately 443 full time equivalent staff employed in centre-based service delivery including permanent, temporary, and casual employees.

Children’s Services has a broad strategy in Council’s Delivery Program to deliver high quality children’s services. Linked to this strategy are the five major pillars in the Board’s Strategic Plan (2019-2021) - We Deliver our families promise; We love to work here; The right service in the right place; We use resources wisely and being our best.

This report focuses on several key actions within this Strategic Plan but highlights that 2022-2026 Strategic Plan has been finalised and will be presented to the Board in November.

 

 

 

The Children’s Services Program 

 

The Children’s Services program is focused on delivering high quality children’s services that are affordable, accessible, and viable. Utilisation of services drives income and therefore is a key performance indicator. For the cumulative period July 2021 to June 2022, of the five components of Children’s Services managed by the Board, four achieved or exceeded projected utilisation targets. Long Day Care tracked below the Year-to-Date utilisation target because of the impacts of COVID-19.

 

Funded Programs

 

Children’s Services receives Federal funding from The Department of Social Services (DSS) to deliver The Children and Parenting Program (CAPPS) and The Middle Years Mentoring Program (MYMP).

 

The CAPPS program supports parents through the provision of parenting programs and individualised support as well as building the capacity of educators to identify and respond to vulnerable families. The project delivered the Healthy Mind, Body and Family program which was a finalist at the 2022 NSW Local Government Awards. The program was also presented at the National Australian Institute of Family Studies conference. The funding for this program is due to end in June 2023.

 

The MYMP is a three-year funded program which ended in June 2022 to deliver innovative programs to support young people in the middle years’ age bracket to improve social cohesion, belonging, positive relationships and respond to vulnerable young people. The program delivered training to educators to build their capacity to support young people. The program developed several innovative initiatives in the last 12 months including KP Kids which was a targeted program that supported young people in a highly vulnerable community.

 

Building and Playground Upgrades

 

Children’s Services continuously strives to maintain services as aesthetically pleasing and safe environments for children, families, and staff. In 2021/2022, $1.4m was spent on building and playground upgrades including building renovations. City Presentations maintenance works also contributed significantly to this overall spend. The Board also made provision for large building upgrades at Werrington County, Platypus and Jamisontown Children’s Centre which have been a great investment.

 

Enrolment of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children

 

For the 2021-2022 reporting period we had a 2.6% increase in enrolments of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children, bringing the total number to 314 children. Children’s Services have also employed 11 educators from an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander background to support and guide other educators in centres.

 

Enrolment of Children with Disabilities

 

Support to improve access for children with ongoing high support needs has been provided by the Commonwealth funded Inclusion Development Fund (IDF) and through the State Government Preschool Disability Inclusion Program. These programs build the capacity of services to include children with ongoing high support needs into mainstream services. Inclusion Development Funding enables services to engage an additional staff member but there is still a shortfall in the funding received and the cost of employing additional staff which needs to be met by services.

During the past year the services managed by the Cooperative enrolled over 93 children with diagnosed additional needs and disability.

 

Curriculum Implementation

 

Over the last 12 months, Children’s Services introduced reconciliation in progress action plans to capture simple goals to embed Aboriginal Pedagogy and Education into daily practice. This has improved our relationships and understandings of the Aboriginal culture.

 

As part of our Professional Learning, we have delivered Learning Little Scientists – a child led inquiry pedagogy. These sessions provided the theory and practice behind the science focused curriculum approach. We had 10 services attend with 4 entering the Little Stem Award. Ridge-ee-didge Children’s Centre reached top 6 in their application for the State.

 

Penrith City Council Children’s Services worked in partnership with Waste Resource and Recovery Education Officers during this period to deliver VegePod’s to each service. As part of this initiative our services received education resources, materials, and support to embed composting, sustainable gardening, and recycling. We also received summer and autumn seedling to plant in our VegePods. The VegePods are a raised garden that sustains itself by self-watering and creating its own microclimate, growing healthy veggies. In our OSHC programs we have had a focus on relationships, shared decision making and FUN! We have developed an OSHC leaders’ group that are reflecting and working on strategies to improve the challenges that are faced in the OSHC environment.

 

Children’s Services Business Approach

 

During the financial year, Children’s Services strengthened its business model approach to the management of centres. Productivity initiatives that occurred in 2021/2022 included: the

implementation of a food tender to consolidate all food items under two providers as well as implementing an electronic sleep, nappy change, and incident reporting process to speed up reporting and reduce the use of paper. Another efficiency adopted included the implementation of electronic documentation at a centre level which reduces the time needed for centre staff to update, print, and record daily information in a manual process.

 

Extensive work has also continued in 2021/2022 on translating Councils Customer Promise to Children’s Services Families Promise. One strategy included the implementation of feedback boxes for each service, so families have access to the same process no matter which service they attend. A second strategy built on the feedback from the 2021 Parent Survey which focused on providing families with consistent messaging and communication from services in relation to centre events, staff updates and daily experiences.

 

Key actions were developed and implemented including:

 

•     Developing key communication strategies that engage families and allow staff to share curriculum messages focusing on important routines and experiences.

 

•     The increased use of SMS to families to communicate centre information and key updates on a child’s day.

 

Several successful marketing and awareness campaigns also occurred during this financial year including upgrading the website to ensure it is user friendly and easy to navigate and use. Our website continues to be our key promotional driver with 40 enquiries per month from families enquiring about care.

 

Penrith City Council Children’s Services are committed to supporting the health and wellbeing of staff and therefore ensuring staff are provided with opportunities to participate in health and wellbeing activities. In the last 12 months, 21 teams participated in the Virgin Pulse Go Challenge with a combined step count of 116,590,006 steps which is equivalent to 88,843 km.

 

Staff were recognised as our greatest asset, and this was reflected in the parent satisfaction survey that was rolled out in 2021 with 95.4% of families stating that they would recommend our services to someone else. To recognise the hard work that staff contribute a ‘End of Year Celebration’ awards celebration occurred in December 2021 to reward staff in several categories which included ‘Leader of the Year’ and ‘Educator of the Year’.

 

State and Federal Funding Opportunities

 

Throughout the year there have also been a range of funding packages available and provided to Children’s Services which included:

 

1.       Start Strong and COVID-19 Free Preschool Funding Program - The aim of the funding is to support community and mobile preschools by providing funding to replace a high proportion of estimated fee income. Services are required to provide at least 15 hours of fee-free preschool per week / 600 hours per year for eligible children. Council received a total of $3.7m support services in offering free Preschool education to eligible children aged 3-5 years. The Department of Education announced this year that free Preschool was extended until December 2022.

 

2.       Department of Education’s Before and After School Care Fund - The NSW Government has invested $120 million to expand before and after school care to make places available to all parents with children at government primary schools that need it. The Viability Grant Program is designed to provide short-term financial relief to services that are experiencing financial stress, up to $30k per eligible service was available in 2021. Council received a total of $79k to support projects, initiatives and activities that will provide more sustainable solutions for services when viability is under threat due to unstable or declining utilisation.

 

3.       Establishment Grant Program - York OSHC was successful in achieving funding of $40k through the Establishment Grant Program. These funds will be expended to resource the Service and cover costs associated with the setup of the Service. This grant enables the Service to begin operations in a positive financial position. The NSW Government has committed $2m to support approved providers who will be running Vacation Care programs for NSW public school students in 2022. A particular priority for this grant program is to contribute to the sustainability of approved Vacation Care services. Penrith City Council Children’s Services received $177k in funding.

 

4.       Community Child Care Fund (CCCF) Special Circumstances Grant This funding is to support financial viability of businesses during the COVID-19 period. The grant funding is up to $150k per service per year based on eligibility. Penrith City Council Children’s Services received $446k.

 

Work Health and Safety

 

Throughout 2021/2022, Children’s Services continued to respond to the changing COVID-19 situation. This involved regular review of the NSW Government Public Health Orders to ensure Children’s Services remained compliant, as well as timely advice regarding positive cases and exposures within our Centre’s. During this time the NSW Government introduced mandatory double vaccination against COVID-19 for all Education and Care workers, including early childhood workers.

 

During 2021/2022, 235 Children’s Services staff tested positive for COVID-19. Of these positive cases, 136 were potentially work related, and 86 resulted in Worker’s Compensation claims.

 

During 2021/2022 period there were a total of 304 worker incidents reported compared to 189 incidents in the previous year. This increase is due to the number of COVID-19 infections potentially acquired in the workplace as stated above. During this period, the worker’s compensation legislation was amended to include a presumption of contracting COVID-19 within the workplace for certain industries and professions, including early childhood and care settings.

 

Financial Results 

 

The services managed by the Cooperative reported an operating surplus from ordinary activities of $105k for the 2021-22 year. This surplus result is after a contribution from Council of $90k as well as transfers from several operational reserves of $2.3m for future projects and from reserves for current year projects. These reserves include provision for playground and building upgrades, bus replacement, centre equipment, advertising, and marketing as well as ‘value add’ programs such as music and art.

 

Income derived from the provision of childcare, as represented by Child Care Fees and Child Care Subsidy (CCS) was $24.1m (2021 $23.4m) which is an increased compared to the previous year income. The $24.1m of 2022 income includes both the State and Federal Government fee relief package of free childcare. Grant funding of $5.5M (2021 $3.1m) was provided by both the State and Federal Government which is an increase of 42.8% compared to previous year.

 

Employee Costs for 2021/22 were $25.2m (2021 $24.8m) which is an increase of 1.9% compared to the previous year.  Reflective of the service industry within which the Cooperative operates, employee costs account for the largest category of expenditure and comprise 85.1% of the total income of the Cooperative’s operations.

 

Expenditure on materials, contracts and other expenses were $2.1m (2021 $2.6m) which is a decrease of 17.7% upon last year’s result. This was largely the result of management controlling expenses throughout the year to match the utilisation.

 

Council’s commitment to directly supporting the initiatives undertaken by the Cooperative is reflected by the subsidy provided to the Cooperative’s operations of $90k. This subsidy provides essential funding for the Inclusion Development Fund (previously Inclusion Support Program). Council also makes significant financial contributions to Children’s Services overall which is outlined through the annual Operational Plan. The financial outcome for the services managed by the Cooperative for the financial year 2021-2022 is considered a good result and is testament to the strong financial management of the Cooperative’s services. For the continued success of Children’s Services, the maintenance of utilisation levels is critical to their financial viability and the external grant funding received is of high importance to be able to sustain service delivery at current high levels.

 

 

 

 

 

Conclusion

 

The establishment of the Penrith City Children’s Services Cooperative has proved to be an effective management model for the Children’s Services sponsored by Council. The small favourable outcome for the 2021-2022 Financial Year is an excellent achievement given the current financial environment and provides some necessary equity to position the services for the coming years. The Board of Directors is aware of the complexities of the operation of Children’s Services and the challenges that this brings. Maintaining a balance between services that are viable, accessible, and affordable is high on the Board’s agenda. Sustaining the high quality of service provision for which Council’s services are known is a key driver. Affordability continues to be the driving factor for utilisation levels across all service types and balancing this with viability is a key priority.

 

Lobbying and advocacy continue to ensure that issues related to Children’s Services and particularly issues related to the not-for-profit sector and the Penrith context, are raised, and have a high profile. Continued compliance with the National Law and Regulations is testament to the skill, motivation and dedication of the Children’s Services staff and the support provided by the Children’s Services internal management team. 

 

The Board is under no illusion that the year ahead will present opportunities and challenges in its quest to ensure Children’s Services remains viable within a climate of increased competition, legislation and regulation requirements and the vital importance of maintaining a skilled workforce.

 

A significant legislative change in 2023 is the roll-out from the State Government of The Early Years Commitment which will continue to 600 hours a year of free preschool for our 4-year old’s. The funding will also extend to 3–5-year-old in the long day care space to further support their fees. The Board will need to keep abreast of these emerging changes so that sound change management practices are adopted and the high quality of service provision is sustained. 

 

During the 2021-2022 Financial Year there were no significant changes in the operations of the Cooperative. The Annual General Meeting was held in October 2022 and Council’s representatives on the Board of Directors are Councillors Ross Fowler OAM, Councillor Todd Carney, and Councillor Sue Day. The General Manager’s representative and Company Secretary is Council’s Director – Community and People, Sandy Davies.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Penrith City Council Children’s Services Cooperative Ltd be received.

2.     Council underwrites the operations of the PCCSC Ltd until the presentation to Council of the Penrith City Children’s Services Cooperative Ltd Annual Report for 2023-2024.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.  


Outcome 3 - We plan and shape our growing City

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

3        Reporting on Determined Clause 4.6 Variations to Development Standards                 15

 

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                            14 November 2022

 

 

 

3

Reporting on Determined Clause 4.6 Variations to Development Standards   

 

Compiled by:               Gavin Cherry, Development Assessment Coordinator

Authorised by:            Peter Wood, Development Services Manager

Andrew Jackson, Director - Development and Regulatory Services  

 

Outcome

We plan and shape our growing City

Strategy

Undertake strategic planning that will ensure balanced growth and liveability

Principal Activity

Guide sustainable quality development outcomes for the community through expert advice, transparent, efficient assessment, policy input and continuous improvement

      

 

Executive Summary

The NSW Department of Planning and Environment’s (DPE) Planning Circular PS 20-002 requires reporting to an Ordinary Meeting of Council determined Development Applications involving clause 4.6 – Variations to a Development Standard.  This report includes details of development applications determined inclusive of a clause 4.6 variation from July to September being the first quarter of the 2022/2023 financial year. There were a total of five (5) applications with variation requests in the last quarter relating to building height and lot size with four approved and one refused. City Planning is provided with a copy of the variations register and reasons why variations were supported or not to help inform future reviews of development standards.

 

Background

Clause 4.6 is a provision of the Principal Local Environmental Plan (Standard Instrument) included within Penrith Local Environmental Plan 2010 which provides for an applicant to propose a variation to a development standard as part of a development application.  This clause also allows for the relevant consent authority to consider that request and determine if the variation is appropriate and supportable having regard to specific considerations within the clause and where there is a better planning outcome.

Clause 4.6 requests to vary a development standard are determined under delegated authority where the variation is up to 10% or by the Penrith Local Planning Panel or Sydney Western City Planning Panel in accordance with State Environmental Planning Policy (Planning Systems) 2021 and the Local Planning Panels Direction from the then Minister for Planning and Public Spaces dated 30 June 2020.

The intent of the required quarterly reporting is to identify the development standards that are being varied, the frequency and the reasons. The process also provides transparency for the community. Identifying the development standards that are being varied then enables Council to consider the appropriateness of these standards in the context of future LEP reviews of the Penrith Local Environmental Plan (2010).

 

 

Clause 4.6 Variations for the Quarter

Details of development applications determined inclusive of a clause 4.6 variation request throughout the above period are separately enclosed for the information of Councillors. A total of 4 x applications with variations were approved with 1 x application with a variation request refused. The Planning Circular does not require Council to report on applications refused which is why the refused item does not appear within the enclosure.

The refused development application was for a town house development that contained a variation to the minimum lot size requirement for multi-unit housing developments. The variation was not supported as the proposal did not comply with key controls and objectives within Penrith Development Control Plan 2014, many of which stem directly from the proposed non-compliance to the minimum lot size development standard within Penrith Local Environment Plan 2010. 

The separate enclosure details the approved proposals, the nature and extent of the variation and reasons for support of that variation. The indication of determination authority within this register includes the Local Planning Panel (LPP).

 

Financial Implications

There are no financial implications for Council associated with this report.

 

Risk Implications

There are no risk implications for Council subject to compliance with Planning Circular PS 20-002.

 

Strategic Planning Implications

Council’s City Planning Team are provided with a copy of the variations register and reasons why variations were supported or not. This information will assist to inform a future review of development standards including mapped building height and floor space ratio provisions across the Local Government Area.

 

Conclusion

Future Clause 4.6 determinations will continue be reported to Council on a quarterly basis capturing three months of information within each report in accordance with the Planning Circular.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the information contained in the report on Reporting on Determined Clause 4.6 Variations to Development Standards be received.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.  


Outcome 4 - We manage and improve our built environment

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

4        Penrith Whitewater Annual Report 2021-2022                                                                19

 

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                            14 November 2022

 

 

 

4

Penrith Whitewater Annual Report 2021-2022   

 

Compiled by:               Jack Hodge, Venue Manager - Penrith Whitewater Stadium

Authorised by:            Brian Steffen, Director - City Services  

 

Outcome

We manage and improve our built environment

Strategy

Plan for, maintain and provide spaces and facilities that support opportunities for people to participate in recreational activities

Principal Activity

Manage and facilitate the use of community, sport, recreation and open space facilities

      

 

Executive Summary

Each year, following the Annual General Meeting of the Company, a report is presented to the Council on the year’s activities of the Penrith Whitewater Stadium (PWS), including the financial performance.

The reports from both the Chairman and the Stadium Manager highlight the major activities of the Stadium over the last year. The venue has continued throughout the year to attract professional athletes, sporting championships and casual users, the participation rates in each activity are detailed in the report.

Annual Report

The Twenty Fourth Annual General Meeting of the Company was held on 21st September 2022 for the period ended 30th June 2022.

The Chairman of the Board and Stadium Manager will be in attendance tonight to make a short presentation which will focus on:

•        The Past year – highlights, financial position and issues arising; and

•        The Year ahead.

Following are their reports that have been extracted from the Annual Report of Penrith Whitewater Stadium Limited (PWS).

Chairman’s Report

It gives me much pleasure to present the Chairman’s Report to the 24th Annual General Meeting of Penrith Whitewater Stadium Limited.

The COVID-19 pandemic, the largest flood since the construction of PWS and subsequent water quality issues has once again had a significant effect on patronage for whitewater rafting and canoeing based activities. Revenue for the year was $455,851 which is 22% less than $582,611 for 2021. The financial outcome for the year ended 30 June 2022 resulted in a loss before depreciation, amortisation and interest of $412,662. The Stadium continues to contribute to the overall Penrith economy and to the advancement of the sport of canoe slalom both locally and internationally.

Penrith Whitewater Stadium continues to generate a great deal of publicity both nationally and internationally, adding to its reputation as one of the world’s premier sporting facilities.  I would like to congratulate the Australian Canoe Slalom Team, and everyone associated with it on another successful international season under difficult circumstances.  The venue continues to successfully host local and national competitions and looks forward to hosting international competitions and athletes as we emerge from the pandemic and prepare to host the Canoe Slalom World Championships in 2025. 

I would like to take this opportunity to thank Venue Manager, Jack Hodge and his management team (Simonetta, Jeff, and Morgen) for leading the organisation in these difficult times throughout the year.  Penrith Whitewater staff continues to show great dedication and commitment to the business. The underlying and continuing enthusiasm and commitment of staff is fundamental to the venue’s success.

I would also like to thank my fellow Directors for their commitment and input to the operations of Penrith Whitewater Stadium.  During the year we saw the appointment of Councillors Marlene Shipley, Glenn Gardiner, John Thain and the resignation of Kevin Crameri OAM, Marcus Cornish, and Brian Cartwright.

Stadium Manager’s Report

2021-22 has been another very challenging year for PWS due to the ongoing disruption to everyday life and business caused by COVID-19 and an even bigger and more disruptive flood than last year. The floods damaged PWS pumping infrastructure and reduced water quality leading to an extended shutdown period.

Overall participation in the activities offered by PWS decreased in 2021-22.  Rafting decreased by 35%, Canoe/Kayak increased by 13% and Swiftwater Rescue courses decreased by 10%.

Whitewater rafting revenue decreased by 40%, Canoe/Kayak decreased by 21%, Swiftwater Rescue increased by 6%.

Net profit decreased from a profit of $415,443 to a loss of -$499.301 due to a reduction of $756,896 in other income which last year included a $570,000 subsidy from Penrith City Council and COVID-19 related business support of $186,900 from the Federal Government.

Unfortunately, PWS was unable to host international paddlers at competitions and training again this year. PWS maintained its strong support for the sport of canoeing throughout the year and operated while still closed to the public to allow the Australian team to train until they were able to travel overseas to the World Cup and World Championships. In 2021-22 PWS was the host of the Oceania Canoe Slalom Championships, the Australian Open and facilitated over 212 hours of slalom training and competitions for Australian paddlers.  Congratulations to the Australian Canoe Slalom Team and everyone associated with it for the international results of Australian paddlers this year under difficult circumstances.

A very special thanks to the PWS team for the dedication, resilience and resourcefulness that they have shown. This has allowed us to keep PWS open and activities operating during what has been and continues to be the most challenging circumstance since PWS was built.  Thanks also to the PWS Board of Directors for their ongoing support. The successful operation of PWS relies upon the support of the general public and a network of companies and organisations. PWS would like to thank the general public, suppliers, venue stakeholders and neighbouring organisations for their support and looks forward to working together more closely in the future to maximise the ongoing success of PWS and Penrith Lakes.

Board of Directors

The Constitution of the Company provides, in part, that:

1.       To provide continuity the members of the Board shall resign on a rotating basis. At the First Annual General Meeting, three (3) Directors (including one (1) Councillor) shall resign. At the Second Annual General Meeting, three (3) members shall resign (including one (1) Councillor). Thereafter, the members of the Board, except the Council Officer, shall resign after they have served on the Board for three (3) years after appointment or re-appointment to the Board.

2.       All retiring Directors shall be eligible for re-appointment.

Council should note that the positions of Chairman, Deputy Chairman were declared vacant. Elections were held for the vacant positions at the twenty fourth Annual General Meeting.

Councillor Ross Fowler OAM was re-appointed to the position of Chairman.

It was resolved that Penrith City Council be requested to endorse the reappointment of Geoff Hunter as continuing Director of Penrith Whitewater Stadium Ltd.

Brian Steffen was reappointed as Company Secretary.

Financial Services Manager Comments

The Financial Statements of Penrith Whitewater Stadium have been independently audited by Lower Russell and Farr for the 2021-22 financial year ending 30th June 2022.

For this period, Penrith Whitewater Stadium Limited reported an operating deficit of $499,301, an increase in deficit of $344,640, from a deficit of $154,661 (without subsidy) in 2020-21. There was no subsidy provided from Council in 2021-22 financial year. Operating Revenue decreased by 22% from $582,611 in 2020-21 to $455,851. Other Revenue also decreased by 98% from $191,129 in 2020-21 to $4,771. Total expenses increased by 3% from $928,401 to $959,921.

The year-end Penrith Whitewater Stadium Financial Position shows Total Assets as $1,058,913 (notably with Cash reducing from $757,842 to $378,556), Total Liabilities of $608,607, and Total Equity of $450,306.

         

 

2022

$

2021

$

Variance

$

Variance

%

Operating Revenue

455,851

582,611

-126,760

-22%

Other Revenue

4,771

191,129

-186,358

-98%

Subsidy

0

570,000

-570,000

-100%

Total Revenue

460,620

1,343,740

-883,120

-66%

Expenses

959,921

928,401

31,520

3%

Reported Operating Profit/(Deficit)

-499,301

415,339

-914,640

-220%

Operating Profit

(excluding Council Subsidy)

-499,301

-154,661

-344,640

223%

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Penrith Whitewater Annual Report 2021-2022 be received

2.     Council agree to underwrite the operation of the Penrith Whitewater Stadium Limited until the presentation to Council of the Penrith Whitewater Stadium Limited Annual Report for 2023-24.

3.     Council note and support the appointment and re-appointment of the persons named in the report to the Board of Directors of Penrith Whitewater Stadium Ltd.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

There are no attachments for this report.  


Outcome 5 - We have open and collaborative leadership

 

Item                                                                                                                                       Page

 

5        Annual Review of Council's Investment Policy and Strategy                                          25

 

6        Draft Community Engagement Policy and Draft Community Engagement Strategy and Community Participation Plan                                                                                          31

 

7        ARIC & Internal Audit Annual Reports                                                                             34

 

 

 

 

 



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                            14 November 2022

 

 

 

5

Annual Review of Council's Investment Policy and Strategy   

 

Compiled by:               James Legarse, Operational Project Accountant

Authorised by:            Neil Farquharson, Financial Services Manager

Andrew Moore, Director - Corporate Services  

 

Outcome

We have open and collaborative leadership

Strategy

Deliver an efficient, transparent and accountable service to the community

Principal Activity

Support financial sustainability through financial planning and budget management and provide accurate reporting to the community

      

 

Executive Summary

Council’s Investment Policy (the Policy) and Strategy are reviewed on an annual basis and Council Officers have completed the review over recent months. It is a prudent and appropriate financial management practice that the Policy be regularly reviewed to consider the latest economic environment and investment strategies.

 

The Council’s the Policy and Strategy was presented to Council’s Audit, Risk and Improvement Committee (ARIC) meeting held on 20 September 2022 - with minor amendments. The suggested changes by ARIC are cosmetics in nature and have been applied to the version currently being presented to this meeting for consideration.

The current Ministerial Investment Order was issued in 2011 and has been incorporated in Council’s Policy revisions since 2013.

The proposed changes to the Investment Policy and Strategy for consideration following this year’s review include:

·    Accommodating a change in the business process of an Authorised Deposit-taking Institutions (ADIs),

·    Clarifying the exception to ‘Minimum Investment’,

·    Expanding the guidelines in Ethical and Socially Responsible Investments,

·    Verify terminologies, and

·    Extending the delegation of authority for medium to long term investment approval.

 

Other changes that are proposed are cosmetic in nature or are an update of the current amounts/rates/results, referenced and relevant to this financial year. These amendments do not constitute a change in Policy or Strategy.

Background

In May 2010 the Department of Premier and Cabinet, Division of Local Government released their Investment Policy Guidelines to assist councils in their preparation of an Investment Policy for the prudent and appropriate management of councils’ surplus funds. This was in response to concerns some funds were not invested in councils’ names, and the loss of capital from some councils investing in structured products. The Ministerial Investment Order dated 11 February 2011 removed the ability for councils to invest in mortgages of land, deposits with Local Government Financial Services and added key considerations.

On 10 October 2017 the Office of Local Government (OLG) released Circular Number 17-29 - Interim TCorp Waiver which allows councils to seek investment advice from TCorp as part of their financial and strategic planning processes. Section 5 of the Guidelines requires councils to seek advice from advisors licenced by the Australian Securities and Investments Commission, to receive written confirmation that no actual or potential conflicts of interest exist, and to undertake separate reference checks of advisors.

Council’s Investment Policy was last amended and reported to Council at its Policy Review Committee meeting, held 9 August 2021. In this Policy review, some of the amendments are cosmetic in nature and did not constitute a change in Policy or Strategy.

The proposed changes to the 2022-23 Investment Policy and Strategy continue to support and endorse the Council’s risk profile of a ‘conservative’ approach in investment decision making.

Variations to existing Investment Policy 

 

I.    4.3 Delegation of Authority (third paragraph): As recently advised by one of the major banks, a change in their investment procedure will take place in this calendar year. The introduction of the new process will require Council to create new account with the bank for every investment placed directly with them. With this, it is important to add ‘…including opening of new accounts and fund transfers. The addition is consistent with the Council’s Delegation Register – being, LGAFIN01.01 (Authority to authorise payments which are for the purpose of transferring of amounts between Council’s bank accounts, investments with authorised organisations or repayment of loans.) and LGAFIN01.02 (Authority to sign documents to invest money on behalf of Council).

 

Authority to sign documents to invest money, including opening of new accounts and fund transfers, on behalf of the Council has been given to the Director Corporate Services, Financial Services Manager, Operational Finance Coordinator, Operational Finance Accountant, Treasury and Operations Accountant, Business Support Accountant and Asset Accountant, as noted in the Councils Delegation Register’.

 

II.   5.5 Minimum Investment: The Council usually carries an amount in the General Fund to cover daily outgoings and any surplus is placed in the Call Account. The Call Account is primarily used to assist with the operational needs of the Council - with an interest rate at par with the RBA Cash Rate. Movements in this account are recorded in the Investment Register and reported in the monthly Investment Report, but the funds are not proposed as an income earning strategy. At times, the funds transferred in Call Account are less than $250,000. It is therefore proposed to include With exception to Call Account(s) placements, the at the start of the paragraph.

 

‘With exception to Call Account(s) placements, the face value of individual investments should generally be a minimum of $250,000 but typically a larger amount’.

 

III.  5.10 Ethical and Socially Responsible Investments: In last year’s ARIC review of the Investment Policy and Strategy, it was advised for ‘future consideration’ to elaborate on this section as there appears to be growing public interest in this topic. As a proactive approach, it is recommended to include the following paragraphs which would provide further clarification on the criteria for selection of these type of investment products.

These types of investments may be in respect of the individual product, the issuer of the investment (or both), and should be endorsed by an accredited industry body or institution.

 

Ethical and SRIs will be assessed on the same basis as other investment opportunities and the Council will select the investment that best meets its overall investment objective.

 

The criteria for Ethical and SRI are all preferred and not mandatory requirements’.

 

IV.  6.1(ii) Institutional Credit Framework and Additional Guidelines: The Council’s Cash and Investment processes recently went through internal audit review. The procedures in place were regarded as effective with a sole recommendation being made to add clarification on what would constitute ‘short-term’, ‘medium-term’, and ‘long-term’. The recommendation impacts two different sections of the policy, being:

 

(1)  Credit Rating as set out by Moody’s (per Attachment H ‘Moody’s Ratings Description’, second paragraph), which only distinguishes between short term and long term investments.

 

Long-term ratings are assigned to issuers or obligations with an original maturity of greater than one year and reflect both on the likelihood of a default or impairment on contractual financial obligations and the expected financial loss suffered in the event of default or impairment. Short-term ratings are assigned to obligations with an original maturity of up to one year (twelve months) and reflect both on the likelihood of a default or impairment on contractual financial obligations and the expected financial loss suffered in the event of default or impairment.

 

(2)  The additional guidelines for risk management currently requires the Responsible Accounting Officer (Director of Corporate Services) to approve investments prior to placement in medium to long term products, including Growth Funds. The intention of the current policy was for short term investment to be considered to be less than 3 years, with medium term investments being 3 – 7 years and long term investments be greater than 7 years, however these classifications were not defined within the investment policy. These classifications are in line with TCorp investment timeframes (extract below).

 

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It is, therefore, recommended to include the descriptions of ‘Long Term Credit Ratings’ and ‘Short Term Credit Ratings’ following in the relevant sections of the policy:

 

6.1(i) Overall Portfolio Credit Framework & (ii) Institutional Credit Framework

 

6.1(i) Overall Portfolio Credit Framework

Table

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6.1(ii) Institutional Credit Framework

Table

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Additional Guidelines – in reference to the duration/term that the delegated authority is required to sign on investment recommendations:

 

o     Short Term: up to 3 years

o     Medium Term: 3-7 years

o     Long Term: greater than 7 years

 

V.   Additional Guidelines: Some investment products, like Floating Rate Notes (FRN), have a short window of bidding time before the books are closed for pricing – generally, around lunch time of the same day it opened. It is beneficial for Council’s Investment Portfolio to hold this kind of investment product for the purpose of diversification and mitigation of interest rate risk. Furthermore, FRN’s have a secondary market for buy-and-sell options, which may assist in the liquidity/cashflow needs of the organisation.

 

In the event that the bid was not communicated before the closure of the book, the Council misses out on securing the investment in the primary market. FRN terms are usually between three to five years – classified as ‘Medium Term’. At the moment, it is only the Director Corporate Services that can authorise this investment product, being the Responsible Accounting Officer. Because the nature of placement is ‘time-sensitive’, it is prudent to have other appropriate signatory options to authorise the investment recommendation, to ensure the Council does not miss out on securing a FRN deal. Consistent with the Delegation LGAFIN01.02 (Authority to sign documents to invest money on behalf of Council), it is recommended to add the ‘Financial Services Manager’ as an authorised officer when approving medium to long term products, including growth funds.

 

The paragraph/bullet point will now read as follow:

 

Investments must also be approved by the Responsible Accounting Officer or Financial Services Manager before placing in medium to long term products, including growth funds…”.

 

Review of Investment Strategy

 

I.    Investment environment: Delete the two paragraphs, as it relates to the height of the pandemic - COVID-19. Though still relevant, the pressing matter under the current economic climate is the radically fast Cash Rate increases since May 2022. It is recommended to add the below paragraph:

 

The successive increases in the Cash Rate since May 2022, have seen Council’s portfolio be unable to transition quickly, resulting in the monthly benchmarks not being attained of late. This is a temporary result as interest rates secured prior to the Cash Rate increases have been quickly outweighed. As the Council continues to be proactive in securing the best rates on offer at the time they are placed, the monthly investment return is anticipated to return to meeting or exceeding the benchmarks.

 

II.   Liquidity, Maturity and Returns: Delete the third paragraph which relates to the impact of COVID-19. Though still relevant, the pressing matter under the current economic climate is the radically fast Cash Rate increases since May 2022. It is recommended to update this with the below:

 

Presently, the Investment Portfolio’s monthly return has been lower than the two benchmarks, being BBSW Monthly Net Return Annualised and Enhanced BBSW Monthly Net Return Annualised (+20 basis points). This is due to investment interest rates secured prior to the Cash Rate increases in May 2022 being quickly outweighed. As these investments mature and are reinvested with the current best rate(s) offered in the market, as well as the stabilisation of the Cash Rate; the Investment Portfolio’s monthly return will ultimately surpass the benchmarks again.

 

Conclusion

 

Council Officers have prepared the Annual Review of Council’s Investment Policy and Strategy. The review was presented to the ARIC meeting held 20 September 2022, and the proposed cosmetic changes have been incorporated into the review being presented tonight. This report recommends that Council adopt the proposed changes to the Investment Policy and Strategy as outlined in this report.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Annual Review of Council's Investment Policy and Strategy be received.

2.     Council adopts the proposed changes to the Annual Review of Council's Investment Policy tabled in this report.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

2022-23 Investment Policy

9 Pages

Attachments Included

2.

2022-23 Investment Policy Attachments

12 Pages

Attachments Included

3.

2022-23 Investment Strategy

4 Pages

Attachments Included

  


Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                            14 November 2022

 

 

 

6

Draft Community Engagement Policy and Draft Community Engagement Strategy and Community Participation Plan and Draft Community Engagement Strategy and Community Participation Plan 2022-26

 

Compiled by:               Lawrence Hennessy, Corporate Strategic Lead

Authorised by:            Stephannie Kissun, Business Transformation Manager

Andrew Moore, Director - Corporate Services  

 

Outcome

We have open and collaborative leadership

Strategy

Encourage community participation in collective decisions and initiatives

Principal Activity

Manage Council’s community engagement framework

 

Previous Items:           6- Overview of proposed Community Engagement Framework and presentation of the draft Community Engagement Policy and draft Community Engagement Strategy and Participation Plan 2022-26- Councillor Briefing- 07 Nov 2022 7:00PM     

 

 

Executive Summary

Council is seeking to strengthen our community engagement and public participation management to establish ongoing consistent quality of practice. This has been articulated through the development of a draft Community Engagement Policy and draft Community Engagement Strategy and Community Participation Plan.

The draft Strategy and Policy were presented to a Councillor Briefing, seeking feedback on the documents and the roadmap forward, including the future development of the implementation plan and toolkits to ensure that expectations from the review are achieved.

Background

In accordance with the Integrated Planning and Reporting (IP&R) framework and section 402A of the Local Government Act 1993, a Council must establish and implement a strategy for engagement with the local community (called its Community Engagement Strategy) when developing its plans, policies and programs, and for the purpose of determining its activities (other than routine administrative matters).

The strategy must be adopted by Council by the end of 2022.

The Community Participation Plan is also a legislative requirement of The Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 (the EP&A Act) Schedule 1 Community Participation Requirements and Division 2.6 Community Participation.

Given the new legislative requirements it is an appropriate time align the Community Engagement Policy.

The Penrith City Council Community Engagement Strategy and Community Participation Plan 2022-26 is the result of a review and update undertaken of the current Community Engagement Strategy and Community Participation Plan. The draft is written for the community and provides transparency and clarity for the community and all stakeholders so that they can understand their role in the decision-making process. It outlines Council’s approach to engaging with the community and stakeholders and any mandatory requirements for engagement. It meets Council’s statutory obligations and requirements under the IP&R guidelines.

Current Situation

The current Community Engagement Strategy and Community Participation Plan underwent significant community and stakeholder consultation in 2019 and 2020, with adoption by Council for the Community Engagement Strategy at its meeting on 25 November 2019 and the Community Participation Plan at its meeting 20 June 2020.

The fundamental elements of the strategy and plan have not changed. The engagement principles are based on the required social justice principles and the interpretation and methodology of community engagement is guided by the International Association for Public Participation (IAP2) and its participation levels spectrum which is recommended by the Office of Local Government and has been adopted by Council.

A previous Community Participation Policy was written in 2003 but is not on the Council Policy Register. This policy has been taken into consideration in the development of the new draft Community Engagement Policy.

Conclusion

Council has developed a draft Community Engagement Policy and draft Community Engagement Strategy and Community Participation Plan 2022-26.

The Community Engagement Policy and the Community Engagement Strategy and Community Participation Plan 2022-26 has been prepared to outline Council’s approach to engaging with the community and stakeholders and any mandatory requirements for engagement. It meets Council’s statutory obligations and IP&R guidelines.

There is a legislative requirement for Council to adopt a Community Engagement Strategy by the end of 2022.

It is intended that the draft Community Engagement Policy and draft Community Strategy and Participation Plan 2022-26 be brought to the Policy Review Committee to approve for public exhibition and go to Council at the 12 December 2022 meeting for adoption.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1.     The information contained in the report on Draft Community Engagement Policy and Draft Community Engagement Strategy and Community Participation Plan be received

2.     That the draft Community Engagement Policy and the draft Community Engagement Strategy and Participation Plan 2022-26 be approved to go on public exhibition and presented to Council at the 12 December 2022 meeting for adoption.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

Draft Community Engagement Policy November 2022

2 Pages

Attachments Included

2.

Draft PCC-Community Engagement Strategy and Community Participation Plan 2022-26

32 Pages

Attachments Included

3.

Community Participation Policy 25 August 2003

4 Pages

Attachments Included

  


Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                            14 November 2022

 

 

 

7

ARIC & Internal Audit Annual Reports   

 

Compiled by:               Anthony Robinson, Risk and Audit Coordinator

Authorised by:            Matthew Bullivant, Legal Services Manager

Stephen Britten, Chief Governance Officer  

 

Outcome

We have open and collaborative leadership

Strategy

Corporate Enablers

Principal Activity

Undertake the audit program as agreed with the Audit Risk and Improvement Committee (ARIC) to ensure Council’s operations are ethical and efficient

      

 

Executive Summary

The Audit, Risk and Improvement Committee (ARIC) Charter requires that the Chair of the ARIC present ARIC and Internal Audit annual reports to the Council each year. The report recommends that the attached annual reports be received by the Policy Review Committee.

The outgoing Chair of the ARIC, Mr Bruce Turner AM, will give a presentation to the Policy Review Committee in relation to the reports.

Background

The ARIC Charter requires that the Chair of the ARIC present ARIC and Internal Audit annual reports to the ARIC each year, and subsequently to the Policy Review Committee of Council.

 

The outgoing Chair, Mr Bruce Turner AM, presented the annual reports to the ARIC at its meeting on 20 September 2022, and the ARIC endorsed both reports.

 

The reports are attached for review by the Policy Review Committee. Mr Bruce Turner AM will provide a brief presentation. The ARIC Annual Report includes a performance review of the ARIC over its five year term, which concluded at its meeting held on 18 October 2022.

 

This will be Bruce’s final presentation to Council, as he has decided to depart from the position of ARIC Chair after five years of exemplary service. At the Ordinary meeting held on 31 October 2022 Council resolved to send Mayoral letters to the outgoing independent members.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That the information contained in the report on ARIC & Internal Audit Annual Reports be received.

 

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES

1.

ARIC Annual Report 2022

4 Pages

Appendix

2.

Internal Audit Annual Report 2022

2 Pages

Appendix

  


Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                          14 November 2022

Appendix 1 - ARIC Annual Report 2022

 

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Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                          14 November 2022

Appendix 2 - Internal Audit Annual Report 2022

 

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ATTACHMENTS  

 

 

Date of Meeting:     Monday 14 November 2022

Report Title:            St Marys Town Centre Corporation - 2021-22 Annual Report and Audited Financial Statement

Attachments:           St Marys Town Centre Corporation 2021-22 Annual Report

                                St Marys Town Centre Limited - Audited Financial Statement 2021-22

                                St Marys Town Centre Corporation KPI Commentary for 2021-22



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                          14 November 2022

Attachment 1 - St Marys Town Centre Corporation 2021-22 Annual Report

 

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Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                          14 November 2022

Attachment 2 - St Marys Town Centre Limited - Audited Financial Statement 2021-22

 

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Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                          14 November 2022

Attachment 3 - St Marys Town Centre Corporation KPI Commentary for 2021-22

 

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ATTACHMENTS  

 

 

Date of Meeting:     Monday 14 November 2022

Report Title:            Annual Review of Council's Investment Policy and Strategy

Attachments:           2022-23 Investment Policy

                                2022-23 Investment Policy Attachments

                                2022-23 Investment Strategy



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                          14 November 2022

Attachment 1 - 2022-23 Investment Policy

 

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Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                          14 November 2022

Attachment 2 - 2022-23 Investment Policy Attachments

 

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Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                          14 November 2022

Attachment 3 - 2022-23 Investment Strategy

 

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ATTACHMENTS  

 

 

Date of Meeting:     Monday 14 November 2022

Report Title:            Draft Community Engagement Policy and Draft Community Engagement Strategy and Community Participation Plan

Attachments:           Draft Community Engagement Policy November 2022

                                Draft PCC-Community Engagement Strategy and Community Participation Plan 2022-26

                                Community Participation Policy 25 August 2003



Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                          14 November 2022

Attachment 1 - Draft Community Engagement Policy November 2022

 

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Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                          14 November 2022

Attachment 2 - Draft PCC-Community Engagement Strategy and Community Participation Plan 2022-26

 

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Policy Review Committee Meeting                                                                          14 November 2022

Attachment 3 - Community Participation Policy 25 August 2003

 

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